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  • 1.
    Adler, Marlen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Mechanisms and Dynamics of Carbapenem Resistance in Escherichia coli2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The emergence of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing Enterobacteriaceae worldwide has led to an increased use of carbapenems and may drive the development of carbapenem resistance. Existing mechanisms are mainly due to acquired carbapenemases or the combination of ESBL-production and reduced outer membrane permeability. The focus of this thesis was to study the development of carbapenem resistance in Escherichia coli in the presence and absence of acquired β-lactamases. To this end we used the resistance plasmid pUUH239.2 that caused the first major outbreak of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae in Scandinavia.

    Spontaneous carbapenem resistance was strongly favoured by the presence of the ESBL-encoding plasmid and different mutational spectra and resistance levels arose for different carbapenems. Mainly, loss of function mutations in the regulators of porin expression caused reduced influx of antibiotic into the cell and in combination with amplification of β-lactamase genes on the plasmid this led to high resistance levels. We further used a pharmacokinetic model, mimicking antibiotic concentrations found in patients during treatment, to test whether ertapenem resistant populations could be selected even at these concentrations. We found that resistant mutants only arose for the ESBL-producing strain and that an increased dosage of ertapenem could not prevent selection of these resistant subpopulations. In another study we saw that carbapenem resistance can even develop in the absence of ESBL-production. We found mutants in export pumps and the antibiotic targets to give high level resistance albeit with high fitness costs in the absence of antibiotics. In the last study, we used selective amplification of β-lactamases on the pUUH239.2 plasmid by carbapenems to determine the cost and stability of gene amplifications. Using mathematical modelling we determined the likelihood of evolution of new gene functions in this region. The high cost and instability of the amplified state makes de novo evolution very improbable, but constant selection of the amplified state may balance these factors until rare mutations can establish a new function.

    In my studies I observed the influence of β-lactamases on carbapenem resistance and saw that amplification of these genes would further contribute to resistance. The rapid disappearance of amplified arrays of resistance genes in the absence of antibiotic selection may lead to the underestimation of gene amplification as clinical resistance mechanism. Amplification of β-lactamase genes is an important stepping-stone and might lead to the evolution of new resistance genes.

    List of papers
    1. Influence of acquired β-lactamases on the evolution of spontaneous carbapenem resistance in Escherichia coli
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of acquired β-lactamases on the evolution of spontaneous carbapenem resistance in Escherichia coli
    2013 (English)In: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, ISSN 0305-7453, E-ISSN 1460-2091, Vol. 68, no 1, p. 51-59Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To investigate the influence of plasmid-borne β-lactamases on the evolution of spontaneous carbapenem resistance in Escherichia coli and the fitness costs associated with resistance. Methods: Stepwise selection of carbapenem-resistant mutants with or without the extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-encoding plasmid pUUH239.2 was performed. Mutation rates and mutational pathways to resistance were determined. In vitro-selected and constructed mutants were characterized regarding the MICs of the carbapenems, porin expression profiles, growth rates and the presence of mutations in the porins ompC/ompF and their regulatory genes. The influence of the plasmid-encoded β-lactamases TEM-1, OXA-1 and CTX-M-15 on resistance development was determined. Results: Results show that E. coli readily developed reduced carbapenem susceptibility and clinical resistance levels by a combination of porin loss and increased β-lactamase expression, especially towards ertapenem. All tested β-lactamases (CTX-M-15, TEM-1 and OXA-1) contributed to reduced carbapenem susceptibility in the absence of porin expression. However, complete loss of porin expression conferred a 20% fitness cost on the bacterial growth rate. Increased β-lactamase expression through spontaneous gene amplification on the plasmid was a major resistance factor. Conclusions: Plasmid-encoded β-lactamases, including non-ESBL enzymes, have a strong influence on the frequency and resistance level of spontaneous carbapenem-resistant mutants. The fitness cost associated with the loss of OmpC/OmpF in E. coli most likely reduces the survivability of porin mutants and could explain why they have not emerged as a clinical problem in this species.

    Keyword
    Fitness cost, Gene amplification, Mutations, Plasmids
    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-192026 (URN)10.1093/jac/dks368 (DOI)000312646300010 ()
    Available from: 2013-01-24 Created: 2013-01-15 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    2. Frequent emergence of porin-deficient subpopulations with reduced carbapenem susceptibility in ESBL-producing Escherichia coli during exposure to ertapenem in an in vitro pharmacokinetic model
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Frequent emergence of porin-deficient subpopulations with reduced carbapenem susceptibility in ESBL-producing Escherichia coli during exposure to ertapenem in an in vitro pharmacokinetic model
    Show others...
    2013 (English)In: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, ISSN 0305-7453, E-ISSN 1460-2091, Vol. 68, no 6, p. 1319-1326Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES:

    Ertapenem resistance is increasing in Enterobacteriaceae. The production of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and reduced expression of outer membrane porins are major mechanisms of resistance in ertapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae. Less is known of ertapenem resistance in Escherichia coli. The aim of this study was to explore the impact of ESBL production in E. coli on the antibacterial activity of ertapenem.

    METHODS:

    Two E. coli strains, with and without ESBL production, were exposed to ertapenem in vitro for 48 h at concentrations simulating human pharmacokinetics with conventional and higher dosages.

    RESULTS:

    Isolates with non-susceptibility to ertapenem (MICs 0.75-1.5 mg/L) were detected after five of nine time-kill experiments with the ESBL-producing strain. All of these isolates had ompR mutations, which reduce the expression of outer membrane porins OmpF and OmpC. Higher dosage did not prevent selection of porin-deficient subpopulations. No mutants were detected after experiments with the non-ESBL-producing strain. Compared with other experiments, experiments with ompR mutants detected in endpoint samples showed significantly less bacterial killing after the second dose of ertapenem. Impaired antibacterial activity against E. coli with ESBL production and ompR mutation was also demonstrated in time-kill experiments with static antibiotic concentrations.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The combination of ESBL production and porin loss in E. coli can result in reduced susceptibility to ertapenem. Porin-deficient subpopulations frequently emerged in ESBL-producing E. coli during exposure to ertapenem at concentrations simulating human pharmacokinetics. Inappropriate use of ertapenem should be avoided to minimize the risk of selection of ESBL-producing bacteria with reduced susceptibility to carbapenems.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-197878 (URN)10.1093/jac/dkt044 (DOI)000319468900016 ()23478794 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2013-04-05 Created: 2013-04-05 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    3. Combinations of mutations in envZ, ftsI, mrdA, acrB and acrR can cause high-level carbapenem resistance in Escherichia coli
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Combinations of mutations in envZ, ftsI, mrdA, acrB and acrR can cause high-level carbapenem resistance in Escherichia coli
    2016 (English)In: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, ISSN 0305-7453, E-ISSN 1460-2091, Vol. 71, no 5, p. 1188-1198Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The worldwide spread of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae has led to an increased use of carbapenems, the group of beta-lactams with the broadest spectrum of activity. Bacterial resistance to carbapenems is mainly due to acquired carbapenemases or a combination of ESBL production and reduced drug influx via loss of outer-membrane porins. Here, we have studied the development of carbapenem resistance in Escherichia coli in the absence of beta-lactamases. We selected mutants with high-level carbapenem resistance through repeated serial passage in the presence of increasing concentrations of meropenem or ertapenem for similar to 60 generations. Isolated clones were whole-genome sequenced, and the order in which the identified mutations arose was determined in the passaged populations. Key mutations were reconstructed, and bacterial growth rates of populations and isolated clones and resistance levels to 23 antibiotics were measured. High-level resistance to carbapenems resulted from a combination of downstream effects of envZ mutation and target mutations in AcrAB-TolC-mediated drug export, together with PBP genes [mrdA (PBP2) after meropenem exposure or ftsI (PBP3) after ertapenem exposure]. Our results show that antibiotic resistance evolution can occur via several parallel pathways and that new mechanisms may appear after the most common pathways (i.e. beta-lactamases and loss of porins) have been eliminated. These findings suggest that strategies to target the most commonly observed resistance mechanisms might be hampered by the appearance of previously unknown parallel pathways to resistance.

    National Category
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Microbiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-221428 (URN)10.1093/jac/dkv475 (DOI)000376291300008 ()26869688 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council Formas, 2013-5476-25194-9EU, European Research Council, 282004
    Available from: 2014-03-31 Created: 2014-03-31 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    4. High Fitness Costs and Instability of Gene Duplications Reduce Rates of Evolution of New Genes by Duplication-Divergence Mechanisms
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>High Fitness Costs and Instability of Gene Duplications Reduce Rates of Evolution of New Genes by Duplication-Divergence Mechanisms
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: Molecular biology and evolution, ISSN 0737-4038, E-ISSN 1537-1719, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 1526-1535Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [sv]

    An important mechanism for generation of new genes is by duplication-divergence of existing genes. Duplication-divergence includes several different sub-models, such as subfunctionalization where after accumulation of neutral mutations the original function is distributed between two partially functional and complementary genes, and neofunctionalization where a new function evolves in one of the duplicated copies while the old function is maintained in another copy. The likelihood of these mechanisms depends on the longevity of the duplicated state, which in turn depends on the fitness cost and genetic stability of the duplications. Here, we determined the fitness cost and stability of defined gene duplications/amplifications on a low copy number plasmid. Our experimental results show that the costs of carrying extra gene copies are substantial and that each additional kbp of DNA reduces fitness by approximately 0.15%. Furthermore, gene amplifications are highly unstable and rapidly segregate to lower copy numbers in absence of selection. Mathematical modelling shows that the fitness costs and instability strongly reduces the likelihood of both sub- and neofunctionalization, but that these effects can be off-set by positive selection for novel beneficial functions.

    National Category
    Microbiology Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Genetics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-221431 (URN)10.1093/molbev/msu111 (DOI)000337067400019 ()
    Available from: 2014-03-31 Created: 2014-03-31 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
  • 2.
    Adler, Marlen
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Anjum, Mehreen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Berg, Otto, G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational and Systems Biology.
    Andersson, Dan I.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Sandegren, Linus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    High Fitness Costs and Instability of Gene Duplications Reduce Rates of Evolution of New Genes by Duplication-Divergence Mechanisms2014In: Molecular biology and evolution, ISSN 0737-4038, E-ISSN 1537-1719, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 1526-1535Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    An important mechanism for generation of new genes is by duplication-divergence of existing genes. Duplication-divergence includes several different sub-models, such as subfunctionalization where after accumulation of neutral mutations the original function is distributed between two partially functional and complementary genes, and neofunctionalization where a new function evolves in one of the duplicated copies while the old function is maintained in another copy. The likelihood of these mechanisms depends on the longevity of the duplicated state, which in turn depends on the fitness cost and genetic stability of the duplications. Here, we determined the fitness cost and stability of defined gene duplications/amplifications on a low copy number plasmid. Our experimental results show that the costs of carrying extra gene copies are substantial and that each additional kbp of DNA reduces fitness by approximately 0.15%. Furthermore, gene amplifications are highly unstable and rapidly segregate to lower copy numbers in absence of selection. Mathematical modelling shows that the fitness costs and instability strongly reduces the likelihood of both sub- and neofunctionalization, but that these effects can be off-set by positive selection for novel beneficial functions.

  • 3.
    Agarwal, Prasoon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Hematology and Immunology.
    Regulation of Gene Expression in Multiple Myeloma Cells and Normal Fibroblasts: Integrative Bioinformatic and Experimental Approaches2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The work presented in this thesis applies integrative genomic and experimental approaches to investigate mechanisms involved in regulation of gene expression in the context of disease and normal cell biology.

    In papers I and II, we have explored the role of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in multiple myeloma (MM). By using a bioinformatic approach we identified the Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) to be a common denominator for the underexpressed gene signature in MM. By using inhibitors of the PRC2 we showed an activation of the genes silenced by H3K27me3 and a reduction in the tumor load and increased overall survival in the in vivo 5TMM model. Using ChIP-sequencing we defined the distribution of H3K27me3 and H3K4me3 marks in MM patients cells. In an integrated bioinformatic approach, the H3K27me3-associated genes significantly correlated to under-expression in patients with less favorable survival. Thus, our data indicates the presence of a common under-expressed gene profile and provides a rationale for implementing new therapies focusing on epigenetic alterations in MM.

    In paper III we address the existence of a small cell population in MM presenting with differential tumorigenic properties in the 5T33MM murine model. We report that the predominant population of CD138+ cells had higher engraftment potential, higher clonogenic growth, whereas the CD138- MM cells presented with less mature phenotype and higher drug resistance. Our findings suggest that while designing treatment regimes for MM, both the cellpopulations must be targeted.

    In paper IV we have studied the general mechanism of differential gene expression regulation by CGGBP1 in response to growth signals in normal human fibroblasts. We found that CGGBP1 binding affects global gene expression by RNA Polymerase II. This is mediated by Alu RNAdependentinhibition of RNA Polymerase II. In presence of growth signals CGGBP1 is retained in the nuclei and exhibits enhanced Alu binding thus inhibiting RNA Polymerase III binding on Alus. Hence we suggest a mechanism by which CGGBP1 orchestrates Alu RNA-mediated regulation of RNA Polymerase II. This thesis provides new insights for using integrative bioinformatic approaches to decipher gene expression regulation mechanisms in MM and in normal cells.

    List of papers
    1. Polycomb target genes are silenced in multiple myeloma
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Polycomb target genes are silenced in multiple myeloma
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    2010 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 5, no 7, p. e11483-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a genetically heterogeneous disease, which to date remains fatal. Finding a common mechanism for initiation and progression of MM continues to be challenging. By means of integrative genomics, we identified an underexpressed gene signature in MM patient cells compared to normal counterpart plasma cells. This profile was enriched for previously defined H3K27-tri-methylated genes, targets of the Polycomb group (PcG) proteins in human embryonic fibroblasts. Additionally, the silenced gene signature was more pronounced in ISS stage III MM compared to stage I and II. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay on purified CD138+ cells from four MM patients and on two MM cell lines, we found enrichment of H3K27me3 at genes selected from the profile. As the data implied that the Polycomb-targeted gene profile would be highly relevant for pharmacological treatment of MM, we used two compounds to chemically revert the H3K27-tri-methylation mediated gene silencing. The S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase inhibitor 3-Deazaneplanocin (DZNep) and the histone deacetylase inhibitor LBH589 (Panobinostat), reactivated the expression of genes repressed by H3K27me3, depleted cells from the PRC2 component EZH2 and induced apoptosis in human MM cell lines. In the immunocompetent 5T33MM in vivo model for MM, treatment with LBH589 resulted in gene upregulation, reduced tumor load and increased overall survival. Taken together, our results reveal a common gene signature in MM, mediated by gene silencing via the Polycomb repressor complex. The importance of the underexpressed gene profile in MM tumor initiation and progression should be subjected to further studies.

    National Category
    Hematology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-133207 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0011483 (DOI)000279715300003 ()20634887 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2010-11-03 Created: 2010-11-03 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
    2. The epigenomic map of multiple myeloma reveals the importance of Polycomb gene silencing for the malignancy
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The epigenomic map of multiple myeloma reveals the importance of Polycomb gene silencing for the malignancy
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by accumulation of post-germinal center, isotype switched, long-living plasma cells with retained proliferation capacity within the bone marrow. MM is highly heterogeneous and remains fatal. This heterogeneity has hampered identification of a common underlying mechanism for disease establishment and the development of targeted therapy. We recently provided proof-of-principle that gene silencing associated with H3K27me3 contributes to the malignancy of MM. Here we present the first epigenomic map of MM for H3K27me3 and H3K4me3 derived by ChIP- and RNA sequencing from freshly-isolated bone marrow plasma cells from four patients. We compile lists of targets common among the patients as well as unique to MM when compared with PBMCs. Indicating the clinical relevance of our findings, we find increased silencing of H3K27me3 targets with disease progression and in patients presenting with a poor prognosis. Bivalent genes further significantly correlated to under-expressed genes in MM and were unique to MM when compared to PBMCs. Furthermore, bivalent genes, unlike H3K27me3 targets, significantly associated with transcriptional activation upon Polycomb inhibition indicating a potential for drug targeting. Thus, we suggest that gene silencing by Polycomb plays an important role in the development of the malignant phenotype of the MM cell during tumor progression.

    National Category
    Cell and Molecular Biology
    Research subject
    Oncology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-199492 (URN)
    Available from: 2013-05-06 Created: 2013-05-06 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
    3. Tumor-initiating capacity of CD138- and CD138+ tumor cells in the 5T33 multiple myeloma model
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tumor-initiating capacity of CD138- and CD138+ tumor cells in the 5T33 multiple myeloma model
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    2012 (English)In: Leukemia, ISSN 0887-6924, E-ISSN 1476-5551, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 1436-1439Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-177948 (URN)10.1038/leu.2011.373 (DOI)000305081000040 ()22289925 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2012-07-25 Created: 2012-07-20 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
    4. Growth signals employ CGGBP1 to suppress transcription of Alu-SINEs
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Growth signals employ CGGBP1 to suppress transcription of Alu-SINEs
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    2016 (English)In: Cell Cycle, ISSN 1538-4101, E-ISSN 1551-4005, Vol. 15, no 12, p. 1558-1571Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    CGGBP1 (CGG triplet repeat-binding protein 1) regulates cell proliferation, stress response,cytokinesis, telomeric integrity and transcription. It could affect these processes by modulatingtarget gene expression under different conditions. Identification of CGGBP1-target genes andtheir regulation could reveal how a transcription regulator affects such diverse cellular processes.Here we describe the mechanisms of differential gene expression regulation by CGGBP1 inquiescent or growing cells. By studying global gene expression patterns and genome-wide DNAbindingpatterns of CGGBP1, we show that a possible mechanism through which it affects theexpression of RNA Pol II-transcribed genes in trans depends on Alu RNA. We also show that itregulates Alu transcription in cis by binding to Alu promoter. Our results also indicate thatpotential phosphorylation of CGGBP1 upon growth stimulation facilitates its nuclear retention,Alu-binding and dislodging of RNA Pol III therefrom. These findings provide insights into howAlu transcription is regulated in response to growth signals.

    Keyword
    Alu-SINEs; CGGBP1; ChIP-seq; growth signals; RNA Pol III; transcription; tyrosine phosphorylation
    National Category
    Cell Biology
    Research subject
    Bioinformatics; Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-230959 (URN)10.4161/15384101.2014.967094 (DOI)000379743800011 ()25483050 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Swedish Cancer SocietySwedish Research Council
    Available from: 2014-09-01 Created: 2014-09-01 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
  • 4. Agler, Caryline
    et al.
    Nielsen, Dahlia M.
    Urkasemsin, Ganokon
    Singleton, Andrew
    Tonomura, Noriko
    Sigurdsson, Snaevar
    Tang, Ruqi
    Linder, Keith
    Arepalli, Sampath
    Hernandez, Dena
    Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    van de Leemput, Joyce
    Motsinger-Reif, Alison
    O'Brien, Dennis P.
    Bell, Jerold
    Harris, Tonya
    Steinberg, Steven
    Olby, Natasha J.
    Canine Hereditary Ataxia in Old English Sheepdogs and Gordon Setters Is Associated with a Defect in the Autophagy Gene Encoding RAB242014In: PLOS Genetics, ISSN 1553-7390, E-ISSN 1553-7404, Vol. 10, no 2, p. e1003991-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Old English Sheepdogs and Gordon Setters suffer from a juvenile onset, autosomal recessive form of canine hereditary ataxia primarily affecting the Purkinje neuron of the cerebellar cortex. The clinical and histological characteristics are analogous to hereditary ataxias in humans. Linkage and genome-wide association studies on a cohort of related Old English Sheepdogs identified a region on CFA4 strongly associated with the disease phenotype. Targeted sequence capture and next generation sequencing of the region identified an A to C single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) located at position 113 in exon 1 of an autophagy gene, RAB24, that segregated with the phenotype. Genotyping of six additional breeds of dogs affected with hereditary ataxia identified the same polymorphism in affected Gordon Setters that segregated perfectly with phenotype. The other breeds tested did not have the polymorphism. Genome-wide SNP genotyping of Gordon Setters identified a 1.9 MB region with an identical haplotype to affected Old English Sheepdogs. Histopathology, immunohistochemistry and ultrastructural evaluation of the brains of affected dogs from both breeds identified dramatic Purkinje neuron loss with axonal spheroids, accumulation of autophagosomes, ubiquitin positive inclusions and a diffuse increase in cytoplasmic neuronal ubiquitin staining. These findings recapitulate the changes reported in mice with induced neuron-specific autophagy defects. Taken together, our results suggest that a defect in RAB24, a gene associated with autophagy, is highly associated with and may contribute to canine hereditary ataxia in Old English Sheepdogs and Gordon Setters. This finding suggests that detailed investigation of autophagy pathways should be undertaken in human hereditary ataxia. Author Summary Neurodegenerative diseases are one of the most important causes of decline in an aging population. An important subset of these diseases are known as the hereditary ataxias, familial neurodegenerative diseases that affect the cerebellum causing progressive gait disturbance in both humans and dogs. We identified a mutation in RAB24, a gene associated with autophagy, in Old English Sheepdogs and Gordon Setters with hereditary ataxia. Autophagy is a process by which cell proteins and organelles are removed and recycled and its critical role in maintenance of the continued health of cells is becoming clear. We evaluated the brains of affected dogs and identified accumulations of autophagosomes within the cerebellum, suggesting a defect in the autophagy pathway. Our results suggest that a defect in the autophagy pathway results in neuronal death in a naturally occurring disease in dogs. The autophagy pathway should be investigated in human hereditary ataxia and may represent a therapeutic target in neurodegenerative diseases.

  • 5. Ala-Poikela, M.
    et al.
    Svensson, E.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Rojas, A.
    Horko, T.
    Paulin, L.
    Valkonen, J.
    Kvarnheden, A.
    Genetic diversity and mixed infections of begomoviruses in tomato, pepper and cucurbit crops in Nicaragua2005In: Plant Pathology, no 54, p. 448-459Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Alatalo, Juha M.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Little, Chelsea J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Jagerbrand, Annika K.
    Molau, Ulf
    Vascular plant abundance and diversity in an alpine heath under observed and simulated global change2015In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, article id 10197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global change is predicted to cause shifts in species distributions and biodiversity in arctic tundra. We applied factorial warming and nutrient manipulation to a nutrient and species poor alpine/arctic heath community for seven years. Vascular plant abundance in control plots increased by 31%. There were also notable changes in cover in the nutrient and combined nutrient and warming treatments, with deciduous and evergreen shrubs declining, grasses overgrowing these plots. Sedge abundance initially increased significantly with nutrient amendment and then declined, going below initial values in the combined nutrient and warming treatment. Nutrient addition resulted in a change in dominance hierarchy from deciduous shrubs to grasses. We found significant declines in vascular plant diversity and evenness in the warming treatment and a decline in diversity in the combined warming and nutrient addition treatment, while nutrient addition caused a decline in species richness. The results give some experimental support that species poor plant communities with low diversity may be more vulnerable to loss of species diversity than communities with higher initial diversity. The projected increase in nutrient deposition and warming may therefore have negative impacts on ecosystem processes, functioning and services due to loss of species diversity in an already impoverished environment.

  • 7. Alfonso, Julieta
    et al.
    Pollevick, Guido
    Castensson, Anja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Jazin, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Frasch, Alberto
    Analysis of gene expression in the rat hippocampus using Real Time PCR reveals high inter-individual variation in mRNA expression levels2002In: Journal of Neuroscience Research, ISSN 0360-4012, E-ISSN 1097-4547, Vol. 67, no 2, p. 225-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In mammals, gene transcription is a step subjected to tight regulation mechanisms. In fact, changes in mRNA levels in the central nervous system (CNS) can account for numerous phenotypic differences in brain function. We performed a high-resolution analysis of mRNA expression levels for 37 genes selected from a normal rat hippocampus cDNA library. mRNA amounts were quantified using a Real Time PCR SYBR Green assay. We found that, in general, individuals from an inbred rat population (n = 20) have shown 2-3 times differences in the basal level of expression of the genes analyzed. Up to several fold differences among individuals were observed for certain genes. These inter-individual differences were obtained after correction for the different amounts of mRNA in each sample. Power calculations were performed to determine the number of individuals required to detect reliable differences in expression levels between a control and an experimental group. These data indicated that, depending on the variability of the candidate gene selected, it was necessary to analyze from five to 135 individuals in each group to detect differences of 50% in the levels of mRNA expression between two groups investigated. The comparison of mRNA abundance from different genes revealed a wide range of expression levels for the 37 genes, showing a 26,000-fold difference between the highest and lowest expressed gene.

  • 8.
    Alfredsson Timmins, Jenny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Functional organisation of the cell nucleus in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In eukaryotes the genome adopts a non-random spatial organisation, which is important for gene regulation. However, very little is known about the driving forces behind nuclear organisation. In the simple model eukaryote fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, it has been known for a long time that transcriptionally repressed heterochromatin localise to the nuclear membrane (NM); the centromeres attaches to spindle pole body (SPB), while the telomeres are positioned at the NM on the opposite side of the nucleus compared to the SPB. Studies presented in this thesis aimed at advancing our knowledge of nuclear organisation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    We show that the heterochromatic mating-type region localises to the NM in the vicinity of the SPB. This positioning was completely dependent on Clr4, a histone methyl transferase crucial for the formation of heterochromatin. Additional factors important for localisation were also identified: the chromo domain protein Swi6, and the two boundary elements IR-L and IR-R surrounding this locus. We further identify two other chromo domain proteins; Chp1 and Chp2, as crucial factors for correct subnuclear localisation of this region. From these results we suggest that the boundary elements together with chromodomain proteins in balanced dosage and composition cooperate in organising the mating-type chromatin.

    Gene regulation can affect the subnuclear localisation of genes. Using nitrogen starvation in S. pombe as a model for gene induction we determined the subnuclear localisation of two gene clusters repressed by nitrogen: Chr1 and Tel1. When repressed these loci localise to the NM, and this positioning is dependent on the histone deacetylase Clr3. During induction the gene clusters moved towards the nuclear interior in a transcription dependent manner.

    The knowledge gained from work presented in this thesis, regarding nuclear organisation in the S. pombe model system, can hopefully aid to a better understanding of human nuclear organisation.

    List of papers
    1. The Clr4 methyltransferase determines the subnuclear localization of the mating-type region in fission yeast
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Clr4 methyltransferase determines the subnuclear localization of the mating-type region in fission yeast
    2007 (English)In: Journal of Cell Science, ISSN 0021-9533, E-ISSN 1477-9137, Vol. 120, no 11, p. 1935-1943Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The genome has a non-random spatial distribution in the cell nucleus. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, it has been shown that the centromeres, telomeres and the mating-type region localize to the nuclear membrane (NM), the former by attaching to the spindle pole body (SPB). In addition, reporter genes inserted into these areas are transcriptionally repressed due to the formation of specialized chromatin structures. Performing live cell analysis we found that in a wild-type strain the mating-type region was positioned in the proximity of the SPB, the location where the pericentromeric heterochromatin is also found. In a strain lacking the histone methyltransferase, Clr4, crucial for the formation of heterochromatin, the mating-type region had a random localization in the nucleus. Moreover, in a strain where the two boundary elements IR-L and IR-R had been deleted the mating-type region was displaced from its position at the proximity of the SPB, but remained in the vicinity of the NM. Moreover, in all investigated strains with silencing deficiencies the distance between the mating-type region and the SPB increased. This result indicates a correlation between transcriptional derepression and displacement of the region. Two different models of how the mating-type chromatin is organized in the nucleus are discussed.

    Keyword
    fission yeast, heterochromatin, silencing, subnuclear localization
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-13023 (URN)10.1242/jcs.03457 (DOI)000246665300013 ()17504808 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2009-08-05 Created: 2009-08-05 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
    2. Chromo domain proteins in balanced dosage together with boundary elements cooperate in organising the mating-type chromatin in fission yeast
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chromo domain proteins in balanced dosage together with boundary elements cooperate in organising the mating-type chromatin in fission yeast
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The chromatin in the cell nucleus has a spatial organisation. For example, in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, transcriptionally repressed heterochromatin is found at the nuclear membrane (NM). The centromeres and the mating-type region localise in the proximity of the spindle pole body (SPB), while the telomeres are found on the opposite side of the nucleus in the proximity of the nucleolus. In a previous study we used the mating-type region as a model to study the driving force behind nuclear organisation. We proposed two mutually exclusive models to explain what determines the localisation of the mating-type region. The first model suggests that solely the amount of heterochromatin in the region affects the localisation, while the other model stipulates that the boundary elements together with heterochromatin formation anchor the mating-type region in the NM in the vicinity of the SPB. Here, we present data that disproves the first model. We found that in a strain expressing tripled amounts of the chromodomain protein Swi6, a structural component of heterochromatin, the mating-type region was delocalised from the proximity of the SPB. A strain deleted of the histone deacetylase clr3+ also had a delocalised mating-type locus. Interestingly, a strain with a point-mutation in clr3-735 producing an enzymatically inactive protein in normal amounts showed an intermediate phenotype. Most importantly, we identify the chromodomain proteins, Chp1 and Chp2, as crucial factors for correct subnuclear localisation of the mating-type region. We suggest that boundary elements together with chromodomain proteins in balanced dosage and composition cooperate in organising the mating-type chromatin.

    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-107280 (URN)
    Available from: 2009-08-04 Created: 2009-08-04 Last updated: 2010-01-14Bibliographically approved
    3. Reorganization of chromatin is an early response to nitrogen starvation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reorganization of chromatin is an early response to nitrogen starvation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe
    Show others...
    2009 (English)In: Chromosoma, ISSN 0009-5915, E-ISSN 1432-0886, Vol. 118, no 1, p. 99-112Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    There are several documented events of changes in subnuclear localization during gene activation. However, there are conflicting data on whether the nuclear periphery is a compartment for gene repression or activation, and whether genes are moved to the pores at the nuclear membrane (NM) or not during gene activation. Nitrogen starvation of fission yeast serves as a good model system for studying gene induction since it causes fast regulation of hundreds of genes. In this study the subnuclear localization of two gene clusters repressed by nitrogen was investigated. During normal growth conditions the gene clusters localized to the nuclear periphery at the opposite side of the nucleus as compared to the spindle pole body (SPB). This constrained localization was dependent on the histone deacetylase Clr3, known to transcriptionally repress genes in these clusters. Already 20 minutes after nitrogen depletion drastic changes in subnuclear localization of the two loci were observed, away from the NM towards the nuclear interior. At least for one of the clusters the movement was clearly transcription dependent. Data presented here illustrates how interconnected events of gene activation and nuclear reorganization are, as well as provides a suggestion of how nuclear organization might be maintained.

    National Category
    Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-107289 (URN)10.1007/s00412-008-0180-6 (DOI)000262504300009 ()
    Available from: 2009-08-05 Created: 2009-08-05 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
  • 9.
    Ali, Muhammad Akhtar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Younis, Shady
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Wallerman, Ola
    Gupta, Rajesh
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology.
    Andersson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Sjoblöm, Tobias
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Transcriptional modulator ZBED6 affects cell cycle and growth of human colorectal cancer cells2015In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 112, no 25, p. 7743-7748Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The transcription factor ZBED6 (zinc finger, BED-type containing 6) is a repressor of IGF2 whose action impacts development, cell proliferation, and growth in placental mammals. In human colorectal cancers, IGF2 overexpression is mutually exclusive with somatic mutations in PI3K signaling components, providing genetic evidence for a role in the PI3K pathway. To understand the role of ZBED6 in tumorigenesis, we engineered and validated somatic cell ZBED6 knock-outs in the human colorectal cancer cell lines RKO and HCT116. Ablation of ZBED6 affected the cell cycle and led to increased growth rate in RKO cells but reduced growth in HCT116 cells. This striking difference was reflected in the transcriptome analyses, which revealed enrichment of cell-cycle-related processes among differentially expressed genes in both cell lines, but the direction of change often differed between the cell lines. ChIP sequencing analyses displayed enrichment of ZBED6 binding at genes up-regulated in ZBED6-knockout clones, consistent with the view that ZBED6 modulates gene expression primarily by repressing transcription. Ten differentially expressed genes were identified as putative direct gene targets, and their down-regulation by ZBED6 was validated experimentally. Eight of these genes were linked to the Wnt, Hippo, TGF-beta, EGF receptor, or PI3K pathways, all involved in colorectal cancer development. The results of this study show that the effect of ZBED6 on tumor development depends on the genetic background and the transcriptional state of its target genes.

  • 10.
    Almlöf, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lundmark, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lundmark, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ge, Bing
    Pastinen, Tomi
    Goodall, Alison H
    Cambien, François
    Deloukas, Panos
    Ouwehand, Willem H
    Syvänen, Ann-Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Single nucleotide polymorphisms with cis-regulatory effects on long non-coding transcripts in human primary monocytes2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 7, p. e102612-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We applied genome-wide allele-specific expression analysis of monocytes from 188 samples. Monocytes were purified from white blood cells of healthy blood donors to detect cis-acting genetic variation that regulates the expression of long non-coding RNAs. We analysed 8929 regions harboring genes for potential long non-coding RNA that were retrieved from data from the ENCODE project. Of these regions, 60% were annotated as intergenic, which implies that they do not overlap with protein-coding genes. Focusing on the intergenic regions, and using stringent analysis of the allele-specific expression data, we detected robust cis-regulatory SNPs in 258 out of 489 informative intergenic regions included in the analysis. The cis-regulatory SNPs that were significantly associated with allele-specific expression of long non-coding RNAs were enriched to enhancer regions marked for active or bivalent, poised chromatin by histone modifications. Out of the lncRNA regions regulated by cis-acting regulatory SNPs, 20% (n = 52) were co-regulated with the closest protein coding gene. We compared the identified cis-regulatory SNPs with those in the catalog of SNPs identified by genome-wide association studies of human diseases and traits. This comparison identified 32 SNPs in loci from genome-wide association studies that displayed a strong association signal with allele-specific expression of non-coding RNAs in monocytes, with p-values ranging from 6.7×10-7 to 9.5×10-89. The identified cis-regulatory SNPs are associated with diseases of the immune system, like multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis.

  • 11.
    Andersson, Anna-Carin
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Conservation Biology and Genetics.
    Postglacial Population History of the Common Shrew (Sorex araneus) in Fennoscandia: Molekylära studier av återkolonisation, könsbundet genflöde och kromosomrasbildning.2004Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The common shrew, Sorex araneus, has one of the most variable karyotypes among mammals, displaying numerous chromosomes races throughout its distribution, which can be categorized into different karyotypic groups. The objective of this thesis was to examine the postglacial population history of Fennoscandian common shrews using autosomal microsatellites, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and a Y chromosome specific microsatellite (L8Y).

    Autosomal microsatellites and mtDNA revealed weak genetic structure over a hybrid zone between the karyotypically divergent Northern and Western karyotypic groups. However, the genetic structure displayed by the Y chromosome microsatellite was orders of magnitude higher. Hence, considerable chromosomal differences between the groups do not prevent female gene flow, while male gene flow is reduced (cf. Haldane's rule). Further, the results suggest that the Haldane effect may be caused by the chromosomal differences between the karyotypic groups.

    No mtDNA differentiation was observed either between chromosome races or between the Northern and Western karyotypic groups in Fennoscandia. The combined pattern of karyotypic and mtDNA variation of Fennoscandian common shrews, suggest bi-directional postglacial recolonisation from a single refugium in Europe. The variation of the Y-linked microsatellite supported this conclusion. In contrast, significant mtDNA structure, discordant with the karyotypic variation, revealed that common shrews in southern Finland belong to a different lineage than remaining Fennoscandian regions, implying postglacial recolonisation from a different source.

    MtDNA variation of the chromosome races in Sweden supports the hypothesis that three races of the Western karyotypic group have been formed through whole arm reciprocal translocations (WARTs), as suggested by their mutual karyotypic variation. The variation of the molecular markers supports the theory of rapid karyotypic evolution in the common shrew.

    List of papers
    1. No apparent reduction of gene flow in a hybrid zone between the West and North European karyotypic groups of the common shrew, Sorex araneus.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>No apparent reduction of gene flow in a hybrid zone between the West and North European karyotypic groups of the common shrew, Sorex araneus.
    2004 In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 1205-1215.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91849 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-05-13 Created: 2004-05-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Lack of mitochondrial DNA structure between chromosome races of the common shrew, Sorex araneus, in Sweden. Implications for chromosomal evolution.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lack of mitochondrial DNA structure between chromosome races of the common shrew, Sorex araneus, in Sweden. Implications for chromosomal evolution.
    Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91850 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-05-13 Created: 2004-05-13 Last updated: 2010-01-13Bibliographically approved
    3. Fennoscandian phylogeography of the common shrew Sorex araneus. Postglacial recolonisation-combining information from chromosomal variation with mitochondrial DNA data
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fennoscandian phylogeography of the common shrew Sorex araneus. Postglacial recolonisation-combining information from chromosomal variation with mitochondrial DNA data
    2011 (English)In: Acta Theriologica, ISSN 0001-7051, E-ISSN 2190-3743, Vol. 56, no 2, p. 103-116Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    We examine mtDNA variation of the common shrew in Fennoscandia to explore the incongruence found in previous studies using chromosomal and mitochondrial markers, aiming to reveal post-glacial recolonisation patterns. A total of 241 common shrews from 51 localities in Fennoscandia were analysed. This area includes a secondary contact zone between two groups (the Northern group and the Western group) showing distinct karyotypes. All individuals were sequenced for 447 bp of the mitochondrial control region. No significant differentiation in the mtDNA variation was observed between the two major chromosomal groups in Fennoscandia. The star-like shape of the sequence network for the entire study area shows the most common haplotype A as ancestral in all regions but one, in situ formation of most haplotypes and population expansion. The only significant mtDNA structure observed occurs between south Finland and the rest of Fennoscandia. We propose that the Northern and Western group shared a common refugium during the Last Glacial Maximum but recolonised Fennoscandia via two routes. Karyotypic differences between south and north Finland has led researchers to suggest that both regions originate from the same ancestral population east of Finland. The observed divergence of mtDNA variation between these two regions supports this hypothesis.

    Keyword
    Control region, Common shrew, Glacial refugia, Colonization history, Chromosome race
    National Category
    Biological Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91851 (URN)10.1007/s13364-010-0022-9 (DOI)000290689600001 ()
    Available from: 2004-05-13 Created: 2004-05-13 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    4. Reduced levels of male gene flow in a hybrid zone between the North and West European karyotypic groups of the common shrew, Sorex araneus. Chromosomally based explanation for Haldane's rule?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reduced levels of male gene flow in a hybrid zone between the North and West European karyotypic groups of the common shrew, Sorex araneus. Chromosomally based explanation for Haldane's rule?
    Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91852 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-05-13 Created: 2004-05-13 Last updated: 2010-01-13Bibliographically approved
    5. Y-chromosome microsatellite variation among common shrews (Sorex araneus) in northern Europe.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Y-chromosome microsatellite variation among common shrews (Sorex araneus) in northern Europe.
    Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91853 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-05-13 Created: 2004-05-13 Last updated: 2010-01-13Bibliographically approved
  • 12.
    Anderung, Cecilia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Persson, P
    Carretero, J. M.
    Ortega, A. I.
    Arasuaga, J. L.
    Elburg, R.
    Smith, C.
    Ellegren, Hans
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Götherström, Anders
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Genetics of Iberian Bronze Age cattle remains indicate prehistoric contacts over the Strait of Gibraltar.2005In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, no 102, p. 8431-8435Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Ankarklev, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Franzen, Oscar
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Cell & Mol Biol, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden. KISP, Sci Life Lab, S-17165 Solna, Sweden..
    Peirasmaki, Dimitra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Jerlstrom-Hultqvist, Jon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lebbad, Marianne
    Publ Hlth Agcy Sweden, Dept Microbiol, SE-17182 Solna, Sweden..
    Andersson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular Evolution. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Andersson, Bjorn
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Cell & Mol Biol, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.;KISP, Sci Life Lab, S-17165 Solna, Sweden..
    Svärd, Staffan G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Comparative genomic analyses of freshly isolated Giardia intestinalis assemblage A isolates2015In: BMC Genomics, ISSN 1471-2164, E-ISSN 1471-2164, Vol. 16, article id 697Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The diarrhea-causing protozoan Giardia intestinalis makes up a species complex of eight different assemblages (A-H), where assemblage A and B infect humans. Comparative whole-genome analyses of three of these assemblages have shown that there is significant divergence at the inter-assemblage level, however little is currently known regarding variation at the intra-assemblage level. We have performed whole genome sequencing of two sub-assemblage AII isolates, recently axenized from symptomatic human patients, to study the biological and genetic diversity within assemblage A isolates. Results: Several biological differences between the new and earlier characterized assemblage A isolates were identified, including a difference in growth medium preference. The two AII isolates were of different sub-assemblage types (AII-1 [AS175] and AII-2 [AS98]) and showed size differences in the smallest chromosomes. The amount of genetic diversity was characterized in relation to the genome of the Giardia reference isolate WB, an assemblage AI isolate. Our analyses indicate that the divergence between AI and AII is approximately 1 %, represented by similar to 100,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) distributed over the chromosomes with enrichment in variable genomic regions containing surface antigens. The level of allelic sequence heterozygosity (ASH) in the two AII isolates was found to be 0.25-0.35 %, which is 25-30 fold higher than in the WB isolate and 10 fold higher than the assemblage AII isolate DH (0.037 %). 35 protein-encoding genes, not found in the WB genome, were identified in the two AII genomes. The large gene families of variant-specific surface proteins (VSPs) and high cysteine membrane proteins (HCMPs) showed isolate-specific divergences of the gene repertoires. Certain genes, often in small gene families with 2 to 8 members, localize to the variable regions of the genomes and show high sequence diversity between the assemblage A isolates. One of the families, Bactericidal/ Permeability Increasing-like protein (BPIL), with eight members was characterized further and the proteins were shown to localize to the ER in trophozoites. Conclusions: Giardia genomes are modular with highly conserved core regions mixed up by variable regions containing high levels of ASH, SNPs and variable surface antigens. There are significant genomic variations in assemblage A isolates, in terms of chromosome size, gene content, surface protein repertoire and gene polymorphisms and these differences mainly localize to the variable regions of the genomes. The large genetic differences within one assemblage of G. intestinalis strengthen the argument that the assemblages represent different Giardia species.

  • 14. Antolín, Roberto
    et al.
    Nettelblad, Carl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Scientific Computing. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computational Science. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gorjanc, Gregor
    Money, Daniel
    Hickey, John M.
    A hybrid method for the imputation of genomic data in livestock populations2017In: Genetics Selection Evolution, ISSN 0999-193X, E-ISSN 1297-9686, Vol. 49, article id 30Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15. Arandjelovic, M.
    et al.
    Guschanski, Katerina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology. Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany.
    Schubert, G.
    Harris, T. R.
    Thalmann, O.
    Siedel, H.
    Vigilant, L.
    Two-step multiplex polymerase chain reaction improves the speed and accuracy of genotyping using DNA from noninvasive and museum samples2009In: Molecular Ecology Resources, ISSN 1755-098X, E-ISSN 1755-0998, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 28-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many studies in molecular ecology rely upon the genotyping of large numbers of low‐quantity DNA extracts derived from noninvasive or museum specimens. To overcome low amplification success rates and avoid genotyping errors such as allelic dropout and false alleles, multiple polymerase chain reaction (PCR) replicates for each sample are typically used. Recently, two‐step multiplex procedures have been introduced which drastically increase the success rate and efficiency of genotyping. However, controversy still exists concerning the amount of replication needed for suitable control of error. Here we describe the use of a two‐step multiplex PCR procedure that allows rapid genotyping using at least 19 different microsatellite loci. We applied this approach to quantified amounts of noninvasive DNAs from western chimpanzee, western gorilla, mountain gorilla and black and white colobus faecal samples, as well as to DNA from ~100‐year‐old gorilla teeth from museums. Analysis of over 45 000 PCRs revealed average success rates of > 90% using faecal DNAs and 74% using museum specimen DNAs. Average allelic dropout rates were substantially reduced compared to those obtained using conventional singleplex PCR protocols, and reliable genotyping using low (< 25 pg) amounts of template DNA was possible. However, four to five replicates of apparently homozygous results are needed to avoid allelic dropout when using the lowest concentration DNAs (< 50 pg/reaction), suggesting that use of protocols allowing routine acceptance of homozygous genotypes after as few as three replicates may lead to unanticipated errors when applied to low‐concentration DNAs.

  • 16.
    Arendt, Maja
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Cairns, K. M.
    Univ New South Wales, Sch Biotechnol & Biomol Sci, Fac Sci, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Ballard, J. W. O.
    Univ New South Wales, Sch Biotechnol & Biomol Sci, Fac Sci, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Savolainen, P.
    Royal Inst Technol KTH, Sch Biotechnol, Sci Life Lab, Solna, Sweden..
    Axelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Diet adaptation in dog reflects spread of prehistoric agriculture2016In: Heredity, ISSN 0018-067X, E-ISSN 1365-2540, Vol. 117, no 5, p. 301-306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adaptations allowing dogs to thrive on a diet rich in starch, including a significant AMY2B copy number gain, constituted a crucial step in the evolution of the dog from the wolf. It is however not clear whether this change was associated with the initial domestication, or represents a secondary shift related to the subsequent development of agriculture. Previous efforts to study this process were based on geographically limited data sets and low-resolution methods, and it is therefore not known to what extent the diet adaptations are universal among dogs and whether there are regional differences associated with alternative human subsistence strategies. Here we use droplet PCR to investigate worldwide AMY2B copy number diversity among indigenous as well as breed dogs and wolves to elucidate how a change in dog diet was associated with the domestication process and subsequent shifts in human subsistence. We find that AMY2B copy numbers are bimodally distributed with high copy numbers (median 2n(AMY2B)=11) in a majority of dogs but no, or few, duplications (median 2n(AMY2B)=3) in a small group of dogs originating mostly in Australia and the Arctic. We show that this pattern correlates geographically to the spread of prehistoric agriculture and conclude that the diet change may not have been associated with initial domestication but rather the subsequent development and spread of agriculture to most, but not all regions of the globe.

  • 17.
    Arendt, Maja
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fall, Tove
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Axelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Amylase activity is associated with AMY2B copy numbers in dog: implications for dog domestication, diet and diabetes2014In: Animal Genetics, ISSN 0268-9146, E-ISSN 1365-2052, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 716-722Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High amylase activity in dogs is associated with a drastic increase in copy numbers of the gene coding for pancreatic amylase, AMY2B, that likely allowed dogs to thrive on a relatively starch-rich diet during early dog domestication. Although most dogs thus probably digest starch more efficiently than do wolves, AMY2B copy numbers vary widely within the dog population, and it is not clear how this variation affects the individual ability to handle starch nor how it affects dog health. In humans, copy numbers of the gene coding for salivary amylase, AMY1, correlate with both salivary amylase levels and enzyme activity, and high amylase activity is related to improved glycemic homeostasis and lower frequencies of metabolic syndrome. Here, we investigate the relationship between AMY2B copy numbers and serum amylase activity in dogs and show that amylase activity correlates with AMY2B copy numbers. We then describe how AMY2B copy numbers vary in individuals from 20 dog breeds and find strong breed-dependent patterns, indicating that the ability to digest starch varies both at the breed and individual level. Finally, to test whether AMY2B copy number is strongly associated with the risk of developing diabetes mellitus, we compare copy numbers in cases and controls as well as in breeds with varying diabetes susceptibility. Although we see no such association here, future studies using larger cohorts are needed before excluding a possible link between AMY2B and diabetes mellitus.

  • 18.
    Arendt, Maja Louise
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Univ Cambridge, Dept Vet Med, Cambridge, England..
    Melin, Malin
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Tonomura, Noriko
    Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Cambridge, MA USA.;Tufts Univ, Cummings Sch Vet Med, Dept Clin Sci, North Grafton, MA USA..
    Koltookian, Michele
    Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Cambridge, MA USA..
    Courtay-Cahen, Celine
    Anim Hlth Trust, Newmarket, Suffolk, England..
    Flindall, Netty
    Anim Hlth Trust, Newmarket, Suffolk, England..
    Bass, Joyce
    Anim Hlth Trust, Newmarket, Suffolk, England..
    Boerkamp, Kim
    Univ Utrecht, Dept Clin Sci Compan Anim, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Megquir, Katherine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Cambridge, MA USA.;Tufts Univ, Cummings Sch Vet Med, Dept Clin Sci, North Grafton, MA USA..
    Youell, Lisa
    Anim Hlth Trust, Newmarket, Suffolk, England..
    Murphy, Sue
    Anim Hlth Trust, Newmarket, Suffolk, England..
    McCarthy, Colleen
    Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Cambridge, MA USA..
    London, Cheryl
    Ohio State Univ, Dept Vet Clin Sci, Columbus, OH 43210 USA..
    Rutteman, Gerard R.
    Univ Utrecht, Dept Clin Sci Compan Anim, Utrecht, Netherlands.;Vet Specialist Ctr De Wagenrenk, Wageningen, Netherlands..
    Starkey, Mike
    Anim Hlth Trust, Newmarket, Suffolk, England..
    Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Cambridge, MA USA..
    Genome-Wide Association Study of Golden Retrievers Identifies Germ-Line Risk Factors Predisposing to Mast Cell Tumours2015In: PLoS Genetics, ISSN 1553-7390, E-ISSN 1553-7404, Vol. 11, no 11, article id e1005647Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Canine mast cell tumours (CMCT) are one of the most common skin tumours in dogs with a major impact on canine health. Certain breeds have a higher risk of developing mast cell tumours, suggesting that underlying predisposing germ-line genetic factors play a role in the development of this disease. The genetic risk factors are largely unknown, although somatic mutations in the oncogene C-KIT have been detected in a proportion of CMCT, making CMCT a comparative model for mastocytosis in humans where C-KIT mutations are frequent. We have performed a genome wide association study in golden retrievers from two continents and identified separate regions in the genome associated with risk of CMCT in the two populations. Sequence capture of associated regions and subsequent fine mapping in a larger cohort of dogs identified a SNP associated with development of CMCT in the GNAI2 gene (p = 2.2x10(-16)), introducing an alternative splice form of this gene resulting in a truncated protein. In addition, disease associated haplotypes harbouring the hyaluronidase genes HYAL1, HYAL2 and HYAL3 on cfa20 and HYAL4, SPAM1 and HYALP1 on cfa14 were identified as separate risk factors in European and US golden retrievers, respectively, suggesting that turnover of hyaluronan plays an important role in the development of CMCT.

  • 19.
    Arnqvist, Göran
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Novicic, Zorana Kurbalija
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology. Univ Belgrade, Inst Biol Res Sinisa Stankovic, Despot Stefan Blvd 142, Belgrade 11000, Serbia..
    Castro, Jose A.
    Univ Illes Balears, Fac Ciencies, Dept Biol, Lab Genet, Edifici Guillem Colom,Campus UIB, Palma de Mallorca 07122, Balears, Spain..
    Sayadi, Ahmed
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Negative frequency dependent selection on sympatric mtDNA haplotypes in Drosophila subobscura2016In: Hereditas, ISSN 0018-0661, E-ISSN 1601-5223, Vol. 153, article id 15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Recent experimental evidence for selection on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has prompted the question as to what processes act to maintain within-population variation in mtDNA. Balancing selection though negative frequency dependent selection (NFDS) among sympatric haplotypes is a possibility, but direct empirical evidence for this is very scarce. Findings: We extend the previous findings of a multi-generation replicated cage experiment in Drosophila subobscura, where mtDNA polymorphism was maintained in a laboratory setting. First, we use a set of Monte Carlo simulations to show that the haplotype frequency dynamics observed are inconsistent with genetic drift alone and most closely match those expected under NFDS. Second, we show that haplotype frequency changes over time were significantly different from those expected under either genetic drift or positive selection but were consistent with those expected under NFSD. Conclusions: Collectively, our analyses provide novel support for NFDS on mtDNA haplotypes, suggesting that mtDNA polymorphism may at least in part be maintained by balancing selection also in natural populations. We very briefly discuss the possible mechanisms that might be involved.

  • 20.
    Arnqvist, Göran
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Sayadi, Ahmed
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Immonen, Elina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Hotzy, Cosima
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Rankin, Daniel
    Univ Zurich, Inst Evolutionary Biol & Environm Studies, Zurich, Switzerland..
    Tuda, Midori
    Kyushu Univ, Dept Bioresource Sci, Lab Insect Nat Enemies, Fukuoka 8128581, Japan.;Kyushu Univ, Inst Biol Control, Fac Agr, Fukuoka 8128581, Japan..
    Hjelmen, Carl E.
    Texas A&M Univ, Dept Entomol, College Stn, TX 77843 USA..
    Johnston, J. Spencer
    Texas A&M Univ, Dept Entomol, College Stn, TX 77843 USA..
    Genome size correlates with reproductive fitness in seed beetles2015In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 282, no 1815, article id 20151421Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ultimate cause of genome size (GS) evolution in eukaryotes remains a major and unresolved puzzle in evolutionary biology. Large-scale comparative studies have failed to find consistent correlations between GS and organismal properties, resulting in the 'C-value paradox'. Current hypotheses for the evolution of GS are based either on the balance between mutational events and drift or on natural selection acting upon standing genetic variation in GS. It is, however, currently very difficult to evaluate the role of selection because within-species studies that relate variation in life-history traits to variation in GS are very rare. Here, we report phylogenetic comparative analyses of GS evolution in seed beetles at two distinct taxonomic scales, which combines replicated estimation of GS with experimental assays of life-history traits and reproductive fitness. GS showed rapid and bidirectional evolution across species, but did not show correlated evolution with any of several indices of the relative importance of genetic drift. Within a single species, GS varied by 4-5% across populations and showed positive correlated evolution with independent estimates of male and female reproductive fitness. Collectively, the phylogenetic pattern of GS diversification across and within species in conjunction with the pattern of correlated evolution between GS and fitness provide novel support for the tenet that natural selection plays a key role in shaping GS evolution.

  • 21. Arrendal, J.S.E.
    et al.
    Walker, C.W.
    Sundqvist, A.-K.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Hellborg, L.C.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Vilà, Carles
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Genetic assessment of a demographically successful translocation program.2004In: Conservation Genetics, no 5, p. 79-88Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 22. Axeisson, T
    et al.
    Shavorskaya, O
    Lagercrantz, U
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Functional Genomics. evolutionär funktionsgenomik.
    Multiple flowering time QTLs within several Brassica species could be the result of duplicated copies of one ancestral gene.2001In: Genome, ISSN 0831-2796, Vol. 44, no 5, p. 856-64Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Axelsson, E.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Smith, N.G.C.
    Sundström, H.
    Berlin, S.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Ellegren, H.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Male-biased mutation rate and divergence in autosomal, Z-linked and W-linked introns of chicken and turkey.2004In: Molecular Biology and Evolution, no 21, p. 1538-1547Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Axelsson, Erik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Webster, Matthew T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ratnakumar, Abhirami
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ponting, Chris P.
    Univ Oxford, MRC Funct Genom Unit, Dept Physiol Anat & Genet, Oxford OX1 3QX, England.
    Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Broad Inst Massachusetts Inst Technol & Harvard, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA.
    Death of PRDM9 coincides with stabilization of the recombination landscape in the dog genome2011In: Genome Research, ISSN 1088-9051, E-ISSN 1549-5469, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 51-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Analysis of diverse eukaryotes has revealed that recombination events cluster in discrete genomic locations known as hotspots. In humans, a zinc-finger protein, PRDM9, is believed to initiate recombination in >40% of hotspots by binding to a specific DNA sequence motif. However, the PRDM9 coding sequence is disrupted in the dog genome assembly, raising questions regarding the nature and control of recombination in dogs. By analyzing the sequences of PRDM9 orthologs in a number of dog breeds and several carnivores, we show here that this gene was inactivated early in canid evolution. We next use patterns of linkage disequilibrium using more than 170,000 SNP markers typed in almost 500 dogs to estimate the recombination rates in the dog genome using a coalescent-based approach. Broad-scale recombination rates show good correspondence with an existing linkage-based map. Significant variation in recombination rate is observed on the fine scale, and we are able to detect over 4000 recombination hotspots with high confidence. In contrast to human hotspots, 40% of canine hotspots are characterized by a distinct peak in GC content. A comparative genomic analysis indicates that these peaks are present also as weaker peaks in the panda, suggesting that the hotspots have been continually reinforced by accelerated and strongly GC biased nucleotide substitutions, consistent with the long-term action of biased gene conversion on the dog lineage. These results are consistent with the loss of PRDM9 in canids, resulting in a greater evolutionary stability of recombination hotspots. The genetic determinants of recombination hotspots in the dog genome may thus reflect a fundamental process of relevance to diverse animal species.

  • 25.
    Axelsson, Erik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Webster, Matthew T
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Smith, Nick G C
    Burt, David W
    Ellegren, Hans
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Comparison of the chicken and turkey genomes reveals a higher rate of nucleotide divergence on microchromosomes than macrochromosomes.2005In: Genome Res, ISSN 1088-9051, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 120-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A distinctive feature of the avian genome is the large heterogeneity in the size of chromosomes, which are usually classified into a small number of macrochromosomes and numerous microchromosomes. These chromosome classes show characteristic differences in a number of interrelated features that could potentially affect the rate of sequence evolution, such as GC content, gene density, and recombination rate. We studied the effects of these factors by analyzing patterns of nucleotide substitution in two sets of chicken-turkey sequence alignments. First, in a set of 67 orthologous introns, divergence was significantly higher in microchromosomes (chromosomes 11-38; 11.7% divergence) than in both macrochromosomes (chromosomes 1-5; 9.9% divergence; P = 0.016) and intermediate-sized chromosomes (chromosomes 6-10; 9.5% divergence; P = 0.026). At least part of this difference was due to the higher incidence of CpG sites on microchromosomes. Second, using 155 orthologous coding sequences we noted a similar pattern, in which synonymous substitution rates on microchromosomes (13.1%) were significantly higher than were rates on macrochromosomes (10.3%; P = 0.024). Broadly assuming neutrality of introns and synonymous sites, or constraints on such sequences do not differ between chromosomal classes, these observations imply that microchromosomal genes are exposed to more germ line mutations than those on other chromosomes. We also find that dN/dS ratios for genes located on microchromosomes (average, 0.094) are significantly lower than those of macrochromosomes (average, 0.185; P = 0.025), suggesting that the proteins of genes on microchromosomes are under greater evolutionary constraint.

  • 26.
    Axelsson, T
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Functional Genomics.
    Bowman, C M
    Sharpe, A G
    Lydiate, D J
    Lagercrantz, U
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Functional Genomics. evolutionär funktionsgenomik.
    Amphidiploid Brassica juncea contains conserved progenitor genomes.2000In: Genome, ISSN 0831-2796, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 679-88Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Ayllon, Fernando
    et al.
    Inst Marine Res, N-5024 Bergen, Norway..
    Kjaerner-Semb, Erik
    Inst Marine Res, N-5024 Bergen, Norway.;Univ Bergen, Dept Biol, Bergen, Norway..
    Furmanek, Tomasz
    Inst Marine Res, N-5024 Bergen, Norway..
    Wennevik, Vidar
    Inst Marine Res, N-5024 Bergen, Norway..
    Solberg, Monica F.
    Inst Marine Res, N-5024 Bergen, Norway..
    Dahle, Geir
    Inst Marine Res, N-5024 Bergen, Norway..
    Taranger, Geir Lasse
    Inst Marine Res, N-5024 Bergen, Norway..
    Glover, Kevin A.
    Inst Marine Res, N-5024 Bergen, Norway.;Univ Bergen, Dept Biol, Bergen, Norway..
    Almén, Markus Sällman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Rubin, Carl-Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Edvardsen, Rolf B.
    Inst Marine Res, N-5024 Bergen, Norway..
    Wargelius, Anna
    Inst Marine Res, N-5024 Bergen, Norway..
    The vgll3 Locus Controls Age at Maturity in Wild and Domesticated Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar L.) Males2015In: PLoS Genetics, ISSN 1553-7390, E-ISSN 1553-7404, Vol. 11, no 11, article id e1005628Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wild and domesticated Atlantic salmon males display large variation for sea age at sexual maturation, which varies between 1-5 years. Previous studies have uncovered a genetic predisposition for variation of age at maturity with moderate heritability, thus suggesting a polygenic or complex nature of this trait. The aim of this study was to identify associated genetic loci, genes and ultimately specific sequence variants conferring sea age at maturity in salmon. We performed a genome wide association study (GWAS) using a pool sequencing approach (20 individuals per river and phenotype) of male salmon returning to rivers as sexually mature either after one sea winter (2009) or three sea winters (2011) in six rivers in Norway. The study revealed one major selective sweep, which covered 76 significant SNPs in which 74 were found in a 370 kb region of chromosome 25. Genotyping other smolt year classes of wild and domesticated salmon confirmed this finding. Genotyping domesticated fish narrowed the haplotype region to four SNPs covering 2386 bp, containing the vgll3 gene, including two missense mutations explaining 33-36% phenotypic variation. A single locus was found to have a highly significant role in governing sea age at maturation in this species. The SNPs identified may be both used as markers to guide breeding for late maturity in salmon aquaculture and in monitoring programs of wild salmon. Interestingly, a SNP in proximity of the VGLL3 gene in humans (Homo sapiens), has previously been linked to age at puberty suggesting a conserved mechanism for timing of puberty in vertebrates.

  • 28.
    Backström, Niclas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Ceplitis, Helene
    Berlin, Sofia
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Ellegren, Hans
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Gene conversion drives the evolution of HINTW, an ampliconic gene on the female-specific avian W chromosome.2005In: Mol Biol Evol, ISSN 0737-4038, Vol. 22, no 10, p. 1992-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The HINTW gene on the female-specific W chromosome of chicken and other birds is amplified and present in numerous copies. Moreover, as HINTW is distinctly different from its homolog on the Z chromosome (HINTZ), is a candidate gene in avian sex determination, and evolves rapidly under positive selection, it shows several common features to ampliconic and testis-specific genes on the mammalian Y chromosome. A phylogenetic analysis within galliform birds (chicken, turkey, quail, and pheasant) shows that individual HINTW copies within each species are more similar to each other than to gene copies of related species. Such convergent evolution is most easily explained by recurrent events of gene conversion, the rate of which we estimated at 10(-6)-10(-5) per site and generation. A significantly higher GC content of HINTW than of other W-linked genes is consistent with biased gene conversion increasing the fixation probability of mutations involving G and C nucleotides. Furthermore, and as a likely consequence, the neutral substitution rate is almost twice as high in HINTW as in other W-linked genes. The region on W encompassing the HINTW gene cluster is not covered in the initial assembly of the chicken genome, but analysis of raw sequence reads indicates that gene copy number is significantly higher than a previous estimate of 40. While sexual selection is one of several factors that potentially affect the evolution of ampliconic, male-specific genes on the mammalian Y chromosome, data from HINTW provide evidence that gene amplification followed by gene conversion can evolve in female-specific chromosomes in the absence of sexual selection. The presence of multiple and highly similar copies of HINTW may be related to protein function, but, more generally, amplification and conversion offers a means to the avoidance of accumulation of deleterious mutations in nonrecombining chromosomes.

  • 29.
    Backström, Niclas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Forstmeier, Wolfgang
    Schielzeth, Holger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Mellenius, Harriet
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Nam, Kiwoong
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Bolund, Elisabeth
    Webster, Matthew T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Öst, Torbjörn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Schneider, Melanie
    Kempenaers, Bart
    Ellegren, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    The recombination landscape of the zebra finch Taeniopygia guttata genome2010In: Genome Research, ISSN 1088-9051, E-ISSN 1549-5469, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 485-495Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding the causes and consequences of variation in the rate of recombination is essential since this parameter is considered to affect levels of genetic variability, the efficacy of selection, and the design of association and linkage mapping studies. However, there is limited knowledge about the factors governing recombination rate variation. We genotyped 1920 single nucleotide polymorphisms in a multigeneration pedigree of more than 1000 zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) to develop a genetic linkage map, and then we used these map data together with the recently available draft genome sequence of the zebra finch to estimate recombination rates in 1 Mb intervals across the genome. The average zebra finch recombination rate (1.5 cM/Mb) is higher than in humans, but significantly lower than in chicken. The local rates of recombination in chicken and zebra finch were only weakly correlated, demonstrating evolutionary turnover of the recombination landscape in birds. The distribution of recombination events was heavily biased toward ends of chromosomes, with a stronger telomere effect than so far seen in any organism. In fact, the recombination rate was as low as 0.1 cM/Mb in intervals up to 100 Mb long in the middle of the larger chromosomes. We found a positive correlation between recombination rate and GC content, as well as GC-rich sequence motifs. Levels of linkage disequilibrium (LD) were significantly higher in regions of low recombination, showing that heterogeneity in recombination rates have left a footprint on the genomic landscape of LD in zebra finch populations.

  • 30.
    Balciuniene, J
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Emilsson, L
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Oreland, L
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Pettersson, U
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Jazin, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Investigation of the functional effect of monoamine oxidase polymorphisms in human brain2002In: Human Genetics, ISSN 0340-6717, E-ISSN 1432-1203, Vol. 110, no 1, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31. Balciuniene, J
    et al.
    Syvänen, A-C
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    McLeod, H L
    Pettersson, U
    Jazin, E E
    Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    The geographic distribution of monoamine oxidase haplotypes supports a bottleneck during the dispersion of modern humans from Africa.2001In: J Mol Evol, ISSN 0022-2844, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 157-63Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 32. Barnett, Ross
    et al.
    Barnes, Ian
    Phillips, Matthew J
    Martin, Larry D
    Harington, C Richard
    Leonard, Jennifer A
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Cooper, Alan
    Evolution of the extinct Sabretooths and the American cheetah-like cat.2005In: Curr Biol, ISSN 0960-9822, Vol. 15, no 15, p. R589-90Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 33. Beaumont, Mark A
    et al.
    Nielsen, Rasmus
    Robert, Christian
    Hey, Jody
    Gaggiotti, Oscar
    Knowles, Lacey
    Estoup, Arnaud
    Panchal, Mahesh
    Corander, Jukka
    Hickerson, Mike
    Sisson, Scott A
    Fagundes, Nelson
    Chikhi, Lounès
    Beerli, Peter
    Vitalis, Renaud
    Cornuet, Jean-Marie
    Huelsenbeck, John
    Foll, Matthieu
    Yang, Ziheng
    Rousset, Francois
    Balding, David
    Excoffier, Laurent
    In defence of model-based inference in phylogeography.2010In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 436-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent papers have promoted the view that model-based methods in general, and those based on Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) in particular, are flawed in a number of ways, and are therefore inappropriate for the analysis of phylogeographic data. These papers further argue that Nested Clade Phylogeographic Analysis (NCPA) offers the best approach in statistical phylogeography. In order to remove the confusion and misconceptions introduced by these papers, we justify and explain the reasoning behind model-based inference. We argue that ABC is a statistically valid approach, alongside other computational statistical techniques that have been successfully used to infer parameters and compare models in population genetics. We also examine the NCPA method and highlight numerous deficiencies, either when used with single or multiple loci. We further show that the ages of clades are carelessly used to infer ages of demographic events, that these ages are estimated under a simple model of panmixia and population stationarity but are then used under different and unspecified models to test hypotheses, a usage the invalidates these testing procedures. We conclude by encouraging researchers to study and use model-based inference in population genetics.

  • 34. Belle, Elise M S
    et al.
    Webster, Matthew T
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Eyre-Walker, Adam
    Why are young and old repetitive elements distributed differently in the human genome?2005In: J Mol Evol, ISSN 0022-2844, Vol. 60, no 3, p. 290-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alu elements are not distributed homogeneously throughout the human genome: old elements are preferentially found in the GC-rich parts of the genome, while young Alus are more often found in the GC-poor parts of the genome. The process giving rise to this differential distribution remains poorly understood. Here we investigate whether this pattern could be due to a preferential degradation of Alu elements integrated in GC-poor regions by small indel mutations. We aligned 5.1 Mb of human and chimpanzee sequences and examined whether the rate of insertion and deletion inside Alu elements differed according to the base composition surrounding them. We found that Alu elements are not preferentially degraded in GC-poor regions by indel events. We also looked at whether very young L1 elements show the same change in distribution compared to older ones. This analysis indicated that L1 elements also show a shift in their distribution, although we could not assess it as precisely as for Alu elements. We propose that the differential distribution of Alu elements is likely to be due to a change in their pattern of insertion or their probability of fixation through evolutionary time.

  • 35.
    Benetkiewicz, Magdalena
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Development and Application of Human Chromosome 22 Genomic Microarray: Chromosome 22-Associated Disorders Analyzed by Array-Based Comparative Genomic Hybridization2006Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The array-based form of comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) is a new methodology that has shown to be of significant importance. This thesis focuses on the development of array-CGH with the aim to define candidate regions/genes on chromosome 22 in a wide spectrum of cancer-related conditions. In paper I, we developed and applied the first comprehensive genomic microarray, representing human chromosome 22, for analysis of DNA copy number. Using this array-based approach, we identified gene copy number alterations, including heterozygous/homozygous deletions, amplifications, IGLV/IGLC locus instability and the breakpoints of imbalanced translocation, in several 22q-associated disorders. In paper II, we applied the same array to perform DNA copy number profiling of a series of ovarian carcinoma. cDNA arrays were also used in this study to correlate gene expression levels with DNA-copy number. In the course of this analysis, we determined a small 3.5 Mb candidate 22q telomeric region and suggested a number of specific candidate genes. Paper III described the comprehensive and high-resolution analysis of chromosome 22 in a large set of various stage breast cancers. Multiple distinct patterns of genetic aberrations were observed. The smallest identified candidate locus was 220 kb in size and mapped to a gene-rich region in the vicinity of telomere of 22q. Intriguing result of this study was the detection of high frequency (26.6%) of intra-tumoral clonal variation in gene copy number profiles, which should be viewed as a high number, considering that we study in detail only a single human chromosome. In paper IV, we profiled a series of 28 Wilms tumor samples using 22q-array in order to assess specific regions affected with DNA dosage-alterations. The distribution of aberrations defined a complex amplifier genotype and delimited two tumor suppressor/oncogene candidate loci. These results open up for several avenues for continued research of these tumor forms. These findings also demonstrate the power of array-CGH in the precise determination of minute DNA copy number alterations and strengthen the notion that further studies, preferentially in the context of the entire human genome, are needed.

    List of papers
    1. A full-coverage, high-resolution human chromosome 22 genomic microarray for clinical and research applications
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A full-coverage, high-resolution human chromosome 22 genomic microarray for clinical and research applications
    Show others...
    2002 In: Human Molecular Genetic, Vol. 11, no 25, p. 3221-3229Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-93930 (URN)
    Available from: 2006-03-22 Created: 2006-03-22Bibliographically approved
    2. High-resolution gene copy number and expression profiling of human chromosome 22 in ovarian carcinomas
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>High-resolution gene copy number and expression profiling of human chromosome 22 in ovarian carcinomas
    Show others...
    2005 In: Gene, Chromosomes & Cancer, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 228-237Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-93931 (URN)
    Available from: 2006-03-22 Created: 2006-03-22Bibliographically approved
    3.
    The record could not be found. The reason may be that the record is no longer available or you may have typed in a wrong id in the address field.
    4.
    The record could not be found. The reason may be that the record is no longer available or you may have typed in a wrong id in the address field.
  • 36.
    Berger, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Postma, Erik
    Biased Estimates of Diminishing-Returns Epistasis?: Empirical Evidence Revisited2014In: Genetics, ISSN 0016-6731, E-ISSN 1943-2631, Vol. 198, no 4, p. 1417-1420Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Empirical evidence for diminishing fitness returns of beneficial mutations supports Fisher's geometric model. We show that a similar pattern emerges through the phenomenon of regression to the mean and that few studies correct for it. Although biases are often small, regression to the mean has overemphasized diminishing returns and will hamper cross-study comparisons unless corrected for.

  • 37.
    Berggren Bremdal, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Evolution of MHC Genes and MHC Gene Expression2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Polymorphism in coding regions and regions controlling gene expression is the major determinant of adaptive differences in natural populations. Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) possess a high level of genetic variation, which is maintained by selection over long coalescence times. MHC genes encode antigen-presenting molecules in the adaptive immune system, which protects the host from infectious diseases. However, MHC molecules may also present self-peptides and for most autoimmune diseases there is a genetic factor associated with the MHC.

    MHC genes have been used to learn about the interplay of selection and historical population events. In domestic dogs and their progenitor, the wolf, I explored factors associated with domestication and breed formation and their influence not only on MHC coding regions but also on the haplotypic structure of the class II region. Polymorphism and strong selection was demonstrated in the proximal promoters of MHC genes in dogs and wolves. Hence, genetic variation associated with MHC gene expression may have at least equal importance for a well functioning immune system. Associations between promoter sequences and particular coding alleles suggested allele-specific expression patterns. SNP haplotypes of the MHC class II region revealed ancestral as well as convergent haplotypes, in which combinations of alleles are kept by selection. Interestingly, weaker allelic associations were found between different genes and between coding regions and promoters in dogs compared to wolves. Potentially, this could cause insufficient defense against infections and predispose dogs to autoimmune diseases. For example, I identified a site in the promoter region that showed a consistent difference between haplotypes conferring susceptibility and protection to diabetes in dogs, which should be investigated further.

    Furthermore, I investigated how selection and demographic changes associated with glacial and inter-glacial periods have affected MHC variation in European hedgehogs and extended the prevailing knowledge concerning their population history.

    List of papers
    1. Understanding the phylogeographic patterns of European hedgehogs, Erinaceus concolor and E. europaeus using the MHC.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Understanding the phylogeographic patterns of European hedgehogs, Erinaceus concolor and E. europaeus using the MHC.
    2005 (English)In: Heredity, ISSN 0018-067X, Vol. 95, no 1, p. 84-90Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The genome of the European hedgehog, Erinaceus concolor and E. europaeus, shows a strong signal of cycles of restriction to glacial refugia and postglacial expansion. Patterns of expansion, however, differ for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and preliminary analysis of nuclear markers. In this study, we determine phylogeographic patterns in the hedgehog using two loci of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), isolated for the first time in hedgehogs. These genes show long persistence times and high polymorphism in many species because of the actions of balancing selection. Among 84 individuals screened for variation, only two DQA alleles were identified in each species, but 10 DQB alleles were found in E. concolor and six in E. europaeus. A strong effect of demography on patterns of DQB variability is observed, with only weak evidence of balancing selection. While data from mtDNA clearly subdivide both species into monophyletic subgroups, the MHC data delineate only E. concolor into distinct subgroups, supporting the preliminary findings of other nuclear markers. Together with differences in variability, this suggests that the refugia history and/or expansion patterns of E. concolor and E. europaeus differ.

    Keyword
    Animals, DNA; Mitochondrial/*genetics, Europe, Genome, Geography, Hedgehogs/*classification/*genetics, Major Histocompatibility Complex, Movement, Phylogeny, Population Dynamics, Research Support; Non-U.S. Gov't, Selection (Genetics)
    National Category
    Genetics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-76386 (URN)16077505 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2006-03-02 Created: 2006-03-02 Last updated: 2018-02-22
    2. MHC promoter polymorphism in grey wolves and domestic dogs.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>MHC promoter polymorphism in grey wolves and domestic dogs.
    2005 (English)In: Immunogenetics, ISSN 0093-7711, Vol. 57, no 3-4, p. 267-72Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A functional immune system requires a tight control over major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene transcription, as the abnormal MHC expression patterns of severe immunodeficiency and autoimmune diseases demonstrate. Although the regulation of MHC expression has been well documented in humans and mice, little is known in other species. In this study, we detail the level of polymorphism in wolf and dog MHC gene promoters. The promoter regions of the DRB, DQA and DQB locus were sequenced in 90 wolves and 90 dogs. The level of polymorphism was high in the DQB promoters, with variation found within functionally relevant regions, including binding sites for transcription factors. Clear associations between DQB promoters and exon 2 alleles were noted in wolves, indicating strong linkage disequilibrium in this region. Low levels of polymorphism were found within the DRB and DQA promoter regions. However, a variable site was identified within the T box, a TNF-alpha response element, of the DQA promoter. Furthermore, we identified a previously unrecognised 18-base-pair deletion within exon 1 of the DQB locus.

    Keyword
    Alleles, Animals, Base Sequence, Comparative Study, DNA/genetics, Dogs/*genetics/*immunology, Exons, Linkage Disequilibrium, Major Histocompatibility Complex, Molecular Sequence Data, Polymorphism; Genetic, Promoter Regions (Genetics), Research Support; Non-U.S. Gov't, Sequence Deletion, Sequence Homology; Nucleic Acid, Species Specificity, Variation (Genetics), Wolves/*genetics/*immunology
    National Category
    Genetics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-76387 (URN)15900498 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2006-03-02 Created: 2006-03-02 Last updated: 2011-01-11
    3. Allelic combinations of promoter and exon 2 in DQB1 in dogs and wolves
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Allelic combinations of promoter and exon 2 in DQB1 in dogs and wolves
    2008 (English)In: Journal of Molecular Evolution, ISSN 0022-2844, E-ISSN 1432-1432, Vol. 67, no 1, p. 76-84Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Polymorphism of PBRs of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes is well recognized, but the polymorphism also extends to proximal promoter regions. Examining DQB1 variability in dogs and wolves, we identified 7 promoter variants and 13 exon 2 alleles among 89 dogs, including a previously unknown DQB1 exon 2 allele, and 8 promoter variants and 9 exon 2 alleles among 85 wolves. As expected from previous studies and from a close chromosomal location, strong linkage disequilibrium was demonstrated in both wolves and dogs by having significantly fewer promoter/exon 2 combinations than expected from simulations of randomized data sets. Interestingly, we noticed weaker haplotypic associations in dogs than in wolves. Dogs had twice as many promoter/exon 2 combinations as wolves and an almost 2-fold difference in the number of exon 2 alleles per promoter variant. This difference was not caused by an admixture of breeds in our group of dogs because the high ratio of observed to expected number of haplotypes persisted within a single dog breed, the German Shepherd. Ewens-Watterson tests indicated that both the promoter and exon 2 are under the balancing selection, and both regions appear to be more recently derived in the dog than in the wolf. Hence, although reasons for the differences are unknown, they may relate to altered selection pressure on patterns of expression. Deviations from normal MHC expression patterns have been associated with autoimmune diseases, which occur frequently in several dog breeds. Further knowledge about these deviations may help us understand the source of such diseases.

    Keyword
    dog, DLA, DQB1, MHC, promoter, linkage disequilibrium, wolf
    National Category
    Biological Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-109175 (URN)10.1007/s00239-008-9126-0 (DOI)000258088000008 ()
    Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    4. Evolutionary history of DLA class II haplotypes in canine diabetes mellitus through single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evolutionary history of DLA class II haplotypes in canine diabetes mellitus through single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping
    2010 (English)In: Tissue Antigens, ISSN 0001-2815, E-ISSN 1399-0039, Vol. 75, no 3, p. 218-226Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) is a characteristic of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, as well as the genome in general in dogs as a consequence of demographic changes with domestication. Disease association studies of MHC haplotypes may be affected by high LD and the resultant shared genetic backgrounds of haplotypes giving associations with linked but non-causative mutations, and also by convergent haplotypes, in which combinations of alleles have arisen independently. This study provides preliminary tools for dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) class II haplotype analysis with 102 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified in 14.6 kb and genotyping of 20 of these SNPs to tag haplotypes in 60 dogs with diabetes mellitus and in 49 non-diabetic dogs. The pattern of LD and analysis of SNP patterns indicated combinations of exon 2 alleles have arisen through both recombination and convergence. For exon 2 haplotypes associated with susceptibility or protection from diabetes mellitus, a region of fixed differences in SNPs across the DQ region was observed, suggesting a region outside exon 2 may be implicated in disease association. Four new DQB1 promoter alleles restricted to diabetic dogs were identified, as well as a substitution difference in the X1 box of the DQB1 promoter that will potentially modify the effect of the protective haplotypes within diabetic dogs

    Keyword
    canine major histocompatibility complex, diabetes mellitus, DLA, haplotypes
    National Category
    Genetics
    Research subject
    Biology with specialization in Evolutionary Genetics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-122009 (URN)10.1111/j.1399-0039.2009.01426.x (DOI)000274336000004 ()20047645 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2010-04-05 Created: 2010-04-05 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
    5. Linkage disequilibrium and haplotype patterns of the MHC class II region - a comparison between wolves and dogs.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Linkage disequilibrium and haplotype patterns of the MHC class II region - a comparison between wolves and dogs.
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Keyword
    major histocompatibility complex, MHC, DLA, linkage disequilibrium, haplotype, wolves, dogs
    National Category
    Genetics
    Research subject
    Biology with specialization in Evolutionary Genetics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-122010 (URN)
    Available from: 2010-04-05 Created: 2010-04-05 Last updated: 2010-04-07
  • 38.
    Berggren, Karin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Ellegren, H
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Hewitt, G M
    Seddon, J M
    Understanding the phylogeographic patterns of European hedgehogs, Erinaceus concolor and E. europaeus using the MHC.2005In: Heredity, ISSN 0018-067X, Vol. 95, no 1, p. 84-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The genome of the European hedgehog, Erinaceus concolor and E. europaeus, shows a strong signal of cycles of restriction to glacial refugia and postglacial expansion. Patterns of expansion, however, differ for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and preliminary analysis of nuclear markers. In this study, we determine phylogeographic patterns in the hedgehog using two loci of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), isolated for the first time in hedgehogs. These genes show long persistence times and high polymorphism in many species because of the actions of balancing selection. Among 84 individuals screened for variation, only two DQA alleles were identified in each species, but 10 DQB alleles were found in E. concolor and six in E. europaeus. A strong effect of demography on patterns of DQB variability is observed, with only weak evidence of balancing selection. While data from mtDNA clearly subdivide both species into monophyletic subgroups, the MHC data delineate only E. concolor into distinct subgroups, supporting the preliminary findings of other nuclear markers. Together with differences in variability, this suggests that the refugia history and/or expansion patterns of E. concolor and E. europaeus differ.

  • 39.
    Berggren, Karin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Ellegren, Hans
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Hewitt, G. M.
    Seddon, J. M.
    Demographic effects have been more important than selection in shaping patterns of variation at MHC genes in European hedgehogs, Erinaceus europaeus and Erinaceus concolor.2005In: Heredity, no 85, p. 84-90Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Berggren, Karin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Seddon, Jennifer
    University of Queensland.
    Linkage disequilibrium and haplotype patterns of the MHC class II region - a comparison between wolves and dogs.Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Berggren, Karin T
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Seddon, Jennifer M
    MHC promoter polymorphism in grey wolves and domestic dogs.2005In: Immunogenetics, ISSN 0093-7711, Vol. 57, no 3-4, p. 267-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A functional immune system requires a tight control over major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene transcription, as the abnormal MHC expression patterns of severe immunodeficiency and autoimmune diseases demonstrate. Although the regulation of MHC expression has been well documented in humans and mice, little is known in other species. In this study, we detail the level of polymorphism in wolf and dog MHC gene promoters. The promoter regions of the DRB, DQA and DQB locus were sequenced in 90 wolves and 90 dogs. The level of polymorphism was high in the DQB promoters, with variation found within functionally relevant regions, including binding sites for transcription factors. Clear associations between DQB promoters and exon 2 alleles were noted in wolves, indicating strong linkage disequilibrium in this region. Low levels of polymorphism were found within the DRB and DQA promoter regions. However, a variable site was identified within the T box, a TNF-alpha response element, of the DQA promoter. Furthermore, we identified a previously unrecognised 18-base-pair deletion within exon 1 of the DQB locus.

  • 42.
    Berglund, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Meiotic Recombination in Human and Dog: Targets, Consequences and Implications for Genome Evolution2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding the mechanism of recombination has important implications for genome evolution and genomic variability. The work presented in this thesis studies the properties of recombination by investigating the effects it has on genome evolution in humans and dogs.

    Using alignments of human genes with chimpanzee and macaque orthologues we studied substitution patterns along the human lineage and scanned for evidence of positive selection. The properties mirror the situation in human non-coding sequences with the fixation bias ‘GC-biased gene conversion’ (gBGC) as a driving force in the most rapidly evolving regions. By assigning candidate genes to distinct classes of evolutionary forces we quantified the extent of those genes affected by gBGC to 20%. This suggests that human-specific characters can be prompted by the fixation bias of gBGC, which can be mistaken for selection.

    The gene PRDM9 controls recombination in most mammals, but is lacking in dogs. Using whole-genome alignments of dog with related species we examined the effects of PRDM9 inactivation. Additionally, we analyzed genomic variation in the genomes of several dog breeds. We identified that non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR) via sequence identity, often GC-rich, creates structural variants of genomic regions. We show that these regions, which are also found in dog recombination hotspots, are a subset of unmethylated CpG-islands (CGIs). We inferred that CGIs have experienced a drastic increase in biased substitution rates, concurrent with a shift of recombination to target these regions. This enables recurrent episodes of gBGC to shape their distribution.

    The work presented in this thesis demonstrates the importance of meiotic recombination on patterns of molecular evolution and genomic variability in humans and dogs. Bioinformatic analyses identified mechanisms that regulate genome composition. gBGC is presented as an alternative to positive selection and is revealed as a major factor affecting allele configuration and the emergence of accelerated evolution on the human lineage. Characterization of recombination-induced sequence patterns highlights the potential of non-methylation and establishes unmethylated CGIs as targets of meiotic recombination in dogs. These observations describe recombination as an interesting process in genome evolution and provide further insights into the mechanisms of genomic variability.

    List of papers
    1. Hotspots of biased nucleotide substitutions in human genes
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hotspots of biased nucleotide substitutions in human genes
    2009 (English)In: PLoS biology, ISSN 1544-9173, E-ISSN 1545-7885, Vol. 7, no 1, p. e26-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Genes that have experienced accelerated evolutionary rates on the human lineage during recent evolution are candidates for involvement in human-specific adaptations. To determine the forces that cause increased evolutionary rates in certain genes, we analyzed alignments of 10,238 human genes to their orthologues in chimpanzee and macaque. Using a likelihood ratio test, we identified protein-coding sequences with an accelerated rate of base substitutions along the human lineage. Exons evolving at a fast rate in humans have a significant tendency to contain clusters of AT-to-GC (weak-to-strong) biased substitutions. This pattern is also observed in noncoding sequence flanking rapidly evolving exons. Accelerated exons occur in regions with elevated male recombination rates and exhibit an excess of nonsynonymous substitutions relative to the genomic average. We next analyzed genes with significantly elevated ratios of nonsynonymous to synonymous rates of base substitution (dN/dS) along the human lineage, and those with an excess of amino acid replacement substitutions relative to human polymorphism. These genes also show evidence of clusters of weak-to-strong biased substitutions. These findings indicate that a recombination-associated process, such as biased gene conversion (BGC), is driving fixation of GC alleles in the human genome. This process can lead to accelerated evolution in coding sequences and excess amino acid replacement substitutions, thereby generating significant results for tests of positive selection.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-119520 (URN)10.1371/journal.pbio.1000026 (DOI)000262811000008 ()19175294 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2010-02-26 Created: 2010-02-26 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
    2. Detecting positive selection within genomes: the problem of biased gene conversion
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Detecting positive selection within genomes: the problem of biased gene conversion
    Show others...
    2010 (English)In: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8436, E-ISSN 1471-2970, Vol. 365, no 1552, p. 2571-2580Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The identification of loci influenced by positive selection is a major goal of evolutionary genetics. A popular approach is to perform scans of alignments on a genome-wide scale in order to find regions evolving at accelerated rates on a particular branch of a phylogenetic tree. However, positive selection is not the only process that can lead to accelerated evolution. Notably, GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC) is a recombination-associated process that results in the biased fixation of G and C nucleotides. This process can potentially generate bursts of nucleotide substitutions within hotspots of meiotic recombination. Here, we analyse the results of a scan for positive selection on genes on branches across the primate phylogeny. We show that genes identified as targets of positive selection have a significant tendency to exhibit the genomic signature of gBGC. Using a maximum-likelihood framework, we estimate that more than 20 per cent of cases of significantly elevated non-synonymous to synonymous substitution rates ratio (d(N)/d(S)), particularly in shorter branches, could be due to gBGC. We demonstrate that in some cases, gBGC can lead to very high d(N)/d(S) (more than 2). Our results indicate that gBGC significantly affects the evolution of coding sequences in primates, often leading to patterns of evolution that can be mistaken for positive selection.

    Keyword
    biased gene conversion, selection, recombination
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-135631 (URN)10.1098/rstb.2010.0007 (DOI)000280097000017 ()20643747 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2010-12-07 Created: 2010-12-07 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
    3. Novel origins of copy number variation in the dog genome
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Novel origins of copy number variation in the dog genome
    Show others...
    2012 (English)In: Genome Biology, ISSN 1465-6906, E-ISSN 1474-760X, Vol. 13, no 8, p. R73-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Copy number variants (CNVs) account for substantial variation between genomes and are a major source of normal and pathogenic phenotypic differences. The dog is an ideal model to investigate mutational mechanisms that generate CNVs as its genome lacks a functional ortholog of the PRDM9 gene implicated in recombination and CNV formation in humans. Here we comprehensively assay CNVs using high-density array comparative genomic hybridization in 50 dogs from 17 dog breeds and 3 gray wolves. RESULTS: We use a stringent new method to identify a total of 430 high-confidence CNV loci, which range in size from 9 kb to 1.6 Mb and span 26.4 Mb, or 1.08%, of the assayed dog genome, overlapping 413 annotated genes. Of CNVs observed in each breed, 98% are also observed in multiple breeds. CNVs predicted to disrupt gene function are significantly less common than expected by chance. We identify a significant overrepresentation of peaks of GC content, previously shown to be enriched in dog recombination hotspots, in the vicinity of CNV breakpoints. CONCLUSIONS: A number of the CNVs identified by this study are candidates for generating breed-specific phenotypes. Purifying selection seems to be a major factor shaping structural variation in the dog genome, suggesting that many CNVs are deleterious. Localized peaks of GC content appear to be novel sites of CNV formation in the dog genome by non-allelic homologous recombination, potentially activated by the loss of PRDM9. These sequence features may have driven genome instability and chromosomal rearrangements throughout canid evolution.

    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-194244 (URN)10.1186/gb-2012-13-8-r73 (DOI)000315867500007 ()22916802 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Additional author: The LUPA Consortium (www.eurolupa.org)

    Available from: 2013-02-11 Created: 2013-02-11 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    4. Germline Metyhlation Patterns Determine The Distribution Of Recombination Events In The Dog Genome
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Germline Metyhlation Patterns Determine The Distribution Of Recombination Events In The Dog Genome
    (English)In: Genome Biology and Evolution, ISSN 1759-6653, E-ISSN 1759-6653Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    National Category
    Genetics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-233190 (URN)
    Available from: 2014-09-30 Created: 2014-09-30 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
  • 43.
    Berglund, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Quilez, Javier
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Webster, Matthew
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Germline Metyhlation Patterns Determine The Distribution Of Recombination Events In The Dog GenomeIn: Genome Biology and Evolution, ISSN 1759-6653, E-ISSN 1759-6653Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Berlin, S.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Ellegren, H.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Chicken W:: A genetically uniform chromosome in a highly variable genome.2004In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, no 101, p. 15967-15969Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Berlin, S.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Smith, N.G.
    Ellegren, H.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Do avian mitochondria recombine?2004In: Journal of Molecular Evolution, no 58, p. 163-167Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Berlin, Sofia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    The Effects of Mutation and Selection on the Rate and Pattern of Molecular Evolution in Birds2004Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    By comparing sequence diversity and divergence on sex chromosomes one can study how the rate of evolution in affected by mutation and/or selection. The rate of mutation in male biased, meaning that relatively more mutations are created in the male germ line than in the female. Since the male mutation bias (αm) most likely is a consequence of the difference in cell divisions between male and female germ lines, life history characters that affect this difference should covary with αm. Indeed, we found a positive correlation between estimates of αm and increased generation times and increased intensity of sperm competition. We have also found that estimates of αm varied significantly between gametologous introns located on the sex chromosomes. This could be a consequence of the variation in substitution rates between loci.

    Population genetics theory predicts that both positive and negative selection reduce genetic diversity around a selected locus at a distance determined by the rate of recombination. Consequently, a non-recombining chromosome, like the female specific W chromosome in birds, selection is expected to have a large impact on sequence diversity. Indeed, in a large sequence screening we found only one segregating site among 7643 base pairs sequenced in 47 chicken females. Furthermore, we also found that deleterious substitutions are fixed in a higher rate for W- than Z-linked sequences, which is in agreement with the lack of recombination and strong genetic drift due to the low effective population size.

    Rarely non-synonymous mutations are beneficial for an individual, but when it happens, the mutation is positively selected and rapidly reaches fixation in a population. We have found that positive selection has been acting on the female reproductive protein, zona pellucida c in birds. This rapid evolution is likely a mechanism to prevent hybridisation.

    List of papers
    1. Life history and the male mutation bias.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Life history and the male mutation bias.
    Show others...
    2003 (English)In: Evolution, ISSN 0014-3820, Vol. 57, no 10, p. 2398-2406Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-92040 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-09-07 Created: 2004-09-07 Last updated: 2009-03-31Bibliographically approved
    2. Substitution rate heterogeneity and the male mutation bias.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Substitution rate heterogeneity and the male mutation bias.
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-92041 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-09-07 Created: 2004-09-07 Last updated: 2010-01-14Bibliographically approved
    3. Accumulation of deleterious mutations on the female specific chromosome in birds.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Accumulation of deleterious mutations on the female specific chromosome in birds.
    (English)Manuscript (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-92042 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-09-07 Created: 2004-09-07 Last updated: 2010-01-14Bibliographically approved
    4. Chicken W: a genetically uniform chromosome in a highly variable genome.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chicken W: a genetically uniform chromosome in a highly variable genome.
    (English)Manuscript (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-92043 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-09-07 Created: 2004-09-07 Last updated: 2010-01-14Bibliographically approved
    5. Adaptive evolution of ZPC, a female reproductive protein in diverse vertebrate species.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adaptive evolution of ZPC, a female reproductive protein in diverse vertebrate species.
    (English)Manuscript (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-92044 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-09-07 Created: 2004-09-07 Last updated: 2010-01-14Bibliographically approved
  • 47.
    Berlin, Sofia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Smith, Nick G C
    Testing for adaptive evolution of the female reproductive protein ZPC in mammals, birds and fishes reveals problems with the M7-M8 likelihood ratio test.2005In: BMC Evol Biol, ISSN 1471-2148, Vol. 5, p. 65-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Adaptive evolution appears to be a common feature of reproductive proteins across a very wide range of organisms. A promising way of addressing the evolutionary forces responsible for this general phenomenon is to test for adaptive evolution in the same gene but among groups of species, which differ in their reproductive biology. One can then test evolutionary hypotheses by asking whether the variation in adaptive evolution is consistent with the variation in reproductive biology. We have attempted to apply this approach to the study of a female reproductive protein, zona pellucida C (ZPC), which has been previously shown by the use of likelihood ratio tests (LRTs) to be under positive selection in mammals. RESULTS: We tested for evidence of adaptive evolution of ZPC in 15 mammalian species, in 11 avian species and in six fish species using three different LRTs (M1a-M2a, M7-M8, and M8a-M8). The only significant findings of adaptive evolution came from the M7-M8 test in mammals and fishes. Since LRTs of adaptive evolution may yield false positives in some situations, we examined the properties of the LRTs by several different simulation methods. When we simulated data to test the robustness of the LRTs, we found that the pattern of evolution in ZPC generates an excess of false positives for the M7-M8 LRT but not for the M1a-M2a or M8a-M8 LRTs. This bias is strong enough to have generated the significant M7-M8 results for mammals and fishes. CONCLUSION: We conclude that there is no strong evidence for adaptive evolution of ZPC in any of the vertebrate groups we studied, and that the M7-M8 LRT can be biased towards false inference of adaptive evolution by certain patterns of non-adaptive evolution.

  • 48.
    Besnier, Francois
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, The Linnaeus Centre for Bioinformatics.
    Wahlberg, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Rönnegård, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, The Linnaeus Centre for Bioinformatics.
    Ek, Weronica
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences .
    Andersson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Siegel, Paul
    virginia polytechnic institute and state university.
    Carlborg, Örjan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, The Linnaeus Centre for Bioinformatics.
    Fine mapping and replication of QTL in outbred chicken advanced intercross lines2011In: Genetics Selection Evolution, ISSN 0999-193X, E-ISSN 1297-9686, Vol. 43, p. 3-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Linkage mapping is used to identify genomic regions affecting the expression of complex traits. However, when experimental crosses such as F2 populations or backcrosses are used to map regions containing a Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL), the size of the regions identified remains quite large, i.e. 10 or more Mb. Thus, other experimental strategies are needed to refine the QTL locations. Advanced Intercross Lines (AIL) are produced by repeated intercrossing of F2 animals and successive generations, which decrease linkage disequilibrium in a controlled manner. Although this approach is seen as promising, both to replicate QTL analyses and fine-map QTL, only a few AIL datasets, all originating from inbred founders, have been reported in the literature.

    METHODS: We have produced a nine-generation AIL pedigree (n = 1529) from two outbred chicken lines divergently selected for body weight at eight weeks of age. All animals were weighed at eight weeks of age and genotyped for SNP located in nine genomic regions where significant or suggestive QTL had previously been detected in the F2 population. In parallel, we have developed a novel strategy to analyse the data that uses both genotype and pedigree information of all AIL individuals to replicate the detection of and fine-map QTL affecting juvenile body weight.

    RESULTS: Five of the nine QTL detected with the original F2 population were confirmed and fine-mapped with the AIL, while for the remaining four, only suggestive evidence of their existence was obtained. All original QTL were confirmed as a single locus, except for one, which split into two linked QTL.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that many of the QTL, which are genome-wide significant or suggestive in the analyses of large intercross populations, are true effects that can be replicated and fine-mapped using AIL. Key factors for success are the use of large populations and powerful statistical tools. Moreover, we believe that the statistical methods we have developed to efficiently study outbred AIL populations will increase the number of organisms for which in-depth complex traits can be analyzed.

     

  • 49. Bianchi, Matteo
    et al.
    Sundberg, Katarina
    Rafati, Nima
    Karlsson, Åsa
    Andersson, Göran
    Kämpe, Olle
    Hedhammar, Åke
    Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin
    Rosengren Pielberg, Gerli
    The Type I Interferon Gene Cluster is Associated with Hypothyroidism in a Swedish Giant Schnauzer Dog PopulationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Bin Kaderi, Mohamed Arifin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology, Hematology and Immunology.
    Assessment of Novel Molecular Prognostic Markers in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The clinical course of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is highly heterogeneous, which has prompted the search for biomarkers that can predict prognosis in this disease. The IGHV gene mutation status and certain genomic aberrations have been identified as reliable prognostic markers of clinical outcome for this disorder. However, the search for more feasible prognostic markers in CLL is still being pursued. Recently, certain single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the GNAS1, BCL2 and MDM2 genes and the RNA expression levels of the LPL, ZAP70, TCL1, CLLU1 and MCL1 genes were suggested as novel prognostic markers in CLL.

    In papers I-III, we performed genotyping analyses of the GNAS1 T393C, BCL2 -938C>A and MDM2 SNP309 polymorphisms in 268-418 CLL patients and related the genotypes with clinical data. Association studies between the polymorphisms and established prognostic markers (i.e. IGHV mutation status, genomic aberrations, CD38 expression) were also performed. Our studies did not find any significant relationship between these SNPs with either clinical outcome or other known prognostic markers in CLL.

    In paper IV, we measured the RNA expression levels of LPL, ZAP70, TCL1, CLLU1 and MCL1 in 252 CLL cases and correlated these levels with clinical outcome. Here, we verified that high expression of all these RNA-based markers, except MCL1, were associated with an unfavourable prognosis. We also confirmed a close relationship between IGHV mutation status and the RNA-based markers, especially for LPL and CLLU1 expression. Among the RNA-based markers, multivariate analysis revealed LPL expression as the strongest independent prognostic marker for overall survival and time to treatment. Furthermore, the RNA-based markers could add further prognostic information to established markers in subgroups of patients, with LPL expression status giving the most significant results.

    In summary, data from papers I-III could not verify the GNAS1 T393C, BCL2 -938C>A and MDM2 SNP309 polymorphisms as prognostic markers in CLL. Future SNP markers must hence be confirmed in large, independent cohorts before being proposed as prognostic marker in CLL. In paper IV, we conclude that LPL expression appears to be the strongest among the RNA-based markers for CLL prognostication. Further efforts to standardize LPL quantification are required before it can be applied in the clinical laboratory to predict clinical outcome in this disease.

    List of papers
    1. The GNAS1 T393C polymorphism and lack of clinical prognostic value in chronic lymphocytic leukemia
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The GNAS1 T393C polymorphism and lack of clinical prognostic value in chronic lymphocytic leukemia
    Show others...
    2008 (English)In: Leukemia research: a Forum for Studies on Leukemia and Normal Hemopoiesis, ISSN 0145-2126, E-ISSN 1873-5835, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 984-987Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a clinically heterogeneous disease with no known single predisposing genetic factor shown in all cases. Recently, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) T393C in the GNAS1 gene has been reported to have a clinical impact on CLL progression and overall survival. In order to further investigate the T393C SNP in CLL, we have genotyped 279 CLL cases and correlated the genotypes to clinical outcome and other known prognostic factors such as the immunoglobulin heavy chain variable (IGHV) gene mutation status and CD38 expression. In the present study, no difference in overall survival or time to treatment was observed in the CLL patients with the different genotypes in contrast to the previous report. Furthermore, no correlation was observed with the T393C genotypes and IGHV mutational status, Binet stage or CD38 in this cohort. In summary, our data does not support the use of the T393C GNAS SNP as a clinical prognostic factor in CLL.

    Keyword
    GNAS1 T393C single nucleotide polymorphism, chronic lymphocytic leukemia prognosis
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-13005 (URN)10.1016/j.leukres.2007.10.003 (DOI)000255269100021 ()18006055 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2008-01-20 Created: 2008-01-20 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
    2. The BCL-2 promoter (-938C>A) polymorphism does not predict clinical outcome in chronic lymphocytic leukemia
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The BCL-2 promoter (-938C>A) polymorphism does not predict clinical outcome in chronic lymphocytic leukemia
    Show others...
    2008 (English)In: Leukemia, ISSN 0887-6924, E-ISSN 1476-5551, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 339-343Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The (-938C>A) polymorphism in the promoter region of the BCL-2 gene was recently associated with inferior time to treatment and overall survival in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients displaying the -938A/A genotype and may thus serve as an unfavorable genetic marker in CLL. Furthermore, the -938A/A genotype was associated with increased expression of Bcl-2. To investigate this further, we analyzed the -938 genotypes of the BCL-2 gene in 268 CLL patients and correlated data with treatment status, overall survival and known prognostic factors, for example, Binet stage, immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable (IGHV) mutational status and CD38 expression. In contrast to the recent report, the current cohort of CLL patients showed no differences either in time to treatment or overall survival in relation to usage of a particular genotype. In addition, no correlation was evident between the (-938C>A) genotypes and IGHV mutational status, Binet stage or CD38. Furthermore, the polymorphism did not appear to affect the Bcl-2 expression at the RNA level. Taken together, our data do not support the use of the (-938C>A) BCL-2 polymorphism as a prognostic marker in CLL and argue against its postulated role in modulating Bcl-2 levels.

    Keyword
    chronic lymphocytic leukemia, BCL-2 promoter polymorphism, immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable gene mutation status, Binet stage, CD38, prognosis
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-13004 (URN)10.1038/sj.leu.2405042 (DOI)000253166900015 ()18046447 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2008-01-20 Created: 2009-01-12 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
    3. Lack of association between the MDM2 promoter polymorphism SNP309 and clinical outcome in chronic lymphocytic leukemia
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lack of association between the MDM2 promoter polymorphism SNP309 and clinical outcome in chronic lymphocytic leukemia
    Show others...
    2010 (English)In: Leukemia research: a Forum for Studies on Leukemia and Normal Hemopoiesis, ISSN 0145-2126, E-ISSN 1873-5835, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 335-339Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The 309T>G polymorphism in the promoter region of the MDM2gene, known as SNP309, has recently been suggested as an unfavorable prognostic marker in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) although this has been questioned. To investigate this further, we analyzed the MDM2 SNP309 genotypes in 418 CLL patients and correlated the results with established CLL prognostic factors, time to treatment and overall survival. In this Swedish cohort, no association existed between any particular MDM2 SNP309 genotype, overall survival and time to treatment. Furthermore, no correlation was shown between the MDM2 SNP309 genotypes and Binet stage, IGHV mutational status and recurrent genomic aberrations. In summary, this study argues against the use of the MDM2 SNP309 as a prognostic marker in CLL.

    Keyword
    MDM2 SNP309, Chronic lymphocytic leukemia, Binet stage, IGHV mutational status, Genomic aberrations, Prognostic markers
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Research subject
    Clinical Genetics; Medicine; Oncology; Medical Genetics; Molecular Genetics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-111075 (URN)10.1016/j.leukres.2009.06.006 (DOI)000274529600013 ()19573916 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2009-12-02 Created: 2009-12-02 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
    4. LPL is the strongest prognostic factor in a comparative analysis of RNA-based markers in early chronic lymphocytic leukemia
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>LPL is the strongest prognostic factor in a comparative analysis of RNA-based markers in early chronic lymphocytic leukemia
    Show others...
    2011 (English)In: Haematologica (online), ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 96, no 8, p. 1153-1160Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    The expression levels of LPL, ZAP70, TCL1A, CLLU1 and MCL1 have recently been proposed as prognostic factors in chronic lymphocytic leukemia. However, few studies have systematically compared these different RNA-based markers.

    DESIGN AND METHODS:

    Using real-time quantitative PCR, we measured the mRNA expression levels of these genes in unsorted samples from 252 newly diagnosed chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients and correlated our data with established prognostic markers (for example Binet stage, CD38, IGHV gene mutational status and genomic aberrations) and clinical outcome.

    RESULTS:

    High expression levels of all RNA-based markers, except MCL1, predicted shorter overall survival and time to treatment, with LPL being the most significant. In multivariate analysis including the RNA-based markers, LPL expression was the only independent prognostic marker for overall survival and time to treatment. When studying LPL expression and the established markers, LPL expression retained its independent prognostic strength for overall survival. All of the RNA-based markers, albeit with varying ability, added prognostic information to established markers, with LPL expression giving the most significant results. Notably, high LPL expression predicted a worse outcome in good-prognosis subgroups, such as patients with mutated IGHV genes, Binet stage A, CD38 negativity or favorable cytogenetics. In particular, the combination of LPL expression and CD38 could further stratify Binet stage A patients.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    LPL expression is the strongest RNA-based prognostic marker in chronic lymphocytic leukemia that could potentially be applied to predict outcome in the clinical setting, particularly in the large group of patients with favorable prognosis.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences Medical Genetics Cancer and Oncology
    Research subject
    Clinical Genetics; Medical Genetics; Oncology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-111078 (URN)10.3324/haematol.2010.039396 (DOI)000294722700013 ()21508119 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2009-12-02 Created: 2009-12-02 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
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