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  • 1.
    Abdeldaim, Guma
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Klinisk mikrobiologi och infektionsmedicin, Klinisk bakteriologi. Benghazi Univ, Fac Med, Dept Med Microbiol & Parasitol, Benghazi, Libya..
    Svensson, Erik
    Statens Serum Inst, Int Reference Lab Mycobacteriol, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Blomberg, Jonas
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Klinisk mikrobiologi och infektionsmedicin, Klinisk virologi.
    Herrmann, Björn
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Klinisk mikrobiologi och infektionsmedicin, Klinisk bakteriologi.
    Duplex detection of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and medically important non-tuberculosis mycobacteria by real-time PCR based on the rnpB gene2016Ingår i: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 124, nr 11, s. 991-995Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    A duplex real-time PCR based on the rnpB gene was developed for Mycobacterium spp. The assay was specific for the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTB) and also detected all 19 tested species of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). The assay was evaluated on 404 clinical samples: 290 respiratory samples and 114 from tissue and other nonrespiratory body sites. M. tuberculosis was detected by culture in 40 samples and in 30 samples by the assay. The MTB assay showed a sensitivity similar to Roche Cobas Amplicor MTB-PCR (Roche Molecular Systems, Pleasanton, CA, USA). There were only nine samples with non-tuberculous mycobacteria detected by culture. Six of them were detected by the PCR assay.

  • 2.
    Abdillahi, Suado M.
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Div Infect Med, Dept Clin Sci, Tornavagen 10, S-22184 Lund, Sweden.
    Maass, Tobias
    Univ Cologne, Fac Med, Ctr Biochem, Ctr Mol Med Cologne, D-50931 Cologne, Germany.
    Kasetty, Gopinath
    Lund Univ, Div Resp Med & Allergol, Dept Clin Sci, S-22184 Lund, Sweden.
    Strömstedt, Adam A.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Farmaceutiska fakulteten, Institutionen för läkemedelskemi, Farmakognosi.
    Baumgarten, Maria
    Lund Univ, Div Infect Med, Dept Clin Sci, Tornavagen 10, S-22184 Lund, Sweden.
    Tati, Ramesh
    Lund Univ, Div Infect Med, Dept Clin Sci, Tornavagen 10, S-22184 Lund, Sweden.
    Nordin, Sara L.
    Lund Univ, Div Infect Med, Dept Clin Sci, Tornavagen 10, S-22184 Lund, Sweden.
    Walse, Björn
    Sarom Biostruct AB, S-22363 Lund, Sweden.
    Wagener, Raimund
    Univ Cologne, Fac Med, Ctr Biochem, Ctr Mol Med Cologne, D-50931 Cologne, Germany.
    Schmidtchen, Artur
    Lund Univ, Div Dermatol & Venereol, Dept Clin Sci, S-22184 Lund, Sweden;Univ Copenhagen, Bispebjerg Hosp, Dept Biomed Sci, Copenhagen Wound Healing Ctr, DK-2400 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Mörgelin, Matthias
    Lund Univ, Div Infect Med, Dept Clin Sci, Tornavagen 10, S-22184 Lund, Sweden;Colzyx AB, S-22381 Lund, Sweden.
    Collagen VI Contains Multiple Host Defense Peptides with Potent In Vivo Activity2018Ingår i: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 201, nr 3, s. 1007-1020Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Collagen VI is a ubiquitous extracellular matrix component that forms extensive microfibrillar networks in most connective tissues. In this study, we describe for the first time, to our knowledge, that the collagen VI von Willebrand factor type A like domains exhibit a broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in human skin infections in vivo. In silico sequence and structural analysis of VWA domains revealed that they contain cationic and amphipathic peptide sequence motifs, which might explain the antimicrobial nature of collagen VI. In vitro and in vivo studies show that these peptides exhibited significant antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa through membrane disruption. Our findings shed new light on the role of collagen VI derived peptides in innate host defense and provide templates for development of peptide-based antibacterial therapies.

  • 3.
    Adamson, L.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Pathol & Oncol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Andersson, B.
    Gothenburg Univ, Immunol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Kiessling, R.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Pathol & Oncol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nasman-Glaser, B.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Pathol & Oncol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Karlsson-Parra, Alex
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi, Klinisk immunologi.
    GMP-production of an allogenic DC-based cancer vaccine (INTUVAX) for treatment of patients with metastatic kidney-or primary liver cancer. Comparison of two production platforms for DC-generation2016Ingår i: European Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0014-2980, E-ISSN 1521-4141, Vol. 46, s. 946-947Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 4. Agardh, D
    et al.
    Dahlbom, I
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för genetik och patologi.
    Daniels, T
    Lörinc, E
    Ivarsson, SÅ
    Lernmark, Å
    Hansson, Tony
    Department of Rheumatology, Karolinska Institute.
    Autoantibodies Against Soluble and Immobilized Human Recombinant Tissue Transglutaminase in Children with Celiac Disease.2005Ingår i: J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr., Vol. 41, nr 3, s. 322-327Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 5.
    Ahl, David
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk cellbiologi, Integrativ Fysiologi.
    Eriksson, Olle
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk cellbiologi.
    Sedin, John
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk cellbiologi.
    Seignez, Cedric
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk cellbiologi, Integrativ Fysiologi.
    Schwan, Emil
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk cellbiologi.
    Kreuger, Johan
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk cellbiologi, Integrativ Fysiologi.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk cellbiologi, Integrativ Fysiologi.
    Phillipson, Mia
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk cellbiologi, Integrativ Fysiologi.
    Turning Up the Heat: Local Temperature Control During in vivo Imaging of Immune Cells2019Ingår i: Frontiers in Immunology, ISSN 1664-3224, E-ISSN 1664-3224, Vol. 10, artikel-id 2036Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Intravital imaging is an invaluable tool for studying the expanding range of immune cell functions. Only in vivo can the complex and dynamic behavior of leukocytes and their interactions with their natural microenvironment be observed and quantified. While the capabilities of high-speed, high-resolution confocal and multiphoton microscopes are well-documented and steadily improving, other crucial hardware required for intravital imaging is often developed in-house and less commonly published in detail. In this report, we describe a low-cost, multipurpose, and tissue-stabilizing in vivo imaging platform that enables sensing and regulation of local tissue temperature. The effect of tissue temperature on local blood flow and leukocyte migration is demonstrated in muscle and skin. Two different models of vacuum windows are described in this report, however, the design of the vacuum window can easily be adapted to fit different organs and tissues.

  • 6.
    Ahmed, Aisha S.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Nobel Vag 9, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gedin, Per
    Lowenstromska Hosp, Ortho Ctr Stockholm, S-19489 Upplands Vasby, Sweden.
    Hugo, Anders
    Lowenstromska Hosp, Ortho Ctr Stockholm, S-19489 Upplands Vasby, Sweden.
    Bakalkin, Georgy
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Farmaceutiska fakulteten, Institutionen för farmaceutisk biovetenskap.
    Kanar, Alkass
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Oncol Pathol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden;Swedish Natl Board Forens Med, S-17165 Solna, Sweden.
    Hart, David A.
    Univ Calgary, McCaig Inst Bone & Joint Hlth, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada.
    Druid, Henrik
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Oncol Pathol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden;Swedish Natl Board Forens Med, S-17165 Solna, Sweden.
    Svensson, Camilla
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kosek, Eva
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Nobel Vag 9, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden;Stockholm Spine Ctr, Lowenstromska Hosp, S-19489 Upplands Vasby, Sweden.
    Activation of NF-kappa B in Synovium versus Cartilage from Patients with Advanced Knee Osteoarthritis: A Potential Contributor to Inflammatory Aspects of Disease Progression2018Ingår i: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 201, nr 7, s. 1918-1927Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to assess the activation and association of the NF-kappa B system across synovial membrane (SM) and articular cartilage (AC) in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) and ascertain its potential effects on catabolic mediator expression in advanced OA. SM and AC were obtained from 40 OA patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty and from 19 postmortem control subjects. NF-kappa B subunit RelA in nuclear and cytosolic fractions and NF-kappa B1-DNA binding in nuclear extracts was assessed by ELISA, whereas NFKB1, RELA, IL-8, IL-6, and MMP3 gene expression were analyzed by reverse transcriptase-quantitative PCR in tissues. We observed higher SM nuclear RelA protein levels and upregulated NF-kappa B1-DNA binding in OA patients compared with postmortem controls. However, in AC, lower nuclear RelA levels were observed compared with cytosolic extracts in patients. Nuclear RelA levels correlated positively with NF-kappa B1-DNA binding in SM and AC in patients. SM RELA and MMP3 mRNA levels were upregulated, whereas IL-8 and IL-6 as well as AC RELA were downregulated in patients compared with controls. In SM, nuclear RelA levels correlated positively with MMP3 gene expression in patients. A negative correlation was observed between SM nuclear RelA levels and AC NF-kappa B1-DNA binding, and SM nuclear NF-kappa B1-DNA binding correlated negatively with AC MMP3 and NFKB1 mRNA levels in patients. These findings highlight NF-kappa B-triggered cross-talk and feedback mechanisms between SM and AC in OA. Further, our findings strongly support a role for an activated NF-kappa B system in the transcriptional mechanism of inflammatory processes, especially in SM of patients with advanced OA.

  • 7. Akeus, Paulina
    et al.
    Langenes, Veronica
    von Mentzer, Astrid
    Yrlid, Ulf
    Sjoling, Asa
    Saksena, Pushpa
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi.
    Raghavan, Sukanya
    Quiding-Jarbrink, Marianne
    Altered chemokine production and accumulation of regulatory T cells in intestinal adenomas of APC(Min/+) mice2014Ingår i: Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy, ISSN 0340-7004, E-ISSN 1432-0851, Vol. 63, nr 8, s. 807-819Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Tumor progression in the colon moves from aberrant crypt foci to adenomatous polyps to invasive carcinomas. The composition of the tumor-infiltrating leukocyte population affects the ability of the immune system to fight the tumor. T cell infiltration into colorectal adenocarcinomas, particularly T helper 1 (Th1) type T cells as well as increased regulatory T cell (Treg) frequencies, is correlated with improved prognosis. However, whether Th1 cells and Tregs are already present at the adenoma stage is not known. In this study, the APC(Min/+) mouse model of intestinal adenomatous polyposis was used to investigate tumor-associated lymphocyte subsets and the mechanisms of their accumulation into gastrointestinal adenomas. Compared to unaffected tissue, adenomas accumulated CD4(+)FoxP3(+) putative Treg in parallel with lower frequencies of conventional T cells and B cells. The accumulation of Treg was also observed in human adenomatous polyps. Despite high Treg numbers, the function of conventional T cells present in the APC(Min/+) adenomas was not different from those in the unaffected tissue. Adenomas displayed an altered chemokine balance, with higher CCL17 and lower CXCL11 and CCL25 expression than in the unaffected tissue. In parallel, CXCR3(+) Tregs were largely absent from adenomas. The data indicate that already in early stages of tumor development, the balance of lymphocyte-recruiting chemokines is altered possibly contributing to the observed shift toward higher frequencies of Treg.

  • 8.
    Albrecht, Inka
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Theumatol Unit, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wick, Cecilia
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Theumatol Unit, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hallgren, Asa
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Expt Endocrinol, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Tjarnlund, Anna
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Theumatol Unit, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nagaraju, Kanneboyina
    Childrens Natl Med Ctr, Med Genet Res Ctr, Washington, DC 20010 USA..
    Andrade, Felipe
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA..
    Thompson, Kathryn
    Childrens Natl Med Ctr, Med Genet Res Ctr, Washington, DC 20010 USA..
    Coley, William
    Childrens Natl Med Ctr, Med Genet Res Ctr, Washington, DC 20010 USA..
    Phadke, Aditi
    Childrens Natl Med Ctr, Med Genet Res Ctr, Washington, DC 20010 USA..
    Diaz-Gallo, Lina-Marcela
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Theumatol Unit, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Bottai, Matteo
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Biostat, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nennesmo, Inger
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Chemin, Karine
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Theumatol Unit, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Herrath, Jessica
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Theumatol Unit, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Johansson, Karin
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Theumatol Unit, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wikberg, Anders
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Theumatol Unit, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ytterberg, A. Jimmy
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Theumatol Unit, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Biochem & Biophys, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Zubarev, Roman A.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Biochem & Biophys, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Danielsson, Olof
    Linkoping Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Div Neurol, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Krystufkova, Olga
    Charles Univ Prague, Fac Med 1, Inst Rheumatol, Prague, Czech Republic.;Charles Univ Prague, Fac Med 1, Dept Rheumatol, Prague, Czech Republic..
    Vencovsky, Jiri
    Charles Univ Prague, Fac Med 1, Inst Rheumatol, Prague, Czech Republic.;Charles Univ Prague, Fac Med 1, Dept Rheumatol, Prague, Czech Republic..
    Landegren, Nils
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Autoimmunitet. Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Expt Endocrinol, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wahren-Herlenius, Marie
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Expt Rheumatol Unit, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Padyukov, Leonid
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Theumatol Unit, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kämpe, Olle
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Autoimmunitet. Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Expt Endocrinol, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lundberg, Ingrid E.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Theumatol Unit, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Development of autoantibodies against muscle-specific FHL1 in severe inflammatory myopathies2015Ingår i: Journal of Clinical Investigation, ISSN 0021-9738, E-ISSN 1558-8238, Vol. 125, nr 12, s. 4612-4624Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Mutations of the gene encoding four-and-a-half LIM domain 1 (FHL1) are the causative factor of several X-linked hereditary myopathies that are collectively termed FHL1-related myopathies. These disorders are characterized by severe muscle dysfunction and damage. Here, we have shown that patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs) develop autoimmunity to FHL1, which is a muscle-specific protein. Anti-FHL1 autoantibodies were detected in 25% of IIM patients, while patients with other autoimmune diseases or muscular dystrophies were largely anti-FHL1 negative. Anti-FHL1 reactivity was predictive for muscle atrophy, dysphagia, pronounced muscle fiber damage, and vasculitis. FHL1 showed an altered expression pattern, with focal accumulation in the muscle fibers of autoantibody-positive patients compared with a homogeneous expression in anti-FHL1-negative patients and healthy controls. We determined that FHL1 is a target of the cytotoxic protease granzyme B, indicating that the generation of FHL1 fragments may initiate FHL1 autoimmunity. Moreover, immunization of myositis-prone mice with FHL1 aggravated muscle weakness and increased mortality, suggesting a direct link between anti-FHL1 responses and muscle damage. Together, our findings provide evidence that FHL1 may be involved in the pathogenesis not only of genetic FHL1-related myopathies but also of autoimmune IIM. Importantly, these results indicate that anti-FHL1 autoantibodies in peripheral blood have promising potential as a biomarker to identify a subset of severe IIM.

  • 9.
    Alim, Abdul
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Allmänmedicin och preventivmedicin. Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Mechanisms in Tendon Healing: Pain, Biomarkers and the Role of Mast Cells2019Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [sv]

    Senskador och tendinopati är vanliga problem, men de underliggande mekanismerna otillräckligt undersökta. Målet med denna avhandling är att öka kunskapen om mekanismer under läkningen av senor, och hur dessa relaterar till smärta och inflammation.

    Syftet med den första studien var att kvantifiera biomarkörer för läkning av Achillessena, genom analys av prokollagen typ I (PINP) och typ III (PIIINP) hos 65 patienter efter ruptur av Achillessenan. Två veckor efter achillesruptur kvantifierades PINP och PIIINP-nivåerna med mikrodialys följt av ELISA-analys. Ett år efter achillesruptur bedömdes patienternas upplevda besvär med användning av ett validerat formulär, Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score. Ökad andel PINP och PIIINP av totala mängden protein vid två veckor var signifikant associerat med mindre smärta men ökad fatigue i skadat ben efter ett år.

    I nästa studie utvärderade vi effekten av intermittent pneumatisk kompression (IPC) under två veckor av senans läkning efter achillesruptur. Patienterna fick antingen tilläggsbehandling med IPC eller vanlig behandling i gipsskena utan IPC. Vi kunde visa att behandling med IPC signifikant ökade nivån av PINP i den skadade senan, vilket tyder på förbättrad läkning.

    I den tredje studien undersökte vi mastcellers roll under läkningen av Achillessena efter ruptur i en råttmodell. Tre veckor postoperativt visade vi ett ökat antal mastceller och en högre andel degranulerade av mastceller i den läkande senan jämfört med senan på den andra (den friska) sidan. Vi kunde också påvisa glutamatreceptorn NMDAR1 hos mastceller i den läkande senan.

    I den fjärde studien bedömde vi effekten av glutamatstimulering in-vitro, på mastceller från benmärg hos mus. Degranulering av mastceller kvantifierades genom frisättning av β-hexosaminidas. För att kvantifiera NMDAR på proteinnivå använde vi immunfluorescens, och för att studera uttrycket av NMDAR och associerade gener använde vi RT-qPCR/mikroarray. Vi kunde visa att glutamat inducerar uppreglering av glutamatreceptorer av både jonotropisk och metabotropisk typ i mastceller, både på mRNA- och proteinnivå. NMDAR1 samlokaliserade med glutamat i membranet på mastceller, vilket därmed bekräftar en interaktion mellan glutamat och dess receptor. Glutamat inducerade också uttryck av pro-inflammatoriska proteiner såsom IL-6 och CCL2, samt transkriptionsfaktorer såsom Egr2, Egr3 och FosB. Dessutom upphävde NMDA-kanalblockeraren MK-801 fullständigt effekten av glutamat på mastceller, vilket talar för en funktionell betydelse av interaktionen mellan glutamat och glutamatreceptorer i mastceller.

    Sammantaget visar de fynd som presenteras i denna avhandling möjliga mekanismer för läkning av Achillessena i relation till smärta och funktion och introducerar en ny princip för hur immunceller kan kommunicera med nervceller efter achillesruptur.

    Delarbeten
    1. Procollagen markers in microdialysate can predict patient outcome after Achilles tendon rupture.
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Procollagen markers in microdialysate can predict patient outcome after Achilles tendon rupture.
    2016 (Engelska)Ingår i: BMJ open sport & exercise medicine, ISSN 2055-7647, Vol. 2, nr 1, artikel-id e000114Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Patients who sustain acute Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) exhibit variable and mostly impaired long-term functional, and patient-reported outcomes. However, there exists a lack of early predictive markers of long-term outcomes to facilitate the development of improved treatment methods. The aim of this study was to assess markers of tendon callus production in patients with ATR in terms of outcome, pain, and fatigue.

    STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective cohort study; level of evidence 2. Outpatient orthopaedic/sports medicine department.

    PATIENTS: A total of 65 patients (57 men, 8 women; mean age 41±7 years) with ATR were prospectively assessed.

    ASSESSMENTS: Markers of tendon callus production, procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide (PINP) and procollagen type III N-terminal propeptide (PIIINP), were assessed 2 weeks postoperatively using microdialysis followed by enzymatic quantification. Normalised procollagen levels (n-PINP and n-PIIINP) were calculated as the ratio of procollagen to total protein content. Pain and fatigue were assessed at 1 year using reliable questionnaires Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS).

    RESULTS: Patients exhibited fatigue (77.6%) and pain (44.1%) to some extent. Higher levels of n-PINP (R=0.38, p=0.016) and n-PIIINP (R=0.33, p=0.046) were significantly associated with less pain in the limb. Increased concentrations of PINP (R=-0.47, p=0.002) and PIIINP (R=-0.37, p=0.024) were related to more self-reported fatigue in the leg. The results were corroborated by multiple linear regression analyses.

    CONCLUSIONS: Assessment of procollagen markers in early tendon healing can predict long-term patient-reported outcomes after ATR. These novel findings suggest that procollagen markers could be used to facilitate the development of improved treatment methods in patients who sustain ATR.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBERS: NCT01317160: Results. NCT02318472: Pre-results.

    Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
    London, UK: , 2016
    Nyckelord
    Achilles, Chronic, Collagen, Injuries, Tendon
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Ortopedi
    Forskningsämne
    Ortopedi
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-395018 (URN)10.1136/bmjsem-2016-000114 (DOI)27900179 (PubMedID)
    Tillgänglig från: 2019-10-11 Skapad: 2019-10-11 Senast uppdaterad: 2020-02-19Bibliografiskt granskad
    2. Achilles tendon rupture healing is enhanced by intermittent pneumatic compression upregulating collagen type I synthesis
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Achilles tendon rupture healing is enhanced by intermittent pneumatic compression upregulating collagen type I synthesis
    Visa övriga...
    2018 (Engelska)Ingår i: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, ISSN 0942-2056, E-ISSN 1433-7347, Vol. 26, nr 7, s. 2021-2029Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE AND HYPOTHESIS: Adjuvant intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) during leg immobilization following Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) has been shown to reduce the risk of deep venous thrombosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether IPC can also promote tendon healing.

    METHODS: One hundred and fifty patients with surgical repair of acute ATR were post-operatively leg immobilized and prospectively randomized. Patients were allocated for 2 weeks of either adjuvant IPC treatment (n = 74) or treatment-as-usual (n = 74) in a plaster cast without IPC. The IPC group received 6 h daily bilateral calf IPC applied under an orthosis on the injured side. At 2 weeks post-operatively, tendon healing was assessed using microdialysis followed by enzymatic quantification of tendon callus production, procollagen type I (PINP) and type III (PIIINP) N-terminal propeptide, and total protein content. 14 IPC and 19 cast patients (control group) consented to undergo microdialysis. During weeks 3-6, all subjects were leg-immobilized in an orthosis without IPC. At 3 and 12 months, patient-reported outcome was assessed using reliable questionnaires (ATRS and EQ-5D). At 12 months, functional outcome was measured using the validated heel-rise test.

    RESULTS: At 2 weeks post-rupture, the IPC-treated patients exhibited 69% higher levels of PINP in the ruptured Achilles tendon (AT) compared to the control group (p = 0.001). Interestingly, the IPC-treated contralateral, intact AT also demonstrated 49% higher concentrations of PINP compared to the non-treated intact AT of the plaster cast group (p = 0.002). There were no adverse events observed associated with IPC. At 3 and 12 months, no significant (n.s.) differences between the two treatments were observed using patient-reported and functional outcome measures.

    CONCLUSIONS: Adjuvant IPC during limb immobilization in patients with ATR seems to effectively enhance the early healing response by upregulation of collagen type I synthesis, without any adverse effects. Whether prolonged IPC application during the whole immobilization period can also lead to improved long-term clinical healing response should be further investigated. The healing process during leg immobilization in patients with Achilles tendon rupture can be improved through adjuvant IPC therapy, which additionally prevents deep venous thrombosis.

    LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Randomized controlled trial, Level I.

    Nyckelord
    Achilles tendon rupture, Intermittent pneumatic compression devices, Microdialysis, Procollagen, Regeneration
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Kirurgi
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-395017 (URN)10.1007/s00167-017-4621-8 (DOI)28668970 (PubMedID)
    Tillgänglig från: 2019-10-11 Skapad: 2019-10-11 Senast uppdaterad: 2020-02-19Bibliografiskt granskad
    3. Increased mast cell degranulation and co-localization of mast cells with the NMDA receptor-1 during healing after Achilles tendon rupture
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Increased mast cell degranulation and co-localization of mast cells with the NMDA receptor-1 during healing after Achilles tendon rupture
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    2017 (Engelska)Ingår i: Cell and Tissue Research, ISSN 0302-766X, E-ISSN 1432-0878, Vol. 370, nr 3, s. 451-460Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The role of inflammation and the mechanism of tendon healing after rupture has historically been a matter of controversy. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the role of mast cells and their relation to the NMDA receptor-1 (a glutamate receptor) during healing after Achilles tendon rupture. Eight female Sprague Dawley rats had their right Achilles tendon transected. Three weeks after rupture, histological quantification of mast cell numbers and their state of degranulation was assessed by histochemistry. Co-localization of mast cell tryptase (a mast cell marker) and NMDA receptor-1 was determined by immunofluorescence. The intact left Achilles tendon was used as control. An increased number of mast cells and a higher proportion of degranulated mast cells were found in the healing Achilles tendon compared to the intact. In addition, increased co-localization of mast cell tryptase and NMDA receptor-1 was seen in the areas of myotendinous junction, mid-tendon proper and bone tendon junction of the healing versus the intact tendon. These findings introduce a possible role for mast cells in the healing phase after Achilles tendon rupture.

    Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
    Berlin Heidelberg: , 2017
    Nyckelord
    Achilles tendon healing, Mast cells, NMDA, Rats, Tryptase
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Cell- och molekylärbiologi
    Forskningsämne
    Ortopedi; Immunologi
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-395522 (URN)10.1007/s00441-017-2684-y (DOI)000416358400010 ()28975451 (PubMedID)
    Tillgänglig från: 2019-10-20 Skapad: 2019-10-20 Senast uppdaterad: 2020-02-06Bibliografiskt granskad
    4. Glutamate Triggers the Expression of Functional Ionotropic and Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors in Mast Cells
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Glutamate Triggers the Expression of Functional Ionotropic and Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors in Mast Cells
    Visa övriga...
    (Engelska)Manuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Nyckelord
    Glutamate, glutamate receptors, mast cells, NMDA-receptors, tryptase
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Cell- och molekylärbiologi Immunologi inom det medicinska området
    Forskningsämne
    Immunologi; Neurovetenskap
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-394714 (URN)
    Tillgänglig från: 2019-10-09 Skapad: 2019-10-09 Senast uppdaterad: 2019-10-23
  • 10.
    Alim, Md Abdul
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Allmänmedicin och preventivmedicin.
    Grujic, Mirjana
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi.
    Ackerman, Paul W.
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kristiansson, Per
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Allmänmedicin och preventivmedicin.
    Peterson, Magnus
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Allmänmedicin och preventivmedicin.
    Pejler, Gunnar
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Biochemistry, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Glutamate Triggers the Expression of Functional Ionotropic and Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors in Mast CellsManuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 11.
    Al-Shamkhi, Nasrin
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Lungmedicin och allergologi.
    Alving, Kjell
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa, Pediatrik.
    Dahlen, S. E.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Expt Asthma & Allergy Res Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hedlin, G.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Middelveld, R.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Expt Asthma & Allergy Res Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Bjerg, A.
    Univ Gothenburg, Krefting Res Ctr, Dept Internal Med & Clin Nutr, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Ekerljung, L.
    Univ Gothenburg, Krefting Res Ctr, Dept Internal Med & Clin Nutr, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Olin, A. C.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sect Occupat & Environm Med, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, Inst Med,Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Sommar, J.
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med Occupat & Environm Med, Umea, Sweden..
    Forsberg, B.
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med Occupat & Environm Med, Umea, Sweden..
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Lungmedicin och allergologi.
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Klinisk fysiologi.
    Important non-disease-related determinants of exhaled nitric oxide levels in mild asthma - results from the Swedish GA(2)LEN study2016Ingår i: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 46, nr 9, s. 1185-1193Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) has a potential clinical role in asthma management. Constitutive factors such as age, height and gender, as well as individual characteristics, such as IgE sensitization and smoking, affect the levels of FeNO in population-based studies. However, their effect on FeNO in subjects with asthma has been scarcely studied. Objective To study the effects on FeNO of these commonly regarded determinants, as demonstrated in healthy subjects, as well as menarche age and parental smoking, in a population of asthmatics. Material and Methods Fractional exhaled nitric oxide was measured in 557 subjects with asthma from the Swedish GA(2)LEN study. Allergic sensitization was assessed by skin prick tests to most common aeroallergens. Upper airway comorbidities, smoking habits, smoking exposure during childhood and hormonal status (for women) were questionnaire-assessed. Results Male gender (P < 0.001), greater height (P < 0.001) and sensitization to both perennial allergens and pollen (P < 0.001) are related to higher FeNO levels. Current smoking (P < 0.001) and having both parents smoking during childhood, vs. having neither (P < 0.001) or only one parent smoking (P = 0.002), are related to lower FeNO. Women with menarche between 9 and 11 years of age had lower FeNO than those with menarche between 12 and 14 years of age (P = 0.03) or 15 and 17 years of age (P = 0.003). Conclusions and Clinical relevance Interpreting FeNO levels in clinical practice is complex, and constitutional determinants, as well as smoking and IgE sensitisation, are of importance in asthmatic subjects and should be accounted for when interpreting FeNO levels. Furthermore, menarche age and parental smoking during childhood and their effects on lowering FeNO deserve further studies.

  • 12. Amaral, A F S
    et al.
    Minelli, C
    Guerra, S
    Wjst, M
    Probst-Hensch, N
    Pin, I
    Svanes, C
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Lungmedicin och allergologi.
    Heinrich, J
    Jarvis, D L
    The locus C11orf30 increases susceptibility to poly-sensitization2015Ingår i: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 70, nr 3, s. 328-333Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    A number of genetic variants have been associated with allergic sensitization, but whether these are allergen specific or increase susceptibility to poly-sensitization is unknown. Using data from the large multicentre population-based European Community Respiratory Health Survey, we assessed the association between 10 loci and specific IgE and skin prick tests to individual allergens and poly-sensitization. We found that the 10 loci associate with sensitization to different allergens in a nonspecific manner and that one in particular, C11orf30-rs2155219, doubles the risk of poly-sensitization (specific IgE/4 allergens: OR = 1.81, 95% CI 0.80-4.24; skin prick test/4+ allergens: OR = 2.27, 95% CI 1.34-3.95). The association of rs2155219 with higher levels of expression of C11orf30, which may be involved in transcription repression of interferon-stimulated genes, and its association with sensitization to multiple allergens suggest that this locus is highly relevant for atopy.

  • 13.
    Amaral, Andre F. S.
    et al.
    Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Resp Epidemiol Occupat Med & Publ Hlth, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, Emmanuel Kaye Bldg,1B Manresa Rd, London SW3 6LR, England..
    Newson, Roger B.
    Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Resp Epidemiol Occupat Med & Publ Hlth, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, Emmanuel Kaye Bldg,1B Manresa Rd, London SW3 6LR, England.;Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Dept Primary Care & Publ Hlth, Sch Publ Hlth, London, England..
    Abramson, Michael J.
    Monash Univ, Sch Publ Hlth & Prevent Med, Melbourne, Vic 3004, Australia..
    Anto, Josep M.
    Ctr Res Environm Epidemiol CREAL, Barcelona, Spain.;IMIM Hosp del Mar, Med Res Inst, Barcelona, Spain.;UPF, Barcelona, Spain.;CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain..
    Bono, Roberto
    Univ Turin, Dept Publ Hlth & Pediat, Turin, Italy..
    Corsico, Angelo G.
    Univ Pavia, Div Resp Dis, IRCCS Policlin San Matteo Fdn, Via Palestro 3, I-27100 Pavia, Italy..
    de Marco, Roberto
    Univ Verona, Unit Epidemiol & Med Stat, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, I-37100 Verona, Italy..
    Demoly, Pascal
    CHU Montpellier, Dept Pulmonol, Div Allergy, Arnaud de Villeneuve Hosp, Paris, France.;INSERM, EPAR Team, UMR S 1136, Paris, France..
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umea Univ, Div Occupat & Environm Med, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Umea, Sweden..
    Gislason, Thorarinn
    Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland.;Natl Univ Hosp Iceland, Landspitali, Dept Resp Med & Sleep, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Heinrich, Joachim
    Helmholtz Zentrum, Inst Epidemiol 1, Munich, Germany.;Univ Munich, Inst & Outpatient Clin Occupat Social & Environm, Inner City Clin, Univ Hosp Munich, Munich, Germany..
    Huerta, Ismael
    Dept Hlth Asturias, Directorate Gen Publ Hlth, Epidemiol Surveillance Sect, Oviedo, Spain..
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Lungmedicin och allergologi.
    Jogi, Rain
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Lung- allergi- och sömnforskning. Tartu Univ Hosp, Lung Clin, Tartu, Estonia..
    Kim, Jeong-Lim
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publich Hlth & Community Med, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Maldonado, Jose
    Univ Hosp Huelva, Unit Clin Management Pneumol & Allergy, Huelva, Spain..
    Rovira, Jesus Martinez-Moratalla
    Univ Hosp Albacete, Unit Pneumol, Albacete, Spain..
    Neukirch, Catherine
    INSERM, UMR1152, Paris, France.;Univ Paris 07, UMR1152, Paris, France..
    Nowak, Dennis
    Univ Munich, Inst & Outpatient Clin Occupat Social & Environm, Inner City Clin, Univ Hosp Munich, Munich, Germany.;German Ctr Lung Res, Munich, Germany..
    Pin, Isabelle
    CHU Grenoble, Pole Couple Enfants, Pediat, F-38043 Grenoble, France.;Inst Albert Bonniot, INSERM, U823, Grenoble, France.;Univ Grenoble 1, Grenoble, France..
    Probst-Hensch, Nicole
    Swiss Trop & Publ Hlth Inst, Basel, Switzerland.;Univ Basel, Basel, Switzerland..
    Raherison-Semjen, Chantal
    Bordeaux Univ, Inst Publ Hlth & Epidemiol, INSERM, U897, Bordeaux, France..
    Svanes, Cecilie
    Univ Bergen, Ctr Int Hlth, Bergen, Norway.;Haukeland Hosp, Dept Occupat Med, N-5021 Bergen, Norway..
    Landa, Isabel Urrutia
    Galdakao Hosp, Dept Pneumol, Bizkaia, Spain..
    van Ree, Ronald
    Univ Amsterdam, Acad Med Ctr, Dept Expt Immunol, Meibergdreef 9, NL-1105 AZ Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Univ Amsterdam, Acad Med Ctr, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, Meibergdreef 9, NL-1105 AZ Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Versteeg, Serge A.
    Univ Amsterdam, Acad Med Ctr, Dept Expt Immunol, Meibergdreef 9, NL-1105 AZ Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Weyler, Joost
    Univ Antwerp, Epidemiol & Social Med, B-2020 Antwerp, Belgium.;Univ Antwerp, StatUA Stat Ctr, B-2020 Antwerp, Belgium..
    Zock, Jan-Paul
    Ctr Res Environm Epidemiol CREAL, Barcelona, Spain.;UPF, Barcelona, Spain.;CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain..
    Burney, Peter G. J.
    Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Resp Epidemiol Occupat Med & Publ Hlth, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, Emmanuel Kaye Bldg,1B Manresa Rd, London SW3 6LR, England..
    Jarvis, Deborah L.
    Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Resp Epidemiol Occupat Med & Publ Hlth, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, Emmanuel Kaye Bldg,1B Manresa Rd, London SW3 6LR, England..
    Changes in IgE sensitization and total IgE levels over 20 years of follow-up2016Ingår i: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 137, nr 6, s. 1788-1795Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Cross-sectional studies have reported a lower prevalence of sensitization in older adults, but few longitudinal studies have examined whether this is an aging or a year-of-birth cohort effect. Objective: We sought to assess changes in sensitization and total IgE levels in a cohort of European adults as they aged over a 20-year period. Methods: Levels of serum specific IgE to common aeroallergens (house dust mite, cat, and grass) and total IgE levels were measured in 3206 adults from 25 centers in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey on 3 occasions over 20 years. Changes in sensitization and total IgE levels were analyzed by using regression analysis corrected for potential differences in laboratory equipment and by using inverse sampling probability weights to account for nonresponse. Results: Over the 20-year follow-up, the prevalence of sensitization to at least 1 of the 3 allergens decreased from 29.4% to 24.8% (-4.6%; 95% CI, -7.0% to -2.1%). The prevalence of sensitization to house dust mite (-4.3%; 95% CI, -6.0% to -2.6%) and cat (-2.1%; 95% CI, -3.6% to -0.7%) decreased more than sensitization to grass (-0.6%; 95% CI, -2.5% to 1.3%). Age-specific prevalence of sensitization to house dust mite and cat did not differ between year-of-birth cohorts, but sensitization to grass was most prevalent in the most recent ones. Overall, total IgE levels decreased significantly (geometric mean ratio, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.58-0.68) at all ages in all year-of-birth cohorts. Conclusion: Aging was associated with lower levels of sensitization, especially to house dust mite and cat, after the age of 20 years.

  • 14.
    Amin, Kawa
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Lungmedicin och allergologi.
    H Rasool, Aram
    Hattem, Ali
    AM Al-Karboly, Taha
    E Taher, Taher
    Bystrom, Jonas
    Autoantibody profiles in autoimmune hepatitis and chronic hepatitis C identifies similarities in patients with severe disease2017Ingår i: World Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 1007-9327, E-ISSN 2219-2840, Vol. 23, nr 8, s. 1345-1352Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To determine how the auto-antibodies (Abs) profilesoverlap in chronic hepatitis C infection (CHC) andautoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and correlate to liverdisease.METHODS: Levels of antinuclear Ab, smooth muscle antibody (SMA)and liver/kidney microsomal-1 (LKM-1) Ab and markersof liver damage were determined in the sera of 50 patients with CHC infection, 20 AIH patients and 20healthy controls using enzyme linked immunosorbentassay and other immune assays. RESULTS: We found that AIH patients had more severe liverdisease as determined by elevation of total IgG,alkaline phosphatase, total serum bilirubin and serumtransaminases and significantly higher prevalence ofthe three non-organ-specific autoantibodies (auto-Abs)than CHC patients. Antinuclear Ab, SMA and LKM-1 Abwere also present in 36% of CHC patients and relatedto disease severity. CHC cases positive for auto-Abswere directly comparable to AIH in respect of mostmarkers of liver damage and total IgG. These caseshad longer disease duration compared with auto-Abnegative cases, but there was no difference in gender,age or viral load. KLM-1+ Ab CHC cases showed bestoverlap with AIH. CONCLUSION: Auto-Ab levels in CHC may be important markers ofdisease severity and positive cases have a diseasesimilar to AIH. Auto-Abs might have a pathogenic roleas indicated by elevated markers of liver damage.Future studies will unravel any novel associationsbetween these two diseases, whether genetic or other.

  • 15.
    Amin, Kawa
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Lungmedicin och allergologi. Clin Chem & Asthma Res Ctr, Uppsala, Sweden.;Univ Hosp, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Janson, C.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Lungmedicin och allergologi.
    Byström, J.
    Queen Mary Univ London, Barts & London, Harvey Res Inst, Expt Med & Rheumatol William, London, England..
    Role of Eosinophil Granulocytes in Allergic Airway Inflammation Endotypes2016Ingår i: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 84, nr 2, s. 75-85Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Eosinophil granulocytes are intriguing members of the innate immunity system that have been considered important defenders during parasitic diseases as well as culprits during allergy-associated inflammatory diseases. Novel studies have, however, found new homoeostasis-maintaining roles for the cell. Recent clinical trials blocking different Th2 cytokines have uncovered that asthma is heterogeneous entity and forms different characteristic endotypes. Although eosinophils are present in allergic asthma with early onset, the cells may not be essential for the pathology. The cells are, however, likely disease causing in asthma with a late onset, which is often associated with chronic rhinosinusitis. Assessment of eosinophilia, fraction exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) and periostin are markers that have emerged useful in assessing and monitoring asthma severity and endotype. Current scientific knowledge suggests that eosinophils are recruited by the inflammatory environment, activated by the innate interleukin (IL)-33 and prevented from apoptosis by both lymphocytes and innate immune cells such as type two innate immune cells. Eosinophils contain four specific granule proteins that exhibit an array of toxic and immune-modulatory activates. The granule proteins can be released by different mechanisms. Additionally, eosinophils contain a number of inflammatory cytokines and lipid mediators as well as radical oxygen species that might contribute to the disease both by the recruitment of other cells and the direct damage to supporting cells, leading to exacerbations and tissue fibrosis. This review aimed to outline current knowledge how eosinophils are recruited, activated and mediate damage to tissues and therapies used to control the cells.

  • 16.
    Andersen, M.
    et al.
    North Denmark Reg Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, Bispensgade 37, DK-9800 Hjorring, Denmark.;Aalborg Univ, Dept Hlth Sci & Technol, Aalborg, Denmark..
    Nagaev, I.
    Umea Univ, Dept Clin Microbiol, Div Clin Immunol, Umea, Sweden..
    Meyer, M. K.
    Aalborg Univ, Dept Hlth Sci & Technol, Aalborg, Denmark.;North Denmark Reg Hosp, Ctr Clin Sci, Hjorring, Denmark..
    Nagaeva, O.
    Umea Univ, Dept Clin Microbiol, Div Clin Immunol, Umea, Sweden..
    Wikberg, Jarl E. S.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Farmaceutiska fakulteten, Institutionen för farmaceutisk biovetenskap.
    Mincheva-Nilsson, L.
    Umea Univ, Dept Clin Microbiol, Div Clin Immunol, Umea, Sweden..
    Andersen, G. N.
    North Denmark Reg Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, Bispensgade 37, DK-9800 Hjorring, Denmark.;Aalborg Univ, Dept Clin Med, Aalborg, Denmark..
    Melanocortin 2, 3 and 4 Receptor Gene Expressions are Downregulated in CD8(+) T Cytotoxic Lymphocytes and CD19(+) B Lymphocytes in Rheumatoid Arthritis Responding to TNF-alfa Inhibition2017Ingår i: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 86, nr 1, s. 31-39Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Melanocortin signalling in leucocyte subsets elicits anti-inflammatory and immune tolerance inducing effects in animal experimental inflammation. In man, however, the effects of melanocortin signalling in inflammatory conditions have scarcely been examined. We explored the differential reactions of melanocortin 1-5 receptors (MC1-5R) gene expressions in pathogenetic leucocyte subsets in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to treatment with TNF- inhibitor adalimumab. Seven patients with active RA donated blood at start and at 3-month treatment. CD4(+) T helper (h) lymphocytes (ly), CD8(+) T cytotoxic (c) ly, CD19(+) B ly and CD14(+) monocytes were isolated, using immunomagnetic beads, total RNA extracted and reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) performed. Fold changes in MC1-5R, Th1-, inflammatory- and regulatory cytokine gene expressions were assessed for correlation. Six patients responded to adalimumab treatment, while one patient was non-responder. In all lymphocyte subtypes, MC1-5R gene expressions decreased in responders and increased in the non-responder. In responders, decrease in MC2R, MC3R and MC4R gene expressions in CD8(+) Tc and CD19(+) B ly was significant. Fold change in MC1-5R and IFN gene expressions correlated significantly in CD8(+) Tc ly, while fold change in MC1R, MC3R and MC5R and IL-1 gene expressions correlated significantly in CD4(+) Th ly. Our results show regulation of MC2R, MC3R and MC4R gene expressions in CD8(+) Tc ly and CD19(+) B ly. The correlations between fold change in different MCRs and disease driving cytokine gene expressions in CD8(+) Tc ly and CD4(+) Th ly point at a central immune modulating function of the melanocortin system in RA.

  • 17. Andersson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Henriksson, Sara
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi.
    Magnusson, Karl-Eric
    Nilsson, Mats
    Mirazimi, Ali
    In situ rolling circle amplification detection of Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) complementary and viral RNA2012Ingår i: Virology, ISSN 0042-6822, E-ISSN 1096-0341, Vol. 426, nr 2, s. 87-92Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a human pathogen that causes a severe disease with high fatality rate for which there is currently no specific treatment. Knowledge regarding its replication cycle is also highly limited. In this study we developed an in situ technique for studying the different stages during the replication of CCHFV. By integrating reverse transcription, padlock probes, and rolling circle amplification, we were able to detect and differentiate between viral RNA (vRNA) and complementary RNA (cRNA) molecules, and to detect viral protein within the same cell. These data demonstrate that CCHFV nucleocapsid protein (NP) is detectable already at 6 hours post infection in vRNA- and cRNA-positive cells. Confocal microscopy showed that cRNA is enriched and co-localized to a large extent with NP in the perinuclear area, while vRNA has a more random distribution in the cytoplasm with only some co-localize with NP. However, vRNA and cRNA did not appear to co-localize directly. 

  • 18.
    Andersson, Jonas
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för onkologi, radiologi och klinisk immunologi.
    Complement Activation Triggered by Biomaterial Surfaces: Mechanisms and Regulation2003Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Today there are a vast number of medical devices in temporary or permanent contact with human tissues. Blood-biomaterial contact is known to trigger the complement system and results in generation of fluid phase anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a, and surface-bound C3b and iC3b. All these products together are able to attract and activate leukocytes and trigger release of inflammatory mediators leading to a systemic inflammation indirectly causing hemostatic problems and even organ failure. The aim of this study was to identify how complement is triggered on a biomaterial surface and to find ways to regulate this activation.

    The finding that complement activation on biomaterials can be divided into initiation and amplification will facilitate regulation of complement activation biomaterial surfaces. This concept is also compatible with the two techniques to regulate complement activation on a surface.

    Delarbeten
    1. Complement activation on a model biomaterial surface: Binding of C3b via the alternative pathway amplification loop to plasma proteins adsorbed to the surface
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Complement activation on a model biomaterial surface: Binding of C3b via the alternative pathway amplification loop to plasma proteins adsorbed to the surface
    Manuskript (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-90375 (URN)
    Tillgänglig från: 2003-04-24 Skapad: 2003-04-24 Senast uppdaterad: 2010-01-13Bibliografiskt granskad
    2. C3 Adsorbed to a Polymer Surface Can Form an Initiating Alternative Pathway Convertase
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>C3 Adsorbed to a Polymer Surface Can Form an Initiating Alternative Pathway Convertase
    Visa övriga...
    2002 Ingår i: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, Vol. 168, nr 11, s. 5786-5791Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-90376 (URN)
    Tillgänglig från: 2003-04-24 Skapad: 2003-04-24Bibliografiskt granskad
    3. Binding of a model regulator of complement activation (RCA) to a biomaterial surface: surface-bound factor H inhibits complement activation
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Binding of a model regulator of complement activation (RCA) to a biomaterial surface: surface-bound factor H inhibits complement activation
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    2001 Ingår i: Biomaterials, ISSN 0142-9612, Vol. 22, nr 17, s. 2435-2443Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-90377 (URN)
    Tillgänglig från: 2003-04-24 Skapad: 2003-04-24Bibliografiskt granskad
    4. Optimal heparin surface concentration and antithrombin binding capacity as evaluated with human non-anticoagulated blood in vitro
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Optimal heparin surface concentration and antithrombin binding capacity as evaluated with human non-anticoagulated blood in vitro
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    2003 (Engelska)Ingår i: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research, ISSN 0021-9304, E-ISSN 1097-4636, Vol. 67, nr 2, s. 458-466Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Contact between blood and a biomaterial surface takes place in many applications and is known to activate the coagulation and complement systems. Heparin surface coatings have been shown to reduce blood activation upon contact with artificial surfaces. To establish the optimal heparin surface concentration, blood was incubated in a tubing loop model at 37 degrees C. The tubing was coated with different surface concentrations of heparin and rotated at three different velocities. We demonstrate that the blood compatibility of a surface with regard to coagulation, complement, and platelet activation can be improved by increasing the heparin surface concentration in the 6-12 pmol antithrombin/cm2 concentration interval. The binding of factor H is not influenced by the increased heparin surface concentration, suggesting that this factor is not the primary regulator of complement on heparin surfaces. In addition, the heparin coating has no effect on the complement activation that occurs on gas surfaces in extracorporeal circuits.

    Nationell ämneskategori
    Medicin och hälsovetenskap
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-90378 (URN)10.1002/jbm.a.10104 (DOI)14566786 (PubMedID)
    Tillgänglig från: 2003-04-24 Skapad: 2003-04-24 Senast uppdaterad: 2017-12-14Bibliografiskt granskad
  • 19.
    Andrén, Maria
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för genetik och patologi.
    The Role of Fc Gamma Receptors in Experimental Arthritis2004Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Induction of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), an animal model for human rheumatoid arthritis, is dependent on anti-collagen type II (CII) antibodies. The effector mechanism by which autoantibodies contribute to inflammatory reactions in autoimmune diseases is not well understood. In this thesis I have studied the effector pathways used by IgG anti-CII antibodies to initiate arthritis, namely the IgG Fc receptors (FcγRs) and the complement system. We have found that FcγRIII is crucial for development of CIA, as CII-immunized mice lacking this receptor do not develop arthritis and IgG1 and IgG2b anti-CII antibodies require FcγRIII to trigger arthritis when transferred to naïve mice. The antibody-mediated arthritis was further enhanced in mice deficient in the inhibitory FcγRIIB, indicating that FcγRIIB regulates the activation of FcγRIII. Furthermore, we demonstrate that FcγRIII exist as three distinct haplotypes in mice, FcγRIII:H, FcγRIII:V and FcγRIII:T. Mice expressing the FcγRIII:H haplotype are more susceptible to CIA than mice expressing the FcγRIII:V haplotype, indicating that certain FcγRIII haplotype predisposes for CIA. We also show that the most likely FcγRIII-expressing effector cell in CIA is the macrophage, since FcγRIII-expressing macrophages exclusively can induce arthritis in FcγRIII-deficient mice challenged for CIA.

    The complement system was also investigated in development of CIA. We found that this effector pathway is also necessary for onset of arthritis, as CIA was inhibited by treatment with anti-complement factor 5 (C5) antibodies. C5-deficient mice could neither develop CIA unless provided with C5-containing sera.

    Taken together, the work presented in this thesis indicates that FcγRs and the complement system are crucial for the induction of experimental arthritis. These findings are important for understanding the mechanisms behind rheumatoid arthritis and blocking of these effector pathways may in the future be used as treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Delarbeten
    1. Expression of FcγRIII is required for development of collagen-induced arthritis
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Expression of FcγRIII is required for development of collagen-induced arthritis
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    2002 Ingår i: European Journal of Immunology, Vol. 32, s. 2915-2922Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-92480 (URN)
    Tillgänglig från: 2005-01-14 Skapad: 2005-01-14Bibliografiskt granskad
    2. FcγRIII-expressing macrophages are essential for the development of collagen-induced arthritis
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>FcγRIII-expressing macrophages are essential for the development of collagen-induced arthritis
    Manuskript (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-92481 (URN)
    Tillgänglig från: 2005-01-14 Skapad: 2005-01-14 Senast uppdaterad: 2010-01-13Bibliografiskt granskad
    3. Induction of arthritis by single monoclonal IgG anti-collagen type II antibodies and enhancement of arthritis in mice lacking inhibitory FcγRIIB
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Induction of arthritis by single monoclonal IgG anti-collagen type II antibodies and enhancement of arthritis in mice lacking inhibitory FcγRIIB
    Visa övriga...
    2003 Ingår i: European Journal of Immunology, Vol. 33, s. 2269-2277Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-92482 (URN)
    Tillgänglig från: 2005-01-14 Skapad: 2005-01-14Bibliografiskt granskad
    4. IgG Fc receptor polymorphisms and C5 influence susceptibility to collagen-induced arthritis
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>IgG Fc receptor polymorphisms and C5 influence susceptibility to collagen-induced arthritis
    Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Submitted
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-92483 (URN)
    Tillgänglig från: 2005-01-14 Skapad: 2005-01-14Bibliografiskt granskad
  • 20.
    Ardesjö Lundgren, Brita
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Rorsman, Fredrik
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Portela-Gomes, Guida M.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för genetik och patologi.
    Grimelius, Lars
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för genetik och patologi.
    Ekdahl, Kristina Nilsson
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för onkologi, radiologi och klinisk immunologi, Enheten för klinisk immunologi.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för onkologi, radiologi och klinisk immunologi, Enheten för klinisk immunologi.
    Ekwall, Olov
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Identification of complement C3 as an autoantigen in inflammatory bowel disease2010Ingår i: European Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepathology, ISSN 0954-691X, E-ISSN 1473-5687, Vol. 22, nr 4, s. 429-436Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Autoantibodies against goblet cells in the gastrointestinal mucosa have been described in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) but a corresponding autoantigen has not yet been identified. The aim of this study was to identify such an antigen. METHODS: First, 10 candidate autoantigens were discarded based on double stainings of appendiceal sections and a mucin-producing cell line (HT29-mtx). Second, an appendiceal cDNA library was immunoscreened with IBD sera. RESULTS: Three out of 48 positive clones were identified as complement C3. Using immunoprecipitation of in vitro transcribed and translated C3, seven of 17 primary sclerosing cholangitis patient sera, 15 of 65 IBD sera, and none out of 54 sera from healthy blood donors showed C3 immunoreactivity. The results were confirmed using western blot and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with alternative sources of C3 protein. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, we have identified complement C3 as a potential autoantigen in IBD and primary sclerosing cholangitis.

  • 21. Arkema, Elizabeth V
    et al.
    Jonsson, Jerker
    Baecklund, Eva
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Reumatologi.
    Bruchfeld, Judith
    Feltelius, Nils
    Askling, Johan
    Are patients with rheumatoid arthritis still at an increased risk of tuberculosis and what is the role of biological treatments?2015Ingår i: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 74, nr 6, s. 1212-1217Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the risk of tuberculosis (TB) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) both with and without exposure to biological therapy and to directly compare the risks between therapies.

    METHODS: Data from the Swedish National Population Registers, Tuberculosis Register and the Swedish Biologics Register were used to conduct a prospective population-based national cohort study (2002-2011). We estimated the rate of incident TB in the general population and in a cohort of biological-naïve and biological-exposed patients diagnosed with RA. Cox models were used to estimate HRs with particular attention to risks by calendar and follow-up time and individual biologics.

    RESULTS: Compared to the general population, RA patients not exposed to biologicals had a fourfold increased risk of TB (HR 4.2; 95% CI 2.7 to 6.7), which did not decline over calendar time. In contrast, the risk of TB in the biological-exposed RA population decreased since 2002 compared with biological-naïve; from HR=7.9 (95% CI 3.3 to 18.9) in 2002-2006 to HR=2.4 (95% CI 0.9 to 6.1) in 2007-2011. The HRs for most recent exposure to adalimumab and infliximab compared with etanercept were 3.1 (95% CI 0.8 to 12.5) and 2.7 (95% CI 0.7 to 10.9), respectively, and the HR for etanercept compared with biological-naïve RA was 1.7 (95% CI 0.6 to 4.6).

    CONCLUSIONS: In the past decade, the risk of TB has decreased among biological-exposed RA patients but remains higher than in biological-naïve RA patients. Most cases of TB in RA occur in biological-naïve RA patients, underscoring the elevated risk also in these patients.

  • 22.
    Arnberg, Filip K.
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för neurovetenskap, Psykiatri, Akademiska sjukhuset. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Kunskapscentrum för katastrofpsykiatri. Stockholm Univ, Stress Res Inst, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lekander, Mats
    Stockholm Univ, Stress Res Inst, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Osher Ctr Integrat Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Morey, Jennifer N.
    Univ Kentucky, Dept Psychol, 125 Kastle Hall, Lexington, KY 40506 USA..
    Segerstrom, Suzanne C.
    Univ Kentucky, Dept Psychol, 125 Kastle Hall, Lexington, KY 40506 USA..
    Self-rated health and interleukin-6: Longitudinal relationships in older adults2016Ingår i: Brain, behavior, and immunity, ISSN 0889-1591, E-ISSN 1090-2139, Vol. 54, s. 226-232Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Both self-rated health (SRH) and inflammation are implicated in chronic diseases and premature mortality. Better SRH is associated with lower proinflammatory cytokines, but there is little evidence about whether this relationship is more stable or dynamic. Objective: To study the between- and within-person associations between SRH and IL-6. Methods: Older adults (N = 131; M-age = 75 years) rated their health and provided blood samples for analysis of IL-6 at separate occasions every 6 months over a period up to 5 years. Age, sex, BMI, neuroticism, and statin use were examined as covariates in multilevel models. Results: In bivariate models, better SRH, lower BMI, younger age, and female sex correlated with lower IL-6. In multilevel models, stable SRH (between-person differences; p < .001) but not dynamic SRH (within-person changes; p = .93) correlated with IL-6. The stable relationship persisted with demographic and health covariates in the model. Conclusions: Better stable SRH but not dynamic SRH was robustly associated with lower IL-6 among older adults, lending support to previous cross-sectional findings on the relation between inflammatory markers and SRH. The findings suggest that trait-like mechanisms, rather than changes over a time scale of 6-month waves, govern this association. To further investigate the mechanisms behind the SRH-IL-6 association, studies with different measurement frequencies, higher within-person variability, and experimental approaches are warranted.

  • 23. Attarha, Sanaz
    et al.
    Roy, Ananya
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi, Neuroonkologi. Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Biomed Sci & Vet Publ Hlth, Box 7028, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Westermark, Bengt
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi, Neuroonkologi.
    Tchougounova, Elena
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi, Neuroonkologi.
    Mast cells modulate proliferation, migration and sternness of glioma cells through downregulation of GSK3 beta expression and inhibition of STAT3 activation2017Ingår i: Cellular Signalling, ISSN 0898-6568, E-ISSN 1873-3913, Vol. 37, s. 81-92Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Glioblastoma (GBM) heterogeneity is the main obstacle to efficient treatment due to the existence of sub population of cells with increased tumorigenicity and network of tumor associated parenchymal cells in the tumor microenvironment. We previously demonstrated that mast cells (MCs) infiltrate mouse and human gliomas in response to variety of signals in a glioma grade-dependent manner. However, the role of MCs in glioma development and the mechanisms behind MCs-glioma cells interaction remain unidentified. In the present study, we show that MCs upon activation by glioma cells produce soluble factors including IL-6, which are documented to be involved in cancer-related activities. We observe 'tumor educated' MCs decrease glioma cell proliferation and migration, reduce self-renewal capacity and expression of stemness markers but in turn promote glioma cell differentiation. 'Tumor educated' MC derived mediators exert these effects via inactivation of STAT3 signaling pathway through GSK3 beta down-regulation. We identified 'tumor educated' MC derived IL-6 as one of the contributors among the complex mixture of MCs mediators, to be partially involved in the observed MC induced biological effect on glioma cells. Thus, MC mediated abolition of STAT3 signaling hampers glioma cell proliferation and migration by suppressing their stemness and inducing differentiation via down-regulation of GSK3 beta expression. Targeting newly identified inflammatory MC-STAT3 axis could contribute to patient tailored therapy and unveil potential future therapeutic opportunities for patients.

  • 24. Ayoglu, Burcu
    et al.
    Chaouch, Amina
    Lochmueller, Hanns
    Politano, Luisa
    Bertini, Enrico
    Spitali, Pietro
    Hiller, Monika
    Niks, Eric H.
    Gualandi, Francesca
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi, Molekylär och morfologisk patologi. Uppsala universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bushby, Kate
    Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke
    Schwartz, Elena
    Le Priol, Yannick
    Straub, Volker
    Uhlen, Mathias
    Cirak, Sebahattin
    't Hoen, Peter A. C.
    Muntoni, Francesco
    Ferlini, Alessandra
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Szigyarto, Cristina Al-Khalili
    Affinity proteomics within rare diseases: a BIO-NMD study for blood biomarkers of muscular dystrophies2014Ingår i: EMBO Molecular Medicine, ISSN 1757-4676, E-ISSN 1757-4684, Vol. 6, nr 7, s. 918-936Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the recent progress in the broad-scaled analysis of proteins in body fluids, there is still a lack in protein profiling approaches for biomarkers of rare diseases. Scarcity of samples is the main obstacle hindering attempts to apply discovery driven protein profiling in rare diseases. We addressed this challenge by combining samples collected within the BIO-NMD consortium from four geographically dispersed clinical sites to identify protein markers associated with muscular dystrophy using an antibody bead array platform with 384 antibodies. Based on concordance in statistical significance and confirmatory results obtained from analysis of both serum and plasma, we identified eleven proteins associated with muscular dystrophy, among which four proteins were elevated in blood from muscular dystrophy patients: carbonic anhydrase III (CA3) and myosin light chain 3 (MYL3), both specifically expressed in slow-twitch muscle fibers and mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase 2 (MDH2) and electron transfer flavo-protein A (ETFA). Using age-matched sub-cohorts, 9 protein profiles correlating with disease progression and severity were identified, which hold promise for the development of new clinical tools for management of dystrophinopathies.

  • 25.
    Babiker, Adil A.
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för onkologi, radiologi och klinisk immunologi, Enheten för klinisk immunologi. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Klinisk kemi.
    Ronquist, Gunnar
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Klinisk kemi.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för onkologi, radiologi och klinisk immunologi, Enheten för klinisk immunologi.
    Nilsson Ekdahl, Kristina
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för onkologi, radiologi och klinisk immunologi, Enheten för klinisk immunologi.
    Prostasome Involvement in the Development and Growth of Prostate Cancer2010Ingår i: The Open Prostate Cancer Journal, ISSN 1876-8229, Vol. 3, s. 1-13Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Prostasomes are extracellularly occurring submicron, membrane-surrounded organelles produced by the epithelial cells of the prostate and present in semen after secretion. Even dedifferentiated prostate cancer cells have preserved their ability to produce and export prostasomes to the extracellular space. The precise physiological role of prostasomes is not known, although some of their properties assign them to important physiological and patho-physiological functions that could be exploited in prostate cancer growth and development. In this review, some new properties of seminal and malignant cell line (DU145, PC-3 and LNCaP) prostasomes will be discussed.

    There are typical differences in the expressions and activities of prostasomal CD59, ATPase, protein kinases and tissue factor (TF) as well as in the transfer of prostasomal CD59 to CD59-deficient erythrocytes (rabbit and human PNH erythrocytes). CD59, protein kinases and TF exhibit characteristic patterns of overexpression by malignant cell prostasomes. A high ATPase activity is recognized on seminal prostasomes with minimal activity on malignant cell prostasomes resulting in more residual ATP available for phosphorylation reactions. Several proteins are phosphorylated by prostasomal protein kinases, namely, complement component C3, fibrinogen, vitronectin and E-cadherin. Furthermore, TF is identified as the main endogenous phosphorylation substrate on prostasomes. In addition, prothrombotic effects of prostasomes are demonstrated. DU145 and PC-3 cell-derived prostasomes exert a higher clotting effect on whole blood and plasma compared to LNCaP cell-derived and seminal prostasomes.

    In conclusion, malignant cell prostasomes show an increased ability to interact with the biological system in favor of prostate cancer cell promotion and survival. The roles played by prostasomes in this context may improve the understanding of the mechanisms that help the prostate cancer cells to avoid the complement attack (CD59 transfer and phosphorylation and inactivation of C3), to promote angiogenesis (TF) and to metastasize. It may also provide a better understanding of some of the complications usually seen in some terminal prostate cancer patients like thrombotic events and tendency to develop disseminated intravascular coagulation.

  • 26.
    Babiker, Adil Abdelgadir
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för onkologi, radiologi och klinisk immunologi.
    Prostasome Modulation of Blood Cascade System and Phosphoprotein Reactions with Focus on Prostate Cancer2005Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Prostasomes are extracellularly occurring submicron, membrane-surrounded organelles produced by the epithelial cells of the prostate and present in semen. Their precise physiological role is not known, although some of their properties assign them to important physiological and patho-physiological functions. In this thesis, some new properties of seminal and malignant cell line (DU145, PC-3 and LNCaP) prostasomes have been identified.

    Differences in the expressions and activities of prostasomal CD59, ATPase, protein kinases and tissue factor (TF) have been characterized. The transfer of prostasomal CD59 to CD59-deficient erythrocytes (rabbit and human PNH erythrocytes) has been established. CD59, protein kinases and TF were overexpressed by malignant cell prostasomes. ATPase activity was highest on seminal prostasomes with minimal expression by malignant cell prostasomes resulting in more residual ATP available for phosphorylation reactions. Several proteins were phosphorylated by prostasomal protein kinases, viz. complement component C3, fibrinogen, vitronectin and E-cadherin. Furthermore, TF was identified as the main endogenous phosphorylation substrate on prostasomes. In addition, prothrombotic effects of prostasomes were established. DU145 and PC-3-derived prostasomes exerted a higher clotting effect on whole blood and plasma compared to LNCaP and seminal prostasomes.

    In conclusion, malignant cell prostasomes showed higher ability to interact with the biological system in favor of prostate cancer cell promotion and survival. The roles played by prostasomes in this context may improve the understanding of the mechanisms that help the prostate cancer cells to avoid the complement attack (CD59 transfer and phosphorylation of C3), to promote angiogenesis (TF) and to metastasize. It may also provide a better understanding of some of the complications usually seen in some terminal prostate cancer patients like thrombotic events and tendency to develop disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    Delarbeten
    1. Transfer of prostasomal CD59 to CD59-deficient red blood cells results in protection against complement mediated hemolysis
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Transfer of prostasomal CD59 to CD59-deficient red blood cells results in protection against complement mediated hemolysis
    2002 Ingår i: Am J Reprod Immunol, ISSN 8755-8920, Vol. 47, nr 3, s. 183-192Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-93003 (URN)
    Tillgänglig från: 2005-05-03 Skapad: 2005-05-03Bibliografiskt granskad
    2. Transfer of functional prostasomal CD59 of metastatic prostatic cancer cell origin protects cells against complement attck
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Transfer of functional prostasomal CD59 of metastatic prostatic cancer cell origin protects cells against complement attck
    Visa övriga...
    2005 (Engelska)Ingår i: The Prostate, ISSN 0270-4137, E-ISSN 1097-0045, Vol. 62, nr 2, s. 105-114Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Prostasomes are secretory granules produced, stored, and released, by the glandular epithelial cells of the prostate. They express the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored complement regulatory protein CD59, which has been shown to be transferred to spermatozoa and erythrocytes.

    METHODS: The CD59 content of prostasomes isolated from seminal fluid and malignant prostate cells (PC-3, DU145, and LNCaP) and the transfer of prostasomal CD59 to rabbit erythrocytes (RE) and to PIPLC-treated and unmanipulated cancer cells were investigated using FACS. All prostasomes were also incubated with RE and tested in a hemolytic assay.

    RESULTS: Prostasomes from cancer cells had higher expression of CD59 than those of normal cells. Prostasomal CD59 of different origin could be transferred to RE, malignant cell lines stripped of CD59 by PIPLC, or unmanipulated LNCaP cells. Malignant cell prostasomes had an increased ability to inhibit complement-mediated lysis compared to those from non-malignant cells.

    CONCLUSIONS: These results point to a novel mechanism by which prostasomes can protect prostatic malignant cells from complement attack.

    Nationell ämneskategori
    Medicin och hälsovetenskap
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-93004 (URN)10.1002/pros.20102 (DOI)15389819 (PubMedID)
    Tillgänglig från: 2005-05-03 Skapad: 2005-05-03 Senast uppdaterad: 2019-12-14Bibliografiskt granskad
    3. Overexpression of ecto-protein kinases in prostasomes of metastatic cell origin
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Overexpression of ecto-protein kinases in prostasomes of metastatic cell origin
    2006 (Engelska)Ingår i: The Prostate, ISSN 0270-4137, E-ISSN 1097-0045, Vol. 66, nr 7, s. 675-686Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Prostasomes are secretory granules produced, stored, and released by the glandular epithelial cells of the prostate. They express numerous enzymes whose physiological roles have so far not been fully evaluated. In this study, we investigated the expression and function of prostasomal protein kinases and ATPase.

    METHODS:

    The protein kinase activities of prostasomes isolated from seminal fluid and malignant prostate cell lines (PC-3, DU145, and LNCaP) were investigated using the model phosphorylation substrates histone and casein, as well as the plasma proteins C3 and fibrinogen, in combination with specific protein kinase inhibitors. The prostasomal ATPase activity was also evaluated. The expression of protein kinases and ATPase on prostasomes was verified by flow cytometry.

    RESULTS:

    Prostasomes (intact or solubilized with octylglucoside or saponin) from prostate cancer cells had higher expression of protein kinases A, C, and casein kinase II compared to prostasomes isolated from seminal plasma, resulting in higher phosphorylation of both exogenous and endogenous substrates. Using intact prostasomes, it was found that prostasomes of metastatic origin had lower ATPase activity, resulting in higher residual ATP available for the phosphorylation reaction. Finally, complement component C3 and fibrinogen (two proteins whose activities are modulated by phosphorylation) were identified as physiologically relevant phosphorylation substrates.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    These results indicate that prostasomes are capable of modifying proteins possibly involved in the innate response by extracellular phosphorylation mediated by ecto-kinases. This is a novel mechanism by which prostatic malignant cells may interact with their environment.

    Nationell ämneskategori
    Medicin och hälsovetenskap
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-93005 (URN)10.1002/pros.20268 (DOI)16425202 (PubMedID)
    Tillgänglig från: 2005-05-03 Skapad: 2005-05-03 Senast uppdaterad: 2019-12-14Bibliografiskt granskad
    4. Prothrombotic effect of prostasomes of metastatic cell and seminal origin
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Prothrombotic effect of prostasomes of metastatic cell and seminal origin
    Visa övriga...
    2007 (Engelska)Ingår i: The Prostate, ISSN 0270-4137, E-ISSN 1097-0045, Vol. 67, nr 4, s. 378-388Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND. Prostasomes are secretory granules produced by the glandular epithelial cells of the prostate. Seminal prostasomes contain high amounts of Tissue Factor (TF) but no studies of TF on malignant cell prostasomes have been made. Here we compare the expression, phosphorylation, and function of TF on prostasomes of different origin. METHODS. TF was detected on prostasomes isolated from seminal fluid and human prostate cancer cell lines (PC-3, DU145, and LNCaP) using FACS and enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Incubation of prostasomes with radioactive ATP under conditions favoring protein kinase A activity led to phosphorylation of TF as detected by immunoprecipitation and SDS-PAGE. The prothrombotic effect of prostasomes was investigated in whole blood and recalcified plasma. Blocking experiments were performed using anti-TF antibodies and corn trypsin inhibitor. RESULTS. TF was expressed on all tested prostasome preparations with lowest values found for seminal ones. Prostasomal TF was the main endogenous substrate for prostasomal protein kinase A. All tested prostasome preparations greatly enhanced the rate of clot formation in a dose-dependent fashion, that is, the clotting capability of prostasomes seemed to be related to the extent of their expression of TF. In addition, the density of the clot varied between different prostasome preparations. When incubated in whole blood, prostasomes were found to associate to WBC thereby inducing them to express and release TF. CONCLUSIONS. These data show that TF is overexpressed and also subjected to phosphorylation by malignant cell prostasomes. This suggests major roles for prostasomes in thrombotic events that occur in some advanced cases of prostate cancer.

    Nyckelord
    Coagulation, Prostasomes, Prostate cancer, Tissue factor
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Medicin och hälsovetenskap
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-93006 (URN)10.1002/pros.20497 (DOI)000244510000005 ()17219380 (PubMedID)
    Tillgänglig från: 2005-05-03 Skapad: 2005-05-03 Senast uppdaterad: 2019-12-14Bibliografiskt granskad
  • 27.
    Baecklund, Eva
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Reumatologi.
    Backlin, Carin
    Iliadou, Anastasia
    Granath, Fredrik
    Ekbom, Anders
    Amini, Rose-Marie
    Feltelius, Nils
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Sundström, Christer
    Klareskog, Lars
    Askling, Johan
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Diffuse large B-cell lymphomas in rheumatoid arthritis display a predominance of non-germinal center typeManuskript (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract
  • 28.
    Baecklund, Eva
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Reumatologi.
    Ekbom, Anders
    Sparén, Pär
    Feltelius, Nils
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Klareskog, Lars
    Disease activity and risk of lymphoma in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: nested case-control study1998Ingår i: British Medical Journal, Vol. 317, s. 180-181Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 29.
    Baecklund, Eva
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Reumatologi.
    Sundström, Christer
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för genetik och patologi.
    Ekbom, Anders
    Catrina, Anca
    Biberfeld, Peter
    Feltelius, Nils
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Klareskog, Lars
    Lymphoma subtypes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: Increased proportion of diffuse large B cell lymphoma2003Ingår i: Arthritis & Rheumatism, Vol. 48, nr 6, s. 1543-1550Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 30.
    Barbu, Andreea
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi, Klinisk immunologi.
    Hamad, Osama A.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi, Klinisk immunologi.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Kardiovaskulär epidemiologi.
    Ekdahl, Kristina Nilsson
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi, Klinisk immunologi.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi, Klinisk immunologi.
    The role of complement factor C3 in lipid metabolism2015Ingår i: Molecular Immunology, ISSN 0161-5890, E-ISSN 1872-9142, Vol. 67, nr 1, s. 101-107Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Abundant reports have shown that there is a strong relationship between C3 and C3a-desArg levels, adipose tissue, and risk factors for cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome and diabetes. The data indicate that complement components, particularly C3, are involved in lipid metabolism. The C3 fragment, C3a-desArg, functions as a hormone that has insulin-like effects and facilitates triglyceride metabolism. Adipose tissue produces and regulates the levels of complement components, which promotes generation of inflammatory initiators such as the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. The anaphylatoxins trigger a cyto/chemokine response in proportion to the amount of adipose tissue present, and induce inflammation and mediate metabolic effects such as insulin resistance. These observations support the concept that complement is an important participant in lipid metabolism and in obesity, contributing to the metabolic syndrome and to the low-grade inflammation associated with obesity.

  • 31.
    Bartlett, Stephen T.
    et al.
    Univ Maryland, Sch Med, Dept Surg, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA..
    Markmann, James F.
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Div Transplantat, Boston, MA 02114 USA..
    Johnson, Paul
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Surg Sci, Oxford, England.;Univ Oxford, Oxford Ctr Diabet Endocrinol & Metab, Oxford, England..
    Korsgren, Olle
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi, Klinisk immunologi.
    Hering, Bernhard J.
    Univ Minnesota, Dept Surg, Schulze Diabet Inst, Box 242 UMHC, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA..
    Scharp, David
    Prodo Labs LLC, Irvine, CA USA.;Scharp Lacy Res Inst, Irvine, CA USA..
    Kay, Thomas W. H.
    St Vincents Hosp, St Vincents Inst Med Res, Dept Med, Fitzroy, Vic 3065, Australia.;Univ Melbourne, Melbourne, Vic 3010, Australia..
    Bromberg, Jonathan
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Div Transplantat, Boston, MA 02114 USA..
    Odorico, Jon S.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Surg, Sch Med & Publ Hlth, Div Transplantat, Madison, WI USA..
    Weir, Gordon C.
    Joslin Diabet Ctr, Boston, MA 02215 USA.;Harvard Univ, Sch Med, Boston, MA USA..
    Bridges, Nancy
    NIAID, NIH, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Kandaswamy, Raja
    Univ Minnesota, Dept Surg, Schulze Diabet Inst, Box 242 UMHC, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA..
    Stock, Peter
    Univ San Francisco, Med Ctr, Div Transplantat, San Francisco, CA 94117 USA..
    Friend, Peter
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Surg Sci, Oxford, England.;Univ Oxford, Oxford Ctr Diabet Endocrinol & Metab, Oxford, England..
    Gotoh, Mitsukazu
    Fukushima Med Univ, Dept Surg, Fukushima, Japan..
    Cooper, David K. C.
    Univ Pittsburgh, Thomas E Starzl Transplantat Inst, Pittsburgh, PA USA..
    Park, Chung-Gyu
    Seoul Natl Univ, Coll Med, Dept Biomed Sci, Xenotransplantat Res Ctr,Dept Microbiol & Immunol, Seoul, South Korea..
    O'Connell, Phillip
    Univ Sydney, Westmead Hosp, Westmead Millennium Inst, Ctr Transplant & Renal Res, Westmead, NSW 2145, Australia..
    Stabler, Cherie
    Univ Miami, Sch Med, Diabet Res Inst, Coral Gables, FL 33124 USA..
    Matsumoto, Shinichi
    Natl Ctr Global Hlth & Med, Tokyo, Japan.;Otsuka Pharmaceut Factory Inc, Naruto, Japan..
    Ludwig, Barbara
    Tech Univ Dresden, Dept Med 3, D-01062 Dresden, Germany.;Tech Univ Dresden, Univ Clin Carl Gustav Carus, Helmholtz Ctr, Paul Langerhans Inst Dresden, Dresden, Germany.;DZD German Ctr Diabet Res, Dresden, Germany..
    Choudhary, Pratik
    Kings Coll London, Weston Educ Ctr, Diabet Res Grp, London WC2R 2LS, England..
    Kovatchev, Boris
    Univ Virginia, Ctr Diabet Technol, Charlottesville, VA USA..
    Rickels, Michael R.
    Univ Penn, Dept Med, Perelman Sch Med, Div Endocrinol Diabet & Metab, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA..
    Sykes, Megan
    Coulmbia Univ, Med Ctr, Columbia Ctr Translat Immunol, New York, NY USA..
    Wood, Kathryn
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Surg Sci, Oxford, England.;Univ Oxford, Oxford Ctr Diabet Endocrinol & Metab, Oxford, England..
    Kraemer, Kristy
    NIAID, NIH, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Hwa, Albert
    Juvenile Diabet Res Fdn, New York, NY USA..
    Stanley, Edward
    Murdoch Childrens Res Inst, Parkville, Vic, Australia.;Monash Univ, Melbourne, Vic 3004, Australia..
    Ricordi, Camillo
    Univ Miami, Sch Med, Diabet Res Inst, Coral Gables, FL 33124 USA..
    Zimmerman, Mark
    BetaLogics, Raritan, NJ USA..
    Greenstein, Julia
    Juvenile Diabet Res Fdn, Discovery Res, New York, NY USA..
    Montanya, Eduard
    Univ Barcelona, Hosp Univ Bellvitge, CIBERDEM, Bellvitge Biomed Res Inst IDIBELL, Barcelona, Spain..
    Otonkoski, Timo
    Univ Helsinki, Childrens Hosp, Helsinki, Finland.;Univ Helsinki, Biomedicum Stem Cell Ctr, Helsinki, Finland..
    Report from IPITA-TTS Opinion Leaders Meeting on the Future of beta-Cell Replacement2016Ingår i: Transplantation, ISSN 0041-1337, E-ISSN 1534-6080, Vol. 100, s. S1-S44Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 32.
    Baygan, Arjang
    et al.
    Translational Cell Therapy Research Group (TCR), Division of Therapeutic Immunology, Department of LabMed, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Aronsson-Kurttila, Wictor
    Translational Cell Therapy Research Group (TCR), Division of Therapeutic Immunology, Department of LabMed, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Moretti, Gianluca
    Translational Cell Therapy Research Group (TCR), Division of Therapeutic Immunology, Department of LabMed, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tibert, Babylonia
    Translational Cell Therapy Research Group (TCR), Division of Therapeutic Immunology, Department of LabMed, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dahllöf, Göran
    Department of Dental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Klingspor, Lena
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Klinisk mikrobiologi. Department of Microbiology, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Britt
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa, Forskargrupper (Inst. för kvinnor och barns hälsa), Barnneurologi/Barnonkologi.
    Khoein, Bita
    Translational Cell Therapy Research Group (TCR), Division of Therapeutic Immunology, Department of LabMed, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Moll, Guido
    Translational Cell Therapy Research Group (TCR), Division of Therapeutic Immunology, Department of LabMed, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hausmann, Charlotta
    Center for Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation, Department of Pathology/Oncology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Svahn, Britt-Marie
    Translational Cell Therapy Research Group (TCR), Division of Therapeutic Immunology, Department of LabMed, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Westgren, Magnus
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Remberger, Mats
    Center for Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation, Department of Pathology/Oncology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sadeghi, Behnam
    Translational Cell Therapy Research Group (TCR), Division of Therapeutic Immunology, Department of LabMed, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ringden, Olle
    Translational Cell Therapy Research Group (TCR), Division of Therapeutic Immunology, Department of LabMed, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Safety and Side Effects of Using Placenta-Derived Decidual Stromal Cells for Graft-versus-Host Disease and Hemorrhagic Cystitis2017Ingår i: Frontiers in Immunology, ISSN 1664-3224, E-ISSN 1664-3224, Vol. 8, artikel-id 795Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are increasingly used in regenerate medicine. Placenta-derived decidual stromal cells (DSCs) are a novel therapy for acute graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) and hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). DSCs are more immunosuppressive than MSCs. We assessed adverse events and safety using DSCs among 44 treated patients and 40 controls. The median dose of infused cells was 1.5 (range 0.9–2.9) × 106 DSCs/kg. The patients were given 2 (1–5) doses, with a total of 82 infusions. Monitoring ended 3 months after the last DSC infusion. Three patients had transient reactions during DSC infusion. Laboratory values, hemorrhages, and transfusions were similar in the two groups. The frequency of leukemic relapse (2/2, DSC/controls) and invasive fungal infections (6/6) were the same in the two groups. Causes of death were those seen in HSCT patients: infections (5/3), respiratory failure (1/1), circulatory failure (3/1), thromboembolism (1/0), multiorgan failure (0/1), and GVHD and others (2/7). One-year survival for the DSC patients with GVHD was 67%, which was significantly better than achieved previously at our center. One-year survival was 90% in the DSC-treated HC group. DSC infusions appear safe. Randomized studies are required to prove efficacy.

  • 33. Belov, Katherine
    et al.
    Hellman, Lars
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för cell- och molekylärbiologi. Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för cell- och molekylärbiologi, Molekylär immunologi. Molekylär immunologi.
    Immunoglobulin genetics of Ornithorhynchus anatinus (platypus) and Tachyglossus aculeatus (short-beaked echidna).2003Ingår i: Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol, ISSN 1095-6433, Vol. 136, nr 4, s. 811-9Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 34. Belov, Katherine
    et al.
    Lam, Mary K P
    Hellman, Lars
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för cell- och molekylärbiologi. Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för cell- och molekylärbiologi, Molekylär immunologi. Molekylär immunologi.
    Colgan, Donald J
    Evolution of the major histocompatibility complex: Isolation of class II beta cDNAs from two monotremes, the platypus and the short-beaked echidna.2003Ingår i: Immunogenetics, ISSN 0093-7711, Vol. 55, nr 6, s. 402-11Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 35. Bentham, James
    et al.
    Morris, David L
    Cunninghame Graham, Deborah S
    Pinder, Christopher L
    Tombleson, Philip
    Behrens, Timothy W
    Martín, Javier
    Fairfax, Benjamin P
    Knight, Julian C
    Chen, Lingyan
    Replogle, Joseph
    Syvänen, Ann-Christine
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Molekylär medicin. Uppsala universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Rönnblom, Lars
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Reumatologi. Uppsala universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Graham, Robert R
    Wither, Joan E
    Rioux, John D
    Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E
    Vyse, Timothy J
    Genetic association analyses implicate aberrant regulation of innate and adaptive immunity genes in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus2015Ingår i: Nature Genetics, ISSN 1061-4036, E-ISSN 1546-1718, Vol. 47, nr 12, s. 1457-1464Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a genetically complex autoimmune disease characterized by loss of immune tolerance to nuclear and cell surface antigens. Previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) had modest sample sizes, reducing their scope and reliability. Our study comprised 7,219 cases and 15,991 controls of European ancestry, constituting a new GWAS, a meta-analysis with a published GWAS and a replication study. We have mapped 43 susceptibility loci, including ten new associations. Assisted by dense genome coverage, imputation provided evidence for missense variants underpinning associations in eight genes. Other likely causal genes were established by examining associated alleles for cis-acting eQTL effects in a range of ex vivo immune cells. We found an over-representation (n = 16) of transcription factors among SLE susceptibility genes. This finding supports the view that aberrantly regulated gene expression networks in multiple cell types in both the innate and adaptive immune response contribute to the risk of developing SLE.

  • 36. Berg, Aase
    et al.
    Otterdal, Karl
    Patel, Sam
    Gonca, Miguel
    David, Catarina
    Dalen, Ingvild
    Nymo, Stig
    Nilsson, Margareta
    Nordling, Sofia
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi.
    Magnusson, Peetra
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi.
    Ueland, Thor
    Prato, Mauro
    Giribaldi, Giuliana
    Mollnes, Tom Eirik
    Aukrust, Pål
    Langeland, Nina
    Nilsson, Per
    Complement Activation Correlates With Disease Severity and Contributes to Cytokine Responses in Plasmodium falciparum Malaria2015Ingår i: The Internet Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1528-8366, Vol. 212, nr 11, s. 1835-1840Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The impact of complement activation and its possible relation to cytokine responses during malaria pathology was investigated in plasma samples from patients with confirmed Plasmodium falciparum malaria and in human whole-blood specimens stimulated with malaria-relevant agents ex vivo. Complement was significantly activated in the malaria cohort, compared with healthy controls, and was positively correlated with disease severity and with certain cytokines, in particular interleukin 8 (IL-8)/CXCL8. This was confirmed in ex vivo-stimulated blood specimens, in which complement inhibition significantly reduced IL-8/CXCL8 release. P. falciparum malaria is associated with systemic complement activation and complement-dependent release of inflammatory cytokines, of which IL-8/CXCL8 is particularly prominent.

  • 37.
    Bergfelt, Emma
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Hematologi.
    Kozlowski, Piotr
    Ahlberg, Lucia
    Hulegardh, Erik
    Hagglund, Hans
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Hematologi.
    Karlsson, Karin
    Markuszewska-Kuczymska, Alicja
    Tomaszewska-Toporska, Beata
    Smedmyr, Bengt
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Hematologi.
    Astrom, Maria
    Amini, Rose-Marie
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi.
    Hallböök, Hélene
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Hematologi.
    Satisfactory outcome after intensive chemotherapy with pragmatic use of minimal residual disease (MRD) monitoring in older patients with Philadelphia-negative B cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: a Swedish registry-based study2015Ingår i: Medical Oncology, ISSN 1357-0560, E-ISSN 1559-131X, Vol. 32, nr 4, artikel-id 135Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The introduction of minimal residual disease (MRD) monitoring, in the Swedish national guidelines for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, was evaluated in 35 patients aged 46-79 years (median 61), who were diagnosed from 2007 to 2011 and treated with high-intensity, block-based chemotherapy (ABCDV/VABA induction). Both a high complete remission rate (91 %) and acceptable overall survival (OS) rate (47 %) at 5 years were achieved. MRD by flow cytometry was measured in 73 % of the patients reaching complete remission after the first course, but was omitted by the clinicians for eight patients who were either over 70 years of age or already met conventional high-risk criteria. Factors negatively influencing OS were age over 65 years and WHO status >= 2. MRD < 0.1 % after induction had positive impact on continuous complete remission but not on OS. Only five patients were allocated to allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation in first remission, mainly due to conventional high risk factors. Thus, use of intensive remission induction therapy is effective in a selection of older patients. In a population for whom the possibilities of treatment escalation are limited, the optimal role of MRD monitoring remains to be determined.

  • 38.
    Berglund, David
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi, Klinisk immunologi. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Transplantationskirurgi.
    Preparatory Studies to Introduce Regulatory T Cells in Clinical Transplantation2014Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Solid organ transplantation has evolved from being an experimental procedure to a life-saving treatment for patients with end-stage organ failure. The risk of losing a transplant due to acute rejection is very low with the use of modern immunosuppressive protocols and the short-term results are impressive. However, long-term outcomes are suboptimal and transplant recipients are at increased risks for severe complications such as cancers, opportunistic infections and cardiovascular events. The previous struggle to achieve short-term survival has turned into a search for new strategies to improve patient and transplant longevity.

    Regulatory T cells (TRegs), a subset of T cells, occur naturally in the immune system and have the capacity to down regulate immune responses. Under normal conditions they maintain self-tolerance and prevent excessive immune activation. Functional TReg defects lead to a massive autoimmune response and are not compatible with life. Preclinical data support that TRegs can be used as a cell therapy to prevent transplant rejection, with the potential to minimize the need for traditional immunosuppression and improve the long-term outcome.

    This thesis aims to enhance the translation of TReg cell therapy to clinical organ transplantation. In particular, strategies for isolation and expansion of TRegs from uremic patients awaiting kidney transplantation have been assessed. A non-invasive imaging technique to study T cell products after intravenous administration was developed, for use in future clinical trials. The performance of a novel cell purification technique was investigated to potentially improve the clinical production of TRegs.

    The thesis demonstrates that TRegs can be isolated and expanded from uremic patients to display potent suppressive properties in vitro. The mode of isolation and expansion affect the functional characteristics, where cells purified with cytometry based techniques and expanded with mature dendritic cells were the most advantageous. T cells can be labeled using the radioactive tracer [111In]oxine with preserved viability and subsequently followed in vivo with SPECT/CT for more than 1 week after intravenous administration. The use of microfluidic switch technology offers a novel way of purifying TRegs at high speed, purity and viability, under conditions compatible with clinical use.

    Delarbeten
    1. Isolation, expansion and functional assessment of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells and Tr1 cells from uremic patients awaiting kidney transplantation
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Isolation, expansion and functional assessment of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells and Tr1 cells from uremic patients awaiting kidney transplantation
    Visa övriga...
    2012 (Engelska)Ingår i: Transplant Immunology, ISSN 0966-3274, E-ISSN 1878-5492, Vol. 26, nr 1, s. 27-33Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The immunosuppressive properties of regulatory T cells have emerged as an attractive tool for the development of immunotherapies in various disease contexts, e.g. to treat transplantation induced immune reactions. This paper focuses on the process of obtaining and functionally characterizing CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells and Tr1 cells from uremic patients awaiting kidney transplantation.

    Methods: From October 2010 to March 2011 uremic patients awaiting living donor kidney transplantation, and their corresponding kidney donors, were enrolled in the study. A total of seven pairs were included. Isolation of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells was performed by magnetic activated cell sorting of peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from the uremic patients. Donor specific Tr1 cells were differentiated by repetitive stimulation of immature CD4+ T cells with immature dendritic cells, with the T cells coming from the future kidney recipients and the dendritic cells from the corresponding kidney donors. Cells were then expanded and functionally characterized by the one-way mixed leukocyte reaction and assessment of IL-10 production. Phenotypic analysis was performed by flow cytometry.

    Results: The fraction of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells after expansion varied from 39.1 to 50.4% and the cells retained their ability to substantially suppress the mixed leukocyte reaction in all but one patient (3.8–19.2% of the baseline stimulated leukocyte activity, p<0.05). Tr1 cells were successfully differentiated from all but one patient and produced high levels of IL-10 when stimulated with immature dendritic cells (1,275–11,038% of the baseline IL-10 secretion, pb0.05).

    Conclusion: It is practically feasible to obtain and subsequently expand CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells and Tr1 cells from uremic patients without loss of function as assessed by in vitro analyses. This forms a base for adoptive regulatory T cell therapy in the setting of living donor kidney transplantation.

    Nationell ämneskategori
    Immunologi inom det medicinska området
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-170517 (URN)10.1016/j.trim.2011.09.003 (DOI)000300203800004 ()
    Tillgänglig från: 2012-03-13 Skapad: 2012-03-12 Senast uppdaterad: 2018-01-12Bibliografiskt granskad
    2. Obtaining regulatory T cells from uraemic patients awaiting kidney transplantation for use in clinical trials
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Obtaining regulatory T cells from uraemic patients awaiting kidney transplantation for use in clinical trials
    Visa övriga...
    2013 (Engelska)Ingår i: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, ISSN 0009-9104, E-ISSN 1365-2249, Vol. 173, nr 2, s. 310-322Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Adoptive transfer of regulatory T cells (Tregs) has been proposed for use as a cellular therapy to induce transplantation tolerance. Preclinical data are encouraging, and clinical trials with Treg therapy are anticipated. In this study, we investigate different strategies for the isolation and expansion of CD4+CD25highCD127low Tregs from uraemic patients. We use allogeneic dendritic cells (DCs) as feeder cells for the expansion and compare Treg preparations isolated by either fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) or magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) that have been expanded subsequently with either mature or tolerogenic DCs. Expanded Treg preparations have been characterized by their purity, cytokine production and in-vitro suppressive ability. The results show that Treg preparations can be isolated from uraemic patients by both FACS and MACS. Also, the type of feeder cells used in the expansion affects both the purity and the functional properties of the Treg preparations. In particular, FACS-sorted Treg preparations expanded with mature DCs secrete more interleukin (IL)-10 and granzyme B than FACS-sorted Treg preparations expanded with tolerogenic DCs. This is a direct comparison between different isolation techniques and expansion protocols with Tregs from uraemic patients that may guide future efforts to produce clinical-grade Tregs for use in kidney transplantation.

    Nationell ämneskategori
    Kirurgi
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-199952 (URN)10.1111/cei.12112 (DOI)000321287500016 ()23607776 (PubMedID)
    Tillgänglig från: 2013-05-17 Skapad: 2013-05-17 Senast uppdaterad: 2017-12-06Bibliografiskt granskad
    3. Imaging the in vivo fate of human T cells following transplantation in immunoincompetent mice - Implications for clinical cell therapy trials
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Imaging the in vivo fate of human T cells following transplantation in immunoincompetent mice - Implications for clinical cell therapy trials
    Visa övriga...
    2013 (Engelska)Ingår i: Transplant Immunology, ISSN 0966-3274, E-ISSN 1878-5492, Vol. 29, nr 1-4, s. 105-108Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Many forms of adoptive T cell therapy are on the verge of being translated to the clinic. To gain further insight in their immunomodulating functions and to optimize future clinical trials it is essential to develop techniques to study their homing capacity. CD4+ T cells were labeled using [In-111]oxine, and the radioactive uptake was determined in vitro before intravenous injection in immunodeficient mice. In vivo biodistribution of [In-111] oxine-labeled cells or tracer alone was subsequently measured by mu SPECT/CT and organ distribution. CD4+ T cells incorporated [In-111]oxine with higher labeling yield using Ringer-Acetate compared to 0.9% NaCl. Cellular viability after labeling with [In-111]oxine was not compromised using less than 0.4 MBq/million cells. After intravenous infusion CD4+ T cells preferentially homed to the liver (p < 0.01) and spleen (p < 0.05). This study presents a protocol for labeling of T cells by [In-111]oxine with preserved viability and in vivo tracking by SPECT for up to 8 days, which can easily be translated to clinical cell therapy trials. 

    Nyckelord
    T cell, In vivo imaging, Cell therapy, SPECT/CT
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Medicin och hälsovetenskap
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-216763 (URN)10.1016/j.trim.2013.09.009 (DOI)000329145600018 ()
    Tillgänglig från: 2014-01-24 Skapad: 2014-01-24 Senast uppdaterad: 2017-12-06Bibliografiskt granskad
    4. Purification of regulatory T cells with the use of a fully enclosed high-speed microfluidic system
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Purification of regulatory T cells with the use of a fully enclosed high-speed microfluidic system
    Visa övriga...
    2014 (Engelska)Ingår i: Cytotherapy, ISSN 1465-3249, E-ISSN 1477-2566, Vol. 16, nr 10, s. 1384-1389Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background aims. Despite promising advances in cellular therapies, it will be difficult to fully test or implement new therapies until advances are made in the processes for cell preparation. This study describes the use of an advanced prototype of a flow-cytometry cell purification system constructed for operation in a clinical environment to prepare regulatory T cells defined as CD4(+)/CD25(bright)/CD127(neg/low). Methods. The sort performance of the Gigasort system was directly compared with available droplet sorters using mixtures of highly fluorescent and non-fluorescent 5-mu m polystyrene particles. CD4(+)-enriched cell preparations were processed with the use of a sterile, disposable fluid handling unit with a chip containing parallel microfluidic-based sorters. Results. Similar purity and sort efficiency as found with droplet sorters were obtained with the 24-channel chip sorter system. Starting with 450 million fresh peripheral blood mononuclear cells, 150,000 to 1.7 million cells that were, on average, 85% FoxP3-positive and 97% viable, were obtained in <4 h. Conclusions. This study presents a technology adapted to regulatory requirements for clinical cell purification and that achieves high throughput and cell-friendly conditions by use of a microfluidic chip with 24 parallel microsorters, providing a rapid, sterile method of purifying regulatory T cells accurately and with excellent viability.

    Nationell ämneskategori
    Immunologi inom det medicinska området
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-220872 (URN)10.1016/j.jcyt.2014.05.016 (DOI)000342396800007 ()
    Tillgänglig från: 2014-03-21 Skapad: 2014-03-21 Senast uppdaterad: 2018-01-11Bibliografiskt granskad
  • 39.
    Berglund, David
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Transplantationskirurgi.
    Bengtsson, Mats
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för onkologi, radiologi och klinisk immunologi.
    Biglarnia, Alireza
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Transplantationskirurgi.
    Berglund, Erik
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för genetik och patologi.
    Yamamoto, Shinji
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Transplantationskirurgi.
    von Zur-Mühlen, Bengt
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Transplantationskirurgi.
    Lorant, Tomas
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Transplantationskirurgi.
    Tufveson, Gunnar
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Transplantationskirurgi.
    Screening of mortality in transplant patients using an assay for immune function2011Ingår i: Transplant Immunology, ISSN 0966-3274, E-ISSN 1878-5492, Vol. 24, nr 4, s. 246-250Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: So far, the ImmuKnow Immune Cell Function Assay (Cylex, Inc., Columbia, MD, USA) has been used to assess risks of infection and rejection in transplant patients. We hypothesized that the ImmuKnow assay might be used for mortality screening in transplant patients overall. METHODS: In the period of February 2007 to December 2009, at the Uppsala University Hospital, 362 patients who received either kidney, kidney+pancreas, kidney+islet cells, liver or liver+kidney allografts were randomly screened using the ImmuKnow assay. All causes of mortality were compared between two groups: patients with at least one ImmuKnow assay below 175ng/mL and patients with all ImmuKnow assays from 175ng/mL and above. Subsequently, the frequency of rejection within thirty days of the ImmuKnow assay was compared between these two groups. RESULTS: The study included 1031 ImmuKnow assays obtained from the 362 patients. A total of 111 patients had at least one ImmuKnow below 175ng/mL and 251 patients had all their ImmuKnow assays from 175ng/mL and above. By January 31st 2010, 16 of 111 patients (14.4%) with at least one ImmuKnow assay below 175ng/mL were deceased, compared to 13 of 251 patients (5.2%) with all ImmuKnow assays from 175ng/mL and above (p=0.0053, Fisher's exact test). There was no difference in the frequency of rejection between the two groups (19.8% versus 17.5%, p=0.66). CONCLUSIONS: In addition to assessing relative risks of infection and rejection in transplant patients, the ImmuKnow assay may be used to identify patients with increased risk of short-term mortality. Transplant patients being highly overimmunosuppressed as assessed by the ImmuKnow assay do not seem to have a lower risk of short-term rejection.

  • 40.
    Berglund, David
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Transplantationskirurgi. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi, Klinisk immunologi.
    Korsgren, Olle
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi, Klinisk immunologi.
    Lorant, Tomas
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Transplantationskirurgi.
    Schneider, Karin
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi, Klinisk immunologi.
    Tufveson, Gunnar
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Transplantationskirurgi.
    Carlsson, Björn
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi, Klinisk immunologi.
    Isolation, expansion and functional assessment of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells and Tr1 cells from uremic patients awaiting kidney transplantation2012Ingår i: Transplant Immunology, ISSN 0966-3274, E-ISSN 1878-5492, Vol. 26, nr 1, s. 27-33Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The immunosuppressive properties of regulatory T cells have emerged as an attractive tool for the development of immunotherapies in various disease contexts, e.g. to treat transplantation induced immune reactions. This paper focuses on the process of obtaining and functionally characterizing CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells and Tr1 cells from uremic patients awaiting kidney transplantation.

    Methods: From October 2010 to March 2011 uremic patients awaiting living donor kidney transplantation, and their corresponding kidney donors, were enrolled in the study. A total of seven pairs were included. Isolation of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells was performed by magnetic activated cell sorting of peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from the uremic patients. Donor specific Tr1 cells were differentiated by repetitive stimulation of immature CD4+ T cells with immature dendritic cells, with the T cells coming from the future kidney recipients and the dendritic cells from the corresponding kidney donors. Cells were then expanded and functionally characterized by the one-way mixed leukocyte reaction and assessment of IL-10 production. Phenotypic analysis was performed by flow cytometry.

    Results: The fraction of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells after expansion varied from 39.1 to 50.4% and the cells retained their ability to substantially suppress the mixed leukocyte reaction in all but one patient (3.8–19.2% of the baseline stimulated leukocyte activity, p<0.05). Tr1 cells were successfully differentiated from all but one patient and produced high levels of IL-10 when stimulated with immature dendritic cells (1,275–11,038% of the baseline IL-10 secretion, pb0.05).

    Conclusion: It is practically feasible to obtain and subsequently expand CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells and Tr1 cells from uremic patients without loss of function as assessed by in vitro analyses. This forms a base for adoptive regulatory T cell therapy in the setting of living donor kidney transplantation.

  • 41.
    Berglund, David
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi, Klinisk immunologi.
    Lindvall, Pernilla
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi.
    Lubenow, Norbert
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi, Klinisk immunologi.
    Green plasma2015Ingår i: Transfusion, ISSN 0041-1132, E-ISSN 1537-2995, Vol. 55, nr 2, s. 245-245Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 42.
    Bergström, Joakim
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi.
    A Search for the Masked Mechanism Behind IgG-Mediated Suppression of Antibody Responses2017Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Antibodies passively administered together with their specific antigen can enhance or suppress the specific antibody response. This phenomenon is known as antibody feedback regulation. Whether this modulation causes up- or downregulation of the antibody response depends both on the antibody isotype and the antigen used. IgG antibodies passively administered together with particulate antigens, e.g. erythrocytes, can completely prevent the induction of an antibody response to the antigen. The suppressive capacity of IgG has been routinely used in the clinic since the 1960’s in RhD-prophylaxis to prevent hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. Although studied for decades, the underlying mechanism of IgG-suppression has remained elusive. The main focus of this thesis has been to elucidate the mechanism behind IgG-suppression of antibody responses in vivo in mouse models using intravenous immunization with specific IgG together with native or haptenated sheep red blood cells, SRBC. We show that IgG-suppression of IgM and long-term serum IgG-responses operates independently of activating FcγRI, III, IV, or the inhibitory FcγRIIB, thus confirming and extending previous findings. Moreover, we demonstrate for the first time that C1q, C3 and CR1/2 are dispensable for IgG-suppression of antibody responses. These findings strongly argue against the involvement of Fc-dependent mechanisms as the explanation for IgG-suppression. Interestingly, GC formation occurs in IgG-suppressed mice although the antibody response to surface SRBC epitopes are completely suppressed. The data suggests that these GCs develop in response to intracellular SRBC epitopes as well as to the passively administered suppressive IgG. Moreover, we demonstrate that passively administered IgG suppresses several parameters of an antibody/B cell response including antigen specific GC and non-GC B cells, extra-follicular antibody secreting cells, long-lived plasma cells and induction of immunological memory. Before the onset of the present study, two mechanisms appeared compatible with the majority of experimental findings: IgG-mediated antigen clearance and epitope masking. Herein we show that the contribution of IgG-mediated antigen clearance is negligible and that suppression of IgG-responses is strictly epitope specific. This provides compelling evidence that a very important mechanism underlying IgG-suppression is epitope masking.

    Delarbeten
    1. IgG Suppresses Antibody Responses in Mice Lacking C1q, C3, Complement Receptors 1 and 2, or IgG Fc-Receptors.
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>IgG Suppresses Antibody Responses in Mice Lacking C1q, C3, Complement Receptors 1 and 2, or IgG Fc-Receptors.
    2015 (Engelska)Ingår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, nr 11Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Antigen-specific IgG antibodies, passively administered to mice or humans together with large particulate antigens like erythrocytes, can completely suppress the antibody response against the antigen. This is used clinically in Rhesus prophylaxis, where administration of IgG anti-RhD prevents RhD-negative women from becoming immunized against RhD-positive fetal erythrocytes aquired transplacentally. The mechanisms by which IgG suppresses antibody responses are poorly understood. We have here addressed whether complement or Fc-receptors for IgG (FcγRs) are required for IgG-mediated suppression. IgG, specific for sheep red blood cells (SRBC), was administered to mice together with SRBC and the antibody responses analyzed. IgG was able to suppress early IgM- as well as longterm IgG-responses in wildtype mice equally well as in mice lacking FcγRIIB (FcγRIIB knockout mice) or FcγRI, III, and IV (FcRγ knockout mice). Moreover, IgG was able to suppress early IgM responses equally well in mice lacking C1q (C1qA knockout mice), C3 (C3 knockout mice), or complement receptors 1 and 2 (Cr2 knockout mice) as in wildtype mice. Owing to the previously described severely impaired IgG responses in the complement deficient mice, it was difficult to assess whether passively administered IgG further decreased their IgG response. In conclusion, Fc-receptor binding or complement-activation by IgG does not seem to be required for its ability to suppress antibody responses to xenogeneic erythrocytes.

    Nationell ämneskategori
    Mikrobiologi inom det medicinska området
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-270784 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0143841 (DOI)000365889800078 ()26619292 (PubMedID)
    Forskningsfinansiär
    Vetenskapsrådet, K2012-57X-07492-25-6
    Tillgänglig från: 2016-01-04 Skapad: 2016-01-04 Senast uppdaterad: 2018-01-10Bibliografiskt granskad
    2. Development of germinal centers in mice immunized with IgG anti-SRBC and SRBC in spite of a completely suppressed SRBC-specific antibody response
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Development of germinal centers in mice immunized with IgG anti-SRBC and SRBC in spite of a completely suppressed SRBC-specific antibody response
    (Engelska)Manuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Immunologi inom det medicinska området
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-317476 (URN)
    Tillgänglig från: 2017-03-15 Skapad: 2017-03-15 Senast uppdaterad: 2018-01-13
    3. Epitope-Specific Suppression of IgG Responses by Passively Administered Specific IgG: Evidence of Epitope Masking
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Epitope-Specific Suppression of IgG Responses by Passively Administered Specific IgG: Evidence of Epitope Masking
    2017 (Engelska)Ingår i: Frontiers in Immunology, ISSN 1664-3224, E-ISSN 1664-3224, Vol. 8, artikel-id 238Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Specific IgG, passively administered together with particulate antigen, can completely prevent induction of antibody responses to this antigen. The ability of IgG to suppress antibody responses to sheep red blood cells (SRBCs) is intact in mice lacking Fc gamma Rs, complement factor 1q, C3, or complement receptors 1 and 2, suggesting that Fc-dependent effector functions are not involved. Two of the most widely discussed explanations for the suppressive effect are increased clearance of IgG-antigen complexes and/or that IgG "hides" the antigen from recognition by specific B cells, so-called epitope masking. The majority of data on how IgG induces suppression was obtained through studies of the effects on IgM-secreting single spleen cells during the first week after immunization. Here, we show that IgG also suppresses antigen-specific extrafollicular antibody-secreting cells, germinal center B-cells, longlived plasma cells, long-term IgG responses, and induction of memory antibody responses. IgG anti-SRBC reduced the amount of SRBC in the spleens of wild-type, but not of Fc gamma R-deficient mice. However, no correlation between suppression and the amount of SRBC in the spleen was observed, suggesting that increased clearance does not explain IgG-mediated suppression. Instead, we found compelling evidence for epitope masking because IgG anti-NP administered with NP-SRBC suppressed the IgG anti-NP, but not the IgG anti-SRBC response. Vice versa, IgG anti-SRBC administered with NP-SRBC, suppressed only the IgG anti-SRBC response. In conclusion, passively transferred IgG suppressed all measured parameters of an antigen-specific antibody/B cell response and an important mechanism of action is likely to be epitope masking.

    Nationell ämneskategori
    Immunologi inom det medicinska området
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-317472 (URN)10.3389/fimmu.2017.00238 (DOI)000395546800001 ()28321225 (PubMedID)
    Forskningsfinansiär
    Vetenskapsrådet
    Tillgänglig från: 2017-03-15 Skapad: 2017-03-15 Senast uppdaterad: 2018-01-13Bibliografiskt granskad
  • 43. Bergström, Joakim J E
    et al.
    Heyman, Birgitta
    Development of germinal centers in mice immunized with IgG anti-SRBC and SRBC in spite of a completely suppressed SRBC-specific antibody responseManuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 44.
    Bergström, Joakim J. E.
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi.
    Xu, Hui
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi.
    Heyman, Birgitta
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi.
    IgG-mediated Immune Suppression: Discrepancy between Suppression of Antibody and Germinal Center Responses?2014Ingår i: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 80, nr 3, s. 210-210Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 45.
    Bergström, Joakim
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi.
    Xu, Hui
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi.
    Heyman, Birgitta
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi.
    Epitope-Specific Suppression of IgG Responses by Passively Administered Specific IgG: Evidence of Epitope Masking2017Ingår i: Frontiers in Immunology, ISSN 1664-3224, E-ISSN 1664-3224, Vol. 8, artikel-id 238Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Specific IgG, passively administered together with particulate antigen, can completely prevent induction of antibody responses to this antigen. The ability of IgG to suppress antibody responses to sheep red blood cells (SRBCs) is intact in mice lacking Fc gamma Rs, complement factor 1q, C3, or complement receptors 1 and 2, suggesting that Fc-dependent effector functions are not involved. Two of the most widely discussed explanations for the suppressive effect are increased clearance of IgG-antigen complexes and/or that IgG "hides" the antigen from recognition by specific B cells, so-called epitope masking. The majority of data on how IgG induces suppression was obtained through studies of the effects on IgM-secreting single spleen cells during the first week after immunization. Here, we show that IgG also suppresses antigen-specific extrafollicular antibody-secreting cells, germinal center B-cells, longlived plasma cells, long-term IgG responses, and induction of memory antibody responses. IgG anti-SRBC reduced the amount of SRBC in the spleens of wild-type, but not of Fc gamma R-deficient mice. However, no correlation between suppression and the amount of SRBC in the spleen was observed, suggesting that increased clearance does not explain IgG-mediated suppression. Instead, we found compelling evidence for epitope masking because IgG anti-NP administered with NP-SRBC suppressed the IgG anti-NP, but not the IgG anti-SRBC response. Vice versa, IgG anti-SRBC administered with NP-SRBC, suppressed only the IgG anti-SRBC response. In conclusion, passively transferred IgG suppressed all measured parameters of an antigen-specific antibody/B cell response and an important mechanism of action is likely to be epitope masking.

  • 46.
    Bergström, Marcus
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi, Klinisk immunologi.
    Joly, A. -L
    Seiron, P.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi, Klinisk immunologi.
    Isringhausen, S.
    Modig, E.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi, Klinisk immunologi.
    Fellström, Bengt
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Njurmedicin.
    Andersson, J.
    Berglund, David
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Transplantationskirurgi.
    Immunological Profiling of Haemodialysis Patients and Young Healthy Individuals with Implications for Clinical Regulatory T Cell Sorting2015Ingår i: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 81, nr 5, s. 318-324Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    With the increasing interest in clinical trials with regulatory T cells (Tregs), immunological profiling of prospective target groups and standardized procedures for Treg isolation are needed. In this study, flow cytometry was used to assess peripheral blood lymphocyte profiles of young healthy individuals and patients undergoing haemodialysis treatment. Tregs obtained from the former may be used in haematopoietic stem cell transplantation and Tregs from the latter in the prevention of kidney transplant rejection. FOXP3 mRNA expression with accompanying isoform distribution was also assessed by the quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Flow-cytometric gating strategies were systematically analysed to optimize the isolation of Tregs. Our findings showed an overall similar immunological profile of both cohorts in spite of great differences in both age and health. Analysis of flow-cytometric gating techniques highlighted the importance of gating for both CD25high and CD127low expression in the isolation of FOXP3-positive cells. This study provides additional insight into the immunological profile of young healthy individuals and uraemic patients as well as in-depth analysis of flow-cytometric gating strategies for Treg isolation, supporting the development of Treg therapy using cells from healthy donors and uraemic patients.

  • 47.
    Bhandage, Amol K.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för neurovetenskap, Fysiologi.
    Glutamate and GABA signalling components in the human brain and in immune cells2016Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are the principal excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters in the central nervous system (CNS). They both can activate their ionotropic and metabotropic receptors. Glutamate activates ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGlu - AMPA, kainate and NMDA receptors) and GABA activates GABA-A receptors which are modulated by many types of drugs and substances including alcohol. Using real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, I have shown that iGlu and/or GABA-A receptor subunits were expressed in the hippocampus dentate gyrus (HDG), orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DL-PFC), central amygdala (CeA), caudate and putamen of the human brain and their expression was altered by chronic excessive alcohol consumption. It indicates that excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission may have been altered in the brain of human alcoholics. It is possible that changes in one type of neurotransmitter system may drive changes in another. These brain regions also play a role in brain reward system. Any changes in them may lead to changes in the normal brain functions.

    Apart from the CNS, glutamate and GABA are also present in the blood and can be synthesised by pancreatic islet cells and immune cells. They may act as immunomodulators of circulating immune cells and can affect immune function through glutamate and GABA receptors. I found that T cells from human, rat and mouse lymph nodes expressed the mRNAs and proteins for specific GABA-A receptor subunits. GABA-evoked transient and tonic currents recorded using the patch clamp technique demonstrate the functional GABA-A channel in T cells. Furthermore, the mRNAs for specific iGlu, GABA-A and GABA-B receptor subunits and chloride cotransporters were detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from men, non-pregnant women, healthy and depressed pregnant women. The results indicate that the expression of iGlu, GABA-A and GABA-B receptors is related to gender, pregnancy and mental health and support the notion that glutamate and GABA receptors may modulate immune function. Intra- and interspecies variability exists in the expression and it is further influenced by physiological conditions.

    Delarbeten
    1. Selective increases of AMPA, NMDA, and kainate receptor subunit mRNAs in the hippocampus and orbitofrontal cortex but not in prefrontal cortex of human alcoholics
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Selective increases of AMPA, NMDA, and kainate receptor subunit mRNAs in the hippocampus and orbitofrontal cortex but not in prefrontal cortex of human alcoholics
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    2014 (Engelska)Ingår i: Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-5102, E-ISSN 1662-5102, Vol. 8, s. 11-Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Glutamate is the main excitatory transmitter in the human brain. Drugs that affect the glutamatergic signaling will alter neuronal excitability. Ethanol inhibits glutamate receptors. We examined the expression level of glutamate receptor subunit mRNAs in human post-mortem samples from alcoholics and compared the results to brain samples from control subjects. RNA from hippocampal dentate gyrus (HP-DG), orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), and dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex (DL-PFC) samples from 21 controls and 19 individuals with chronic alcohol dependence were included in the study. Total RNA was assayed using quantitative RT-PCR. Out of the 16 glutamate receptor subunits, mRNAs encoding two AMPA [2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazol-4-yl)propanoic acid] receptor subunits GluA2 and GluA3; three kainate receptor subunits GluK2, GluK3 and GluK5 and five NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptor subunits GluN1, GluN2A, GluN2C, GluN2D, and GluN3A were significantly increased in the HP-DG region in alcoholics. In the OFC, mRNA encoding the NMDA receptor subunit GluN3A was increased, whereas in the DL-PFC, no differences in mRNA levels were observed. Our laboratory has previously shown that the expression of genes encoding inhibitory GABA-A receptors is altered in the HP-DG and OFC of alcoholics (Jin et al., 2011). Whether the changes in one neurotransmitter system drives changes in the other or if they change independently is currently not known. The results demonstrate that excessive long-term alcohol consumption is associated with altered expression of genes encoding glutamate receptors in a brain region-specific manner. It is an intriguing possibility that genetic predisposition to alcoholism may contribute to these gene expression changes.

    Nationell ämneskategori
    Fysiologi Neurovetenskaper
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-219489 (URN)10.3389/fncel.2014.00011 (DOI)000331053400001 ()24523671 (PubMedID)
    Tillgänglig från: 2014-03-03 Skapad: 2014-03-03 Senast uppdaterad: 2018-01-11Bibliografiskt granskad
    2. Expression of specific ionotropic glutamate and GABA-A receptor subunits is decreased in central amygdala of alcoholics
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Expression of specific ionotropic glutamate and GABA-A receptor subunits is decreased in central amygdala of alcoholics
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    2014 (Engelska)Ingår i: Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-5102, E-ISSN 1662-5102, Vol. 8, s. 288-Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The central amygdala (CeA) has a role for mediating fear and anxiety responses. It is also involved in emotional imbalance caused by alcohol abuse and dependence and in regulating relapse to alcohol abuse. Growing evidences suggest that excitatory glutamatergic and inhibitory gamma-aminobutyric acid-ergic (GABAergic) transmissions in the CeA are affected by chronic alcohol exposure. Human post-mortem CeA samples from male alcoholics (n = 9) and matched controls (n = 9) were assayed for the expression level of ionotropic glutamate and GABA-A receptors subunit mRNAs using quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCB (RT-qPCR). Our data revealed that out of the 16 ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits, mRNAs encoding two AMPA P-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazol-4-y1)propanoic acid] receptor subunits GluA1 and GluA4; one kainate receptor subunit GluK2; one NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptor subunit GluN2D and one delta receptor subunit GluD2 were significantly decreased in the CeA of alcoholics. In contrast, of the 19 GABA-A receptor subunits, only the mRNA encoding the a2 subunit was significantly down-regulated in the CeA of the alcoholics as compared with control subjects. Our findings imply that the down-regulation of specific ionotropic glutamate and GABA-A receptor subunits in the CeA of alcoholics may represent one of the molecular substrates underlying the new balance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in alcohol dependence.

    Nationell ämneskategori
    Neurovetenskaper
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-239603 (URN)10.3389/fncel.2014.00288 (DOI)000344465400002 ()
    Tillgänglig från: 2014-12-30 Skapad: 2014-12-29 Senast uppdaterad: 2018-01-11Bibliografiskt granskad
    3.
    Posten kunde inte hittas. Det kan bero på att posten inte längre är tillgänglig eller att du har råkat ange ett felaktigt id i adressfältet.
    4. Different subtypes of GABA-A receptors are expressed in human, mouse and rat T lymphocytes
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Different subtypes of GABA-A receptors are expressed in human, mouse and rat T lymphocytes
    2012 (Engelska)Ingår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, nr 8, s. e42959-Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the most prominent neuroinhibitory transmitter in the brain, where it activates neuronalGABA-A receptors (GABA-A channels) located at synapses and outside of synapses. The GABA-A receptors are primarytargets of many clinically useful drugs. In recent years, GABA has been shown to act as an immunomodulatory molecule. Wehave examined in human, mouse and rat CD4+ and CD8+ T cells which subunit isoforms of the GABA-A channels areexpressed. The channel physiology and drug specificity is dictated by the GABA-A receptor subtype, which in turn isdetermined by the subunit isoforms that make the channel. There were 5, 8 and 13 different GABA-A subunit isoformsidentified in human, mouse and rat CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, respectively. Importantly, the γ2 subunit that imposesbenzodiazepine sensitivity on the GABA-A receptors, was only detected in the mouse T cells. Immunoblots andimmunocytochemistry showed abundant GABA-A channel proteins in the T cells from all three species. GABA-activatedwhole-cell transient and tonic currents were recorded. The currents were inhibited by picrotoxin, SR95531 and bicuculline,antagonists of GABA-A channels. Clearly, in both humans and rodents T cells, functional GABA-A channels are expressed butthe subtypes vary. It is important to bear in mind the interspecies difference when selecting the appropriate animal modelsto study the physiological role and pharmacological properties of GABA-A channels in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and whenselecting drugs aimed at modulating the human T cells function.

    Nationell ämneskategori
    Neurovetenskaper
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-172532 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0042959 (DOI)000307789700016 ()
    Tillgänglig från: 2012-04-11 Skapad: 2012-04-11 Senast uppdaterad: 2018-01-12Bibliografiskt granskad
    5. Expression of GABA receptors subunits in peripheral blood mononuclear cells is gender dependent, altered in pregnancy and modified by mental health
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Expression of GABA receptors subunits in peripheral blood mononuclear cells is gender dependent, altered in pregnancy and modified by mental health
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    2015 (Engelska)Ingår i: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 213, nr 3, s. 575-585Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The concept of nerve-driven immunity recognizes a link between the nervous and the immune system. γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain and receptors activated by GABA can be expressed by immune cells. Here we examined if the expression of GABA receptors and chloride transporters in human peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were influenced by gender, pregnancy or mental health.

    METHODS: We used RT-qPCR to determine the mRNA expression level in men (n=16), non-pregnant women (n=19), healthy pregnant women (n=27) and depressed pregnant women (n=15).

    RESULTS: The ρ2 subunit had the most prominent expression level of the GABA-A receptor subunits in all samples. The δ and ρ2 subunits were up-regulated by pregnancy whereas the ε subunit was more frequently expressed in healthy pregnant women than non-pregnant women who, in-turn, commonly expressed the α6 and the γ2 subunits. The β1 and ε subunits expression was altered by depression in pregnant women. The GABA-B1 receptor was up-regulated by depression in pregnant women while the transporters NKCC1 and KCC4 were down-regulated by pregnancy. The changes recorded in the mRNA expression levels imply participation of GABA receptors in establishing and maintaining tolerance in pregnancy. Importantly, the correlation of mental health with the expression of specific receptor subunits reveals a connection between the immune cells and the brain. Biomarkers for mental health may be identified in PBMCs.

    CONCLUSION: The results demonstrate the impact gender, pregnancy and mental health have on expression of GABA receptors plus chloride transporters expressed in human PBMCs.

    Nationell ämneskategori
    Fysiologi
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-240372 (URN)10.1111/apha.12440 (DOI)000348531600007 ()25529063 (PubMedID)
    Tillgänglig från: 2015-01-07 Skapad: 2015-01-07 Senast uppdaterad: 2018-01-11
    6. AMPA, NMDA and kainate glutamate receptor subunits are expressed in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) where the expression of GluK4 is altered by pregnancy and GluN2D by depression in pregnant women
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>AMPA, NMDA and kainate glutamate receptor subunits are expressed in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) where the expression of GluK4 is altered by pregnancy and GluN2D by depression in pregnant women
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    2017 (Engelska)Ingår i: Journal of Neuroimmunology, ISSN 0165-5728, E-ISSN 1872-8421, Vol. 305, s. 51-58Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The amino acid glutamate opens cation permeable ion channels, the iGlu receptors. These ion channels are abundantly expressed in the mammalian brain where glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter. The neurotransmitters and their receptors are being increasingly detected in the cells of immune system. Here we examined the expression of the 18 known subunits of the iGlu receptors families; alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA), kainate, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and delta in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We compared the expression of the subunits between four groups: men, non-pregnant women, healthy pregnant women and depressed pregnant women.

    Out of 18 subunits of the iGlu receptors, mRNAs for 11 subunits were detected in PBMCs from men and nonpregnant women; AMPA: GluA3, GluA4, kainate: GluK2, GluK4, GluK5, NMDA: GluN1, GluN2C, GluN2D, GluN3A, GluN3B, and delta: GluD1. In the healthy and the depressed pregnant women, in addition, the delta GluD2 subunit was identified. The mRNAs for GluK4, GluK5, GluN2C and GluN2D were expressed at a higher level than other subunits. Gender, pregnancy or depression during pregnancy altered the expression of GluA3, GluK4, GluN2D, GluN3B and GluD1 iGlu subunit mRNAs. The greatest changes recorded were the lower GluA3 and GluK4 mRNA levels in pregnant women and the higher GluN2D mRNA level in healthy but not in depressed pregnant women as compared to non-pregnant individuals. Using subunit specific antibodies, the GluK4, GluK5, GluNl, GluN2C and GluN2D subunit proteins were identified in the PBMCs. The results show expression of specific iGlu receptor subunit in the PBMCs and support the idea of physiology-driven changes of iGlu receptors subtypes in the immune cells.

    Nyckelord
    Glutamate, iGluR subunits, Immune cells, Pregnancy, Depression, Physiology-driven changes
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Medicin och hälsovetenskap Neurovetenskaper
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-282410 (URN)10.1016/j.jneuroim.2017.01.013 (DOI)000397694200009 ()28284346 (PubMedID)
    Forskningsfinansiär
    Vetenskapsrådet, 521-2012-1789
    Tillgänglig från: 2016-04-05 Skapad: 2016-04-05 Senast uppdaterad: 2018-01-10Bibliografiskt granskad
  • 48.
    Biglarnia, Ali-Reza
    et al.
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Transplantat, Malmo, Sweden;Lund Univ, Lund, Sweden.
    Huber-Lang, Markus
    Univ Hosp Ulm, Inst Clin & Expt Traumaimmunol, Ulm, Germany.
    Mohlin, Camilla
    Linnaeus Univ, Ctr Biomat Chem, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Nilsson Ekdahl, Kristina
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi, Klinisk immunologi. Centre of Biomaterials Chemistry, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi, Klinisk immunologi.
    The multifaceted role of complement in kidney transplantation2018Ingår i: Nature Reviews Nephrology, ISSN 1759-5061, E-ISSN 1759-507X, Vol. 14, nr 12, s. 767-781Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing evidence indicates an integral role for the complement system in the deleterious inflammatory reactions that occur during critical phases of the transplantation process, such as brain or cardiac death of the donor, surgical trauma, organ preservation and ischaemia-reperfusion injury, as well as in humoral and cellular immune responses to the allograft. Ischaemia is the most common cause of complement activation in kidney transplantation and in combination with reperfusion is a major cause of inflammation and graft damage. Complement also has a prominent role in antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) owing to ABO and HL A incompatibility, which leads to devastating damage to the transplanted kidney. Emerging drugs and treatment modalities that inhibit complement activation at various stages in the complement cascade are being developed to ameliorate the damage caused by complement activation in transplantation. These promising new therapies have various potential applications at different stages in the process of transplantation, including inhibiting the destructive effects of ischaemia and/or reperfusion injury, treating ABMR, inducing accommodation and modulating the adaptive immune response.

  • 49.
    Biglarnia, Ali-Reza
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Transplantationskirurgi.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi, Klinisk immunologi.
    Nilsson Ekdahl, Kristina
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi, Klinisk immunologi.
    Tufveson, Gunnar
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Transplantationskirurgi.
    Nilsson, Thomas
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Larsson, Erik
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi, Molekylär och morfologisk patologi.
    Wadström, Jonas
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Transplantationskirurgi.
    Desensitization With Antigen-Specific Immunoadsorption Interferes With Complement in ABO-Incompatible Kidney Transplantation2012Ingår i: Transplantation, ISSN 0041-1337, E-ISSN 1534-6080, Vol. 93, nr 1, s. 87-92Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Complement activation was characterized during and after desensitization treatment in 19 consecutive patients receiving ABO-incompatible (ABOi) living donor kidney transplants to assess the effect of desensitization protocol including antigen-specific immunoadsorption (IA) on complement activation.

    METHODS:

    All patients received rituximab- and tacrolimus-based triple treatment. Anti-A/B antibodies were removed by IA. Serial determinations of C3, C3a, the C3a/C3 ratio, and sC5b-9 were carried out between day -30 and postoperative day 30. C1q was measured on day -30 and the day before the transplantation. In two recipients, eluates from immunoadsorbent columns were analyzed for C3a, C1q, and immunoglobulins by western blotting. Same complement analysis was performed in eluate from a control column after in vitro perfusion of AB-plasma.

    RESULTS:

    Patient and graft survival were 100% for a median follow-up of 40 months (range, 12-60 months). There were no humoral rejections based on ABO-antigen-antibody interactions. C3a and the C3a/C3 ratio declined with the start of IA treatment, and this decline was maintained postoperatively. C1q declined from day -30 to a lower value on the day before transplantation (P<0.05). In eluates from both patient and control, immunoadsorbent column immunoglobulins together with C3a and C1q were detected.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The current protocol including antigen-specific IA interferes with the complement system; this effect may be partially responsible for the absence of humoral rejection resulting from ABO-antigen-antibody interactions and the excellent outcomes obtained after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation.

  • 50.
    Biglarnia, AliReza
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Transplantationskirurgi.
    Yamamoto, Shinji
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Transplantationskirurgi.
    Sedigh, Amir
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Transplantationskirurgi.
    Drachenberg, Cinthia
    Univ Maryland Hosp, Dept Pathol, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA..
    Wagner, Michael
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Gastroenterologi/hepatologi.
    Sund, Fredrik
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Infektionssjukdomar.
    Berglund, David
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi, Klinisk immunologi.
    von Zur-Mühlen, Bengt
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Transplantationskirurgi.
    Larsson, Erik
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi.
    Impact Of Duodenal Cuff Inflammation On Outcome After Clinical Pancreas Transplantation - A Survey Of A Comprehensive Follow-Up Strategy Including Serial Protocol Biopsy Of The Duodenal Cuff.2015Ingår i: Transplantation, ISSN 0041-1337, E-ISSN 1534-6080, Vol. 99, nr 11, s. S24-S24Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
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