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  • 1.
    Aanestad, Øystein
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Quantitative electromyographic studies of the perineal muscles in normal subjects and patients suffering from anal or urinary incontinence1998Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of the study were to characterize the interference pattern in perineal muscles in healthy subjects with the use of quantitative EMG techniques, to evaluate if prostatic surgery had any effect on the interference pattern and furthermore to examine the interference pattern in the perineal muscles in patients suffering from urinary or anal incontinence.

    The interference pattern in the perineal muscles was examined with a computerized analysis, the Turns and Amplitude (T/A) analysis, and the innervation pattern of the muscles was examined with single fiber electromyography measuring the fiber density. Reference values were collected from 30 normal subjects. The patient material consisted of 20 males subjected to transurethral prostatectomy (TUR-P), 10 males who underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP), 20 patients suffering from anal incontinence and 24 women withurinary incontinence.

    T/A analysis of the interference pattern in the perineal muscles in normal subjects showed a significant increase in number of turns/sec and mean amplitude correlating to increasing force but no age-related changes.

    TUR-P and RRP did effect the innervation of the distal urethral sphincter muscle as shown by increased fiber density indicating a peripheral nerve lesion. T/A analysis did not shown any increased activation of the distal urethral sphincter as a compensation for the loss in bladder neck sphincter function but rather signs of decreasedcentral activation.

    Patients with idiopathic faecal incontinence showed signs of impaired innervation of the external anal sphincter muscle. A decreased interference pattern at maximal contraction indicated a reduced central activation of perineal muscles, in particular for patients with partial rupture of the external anal sphincter muscle. The reduced central activation could play a role for the aetiology of faecal incontinence.

    Patients with urinary stress incontinence also showed signs of impaired innervation of the external anal sphincter muscle as well as reduced interference pattern at maximal contraction and during continuous recording of the EMG activity during cystometry. A reduced central activation of the motor units was predicted as one factor involved in the aetiology.

  • 2.
    Aare, Sudhakar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Ochala, Julien
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Norman, Holly S
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Radell, Peter
    Eriksson, Lars I
    Göransson, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Chen, Yi-Wen
    Hoffman, Eric P
    Larsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Mechanisms underlying the sparing of masticatory versus limb muscle function in an experimental critical illness model2011In: Physiological Genomics, ISSN 1094-8341, E-ISSN 1531-2267, Vol. 43, no 24, p. 1334-1350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acute quadriplegic myopathy (AQM) is a common debilitating acquired disorder in critically ill intensive care unit (ICU) patients which is characterized by tetraplegia/generalized weakness of limb and trunk muscles. Masticatory muscles, on the other hand, are typically spared or less affected, yet the mechanisms underlying this striking muscle-specific difference remain unknown. This study aims to evaluate physiological parameters and the gene expression profiles of masticatory and limb muscles exposed to factors suggested to trigger AQM, such as mechanical ventilation, immobilization, neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBA), corticosteroids (CS) and sepsis for five days by using a unique porcine model mimicking the ICU conditions. Single muscle fiber cross-sectional area and force-generating capacity, i.e., maximum force normalized to fiber cross-sectional area (specific force), revealed maintained masseter single muscle fiber cross-sectional area and specific-force after five days exposure to all triggering factors. This is in sharp contrast to observations in limb and trunk muscles, showing a dramatic decline in specific force in response to five days exposure to the triggering factors. Significant differences in gene expression were observed between craniofacial and limb muscles, indicating a highly complex and muscle specific response involving transcription and growth factors, heat shock proteins, matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, oxidative stress responsive elements and sarcomeric proteins underlying the relative sparing of cranial versus spinal nerve innervated muscles during exposure to the ICU intervention.

  • 3.
    Aarnio, Mikko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Visualization of Peripheral Pain Generating Processes and Inflammation in Musculoskeletal Tissue using [11C]-D-deprenyl PET2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    An objective visualization and quantification of pain-generating processes in the periphery would alter pain diagnosis and represent an important paradigm shift in pain research. Positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand [11C]-D-deprenyl has shown an elevated uptake in painful inflammatory arthritis and whiplash-associated disorder. However, D-Deprenyl’s molecular binding target and uptake mechanism in inflammation and musculoskeletal injuries are still unknown. The present thesis aimed to gain insight into the mechanisms of D-deprenyl binding and uptake and to verify whether pain-associated sites and inflammation in acute musculoskeletal injury could be visualized, objectively quantified and followed over time with [11C]-D-deprenyl PET-computed tomography (PET/CT).

    To identify the D-deprenyl binding target, a high-throughput analysis and competitive radioligand binding studies were performed. D-deprenyl inhibited monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) activity by 55%, MAO-B activity by 99% and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) by 70%, which identified these enzymes as higher-affinity targets. Furthermore, radioligand receptor binding assays pointed favorably towards the concept of MAO-B as the primary target. To investigate the biochemical characteristics of the binding site, we used radioligand binding assays to assess differences in the binding profile in inflamed human synovial membranes exhibiting varying levels of inflammation. D-deprenyl bound to a single, saturable population of membrane-bound protein in synovial membrane homogenates and the level of inflammation correlated with an increase in D-deprenyl binding affinity.

    To verify whether D-deprenyl can visualize pain-generating processes, patients with musculoskeletal injuries were investigated and followed-up with [11C]-D-deprenyl PET/CT. In the study of eight patients with ankle sprain, the molecular aspects of inflammation and tissue injury could be visualized, objectively quantified and followed over time with [11C]-D-deprenyl PET/CT. The pain coexisted with increased [11C]-D-deprenyl uptake. In the study of 16 whiplash patients, an altered [11C]-D-deprenyl uptake in the cervical bone structures and facet joints was associated with subjective pain levels and self-rated disability.

    To further evaluate D-Deprenyl’s usefulness as a marker of inflammation, three PET tracers were compared in an animal PET/CT study. Preliminary findings showed that [11C]-D-deprenyl had an almost identical uptake pattern when compared with [11C]-L-deprenyl. The two deprenyl enantiomers showed no signs of specific binding or trapping and therefore may not be useful to study further in models of inflammatory pain, surgical pain, or both.

    This thesis demonstrates that D-deprenyl visualizes painful inflammation in musculoskeletal injuries and that the probable underlying mechanism of [11C]-D-deprenyl uptake is binding to MAO.

    List of papers
    1. High-throughput screening and radioligand binding studies reveal monoamine oxidase-B as the primary binding target for D-deprenyl
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>High-throughput screening and radioligand binding studies reveal monoamine oxidase-B as the primary binding target for D-deprenyl
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    2016 (English)In: Life Sciences, ISSN 0024-3205, E-ISSN 1879-0631, Vol. 152, p. 231-237Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: D-deprenyl is a useful positron emission tomography tracer for visualization of inflammatory processes. Studies with [C-11]-D-deprenyl showed robust uptake in peripheral painful sites of patients with rheumatoid arthritis or chronic whiplash injury. The mechanism of preferential D-deprenyl uptake is not yet known, but the existence of a specific binding site was proposed. Thus, in the present study, we sought to identify the binding site for D-deprenyl and verify the hypothesis about the possibility of monoamine oxidase enzymes as major targets for this molecule. Main methods: A high-throughput analysis of D-deprenyl activity towards 165 G-protein coupled receptors and 84 enzyme targets was performed. Additionally, binding studies were used to verify the competition of [H-3]D-deprenyl with ligands specific for targets identified in the high-throughput screen. Key findings: Our high-throughput investigation identified monoamine oxidase-B, monoamine oxidase-A and angiotensin converting enzyme as potential targets for D-deprenyl. Further competitive [3H] D-deprenyl binding studies with specific inhibitors identified monoamine oxidase-B as the major binding site. No evident high-affinity hits were identified among G-protein coupled receptors. Significance: Our study was the first to utilize a high-throughput screening approach to identify putative D-deprenyl targets. It verified 249 candidate proteins and confirmed the role of monoamine oxidase - B in D-deprenyl binding. Our results add knowledge about the possible mechanism of D-deprenyl binding, which might aid in explaining the increased uptake of this compound in peripheral inflammation. Monoamine oxidase-B will be further investigated in future studies utilizing human inflamed synovium.

    Keywords
    D-deprenyl High-throughput screening Binding site
    National Category
    Pharmaceutical Sciences Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-291492 (URN)10.1016/j.lfs.2016.03.058 (DOI)000375728500028 ()27058977 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Berzelii Centre EXSELENT, 2013-01495
    Available from: 2016-05-03 Created: 2016-05-03 Last updated: 2018-04-09Bibliographically approved
    2. Characterization of the binding site for d-deprenyl in human inflamed synovial membrane.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Characterization of the binding site for d-deprenyl in human inflamed synovial membrane.
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    2018 (English)In: Life Sciences, ISSN 0024-3205, E-ISSN 1879-0631, Vol. 194, p. 26-33Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: D-Deprenyl when used as a positron emission tomography tracer visualizes peripheral inflammation. The major aim of the current study was to identify and investigate the properties of the binding target for D-deprenyl in synovial membrane explants from arthritic patients.

    Main methods: Thirty patients diagnosed with arthritis or osteoarthritis were enrolled into the study. Homologous and competitive radioligand binding assays utilizing [H-3]D-deprenyl were performed to investigate the biochemical characteristics of the binding site and assess differences in the binding profile in synovial membranes exhibiting varying levels of inflammation.

    Key findings: The [H-3]D-deprenyl binding assay confirmed the existence of a single, saturable population of membrane-bound protein binding sites in synovial membrane homogenates. The macroscopically determined level of inflammation correlated with an increase in [H-3]D-deprenyl binding affinity, without significant alterations in binding site density. Selective monoamine oxidase B inhibitor, selegiline competed for the same site as [H-3]D-deprenyl, but failed to differentiate the samples with regard to their inflammation grade. A monoamine oxidase A inhibitor, pirlindole mesylate showed only weak displacement of [H-3]D-deprenyl binding. No significant alterations in monoamine oxidase B expression was detected, thus it was not confirmed whether it could serve as a marker for ongoing inflammation.

    Significance: Our study was the first to show the biochemical characteristics of the [H-3]D-deprenyl binding site in inflamed human synovium. We confirmed that d-deprenyl could differentiate between patients with varying severity of synovitis in the knee joint by binding to a protein target distinct from monoamine oxidase B.

    Keywords
    Arthritis, Binding target, Monoamine oxidase B, Synovium, d-Deprenyl
    National Category
    Pharmaceutical Sciences
    Research subject
    Pharmaceutical Biochemistry; Medical Biochemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-347601 (URN)10.1016/j.lfs.2017.12.003 (DOI)000425052000004 ()29221756 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 9459
    Available from: 2018-04-04 Created: 2018-04-04 Last updated: 2018-04-18Bibliographically approved
    3. Visualization of painful inflammation in patients with pain after traumatic ankle sprain using [(11)C]-D-deprenyl PET/CT.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Visualization of painful inflammation in patients with pain after traumatic ankle sprain using [(11)C]-D-deprenyl PET/CT.
    Show others...
    2017 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Pain, ISSN 1877-8860, E-ISSN 1877-8879, Vol. 17, p. 418-424Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Positron emission tomography (PET) with the radioligand [(11)C]-D-deprenyl has shown increased signal at location of pain in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and chronic whiplash injury. The binding site of [(11)C]-D-deprenyl in peripheral tissues is suggested to be mitochondrial monoamine oxidase in cells engaged in post-traumatic inflammation and tissue repair processes. The association between [(11)C]-D-deprenyl uptake and the transition from acute to chronic pain remain unknown. Further imaging studies of musculoskeletal pain at the molecular level would benefit from establishing a clinical model in a common and well-defined injury in otherwise healthy and drug-naïve subjects. The aim of this study was to investigate if [(11)C]-D-deprenyl uptake would be acutely elevated in unilateral ankle sprain and if tracer uptake would be reduced as a function of healing, and correlated with pain localizations and pain experience.

    METHODS: Eight otherwise healthy patients with unilateral ankle sprain were recruited at the emergency department. All underwent [(11)C]-D-deprenyl PET/CT in the acute phase, at one month and 6-14 months after injury.

    RESULTS: Acute [(11)C]-D-deprenyl uptake at the injury site was a factor of 10.7 (range 2.9-37.3) higher than the intact ankle. During healing, [(11)C]-D-deprenyl uptake decreased, but did not normalize until after 11 months. Patients experiencing persistent pain had prolonged [(11)C]-D-deprenyl uptake in painful locations.

    CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: The data provide further support that [(11)C]-D-deprenyl PET can visualize, quantify and follow processes in peripheral tissue that may relate to soft tissue injuries, inflammation and associated nociceptive signaling. Such an objective correlate would represent a progress in pain research, as well as in clinical pain diagnostics and management.

    Keywords
    Ankle injuries, Carbon-11, Deprenyl, Inflammation, PET, Pain
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-333782 (URN)10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.10.008 (DOI)000419851500070 ()29126847 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2017-11-16 Created: 2017-11-16 Last updated: 2018-04-09Bibliographically approved
    4. Whiplash injuries associated with experienced pain and disability can be visualized with [11C]-D-deprenyl PET/CT
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Whiplash injuries associated with experienced pain and disability can be visualized with [11C]-D-deprenyl PET/CT
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    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The understanding of etiological mechanisms of whiplash associated disorder is still inadequate. Objective visualization and quantification of peripheral musculoskeletal injury and possible painful inflammation in whiplash associated disorder would facilitate diagnosis, strengthen patients’ subjective pain reports and aid clinical decisions eventually leading to better treatments. In the current study, we further evaluated the potential to use [11C]D-deprenyl PET/CT to visualize inflammation after whiplash injury. Sixteen patients with whiplash injury grade II were recruited at the emergency department and underwent [11C]D-deprenyl PET/CT in the acute phase and at 6 months after injury. Subjective pain levels, self rated neck disability and active cervical range of motion were recorded at each imaging session. Results showed that the molecular aspects of inflammation and possible tissue injuries after acute whiplash injury could be visualized, objectively quantified and followed over time with [11C]-D-deprenyl PET/CT. An altered [11C]D-deprenyl uptake in the cervical bone structures and facet joints was associated with subjective pain levels and self rated disability during both imaging occasions. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of affected peripheral structures in whiplash injury and strengthens the idea that PET/CT detectable organic lesions in peripheral tissue may be relevant for the development of persistent pain and disability in whiplash injury.

    Perspective: This article presents a novel way of objectively visualizing possible structural damage and inflammation that cause pain and disability in whiplash injury. This PET method can bring an advance in pain research and eventually would facilitate the clinical management of patients in pain.

    Keywords
    Whiplash; deprenyl; inflammation; pain; PET; carbon-11
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Research subject
    Molecular Medicine; Medical Cell Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-347602 (URN)
    Available from: 2018-04-04 Created: 2018-04-04 Last updated: 2018-04-12
    5. Evaluation of  PET tracers [11C]D-deprenyl, [11C]L-dideuteriumdeprenyl and [18F]FDG for Visualization of Acute Inflammation in a Rat Model of Pain - Preliminary Findings.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of  PET tracers [11C]D-deprenyl, [11C]L-dideuteriumdeprenyl and [18F]FDG for Visualization of Acute Inflammation in a Rat Model of Pain - Preliminary Findings.
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography with the radioligand [11C]D-deprenyl has shown an increased signal at the location of pain in patients with ankle sprains, rheumatoid arthritis and chronic whiplash injury, but the mechanism of this tracer uptake and its exact binding site in inflammation or tissue injury is still unclear. The aim of this study was to further evaluate [11C]D-deprenyl´s usefulness as a marker of acute inflammation.

    Methods: An animal PET/CT study was performed three days after the induction of a rat model of inflammatory or surgical pain. Fourteen adult male Sprague-Dawley rats and three tracers [11C]D-deprenyl, [11C]L-dideuterumdeprenyl and [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose were used.

    Results: No [11C]D-deprenyl accumulation was seen in a rat model of musculoskeletal pain. In the rat model of inflammatory pain all three ligands were shown to visualize the inflamed ankle joint with much lower uptake in the control ankle joint. The uptake was largest with [11C]D-deprenyl and [11C]L- dideuteriumdeprenyl, where approximately 1 % of the injected dose could be found in the affected ankle joint during the first minutes, whereas the uptake of [18F]FDG was approximately 0.5 % of the injected dose. However, the ratio of uptake of the injected ankle joint versus the control ankle joint was much higher for [18F]FDG (around 10 fold increase) than for the two deprenyl enantiomers (2 – 3 fold increase). The uptake pattern of [11C]D-deprenyl and [11C]L-dideuteriumdeprenyl did not show signs of specific binding or irreversible trapping.

    Conclusions: Contrary to our expectations, of the three tracers only [18F]FDG may be used as markers of peripheral inflammation in a rat model of inflammatory pain. However, as a high site-specificity is required, [11C]D-deprenyl and [11C]L-dideyteriumdeprenyl deserve further exploration regarding sensitivity, specificity and uptake mechanisms in human pain syndromes.

    Keywords
    deprenyl; inflammation; pain; PET; carbon-11
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Research subject
    Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-347604 (URN)
    Available from: 2018-04-04 Created: 2018-04-04 Last updated: 2018-04-12
  • 4.
    Aarts, Clara
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Exclusive breastfeeding-Does it make a difference?: A longitudinal, prospective study of daily feeding practices, health and growth in a sample of Swedish infants2001Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of exclusive breastfeeding in relation to daily feeding practices and to health and growth of infants in an affluent society was examined. In a descriptive longitudinal prospective study 506 mother-infant pairs were followed from birth through the greater part of the first year. Feeding was recorded daily, and health and growth were recorded fortnightly.

    Large individual variations were seen in breastfeeding patterns. A wide discrepancy between the exclusive breastfeeding rates obtained from "current status" data and data "since birth" was found.

    Using a strict definition of exclusive breastfeeding from birth and taking into account the reasons for giving complementary feeding, the study showed that many exclusively breastfed infants had infections early in life, the incidence of which increased with age, despite continuation of exclusive breastfeeding. However, truly exclusively breastfed infants seem less likely to suffer infections than infants who receive formula in addition to breast milk. Increasing formula use was associated with an increasing likelihood of suffering respiratory illnesses. The growth of exclusively breastfed infants was similar to that of infants who were not exclusively breastfed.

    The health of newborn infants during the first year of life was associated with factors other than feeding practices alone. Some of these factors may be prenatal, since increasing birth weight was associated with an increasing likelihood of having respiratory symptoms, even in exclusively breastfed infants. However, exclusive breastfeeding was shown to be beneficial for the health of the infant even in an affluent society.

  • 5. Aavik, Einari
    et al.
    Lumivuori, Henri
    Leppänen, Olli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Wirth, Thomas
    Hakkinen, Sanna-Kaisa
    Braesen, Jan-Hinrich
    Beschorner, Ulrich
    Zeller, Thomas
    Braspenning, Maarten
    van Criekinge, Wim
    Makinen, Kimmo
    Yla-Herttuala, Seppo
    Global DNA methylation analysis of human atherosclerotic plaques reveals extensive genomic hypomethylation and reactivation at imprinted locus 14q32 involving induction of a miRNA cluster2015In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 36, no 16, p. 993-U23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims Genetics can explain just above 10% of the observed heritability in cardiovascular diseases. Epigenetics is about to provide some further explanations, but the information needed for that is in the accumulation phase. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis has revealed thousands of genes, which are epigenetically differentially regulated in atherosclerotic plaques. Our results point to an additional level of complexity that needs to be integrated into the aetiology of atherogenesis.We conducted a genome-wide analysis to identify differentially methylated genes in atherosclerotic lesions. Methods DNA methylation at promoters, exons and introns was identified by massive parallel sequencing. Gene expression was analysed by microarrays, qPCR, immunohistochemistry and western blots. Results Globally, hypomethylation of chromosomal DNA predominates in atherosclerotic plaques and two-thirds of genes showing over 2.5-fold differential in DNA methylation are up-regulated in comparison to healthy mammary arteries. The imprinted chromatin locus 14q32 was identified for the first time as an extensively hypomethylated area in atherosclerosis with highly induced expression of miR127, -136, -410, -431, -432, -433 and capillary formation-associated gene RTL1. The top 100 list of hypomethylated promoters exhibited over 1000-fold enrichment for miRNAs, many of which mapped to locus 14q32. Unexpectedly, also gene body hypermethylation was found to correlate with stimulated mRNA expression. Conclusion Significant changes in genomic methylation were identified in atherosclerotic lesions. The most prominent gene cluster activated via hypomethylation was detected at imprinted chromosomal locus 14q32 with several clustered miRNAs that were up-regulated. These results suggest that epigenetic changes are involved in atherogenesis and may offer new potential therapeutic targets for vascular diseases.

  • 6.
    Abadpour, Shadab
    et al.
    Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Halvorsen, Bente
    Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Sahraoui, Afaf
    University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Korsgren, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Aukrust, Pål
    Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Scholz, Hanne
    Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Interleukin-22 reverses human islet dysfunction and apoptosis triggered by hyperglycemia and LIGHT2018In: Journal of Molecular Endocrinology, ISSN 0952-5041, E-ISSN 1479-6813, article id JME-17-0182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interleukin (IL)-22 has recently been suggested as an anti-inflammatory cytokine that could protect the islet cells from inflammation- and glucose-induced toxicity. We have previously shown that the tumor necrosis factor family member, LIGHT can impair human islet function at least partly via pro-apoptotic effects. Herein, we aimed to investigate the protective role of IL-22 on human islets exposed to the combination of hyperglycemia and LIGHT. First, we found up-regulation of LIGHT receptors (LTβR and HVEM) in engrafted human islets exposed to hyperglycemia (>11 mM) for 17 days post transplantation by using a double islet transplantation mouse model as well as in human islets cultured with high glucose (HG) (20mM glucose) + LIGHT in vitro and this latter effect was attenuated by IL-22. The effect of HG + LIGHT impairing glucose stimulated insulin secretion was reversed by IL-22. The harmful effect of HG + LIGHT on human islet function seemed to involve enhanced endoplasmic reticulum stress evidenced by up-regulation of p-IRE1α and BiP, elevated secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, IP-10 and MCP-1) and the pro-coagulant mediator tissue factor (TF) release and apoptosis in human islets, whereas all these effects were at least partly reversed by IL-22. Our findings suggest that IL-22 could counteract the harmful effects of LIGHT/hyperglycemia on human islet cells and potentially support the strong protective effect of IL-22 on impaired islet function and survival.

  • 7.
    Abbasinejad Enger, Shirin
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Dosimetry Studies of Different Radiotherapy Applications using Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Calculations2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Developing radiation delivery systems for optimisation of absorbed dose to the target without normal tissue toxicity requires advanced calculations for transport of radiation. In this thesis absorbed dose and fluence in different radiotherapy applications were calculated by using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations.

    In paper I-III external neutron activation of gadolinium (Gd) for intravascular brachytherapy (GdNCB) and tumour therapy (GdNCT) was investigated. MC codes MCNP and GEANT4 were compared. MCNP was chosen for neutron capture reaction calculations. Gd neutron capture reaction includes both very short range (Auger electrons) and long range (IC electrons and gamma) products. In GdNCB the high-energetic gamma gives an almost flat absorbed dose delivery pattern, up to 4 mm around the stent. Dose distribution at the edges and inside the stent may prevent stent edge and in-stent restenosis. For GdNCT the absorbed dose from prompt gamma will dominate over the dose from IC and Auger electrons in an in vivo situation. The absorbed dose from IC electrons will enhance the total absorbed dose in the tumours and contribute to the cell killing.

    In paper IV a model for calculation of inter-cluster cross-fire radiation dose from β-emitting radionuclides in a breast cancer model was developed. GEANT4 was used for obtaining absorbed dose. The dose internally in cells binding the isotope (self-dose) increased with decreasing β-energy except for the radionuclides with substantial amounts of conversion electrons and Auger electrons. An effective therapy approach may be a combination of radionuclides where the high self-dose from nuclides with low β-energy should be combined with the inter-cell cluster cross-fire dose from high energy β-particles.

    In paper V MC simulations using correlated sampling together with importance sampling were used to calculate spectra perturbations in detector volumes caused by the detector silicon chip and its encapsulation. Penelope and EGSnrc were used and yielded similar results. The low energy part of the electron spectrum increased but to a less extent if the silicon detector was encapsulated in low z-materials.

    List of papers
    1. Monte Carlo calculations of thermal neutron capture in gadolinium: a comparison of GEANT4 and MCNP with measurements.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Monte Carlo calculations of thermal neutron capture in gadolinium: a comparison of GEANT4 and MCNP with measurements.
    2006 In: Medical Physics, ISSN 0094-2405, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 337-341Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-97526 (URN)
    Available from: 2008-09-19 Created: 2008-09-19Bibliographically approved
    2. Gadolinium neutron capture brachytherapy (GdNCB), a new treatment method for intravascular brachytherapy.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gadolinium neutron capture brachytherapy (GdNCB), a new treatment method for intravascular brachytherapy.
    2006 In: Medical Physics, ISSN 0094-2405, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 46-51Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-97527 (URN)
    Available from: 2008-09-19 Created: 2008-09-19Bibliographically approved
    3. Dosimetry for gadolinium neutron capture therapy (GdNCT)
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dosimetry for gadolinium neutron capture therapy (GdNCT)
    Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-97528 (URN)
    Available from: 2008-09-19 Created: 2008-09-19 Last updated: 2010-01-13Bibliographically approved
    4. Cross-fire doses from β-emitting radionuclides in targeted radiotherapy: A theoretical study based on experimentally measured tumor characteristics
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cross-fire doses from β-emitting radionuclides in targeted radiotherapy: A theoretical study based on experimentally measured tumor characteristics
    2008 (English)In: Physics in Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0031-9155, E-ISSN 1361-6560, Vol. 53, no 7, p. 1909-1920Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A mathematical model based upon histological findings of cell cluster distributions in primary breast cancers and lymph node metastases was developed. The model is unique because it accounts for tumor cell cluster formations within both primary tumors and metastases. The importance of inter-cell cluster cross-fire radiation dose for beta-emitting radionuclides of different energies was studied. The cell clusters were simulated as spheres with 15, 25 and 50 microm radii having a homogeneous radioactivity distribution. The self-dose as well as the dose distribution around the spheres was calculated for seven radionuclides, (90)Y, (188)Re, (32)P, (186)Re, (159)Gd, (131)I and (177)Lu using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code. Generally, the self-dose was decreasing with increasing energy of the emitted beta particles. An exception was (188)Re which, compared to (32)P, had higher beta energy as well as higher self-dose. This was due to the higher emission of conversion and Auger electrons in the (188)Re-decay. When the cell clusters had a mean distance that was shorter than the maximum range of beta-particles, then the inter-cluster cross-fire radiation contributed significantly to the absorbed dose. Thus, high-energy beta-particles may, in spite of a low self-dose to single clusters, still be favorable to use due to the contribution of inter-cluster cross-fire radiation.

    Keywords
    Cancer, tumor, radiation, therapy
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-97529 (URN)10.1088/0031-9155/53/7/007 (DOI)000254175900007 ()18364546 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2008-09-19 Created: 2008-09-19 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    5. Determination of self perturbations of spectra in detectors in photon fields
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Determination of self perturbations of spectra in detectors in photon fields
    Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-97530 (URN)
    Available from: 2008-09-19 Created: 2008-09-19 Last updated: 2010-01-13Bibliographically approved
  • 8. Abbott, A. L.
    et al.
    Adelman, M. A.
    Alexandrov, A. V.
    Barnett, H. J. M.
    Beard, J.
    Bell, P.
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Blacker, D.
    Buckley, C. J.
    Cambria, R. P.
    Comerota, A. J.
    Connolly, E. S., Jr.
    Davies, A. H.
    Eckstein, H. H.
    Faruqi, R.
    Fraedrich, G.
    Gloviczki, P.
    Hankey, G. J.
    Harbaugh, R. E.
    Heldenberg, E.
    Kittner, S. J.
    Kleinig, T. J.
    Mikhailidis, D. P.
    Moore, W. S.
    Naylor, R.
    Nicolaides, A.
    Paraskevas, K. I.
    Pelz, D. M.
    Prichard, J. W.
    Purdie, G.
    Ricco, J. B.
    Riles, T.
    Rothwell, P.
    Sandercock, P.
    Sillesen, H.
    Spence, J. D.
    Spinelli, F.
    Tan, A.
    Thapar, A.
    Veith, F. J.
    Zhou, W.
    Why the United States Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Should not Extend Reimbursement Indications for Carotid Artery Angioplasty/Stenting2012In: European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, ISSN 1078-5884, E-ISSN 1532-2165, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 247-251Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9. Abbott, Anne L.
    et al.
    Adelman, Mark A.
    Alexandrov, Andrei V.
    Barnett, Henry J. M.
    Beard, Jonathan
    Bell, Peter
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Blacker, David
    Buckley, Clifford J.
    Cambria, Richard P.
    Comerota, Anthony J.
    Connolly, E. Sander
    Davies, Alun H.
    Eckstein, Hans-Henning
    Faruqi, Rishad
    Fraedrich, Gustav
    Gloviczki, Peter
    Hankey, Graeme J.
    Harbaugh, Robert E.
    Heldenberg, Eitan
    Kittner, Steven J.
    Kleinig, Timothy J.
    Mikhailidis, Dimitri P.
    Moore, Wesley S.
    Naylor, Ross
    Nicolaides, Andrew
    Paraskevas, Kosmas I.
    Pelz, David M.
    Prichard, James W.
    Purdie, Grant
    Ricco, Jean-Baptiste
    Riles, Thomas
    Rothwell, Peter
    Sandercock, Peter
    Sillesen, Henrik
    Spence, J. David
    Spinelli, Francesco
    Tan, Aaron
    Thapar, Ankur
    Veith, Frank J.
    Zhou, Wei
    Why the United States Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services should not extend reimbursement indications for carotid artery angioplasty/stenting2012In: VASCULAR, ISSN 1708-5381, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 1-7Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Abdsaleh, Shahin
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Core Biopsy of Breast and Axillary Lesions: Technical and Clinical Aspects2006Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this work were to image and analyze the needle behavior at automated core biopsy, to investigate the clinical utility of an alternative core biopsy technique using a semiautomated gun in breast and axillary lesions, and also to compare core biopsy with surgical specimens in malignant breast lesions regarding histologic features and hormone receptor expression.

    In two experimental studies, using butter and silicon phantoms, respectively, the needle pass was imaged and its dynamic behavior studied. It was shown that the needle took a curved course in phantoms. It deviated to the same side as where the tip lay, and the degree of the curvature increased with increasing hardness of the phantoms. Our experimental methods can be applied for imaging of needle behavior and thereby improvement of needle configuration.

    In two clinical studies, a semiautomated gun was used for large needle core biopsy of breast and axillary lesions in two series of 145 and 21 patients, respectively. The sensitivity of the method for diagnosis of malignancy was 87% (108/124), and in 37% (31/83) of cases the full length of the needle notch was filled with specimen. No injury to the neurovascular structures of the axillary area was observed. It was concluded that the semiautomated gun can be used as an alternative to the automated gun when the size and location of the lesion render use of the automatic device uncertain or dangerous, e.g., in small breast lesions or lesions located in the axilla.

    In a series of 129 cases of breast cancer, comparison of core biopsy and surgical specimens showed that core biopsy provided enough information on the histologic type and grade of the lesions. Also, there was moderate to high concordance between the two methods for assessment of progesterone receptors and estrogen receptors (Spearman`s kappa 0.67 and 0.89, respectively).

    List of papers
    1. Behaviour of the 2.1-mm (14 G) Automated Biopsy Needle in Phantoms.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Behaviour of the 2.1-mm (14 G) Automated Biopsy Needle in Phantoms.
    2002 In: Acta Radiologica, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 225-229Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-94101 (URN)
    Available from: 2006-03-03 Created: 2006-03-03Bibliographically approved
    2. Semiautomatic Core Biopsy.: A Modified Biopsy Technique in Breast Diseases.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Semiautomatic Core Biopsy.: A Modified Biopsy Technique in Breast Diseases.
    2003 In: Acta Radiologica, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 47-51Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-94102 (URN)
    Available from: 2006-03-03 Created: 2006-03-03Bibliographically approved
    3. Ultrasound-guided Large Needle Core Biopsy of the Axilla.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ultrasound-guided Large Needle Core Biopsy of the Axilla.
    2004 In: Acta Radiologica, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 193-196Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-94103 (URN)
    Available from: 2006-03-03 Created: 2006-03-03Bibliographically approved
    4. Dynamic Behaviour of Core Biosy Needle:: High-speed Video Imaging of the Needle Course in Silicon Phantoms.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dynamic Behaviour of Core Biosy Needle:: High-speed Video Imaging of the Needle Course in Silicon Phantoms.
    Show others...
    Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-94104 (URN)
    Available from: 2006-03-03 Created: 2006-03-03 Last updated: 2010-01-13Bibliographically approved
    5. Comparison of Core Needle Biopsy and Surgical Specimens in Malignant Breast Lesions Regarding Histologic Features and Hormone Receptor Expression.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparison of Core Needle Biopsy and Surgical Specimens in Malignant Breast Lesions Regarding Histologic Features and Hormone Receptor Expression.
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-94105 (URN)
    Available from: 2006-03-03 Created: 2006-03-03 Last updated: 2010-02-03Bibliographically approved
  • 11.
    Abdsaleh, Shahin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Wärnberg, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Azavedo, E
    Lindgren, P G
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Amini, Rose-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Comparison of core needle biopsy and surgical specimens in malignant breast lesions regarding histological features and hormone receptor expression2008In: Histopathology, ISSN 0309-0167, E-ISSN 1365-2559, Vol. 52, no 6, p. 773-775Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Abdulahad, Noor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    The effects of short-term use of proton pump inhibitors on plasma and salivary nitrate/nitrite and exhaled NO in patients with established coronary artery disease2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Recent studies have suggested several vasoprotective/cardioprotective effects of dietary nitrate (NO3-) and nitrite (NO2-), including blood pressure regulating, antiplatelet effect, enhanced endothelial function and increased oxygen supply in healthy volunteers. There is, on the other hand, concern that an increase in gastric pH may blunt these beneficial effects due to the low pH requirement (pH< 2) for nitric oxide (NO) generation from nitrate in the stomach. This effect has not previously been investigated in 'real life' patients. Aim: To investigate the effects of an increased gastric pH caused by short-term (5 days) use of esomeprazole, a proton pump inhibitor, on plasma and salivary nitrate/nitrite and exhaled NO in patients with established coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods: A total of seven patients with CAD were enrolled in the study. An on-line method was used to determine fractional exhaled concentration of NO (FeNO) at multiple flow rates, data was modeled to estimate alveolar airways NO concentration (Calv) and bronchial NO flux (JNO). Plasma and salivary nitrate/nitrite levels were also analyzed. Results: There was a statistically (P = 0.0469) significant reduction in Calv in the overall patient group after treatment with esomeprazole. There was a trend toward an increase, albeit non-statistically significant (P = 0.0781) in salivary nitrate after treatment with esomeprazole. Conclusion: The major finding in this study is the significant reduction in the alveolar NO concentration in the overall patient group after treatment with esomeprazole. Further research is needed in this area.

  • 13.
    Abdulcadir, Jasmine
    et al.
    Outpatient Clinic for Women with FGM/C, Department of Obstetric and Gynecology, Geneva University Hospitals.
    Abdulcadir, Omar
    Referral Centre for Preventing and Curing Female Genital Mutilation, Department of Maternal and Child Health, Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy.
    Caillet, Martin
    Outpatient Clinic for Women with FGM/C, Department of Obstetric and Gynecology, Geneva University Hospitals.
    Catania, Lucrezia
    Referral Centre for Preventing and Curing Female Genital Mutilation, Department of Maternal and Child Health, Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy.
    Cuzin, Béatrice
    Division of Urology and Transplantation, Edouard Herriot Hospital, Lyon, France.
    Essén, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Foldès, Pierre
    Institute of Reproductive Health, Saint Germain en Laye, Paris, France.
    Johnsdotter, Sara
    Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Johnson-Agbakwu, Crista
    Refugee Women's Health Clinic, Obstetrics & Gynecology, Maricopa Integrated Health System.
    Nour, Nawal
    Global Ob/Gyn and African Women's Health Center, Ambulatory Obstetrics, Office for Multicultural Careers, Division of Global Obstetrics and Gynecology, Brigham and Women's Hospital.
    Ouedraogo, Charlemagne
    University Hospital Yalgado Ouedraogo of Ouagadougou, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.
    Warren, Nicole
    Department of Community Public Health Nursing, John Hopkins School of Nursing, Baltimore, MD, USA.
    Wylomanski, Sophie
    Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Nantes University Hospital, Nantes, France.
    Clitoral Surgery After Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting2017In: Aesthetic surgery journal, ISSN 1090-820X, E-ISSN 1527-330X, Vol. 37, no 9, p. NP113-NP115Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Abdulla, Maysaa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Laszlo, Sofia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Triumf, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Hedström, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Berglund, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Novum, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Amini, Rose-Marie
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Immunol Genet & Pathol, Unit Pathol, Uppsala, Sweden.;Univ Uppsala Hosp, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    A population-based study of cellular markers in R-CHOP treated diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients2016In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 55, no 9-10, p. 1126-1131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To determine the prognostic significance of co-expression of MYC, BCL-2 and BCL-6 proteins in combination with other biomarkers and clinical characteristics within a population-based cohort of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) patients uniformly treated with R-CHOP.

    Patients and methods: The immunohistochemical (IHC) expression of CD10, BCL-2, BCL-6, MUM1, MYC, CD5, CD30, Ki-67 and p53 was evaluated in a retrospective, population-based study comprising 188 DLBCL patients treated with R-CHOP and diagnosed in Sweden between 2002 and 2012.

    Results: Patients had a median age at diagnosis of 64 years (26-85 years) with a male:female ratio of 1.4:1. Approximately half (52%) of the patients presented with an International Prognostic Index (IPI) age adjusted (IPIaa)2. Median follow-up time was 51 months (range 0.4-158) and the five-year lymphoma-specific survival (LSS) was 76%, five-year overall survival (OS) was 65% and five-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 61%. A high Ki-67 value was found in 59% of patients, while p53 overexpression was detected in 12% of patients and MYC, BCL-2 and BCL-6 expression were detected in 42%, 55% and 74% of patients, respectively. IPIaa2 (p=0.002), Ki-6770% (p=0.04) and p53 overexpression50% (p=0.02) were associated with inferior LSS and OS. Co-expression of both MYC (>40%) and BCL-2 (>70%) proteins was detected in 27% of patients and correlated with a significantly inferior LSS (p=0.0002), OS (p=0.009) and PFS (p=0.03). In addition, triple expression of MYC, BCL-2 and BCL-6, also correlated with a significantly inferior LSS (p=0.02).

    Conclusion: Concurrent expression of MYC and BCL-2 proteins, as detected by IHC, was strongly associated with an inferior survival in DLBCL patients treated with R-CHOP. Other markers affecting survival were triple expression of MYC, BCL-2 and BCL-6, IPIaa, high Ki-67 and p53 overexpression.

  • 15.
    Abdulla, Maysaa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology. Univ Uppsala Hosp, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Laszlo, Sofia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology. Univ Uppsala Hosp, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Triumf, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Univ Uppsala Hosp, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Hedström, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Univ Uppsala Hosp, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Berglund, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Univ Uppsala Hosp, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Univ Uppsala Hosp, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Amini, Rose-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology. Univ Uppsala Hosp, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Core needle biopsies for the diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma - a great concern for research2017In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 56, no 1, p. 106-109Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Abdulla, Salim
    et al.
    Ifakara Hlth Inst, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania..
    Adam, Ishag
    Univ Khartoum, Fac Med, Khartoum, Sudan..
    Adjei, George O.
    Univ Ghana, Sch Med, Ctr Trop Clin Pharmacol & Therapeut, Accra, Ghana..
    Adjuik, Martin A.
    INDEPTH Network Secretariat, Accra, Ghana..
    Alemayehu, Bereket
    Int Ctr AIDS Care & Treatment Programs, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia..
    Allan, Richard
    MENTOR Initiat, Crawley, England..
    Arinaitwe, Emmanuel
    Infect Dis Res Collaborat, Kampala, Uganda..
    Ashley, Elizabeth A.
    Epictr, Paris, France..
    Ba, Mamadou S.
    Univ Cheikh Anta Diop, Dept Parasitol & Mycol, Fac Med, Dakar, Senegal..
    Barennes, Hubert
    Ctr Muraz, Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso.;French Foreign Affairs, Biarritz, France..
    Barnes, Karen I.
    WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Cape Town, South Africa.;Univ Cape Town, Dept Med, Div Clin Pharmacol, ZA-7925 Cape Town, South Africa..
    Bassat, Quique
    Ctr Invest Saude Manhica, Manhica, Mozambique.;Univ Barcelona, Barcelona Ctr Int Hlth Res CRESIB, ISGlobal, Hosp Clin, Barcelona, Spain..
    Baudin, Elisabeth
    MENTOR Initiat, Crawley, England..
    Berens-Riha, Nicole
    Univ Munich LMU, Med Ctr, Div Infect Dis & Trop Med, Munich, Germany.;LMU, German Ctr Infect Res DZIF, Munich, Germany..
    Bjoerkman, Anders
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Microbiol Tumour & Cell Biol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Bompart, Francois
    Sanofi Aventis, Direct Acces Med Access Med, Gentilly, France..
    Bonnet, Maryline
    Epictr, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Borrmann, Steffen
    Wellcome Trust Res Programme, Kenya Med Res Inst, Kilifi, Kenya.;Univ Tubingen, Inst Trop Med, Tubingen, Germany.;German Ctr Infect Res, Tubingen, Germany..
    Bousema, Teun
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Fac Infect & Trop Dis, Dept Infect & Immun, London WC1, England.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Med Microbiol, Njimegen, Netherlands..
    Brasseur, Philippe
    IRD, Dakar, Senegal..
    Bukirwa, Hasifa
    Uganda Malaria Surveillance Project, Kampala, Uganda..
    Checchi, Francesco
    Epictr, Paris, France..
    Dahal, Prabin
    WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England.;Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England..
    D'Alessandro, Umberto
    Inst Trop Med, Unit Malariol, B-2000 Antwerp, Belgium.;MRC Unit, Fajara, Gambia.;London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Fac Infect & Trop Dis, Dept Dis Control, London WC1, England..
    Desai, Meghna
    Ctr Dis Control & Prevent, Div Parasit Dis & Malaria, Malaria Branch, Atlanta, GA USA..
    Dicko, Alassane
    Univ Bamako, Fac Med Pharm & Dent, Malaria Res & Training Ctr, Bamako, Mali.;Univ Bamako, Fac Med Pharm & Dent, Dept Publ Hlth, Bamako, Mali..
    Djimde, Abdoulaye A.
    Univ Bamako, Fac Med Pharm & Dent, Malaria Res & Training Ctr, Bamako, Mali..
    Dorsey, Grant
    Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Med, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA..
    Doumbo, Ogobara K.
    Univ Bamako, Fac Med Pharm & Dent, Malaria Res & Training Ctr, Bamako, Mali..
    Drakeley, Chris J.
    German Ctr Infect Res, Tubingen, Germany..
    Duparc, Stephan
    Med Malaria Venture, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Eshetu, Teferi
    Univ Barcelona, Barcelona Ctr Int Hlth Res CRESIB, ISGlobal, Hosp Clin, Barcelona, Spain.;Jimma Univ, Dept Med Lab Sci & Pathol, Jimma, Ethiopia..
    Espie, Emmanuelle
    Epictr, Paris, France..
    Etard, Jean-Francois
    Epictr, Paris, France.;IRD, Montpellier, France..
    Faiz, Abul M.
    Mahidol Univ, Fac Trop Med, Bangkok, Thailand..
    Falade, Catherine O.
    Univ Ibadan, Coll Med, Dept Pharmacol & Therapeut, Ibadan, Nigeria..
    Fanello, Caterina I.
    Mahidol Univ, Fac Trop Med, Mahidol Oxford Res Unit, Bangkok, Thailand..
    Faucher, Jean-Francois
    IRD, Mother & Child Hlth Trop Res Unit, Paris, France.;Univ Paris 05, PRES Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris, France.;Univ Besancon, Med Ctr, Dept Infect Dis, F-25030 Besancon, France..
    Faye, Babacar
    Univ Cheikh Anta Diop, Dept Parasitol & Mycol, Fac Med, Dakar, Senegal..
    Faye, Oumar
    Univ Cheikh Anta Diop, Dept Parasitol & Mycol, Fac Med, Dakar, Senegal..
    Filler, Scott
    Global Fund Fight AIDS TB & Malaria, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Flegg, Jennifer A.
    WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England.;Monash Univ, Sch Math Sci, Melbourne, Vic 3004, Australia.;Monash Univ, Monash Acad Cross & Interdisciplinary Math Applic, Melbourne, Vic 3004, Australia..
    Fofana, Bakary
    Univ Bamako, Fac Med Pharm & Dent, Malaria Res & Training Ctr, Bamako, Mali..
    Fogg, Carole
    Univ Portsmouth, Portsmouth Hosp NHS Trust, Portsmouth, Hants, England..
    Gadalla, Nahla B.
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Fac Infect & Trop Dis, Dept Infect & Immun, London WC1, England.;Natl Res Ctr, Res Inst Trop Med, Dept Epidemiol, Khartoum, Sudan.;NIAID, Rockville, MD USA..
    Gaye, Oumar
    Univ Cheikh Anta Diop, Dept Parasitol & Mycol, Fac Med, Dakar, Senegal..
    Genton, Blaise
    Swiss Trop & Publ Hlth Inst, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Basel, Switzerland.;Univ Lausanne Hosp, Div Infect Dis, Lausanne, Switzerland.;Univ Lausanne Hosp, Dept Ambulatory Care & Community Med, Lausanne, Switzerland..
    Gething, Peter W.
    Univ Oxford, Dept Zool, Spatial Ecol & Epidemiol Grp, Oxford OX1 3PS, England..
    Gil, Jose P.
    Karolinska Inst, Pharmacogenet Sect, Drug Resistance Unit, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Univ Lisbon, Fac Sci, Biosyst & Integrat Sci Inst BioISI, P-1699 Lisbon, Portugal.;SUNY Binghamton, Harpur Coll Arts & Sci, Binghamton, NY USA..
    Gonzalez, Raquel
    Ctr Invest Saude Manhica, Manhica, Mozambique.;Univ Barcelona, Barcelona Ctr Int Hlth Res CRESIB, ISGlobal, Hosp Clin, Barcelona, Spain..
    Grandesso, Francesco
    Epictr, Paris, France..
    Greenhouse, Bryan
    Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Med, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA..
    Greenwood, Brian
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Fac Infect & Trop Dis, Dept Dis Control, London WC1, England..
    Grivoyannis, Anastasia
    Univ Washington, Div Emergency Med, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Guerin, Philippe J.
    WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England.;Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England..
    Guthmann, Jean-Paul
    Inst Veille Sanit, Dept Malad Infect, St Maurice, France..
    Hamed, Kamal
    Novartis Pharmaceut, E Hanover, NJ USA..
    Hamour, Sally
    Royal Free Hosp, UCL Ctr Nephrol, London NW3 2QG, England..
    Hay, Simon I.
    Univ Oxford, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England.;Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;NIH, Fogarty Int Ctr, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Hodel, Eva Maria
    Swiss Trop & Publ Hlth Inst, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Basel, Switzerland.;Univ Liverpool, Liverpool Sch Trop Med, Dept Parasitol, Liverpool L3 5QA, Merseyside, England..
    Humphreys, Georgina S.
    WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England.;Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England..
    Hwang, Jimee
    Ctr Dis Control & Prevent, Div Parasit Dis & Malaria, Malaria Branch, Atlanta, GA USA.;Univ Calif San Francisco, Global Hlth Grp, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA..
    Ibrahim, Maman L.
    Ctr Rech Med & Sanit, Niamey, Niger..
    Jima, Daddi
    Fed Minist Hlth, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia..
    Jones, Joel J.
    Minist Hlth & Social Welf, Natl Malaria Control Programme, Monrovia, Liberia..
    Jullien, Vincent
    Univ Paris 05, AP HP, Paris, France..
    Juma, Elizabeth
    Kenya Govt Med Res Ctr, Nairobi, Kenya..
    Kachur, Patrick S.
    Ctr Dis Control & Prevent, Div Parasit Dis & Malaria, Malaria Branch, Atlanta, GA USA..
    Kager, Piet A.
    Univ Amsterdam, Acad Med Ctr, Ctr Infect & Immun Amsterdam CINIMA, Div Infect Dis Trop Med & AIDS, NL-1105 AZ Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Kamugisha, Erasmus
    Catholic Univ Hlth & Allied Sci, Mwanza, Tanzania..
    Kamya, Moses R.
    Makerere Univ, Coll Hlth Sci, Kampala, Uganda..
    Karema, Corine
    Minist Hlth, Malaria & Other Parasit Dis Div RBC, Kigali, Rwanda..
    Kayentao, Kassoum
    Univ Bamako, Fac Med Pharm & Dent, Malaria Res & Training Ctr, Bamako, Mali..
    Kiechel, Jean-Rene
    Drugs Neglected Dis initiat, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Kironde, Fred
    Makerere Univ, Dept Biochem, Kampala, Uganda..
    Kofoed, Poul-Erik
    Projecto Saude Bandim, Bissau, Guinea Bissau.;Kolding Cty Hosp, Dept Paediat, Kolding, Denmark..
    Kremsner, Peter G.
    Univ Tubingen, Inst Trop Med, Tubingen, Germany.;Ctr Rech Med Lambarene, Lambarene, Gabon..
    Krishna, Sanjeev
    Univ London, Inst Infect & Immun, London, England. Operat Ctr Barcelona Athens, Med Sans Frontieres, Barcelona, Spain..
    Lameyre, Valerie
    Sanofi Aventis, Direct Acces Med Access Med, Gentilly, France..
    Lell, Bertrand
    Univ Tubingen, Inst Trop Med, Tubingen, Germany.;Ctr Rech Med Lambarene, Lambarene, Gabon..
    Lima, Angeles
    Univ Oxford, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England..
    Makanga, Michael
    European & Dev Countries Clin Trials Partnership, Cape Town, South Africa..
    Malik, ElFatih M.
    Fed Minist Hlth, Khartoum, Sudan..
    Marsh, Kevin
    Wellcome Trust Res Programme, Kenya Med Res Inst, Kilifi, Kenya.;Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England..
    Mårtensson, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Karolinska Inst, Dept Microbiol Tumour & Cell Biol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Massougbodji, Achille
    Univ Abomey Calavi, FSS, CERPAGE, Cotonou, Benin..
    Menan, Herve
    Univ Cocody, Fac Pharm, Dept Parasitol, Abidjan, Cote Ivoire..
    Menard, Didier
    Inst Pasteur Cambodia, Malaria Mol Epidemiol Unit, Phnom Penh, Cambodia..
    Menendez, Clara
    Ctr Invest Saude Manhica, Manhica, Mozambique.;Univ Barcelona, Barcelona Ctr Int Hlth Res CRESIB, ISGlobal, Hosp Clin, Barcelona, Spain..
    Mens, Petra F.
    Univ Amsterdam, Acad Med Ctr, Ctr Infect & Immun Amsterdam CINIMA, Div Infect Dis Trop Med & AIDS, NL-1105 AZ Amsterdam, Netherlands.;KIT Biomed Res, Royal Trop Inst, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Meremikwu, Martin
    Univ Calabar, Dept Paediat, Calabar, Nigeria.;Inst Trop Dis Res & Prevent, Calabar, Nigeria..
    Moreira, Clarissa
    WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England.;Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England..
    Nabasumba, Carolyn
    Epictr, Paris, France.;Mbarara Univ Sci & Technol, Fac Med, Mbarara, Uganda..
    Nambozi, Michael
    Trop Dis Res Ctr, Ndola, Zambia..
    Ndiaye, Jean-Louis
    Univ Cheikh Anta Diop, Dept Parasitol & Mycol, Fac Med, Dakar, Senegal..
    Ngasala, Billy E.
    Muhimbili Univ Hlth & Allied Sci, Dept Parasitol, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Infect Dis Unit, Malaria Res, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nikiema, Frederic
    Inst Rech Sci Sante, Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso..
    Nsanzabana, Christian
    WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England.;Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England..
    Ntoumi, Francine
    Univ Tubingen, Inst Trop Med, Tubingen, Germany.;Univ Marien Ngouabi, FCRM, Fac Sci Sante, Brazzaville, Congo..
    Oguike, Mary
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Fac Infect & Trop Dis, Dept Infect & Immun, London WC1, England..
    Ogutu, Bernhards R.
    United States Army Med Res Unit, Kenya Med Res Inst, Kisumu, Kenya..
    Olliaro, Piero
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England.;UNICEF UNDP World Bank WHO Special Programme Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Omar, Sabah A.
    Kenya Govt Med Res Ctr, Ctr Biotechnol Res & Dev, Nairobi, Kenya..
    Ouedraogo, Jean-Bosco
    Ctr Muraz, Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso.;Inst Rech Sci Sante, Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso..
    Owusu-Agyei, Seth
    Kintampo Hlth Res Ctr, Kintampo, Ghana..
    Penali, Louis K.
    WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN W, Dakar, Senegal..
    Pene, Mbaye
    Univ Cheikh Anta Diop, Dept Parasitol & Mycol, Fac Med, Dakar, Senegal..
    Peshu, Judy
    Wellcome Trust Res Programme, Kenya Med Res Inst, Kilifi, Kenya..
    Piola, Patrice
    Inst Pasteur Madagascar, Epidemiol Unit, Antananarivo, Madagascar..
    Plowe, Christopher V.
    Univ Maryland, Sch Med, Howard Hughes Med Inst, Ctr Vaccine Dev, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA..
    Premji, Zul
    Muhimbili Univ Hlth & Allied Sci, Dept Parasitol, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania..
    Price, Ric N.
    WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England.;Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England.;Menzies Sch Hlth Res, Darwin, NT, Australia.;Charles Darwin Univ, Darwin, NT 0909, Australia..
    Randrianarivelojosia, Milijaona
    Inst Pasteur Madagascar, Malaria Res Unit, Antananarivo, Madagascar..
    Rombo, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Infect Dis Unit, Malaria Res Lab,Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden.;Malarsjukhuset, Dept Infect Dis, S-63188 Eskilstuna, Sweden..
    Roper, Cally
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Fac Infect & Trop Dis, Dept Pathogen Mol Biol, London WC1, England..
    Rosenthal, Philip J.
    Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Med, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA..
    Sagara, Issaka
    Univ Bamako, Fac Med Pharm & Dent, Malaria Res & Training Ctr, Bamako, Mali..
    Same-Ekobo, Albert
    Ctr Hosp Univ Yaounde, Fac Med & Sci Biomed, Yaounde, Cameroon..
    Sawa, Patrick
    Int Ctr Insect Physiol & Ecol, Human Hlth Div, Mbita, Kenya..
    Schallig, Henk D. F. H.
    KIT Biomed Res, Royal Trop Inst, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Schramm, Birgit
    Epictr, Paris, France..
    Seck, Amadou
    WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN W, Dakar, Senegal..
    Shekalaghe, Seif A.
    Ifakara Hlth Inst, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania.;Kilimanjaro Christian Med Ctr, Kilimanjaro Clin Med Res Inst, Moshi, Tanzania..
    Sibley, Carol H.
    WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England.;Univ Washington, Dept Genome Sci, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Sinou, Vronique
    Aix Marseille Univ, Fac Pharm, UMR MD3, Marseille, France..
    Sirima, Sodiomon B.
    CNRFP, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso..
    Som, Fabrice A.
    Inst Rech Sci Sante, Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso..
    Sow, Doudou
    Univ Cheikh Anta Diop, Dept Parasitol & Mycol, Fac Med, Dakar, Senegal..
    Staedke, Sarah G.
    Infect Dis Res Collaborat, Kampala, Uganda.;London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Fac Infect & Trop Dis, Dept Clin Res, London WC1, England..
    Stepniewska, Kasia
    WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England.;Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England..
    Sutherland, Colin J.
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Fac Infect & Trop Dis, Dept Infect & Immun, London WC1, England..
    Swarthout, Todd D.
    Med Sans Frontieres, London, England..
    Sylla, Khadime
    Univ Cheikh Anta Diop, Dept Parasitol & Mycol, Fac Med, Dakar, Senegal..
    Talisuna, Ambrose O.
    East Africa Reg Ctr, WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Nairobi, Kenya.;Univ Oxford, KEMRI, Wellcome Trust Res Programme, Nairobi, Kenya..
    Taylor, Walter R. J.
    UNICEF UNDP World Bank WHO Special Programme Res, Geneva, Switzerland.;Hop Cantonal Univ Geneva, Serv Med Int & Humanitaire, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Temu, Emmanuel A.
    MENTOR Initiat, Crawley, England.;Swiss Trop & Publ Hlth Inst, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Basel, Switzerland.;Univ Basel, Basel, Switzerland..
    Thwing, Julie I.
    Ctr Dis Control & Prevent, Div Parasit Dis & Malaria, Malaria Branch, Atlanta, GA USA..
    Tine, Roger C. K.
    Univ Cheikh Anta Diop, Dept Parasitol & Mycol, Fac Med, Dakar, Senegal..
    Tinto, Halidou
    Ctr Muraz, Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso.;Inst Rech Sci Sante, Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso..
    Tommasini, Silva
    Sigma Tau Ind Farmaceut Riunite SpA, Rome, Italy..
    Toure, Offianan A.
    Inst Pasteur Cote Ivoire, Malariol Dept, Abidjan, Cote Ivoire..
    Ursing, Johan
    Projecto Saude Bandim, Bissau, Guinea Bissau.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Infect Dis Unit, Malaria Res, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Vaillant, Michel T.
    CRP Sante, Ctr Hlth Studies, Methodol & Stat Unit, Luxembourg, Luxembourg.;Univ Bordeaux 2, Unite Bases Therapeut Inflammat & Infect 3677, F-33076 Bordeaux, France..
    Valentini, Giovanni
    Sigma Tau Ind Farmaceut Riunite SpA, Rome, Italy..
    Van den Broek, Ingrid
    Med Sans Frontieres, London, England.;Natl Inst Publ Hlth & Environm, Ctr Infect Dis Control, NL-3720 BA Bilthoven, Netherlands..
    Van Vugt, Michele
    Univ Amsterdam, Acad Med Ctr, Ctr Trop Med & Travel Med, Div Infect Dis, NL-1012 WX Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Ward, Stephen A.
    Univ Liverpool, Liverpool Sch Trop Med, Dept Parasitol, Liverpool L3 5QA, Merseyside, England..
    Winstanley, Peter A.
    Univ Warwick, Warwick Med Sch, Coventry CV4 7AL, W Midlands, England..
    Yavo, William
    Univ Cocody, Fac Pharmaceut & Biol Sci, Dept Parasitol & Mycol, Abidjan, Cote Ivoire.;Natl Inst Publ Hlth, Malaria Res & Control Ctr, Abidjan, Cote Ivoire..
    Yeka, Adoke
    Uganda Malaria Surveillance Project, Kampala, Uganda..
    Zolia, Yah M.
    Minist Hlth & Social Welf, Natl Malaria Control Programme, Monrovia, Liberia..
    Zongo, Issaka
    Inst Rech Sci Sante, Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso..
    Clinical determinants of early parasitological response to ACTs in African patients with uncomplicated falciparum malaria: a literature review and meta-analysis of individual patient data2015In: BMC Medicine, ISSN 1741-7015, E-ISSN 1741-7015, Vol. 13, article id 212Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum has emerged in the Greater Mekong sub-region and poses a major global public health threat. Slow parasite clearance is a key clinical manifestation of reduced susceptibility to artemisinin. This study was designed to establish the baseline values for clearance in patients from Sub-Saharan African countries with uncomplicated malaria treated with artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs). Methods: A literature review in PubMed was conducted in March 2013 to identify all prospective clinical trials (uncontrolled trials, controlled trials and randomized controlled trials), including ACTs conducted in Sub-Saharan Africa, between 1960 and 2012. Individual patient data from these studies were shared with the WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN) and pooled using an a priori statistical analytical plan. Factors affecting early parasitological response were investigated using logistic regression with study sites fitted as a random effect. The risk of bias in included studies was evaluated based on study design, methodology and missing data. Results: In total, 29,493 patients from 84 clinical trials were included in the analysis, treated with artemether-lumefantrine (n = 13,664), artesunate-amodiaquine (n = 11,337) and dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (n = 4,492). The overall parasite clearance rate was rapid. The parasite positivity rate (PPR) decreased from 59.7 % (95 % CI: 54.5-64.9) on day 1 to 6.7 % (95 % CI: 4.8-8.7) on day 2 and 0.9 % (95 % CI: 0.5-1.2) on day 3. The 95th percentile of observed day 3 PPR was 5.3 %. Independent risk factors predictive of day 3 positivity were: high baseline parasitaemia (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.16 (95 % CI: 1.08-1.25); per 2-fold increase in parasite density, P <0.001); fever (>37.5 degrees C) (AOR = 1.50 (95 % CI: 1.06-2.13), P = 0.022); severe anaemia (AOR = 2.04 (95 % CI: 1.21-3.44), P = 0.008); areas of low/moderate transmission setting (AOR = 2.71 (95 % CI: 1.38-5.36), P = 0.004); and treatment with the loose formulation of artesunate-amodiaquine (AOR = 2.27 (95 % CI: 1.14-4.51), P = 0.020, compared to dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine). Conclusions: The three ACTs assessed in this analysis continue to achieve rapid early parasitological clearance across the sites assessed in Sub-Saharan Africa. A threshold of 5 % day 3 parasite positivity from a minimum sample size of 50 patients provides a more sensitive benchmark in Sub-Saharan Africa compared to the current recommended threshold of 10 % to trigger further investigation of artemisinin susceptibility.

  • 17. Abedini, Sadollah
    et al.
    Holme, Ingar
    Fellström, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Jardine, Alan
    Cole, Ed
    Maes, Bart
    Holdaas, Hallvard
    Cerebrovascular events in renal transplant recipients2009In: Transplantation, ISSN 0041-1337, E-ISSN 1534-6080, Vol. 87, no 1, p. 112-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The incidence of stroke and risk factors for different subtypes of cerebrovascular (CBV) events in renal transplant recipients have not been examined in any large prospective controlled trial. METHODS: The Assessment of Lescol in Renal Transplantation was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of the effect of fluvastatin (40-80 mg) daily on cardiovascular, and renal outcomes in renal transplant recipients. Patients initially randomized to fluvastatin or placebo in the 5 to 6 year trial was offered open-label fluvastatin in a 2-year extension to the original study. We investigated the incidence of stroke and risk factors for ischemic and hemorrhagic CBV events in 2102 renal graft recipients participating in the Assessment of Lescol in Renal Transplantation core and extension trial with a mean follow-up of 6.7 years. RESULTS: The incidence and type of CBV events did not differ between the lipid lowering arm and the placebo arm. A total of 184 (8.8%, 95% confidence interval 4.6-12.9) of 2102 patients experienced a CBV event during follow-up, corresponding to an incidence of 1.3% CBV event per year. The mortality for patients experiencing a hemorrhagic stroke was 48% (13 of 27), whereas the mortality for ischemic strokes was 6.0% (8 of 133). Diabetes mellitus, previous CBV event, age, and serum creatinine were independent risk factors for cerebral ischemic events. The risk of a hemorrhagic cerebral event was increased by diabetes mellitus, polycystic kidney disease, left ventricular hypertrophy, and systolic blood pressure. INTERPRETATION: Risk factors for CBV events in renal transplant recipients differ according to subtype.

  • 18. Abedini, Sadollah
    et al.
    Holme, Ingar
    März, Winfried
    Weihrauch, Gisela
    Fellström, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Jardine, Alan
    Cole, Edward
    Maes, Bart
    Neumayer, Hans-Hellmut
    Grönhagen-Riska, Carola
    Ambühl, Patrice
    Holdaas, Halvard
    Inflammation in renal transplantation2009In: Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, ISSN 1046-6673, E-ISSN 1533-3450, Vol. 4, no 7, p. 1246-1254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Renal transplant recipients experience premature cardiovascular disease and death. The association of inflammation, all-cause mortality, and cardiovascular events in renal transplant recipients has not been examined in a large prospective controlled trial. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS: ALERT was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of the effect of fluvastatin on cardiovascular and renal outcomes in 2102 renal transplant recipients. Patients initially randomized to fluvastatin or placebo in the 5- to 6-yr trial were offered open-label fluvastatin in a 2-yr extension to the original study. The association between inflammation markers, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), and IL-6 on cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality was investigated. RESULTS: The baseline IL-6 value was 2.9 +/- 1.9 pg/ml (n = 1751) and that of hsCRP was 3.8 +/- 6.7 mg/L (n = 1910). After adjustment for baseline values for established risk factors, the hazard ratios for a major cardiac event and all-cause mortality for IL-6 were 1.08 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01 to 1.15, P = 0.018] and 1.11 (95% CI, 1.05 to 1.18, P < 0.001), respectively. The adjusted hazard ratio for hsCRP for a cardiovascular event was 1.10 (95% CI, 1.01 to 1.20, P = 0.027) and for all-cause mortality was 1.15 (95% CI, 1.06 to 1.1.25, P = 0.049). CONCLUSIONS: The inflammation markers IL-6 and hsCRP are independently associated with major cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality in renal transplant recipients.

  • 19. Abedini, Sadollah
    et al.
    Meinitzer, Andreas
    Holme, Ingar
    März, Winfried
    Weihrauch, Gisela
    Fellström, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Jardine, Alan
    Holdaas, Halvard
    Asymmetrical dimethylarginine is associated with renal and cardiovascular outcomes and all-cause mortality in renal transplant recipients2010In: Kidney International, ISSN 0085-2538, E-ISSN 1523-1755, Vol. 77, no 1, p. 44-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased plasma levels of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) are associated with endothelial dysfunction and predict the progression to dialysis and death in patients with chronic kidney disease. The effects of these increased ADMA levels in renal transplant recipients, however, are unknown. We used the data from ALERT, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of the effect of fluvastatin on cardiovascular and renal outcomes in 2102 renal transplant recipients with stable graft function on enrollment. Patients who were initially randomized to fluvastatin or placebo in the 5- to 6-year trial were offered open-label fluvastatin in a 2-year extension of the original study. After adjustment for baseline values for established factors in this post hoc analysis, ADMA was found to be a significant risk factor for graft failure or doubling of serum creatinine (hazard ratio 2.78), major cardiac events (hazard ratio 2.61), cerebrovascular events (hazard ratio 6.63), and all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 4.87). In this trial extension, the number of end points increased with increasing quartiles of plasma ADMA levels. All end points were significantly increased in the fourth compared to the first quartile. Our study shows that elevated plasma levels of ADMA are associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and the deterioration of graft function in renal transplant recipients.

  • 20.
    Abeid, Muzdalifat
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Tanzania.
    Muganyizi, Projestine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Tanzania.
    Mpembeni, Rose
    Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Tanzania.
    Darj, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Axemo, Pia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    A community-based intervention for improving health-seeking behavior among sexual violence survivors: A controlled before and after design study in rural Tanzania2015In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 8, article id 28608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Despite global recognition that sexual violence is a violation of human rights, evidence still shows it is a pervasive problem across all societies. Promising community intervention studies in the low- and middle-income countries are limited.

    Objective: This study assessed the impact of a community-based intervention, focusing on improving the community’s knowledge and reducing social acceptability of violence against women norms with the goal to prevent and respond to sexual violence.

    Design: The strategies used to create awareness included radio programs, information, education communication materials and advocacy meetings with local leaders. The intervention took place in Morogoro region in Tanzania. The evaluation used a quasi-experimental design including cross-sectional surveys at baseline (2012) and endline (2014) with men and women aged 18-49. Main outcome measures were number of reported rape cases at health facilities and the community’s knowledge and attitudes towards sexual violence.

    Results: The number of reported rape events increased by more than 50% at health facilities during the intervention. Knowledge on sexual violence increased significantly in both areas over the study period (from 57.3% to 80.6% in the intervention area and from 55.5% to 71.9% in the comparison area; p<.001), and the net effect of the intervention between the two areas was statistically significant (6.9, 95% CI 0.2–13.5, p= 0.03). There was significant improvement in most of attitude indicators in the intervention area, but not in the comparison area. However, the intervention had no significant effect in the overall scores of acceptance attitudes in the final assessment when comparing the two areas (-2.4, 95%CI: -8.4 – 3.6, p= 0.42).

    Conclusions: The intervention had an effect on some indicators on knowledge and attitudes towards sexual violence even after a short period of intervention. This finding informs the public health practitioners of the importance of combined strategies in achieving changes.

  • 21.
    Abeid, Muzdalifat
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). MUHAS, Dept Obstet Gynecol, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania.
    Muganyizi, Projestine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). MUHAS, Dept Obstet Gynecol, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania.
    Mpembeni, Rose
    MUHAS, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania.
    Darj, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Publ Hlth & Gen Practice, Trondheim, Norway.
    Axemo, Pia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Evaluation of a training program for health care workers to improve the quality of care for rape survivors: a quasi-experimental design study in Morogoro, Tanzania2016In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 9, article id 31735Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Sexual violence against women and children in Tanzania and globally is a human rights violation and a developmental challenge.

    OBJECTIVE:

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of training health professionals on rape management. The specific objectives were to evaluate the changes of knowledge and attitudes toward sexual violence among a selected population of health professionals at primary health care level.

    DESIGN:

    A quasi-experimental design using cross-sectional surveys was conducted to evaluate health care workers' knowledge, attitude, and clinical practice toward sexual violence before and after the training program. The study involved the Kilombero (intervention) and Ulanga (comparison) districts in Morogoro region. A total of 151 health professionals at baseline (2012) and 169 in the final assessment (2014) participated in the survey. Data were collected using the same structured questionnaire. The amount of change in key indicators from baseline to final assessment in the two areas was compared using composite scores in the pre- and post-interventions, and the net intervention effect was calculated by the difference in difference method.

    RESULTS:

    Overall, there was improved knowledge in the intervention district from 55% at baseline to 86% and a decreased knowledge from 58.5 to 36.2% in the comparison area with a net effect of 53.7% and a p-value less than 0.0001. The proportion of participants who exhibited an accepting attitude toward violence declined from 15.3 to 11.2% in the intervention area but increased from 13.2 to 20.0% in the comparison area.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Training on the management of sexual violence is feasible and the results indicate improvement in healthcare workers' knowledge and practice but not attitudes. Lessons learned from this study for successful replication of such an intervention in similar settings require commitment from those at strategic level within the health service to ensure that adequate resources are made available.

  • 22.
    Abels, M.
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Malmo, Sweden..
    Riva, M.
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Malmo, Sweden..
    Poon, W.
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Malmo, Sweden..
    Bennet, H.
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Malmo, Sweden..
    Nagaraj, V.
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Malmo, Sweden..
    Dyachok, Oleg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Isomaa, B.
    Folkhalsan Res Ctr, Helsinki, Finland.;Dept Social Serv & Hlth Care, Jacobstad, Finland..
    Tuomi, T.
    Folkhalsan Res Ctr, Helsinki, Finland.;Dept Med, Helsinki, Finland..
    Ahren, B.
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Lund, Sweden..
    Tengholm, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Fex, M.
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Malmo, Sweden..
    Renstrom, E.
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Malmo, Sweden..
    Groop, L.
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Malmo, Sweden..
    Lyssenko, V.
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Malmo, Sweden..
    Wierup, N.
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Malmo, Sweden..
    CART is a novel glucose-dependent peptide with antidiabetic actions in humans2015In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 58, no Suppl. 1, p. S279-S280Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Abels, Mia
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Riva, Matteo
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Bennet, Hedvig
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Ahlqvist, Emma
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Dyachok, Oleg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Nagaraj, Vini
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Shcherbina, Liliya
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Fred, Rikard G.
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Poon, Wenny
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Sorhede-Winzell, Maria
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Fadista, Joao
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Lindqvist, Andreas
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Kask, Lena
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Sathanoori, Ramasri
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Dekker-Nitert, Marloes
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Kuhar, Michael J.
    Emory Univ, Yerkes Res Ctr, Atlanta, GA 30322 USA..
    Ahren, Bo
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Wollheim, Claes B.
    Univ Med Ctr, Dept Cell Physiol & Metab, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Hansson, Ola
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Tengholm, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Fex, Malin
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Renström, Erik
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Groop, Leif
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Lyssenko, Valeriya
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden.;Steno Diabet Ctr AS, Gentofte, Denmark..
    Wierup, Nils
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Clin Res Ctr 91 12, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp,Dept Clin Sci Malmo,Unit Neuroend, Jan Waldenstroms Gata 35, S-20502 Malmo, Sweden..
    CART is overexpressed in human type 2 diabetic islets and inhibits glucagon secretion and increases insulin secretion2016In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 59, no 9, p. 1928-1937Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims/hypothesis Insufficient insulin release and hyperglucagonaemia are culprits in type 2 diabetes. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART, encoded by Cartpt) affects islet hormone secretion and beta cell survival in vitro in rats, and Cart(-/-) mice have diminished insulin secretion. We aimed to test if CART is differentially regulated in human type 2 diabetic islets and if CART affects insulin and glucagon secretion in vitro in humans and in vivo in mice. Methods CART expression was assessed in human type 2 diabetic and non-diabetic control pancreases and rodent models of diabetes. Insulin and glucagon secretion was examined in isolated islets and in vivo in mice. Ca2+ oscillation patterns and exocytosis were studied in mouse islets. Results We report an important role of CART in human islet function and glucose homeostasis in mice. CART was found to be expressed in human alpha and beta cells and in a subpopulation of mouse beta cells. Notably, CART expression was several fold higher in islets of type 2 diabetic humans and rodents. CART increased insulin secretion in vivo in mice and in human and mouse islets. Furthermore, CART increased beta cell exocytosis, altered the glucose-induced Ca2+ signalling pattern in mouse islets from fast to slow oscillations and improved synchronisation of the oscillations between different islet regions. Finally, CART reduced glucagon secretion in human and mouse islets, as well as in vivo in mice via diminished alpha cell exocytosis. Conclusions/interpretation We conclude that CART is a regulator of glucose homeostasis and could play an important role in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes. Based on the ability of CART to increase insulin secretion and reduce glucagon secretion, CART-based agents could be a therapeutic modality in type 2 diabetes.

  • 24.
    Abrahamsson, Lotta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi.
    Ljung, Ida-Karin
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi.
    Bliss i interaktion: - En samtalsanalytisk fallstudie av hur blissanvändare och tolkare tillsammans bygger upp yttranden2008Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 25.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    On the Impact of Bariatric Surgery on Glucose Homeostasis2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Obesity has grown to epidemic proportions, and in lack of efficient life-style and medical treatments, the bariatric surgeries are performed in rising numbers. The most common surgery is the Gastric Bypass (GBP) surgery, with the Biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch (DS) as an option for the most extreme cases with a BMI>50 kg/m2.

    In paper I 20 GBP-patients were examined during the first post-operative year regarding the natriuretic peptide, NT-ProBNP, which is secreted from the cardiac ventricles. Levels of NT-ProBNP quickly increased during the first post-surgery week, and later established itself on a higher level than pre-surgery.

    In paper II we report of 5 patient-cases after GBP-surgery with severe problems with postprandial hypoglycaemia that were successfully treated with GLP-1-analogs. The effect of treatment could be observed both symptomatically and in some cases using continuous glucose measuring systems (CGMS).

    In paper III three groups of subjects; 15 post-GBP patients, 15 post-DS, and 15 obese controls were examined for three days using CGMS during everyday life. The post-GBP group had high glucose variability as measured by MAGE and CONGA, whereas the post-DS group had low variability. Both post-operative groups exhibited significant time in hypoglycaemia, about 40 and 80 minutes per day <3.3mmol/l and 20 and 40 minutes < 2.8mmol/l, respectively, longer time for DS-group. Remarkably, only about 20% of these hypoglycaemic episodes were accompanied with symptoms.

    In Paper IV the hypoglycaemia counter regulatory system was investigated; 12 patients were examined before and after GBP-surgery with a stepped hypoglycaemic hyperinsulinemic clamp. The results show a downregulation of symptoms, counter regulatory hormones (glucagon, cortisol, epinephrine, norepinephrine, growth hormone), incretin hormones (GLP-1 and GIP), and sympathetic nervous response.

    In conclusion patients post bariatric surgery exhibit a downregulated counter regulatory response to hypoglycaemia, accompanied by frequent asymptomatic hypoglycaemic episodes in everyday life. Patients suffering from severe hypoglycaemic episodes can often be treated successfully with GLP-1-analogues.

    List of papers
    1. Gastric Bypass Surgery Elevates NT-ProBNP Levels
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gastric Bypass Surgery Elevates NT-ProBNP Levels
    2013 (English)In: Obesity Surgery, ISSN 0960-8923, E-ISSN 1708-0428, Vol. 23, no 9, p. 1421-1426Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is produced in the heart in response to stretching of the myocardium. BNP levels are negatively correlated to obesity, and in obese subjects, a reduced BNP responsiveness has been described. Diet-induced weight loss has been found to lower or to have no effect on BNP levels, whereas gastric banding and gastric bypass have reported divergent results. We studied obese patients undergoing gastric bypass (GBP) surgery during follow-up of 1 year.

    Methods

    Twenty patients, 18 women, mean 41 (SD 9.5) years old, with a mean preoperative BMI of 44.6 (SD 5.5) kg/m2 were examined. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-ProBNP), glucose and insulin were measured preoperatively, at day 6 and months 1, 6 and 12. In 14 of the patients, samples were also taken at days 1, 2 and 4.

    Results

    The NT-ProBNP levels showed a marked increase during the postoperative week (from 54 pg/mL preop to 359 pg/mL on day 2 and fell to 155 on day 6). At 1 year, NT-ProBNP was 122 pg/mL (125 % increase, p = 0.01). Glucose, insulin and HOMA indices decreased shortly after surgery without correlation to NT-ProBNP change. Mean BMI was reduced from 44.6 to 30.5 kg/m2 at 1 year and was not related to NT-ProBNP change.

    Conclusions

    The data indicate that GBP surgery rapidly alters the tone of BNP release, by a mechanism not related to weight loss or to changes in glucometabolic parameters. The GBP-induced conversion of obese subjects, from low to high NT-ProBNP responders, is likely to influence the evaluation of cardiac function in GBP operated individuals.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-199870 (URN)10.1007/s11695-013-0889-z (DOI)000322494800011 ()23456799 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2013-05-17 Created: 2013-05-17 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    2. GLP1 analogs as treatment of postprandial hypoglycemia following gastric bypass surgery: a potential new indication?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>GLP1 analogs as treatment of postprandial hypoglycemia following gastric bypass surgery: a potential new indication?
    2013 (English)In: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 169, no 6, p. 885-889Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The number of morbidly obese subjects submitted to bariatric surgery is rising worldwide. In a fraction of patients undergoing gastric bypass (GBP), episodes with late postprandial hypoglycemia (PPHG) develop 1-3 years after surgery. The pathogenesis of this phenomenon is not fully understood; meal-induced rapid and exaggerated increases of circulating incretins and insulin appear to be at least partially responsible. Current treatments include low-carbohydrate diets, inhibition of glucose intestinal uptake, reduction of insulin secretion with calcium channel blockers, somatostatin analogs, or diazoxide, a KATP channel opener. Even partial pancreatectomy has been advocated. In type 2 diabetes, GLP1 analogs have a well-documented effect of stabilizing glucose levels without causing hypoglycemia. Design: We explored GLP1 analogs as open treatment in five consecutive GBP cases seeking medical attention because of late postprandial hypoglycemic symptoms. Results: Glucose measured in connection with the episodes in four of the cases had been 2.7, 2.5, 1.8, and 1.6 mmol/l respectively. The patients consistently described that the analogs eliminated their symptoms, which relapsed in four of the five patients when treatment was reduced/discontinued. The drug effect was further documented in one case by repeated 24-h continuous glucose measurements. Conclusion: These open, uncontrolled observations suggest that GLP1 analogs might provide a new treatment option in patients with problems of late PPHG.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-213465 (URN)10.1530/EJE-13-0504 (DOI)000327539100021 ()
    Available from: 2014-01-02 Created: 2013-12-23 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    3. Hypoglycemia in everyday life after gastric bypass and duodenal switch
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hypoglycemia in everyday life after gastric bypass and duodenal switch
    2015 (English)In: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 173, no 1, p. 91-100Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Design: Gastric bypass (GBP) and duodenal switch (DS) in morbid obesity are accompanied by marked metabolic improvements, particularly in glucose control. In recent years, episodes of severe late postprandial hypoglycemia have been increasingly described in GBP patients; data in DS patients are scarce. We recruited three groups of subjects; 15 GBP, 15 DS, and 15 non-operated overweight controls to examine to what extent hypoglycemia occurs in daily life. Methods: Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) was used during 3 days of normal activity. The glycemic variability was measured by mean amplitude of glycemic excursion and continuous overall net glycemic action. Fasting blood samples were drawn, and the patients kept a food and symptom log throughout the study. Results: The GBP group displayed highly variable CGM curves, and 2.9% of their time was spent in hypoglycemia (< 3.3 mmol/l, or 60 mg/dl). The DS group had twice as much time in hypoglycemia (5.9%) and displayed CGM curves with little variation as well as lower HbA1c levels (29.3 vs 35.9 mmol/mol, P < 0.05). Out of a total of 72 hypoglycemic episodes registered over the 3-day period, 70 (97%) occurred in the postprandial state and only about one-fifth of the hypoglycemic episodes in the GBP and DS groups were accompanied by symptoms. No hypoglycemias were seen in controls during the 3-day period. Conclusion: Both types of bariatric surgery induce marked, but different, changes in glucose balance accompanied by frequent, but mainly unnoticed, hypoglycemic episodes. The impact and mechanism of hypoglycemic unawareness after weight-reduction surgery deserves to be clarified.

    National Category
    Endocrinology and Diabetes
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-261313 (URN)10.1530/EJE-14-0821 (DOI)000358947700018 ()25899582 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2015-09-03 Created: 2015-09-01 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
    4. Gastric bypass reduces symptoms and hormonal responses to hypoglycemia
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gastric bypass reduces symptoms and hormonal responses to hypoglycemia
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: Diabetes, ISSN 0012-1797, E-ISSN 1939-327X, Vol. 65, no 9, p. 2667-2675Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Gastric bypass (GBP) surgery, one of the most common bariatric procedures, induces weight loss and metabolic effects. The mechanisms are not fully understood, but reduced food intake and effects on gastrointestinal hormones are thought to contribute. We recently observed that GBP patients have lowered glucose levels and frequent asymptomatic hypoglycemic episodes. Here, we subjected patients before and after undergoing GBP surgery to hypoglycemia and examined symptoms and hormonal and autonomic nerve responses. Twelve obese patients without diabetes (8 women, mean age 43.1 years [SD 10.8] and BMI 40.6 kg/m(2) [SD 3.1]) were examined before and 23 weeks (range 19-25) after GBP surgery with hyperinsulinemic-hypoglycemic clamp (stepwise to plasma glucose 2.7 mmol/L). The mean change in Edinburgh Hypoglycemia Score during clamp was attenuated from 10.7 (6.4) before surgery to 5.2 (4.9) after surgery. There were also marked postsurgery reductions in levels of glucagon, cortisol, and catecholamine and the sympathetic nerve responses to hypoglycemia. In addition, growth hormone displayed a delayed response but to a higher peak level. Levels of glucagon-like peptide 1 and gastric inhibitory polypeptide rose during hypoglycemia but rose less postsurgery compared with presurgery. Thus, GBP surgery causes a resetting of glucose homeostasis, which reduces symptoms and neurohormonal responses to hypoglycemia. Further studies should address the underlying mechanisms as well as their impact on the overall metabolic effects of GBP surgery.

    Keywords
    Gastric bypass, hypoglycemia
    National Category
    Endocrinology and Diabetes
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-276380 (URN)10.2337/db16-0341 (DOI)000382099800021 ()27313315 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Swedish Diabetes Association
    Available from: 2016-02-12 Created: 2016-02-12 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
  • 26.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Engström, Britt Edén
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrinology and mineral metabolism.
    Sundbom, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Upper Abdominal Surgery.
    Karlsson, Anders F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Hypoglycemia in everyday life after gastric bypass and duodenal switch2015In: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 173, no 1, p. 91-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design: Gastric bypass (GBP) and duodenal switch (DS) in morbid obesity are accompanied by marked metabolic improvements, particularly in glucose control. In recent years, episodes of severe late postprandial hypoglycemia have been increasingly described in GBP patients; data in DS patients are scarce. We recruited three groups of subjects; 15 GBP, 15 DS, and 15 non-operated overweight controls to examine to what extent hypoglycemia occurs in daily life. Methods: Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) was used during 3 days of normal activity. The glycemic variability was measured by mean amplitude of glycemic excursion and continuous overall net glycemic action. Fasting blood samples were drawn, and the patients kept a food and symptom log throughout the study. Results: The GBP group displayed highly variable CGM curves, and 2.9% of their time was spent in hypoglycemia (< 3.3 mmol/l, or 60 mg/dl). The DS group had twice as much time in hypoglycemia (5.9%) and displayed CGM curves with little variation as well as lower HbA1c levels (29.3 vs 35.9 mmol/mol, P < 0.05). Out of a total of 72 hypoglycemic episodes registered over the 3-day period, 70 (97%) occurred in the postprandial state and only about one-fifth of the hypoglycemic episodes in the GBP and DS groups were accompanied by symptoms. No hypoglycemias were seen in controls during the 3-day period. Conclusion: Both types of bariatric surgery induce marked, but different, changes in glucose balance accompanied by frequent, but mainly unnoticed, hypoglycemic episodes. The impact and mechanism of hypoglycemic unawareness after weight-reduction surgery deserves to be clarified.

  • 27.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Lau Börjesson, Joey
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Sundbom, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Upper Abdominal Surgery.
    Wiklund, Urban
    Umea Univ, Biomed Engn, Dept Radiat Sci, Umea, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Eriksson, Jan W.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Gastric bypass reduces symptoms and hormonal responses to hypoglycemia2016In: Diabetes, ISSN 0012-1797, E-ISSN 1939-327X, Vol. 65, no 9, p. 2667-2675Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gastric bypass (GBP) surgery, one of the most common bariatric procedures, induces weight loss and metabolic effects. The mechanisms are not fully understood, but reduced food intake and effects on gastrointestinal hormones are thought to contribute. We recently observed that GBP patients have lowered glucose levels and frequent asymptomatic hypoglycemic episodes. Here, we subjected patients before and after undergoing GBP surgery to hypoglycemia and examined symptoms and hormonal and autonomic nerve responses. Twelve obese patients without diabetes (8 women, mean age 43.1 years [SD 10.8] and BMI 40.6 kg/m(2) [SD 3.1]) were examined before and 23 weeks (range 19-25) after GBP surgery with hyperinsulinemic-hypoglycemic clamp (stepwise to plasma glucose 2.7 mmol/L). The mean change in Edinburgh Hypoglycemia Score during clamp was attenuated from 10.7 (6.4) before surgery to 5.2 (4.9) after surgery. There were also marked postsurgery reductions in levels of glucagon, cortisol, and catecholamine and the sympathetic nerve responses to hypoglycemia. In addition, growth hormone displayed a delayed response but to a higher peak level. Levels of glucagon-like peptide 1 and gastric inhibitory polypeptide rose during hypoglycemia but rose less postsurgery compared with presurgery. Thus, GBP surgery causes a resetting of glucose homeostasis, which reduces symptoms and neurohormonal responses to hypoglycemia. Further studies should address the underlying mechanisms as well as their impact on the overall metabolic effects of GBP surgery.

  • 28.
    Abu Hamdeh, Sami
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lannsjö, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Howells, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Extended anatomical grading in diffuse axonal injury using MRI: Hemorrhagic lesions in the substantia nigra and mesencephalic tegmentum indicate poor long-term outcome2017In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 5, no 34, p. 341-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical outcome after traumatic diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is difficult to predict. In this study, three magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences were used to quantify the anatomical distribution of lesions, to grade DAI according to the Adams grading system, and to evaluate the value of lesion localization in combination with clinical prognostic factors to improve outcome prediction. Thirty patients (mean 31.2 years ±14.3 standard deviation) with severe DAI (Glasgow Motor Score [GMS] <6) examined with MRI within 1 week post-injury were included. Diffusion-weighted (DW), T2*-weighted gradient echo and susceptibility-weighted (SWI) sequences were used. Extended Glasgow outcome score was assessed after 6 months. Number of DW lesions in the thalamus, basal ganglia, and internal capsule and number of SWI lesions in the mesencephalon correlated significantly with outcome in univariate analysis. Age, GMS at admission, GMS at discharge, and low proportion of good monitoring time with cerebral perfusion pressure <60 mm Hg correlated significantly with outcome in univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis revealed an independent relation with poor outcome for age (p = 0.005) and lesions in the mesencephalic region corresponding to substantia nigra and tegmentum on SWI (p  = 0.008). We conclude that higher age and lesions in substantia nigra and mesencephalic tegmentum indicate poor long-term outcome in DAI. We propose an extended MRI classification system based on four stages (stage I—hemispheric lesions, stage II—corpus callosum lesions, stage III—brainstem lesions, and stage IV—substantia nigra or mesencephalic tegmentum lesions); all are subdivided by age (≥/<30 years).

  • 29.
    Abu Hamdeh, Sami
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lannsjö, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Howells, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    MRI analysis of diffuse axonal injury - Hemorrhagic lesions in the mesencephalon idicate poor long-term outcome2016In: MRI analysis of diffuse axonal injury - Hemorrhagic lesions in the mesencephalon idicate poor long-term outcome, Springer, 2016, Vol. 7, Suppl. 1, article id B-0814Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Clinical outcome after traumatic diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is difficult to predict. Three MRI techniques were compared in demonstrating acute brain lesions.  Relationship of the anatomical distribution of the lesions in combination with clinical prognostic factors to outcome after 6 months was evaluated.  

    Methods and Materials: Thirty patients, aged 16-60 years (mean 31.2 years) with severe DAI (Glasgow Motor Score = GMS < 6) were examined with MRI at 1.5T within one week after the injury. A diffusion-weighted (DW) sequence (SE-EPI, b value 1000 s/mm2), a T2*-weighted gradient echo (T2*GRE) sequence and a susceptibility-weighted (SWI) sequence were evaluated by two independent reviewers with short and long neuroradiological experiences. Clinical outcome was assessed with Extended Glasgow Outcome Score (GOSE) after ≥ 6 months.

    Results: Interreviewer agreement for DAI classification was very good (ҡ 0.82 – 0.91) with all three sequences. SWI visualized more lesions than the T2*GRE or DW sequence.  In univariate analysis, number of DW lesions in the deep gray matter area including the internal capsules, number of SWI lesions in the mesencephalon, age, and GMS at admission and discharge correlated significantly with poor outcome.  Multivariate analysis only revealed an independent relation with poor outcome for age (p = 0.011) and lesions in the mesencephalic region including crura cerebri, substantia nigra and tegmentum on SWI (p = 0.032).

    Conclusion: SWI is the most sensitive technique to visualize lesions in DAI. Age over 30 years and hemorrhagic mesencephalic lesions anterior to the tectum are indicators of poor long-term outcome in DAI.

  • 30.
    Abu Hamdeh, Sami
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lewén, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Howells, Timothy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Intracranial pressure elevations in diffuse axonal injury are associated with non-hemorrhagic MR lesions in central mesencephalic structuresIn: Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Increased intracranial pressure (ICP) in severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients with diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is not well defined. This study investigated the occurrence of increased ICP and whether clinical factors and lesion localization on MRI were associated with increased ICP in DAI patients.

    Methods: Fifty-two severe TBI patients (median 24, range 9-61 years), with ICP-monitoring and DAI on MRI, using T2*-weighted gradient echo, susceptibility-weighted and diffusion-weighted (DW) sequences, were enrolled. Proportion of good monitoring time (GMT) with ICP>20 mmHg during the first 120 hours post-injury was calculated and associations with clinical and MRI-related factors were evaluated using linear regression. 

    Results: All patients had episodes of ICP>20 mmHg. The mean proportion of GMT with ICP>20 mmHg was 5% and 27% of the patients (14/52) had more than 5% of GMT with ICP>20 mmHg. Glasgow Coma Scale motor score at admission (P=0.04) and lesions on DW images in the substantia nigra and mesencephalic tegmentum (SN-T, P=0.001) were associated with the proportion of GMT with ICP>20 mmHg. In multivariate linear regression, lesions on DW images in SN-T (8% of GMT with ICP>20 mmHg, 95% CI 3–13%, P=0.004) and young age (-0.2% of GMT with ICP>20 mmHg, 95% CI -0.07–-0.3%, P=0.0008) were associated with increased ICP.   

    Conclusions: Increased ICP occurs in ~1/3 of severe TBI patients with DAI. Age and lesions on DW images in the central mesencephalon (SN-T) associate with elevated ICP. These findings suggest that MR lesion localization may aid prediction of increased ICP in DAI patients.

  • 31.
    Abu Hamdeh, Sami
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Shevchenko, Ganna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Mi, Jia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Musunuri, Sravani
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Bergquist, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Proteomic differences between focal and diffuse traumatic brain injury in human brain tissue2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 6807Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The early molecular response to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) was evaluated using biopsies of structurally normal-appearing cortex, obtained at location for intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring, from 16 severe TBI patients. Mass spectrometry (MS; label free and stable isotope dimethyl labeling) quantitation proteomics showed a strikingly different molecular pattern in TBI in comparison to cortical biopsies from 11 idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus patients. Diffuse TBI showed increased expression of peptides related to neurodegeneration (Tau and Fascin, p < 0.05), reduced expression related to antioxidant defense (Glutathione S-transferase Mu 3, Peroxiredoxin-6, Thioredoxin-dependent peroxide reductase; p < 0.05) and increased expression of potential biomarkers (e.g. Neurogranin, Fatty acid-binding protein, heart p < 0.05) compared to focal TBI. Proteomics of human brain biopsies displayed considerable molecular heterogeneity among the different TBI subtypes with consequences for the pathophysiology and development of targeted treatments for TBI.

  • 32. Abu Hamdeh, Sami
    et al.
    Virhammar, Johan
    Sehlin, Dag
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Cesarini, Kristina Giuliana
    Marklund, Niklas
    Brain tissue Aβ42 levels are linked to shunt response in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus.2018In: Journal of Neurosurgery, ISSN 0022-3085, E-ISSN 1933-0693, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE The authors conducted a study to test if the cortical brain tissue levels of soluble amyloid beta (Aβ) reflect the propensity of cortical Aβ aggregate formation and may be an additional factor predicting surgical outcome following idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) treatment. METHODS Highly selective ELISAs (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays) were used to quantify soluble Aβ40, Aβ42, and neurotoxic Aβ oligomers/protofibrils, associated with Aβ aggregation, in cortical biopsy samples obtained in patients with iNPH (n = 20), sampled during ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt surgery. Patients underwent pre- and postoperative (3-month) clinical assessment with a modified iNPH scale. The preoperative CSF biomarkers and the levels of soluble and insoluble Aβ species in cortical biopsy samples were analyzed for their association with a favorable outcome following the VP shunt procedure, defined as a ≥ 5-point increase in the iNPH scale. RESULTS The brain tissue levels of Aβ42 were negatively correlated with CSF Aβ42 (Spearman's r = -0.53, p < 0.05). The Aβ40, Aβ42, and Aβ oligomer/protofibril levels in cortical biopsy samples were higher in patients with insoluble cortical Aβ aggregates (p < 0.05). The preoperative CSF Aβ42 levels were similar in patients responding (n = 11) and not responding (n = 9) to VP shunt treatment at 3 months postsurgery. In contrast, the presence of cortical Aβ aggregates and high brain tissue Aβ42 levels were associated with a poor outcome following VP shunt treatment (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS Brain tissue measurements of soluble Aβ species are feasible. Since high Aβ42 levels in cortical biopsy samples obtained in patients with iNPH indicated a poor surgical outcome, tissue levels of Aβ species may be associated with the clinical response to shunt treatment.

  • 33.
    Acosta, Rafael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Rozen, Warren M.
    Whitaker, Iain S.
    Banking of the DIEP Flap: A "Previously Described New Technique" Reply2010In: Plastic and reconstructive surgery (1963), ISSN 0032-1052, E-ISSN 1529-4242, Vol. 126, no 4, p. 1407-1409Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Acosta, Rafael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Rozen, Warren M.
    Whitaker, Iain S.
    Probing Questions on Implantable Probes Reply2010In: Plastic and reconstructive surgery (1963), ISSN 0032-1052, E-ISSN 1529-4242, Vol. 126, no 5, p. 1790-1791Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Acosta Ruiz, Vanessa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Lönnemark, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Brekkan, Einar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Dahlman, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wernroth, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Magnusson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Predictive factors for complete renal tumor ablation using RFA2016In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 57, no 7, p. 886-893Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) can be used to treat renal masses in patients where surgery is preferably avoided. As tumor size and location can affect ablation results, procedural planning needs to identify these factors to limit treatment to a single session and increase ablation success.

    PURPOSE: To identify factors that may affect the primary efficacy of complete renal tumor ablation with radiofrequency after a single session.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: Percutaneous RFA (using an impedance based system) was performed using computed tomography (CT) guidance. Fifty-two renal tumors (in 44 patients) were retrospectively studied (median follow-up, 7 months). Data collection included patient demographics, tumor data (modified Renal Nephrometry Score, histopathological diagnosis), RFA treatment data (electrode placement), and follow-up results (tumor relapse). Data were analyzed through generalized estimating equations.

    RESULTS: Primary efficacy rate was 83%. Predictors for complete ablation were optimal electrode placement (P = 0.002, OR = 16.67) and increasing distance to the collecting system (P = 0.02, OR = 1.18). Tumor size was not a predictor for complete ablation (median size, 24 mm; P = 0.069, OR = 0.47), but all tumors ≤2 cm were completely ablated. All papillary tumors and oncocytomas were completely ablated in a single session; the most common incompletely ablated tumor type was clear cell carcinoma (6 of 9).

    CONCLUSION: Optimal electrode placement and a long distance from the collecting system are associated with an increased primary efficacy of renal tumor RFA. These variables need to be considered to increase primary ablation success. Further studies are needed to evaluate the effect of RFA on histopathologically different renal tumors.

  • 36.
    Acosta, S.
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Vasc Ctr, Malmo, Sweden..
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Wanhainen, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Negative-pressure wound therapy for prevention and treatment of surgical-site infections after vascular surgery2017In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168, Vol. 104, no 2, p. E75-E84Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundIndications for negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in vascular surgical patients are expanding. The aim of this review was to outline the evidence for NPWT on open and closed wounds. MethodsA PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane Library search from 2007 to June 2016 was performed combining the medical subject headings terms wound infection', abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA)', fasciotomy', vascular surgery' and NPWT' or VAC'. ResultsNPWT of open infected groin wounds was associated with shorter duration of wound healing by 47 days, and was more cost-effective than alginate dressings in one RCT. In one RCT and six observational studies, NPWT-related major bleeding and graft preservation rates were 0-10 and 83-100 per cent respectively. One retrospective comparative study showed greater wound size reduction per day, fewer dressing changes, quicker wound closure and shorter hospital stay with NPWT compared with gauze dressings for lower leg fasciotomy. NPWT and mesh-mediated fascial traction after AAA repair and open abdomen was associated with high primary fascial closure rates (96-100 per cent) and low risk of graft infection (0-7 per cent). One retrospective comparative study showed a significant reduction in surgical-site infection, from 30 per cent with standard wound care to 6 per cent with closed incisional NPWT. ConclusionNPWT has a central role in open and infected wounds after vascular surgery; the results of prophylactic care of closed incisions are promising.

  • 37.
    Acosta, S.
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Vasc Ctr, Dept Clin Sci, Malmo, Sweden..
    Wanhainen, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Temporary Abdominal Closure After Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: A Systematic Review of Contemporary Observational Studies2016In: European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, ISSN 1078-5884, E-ISSN 1532-2165, Vol. 51, no 3, p. 371-378Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of this paper was to review the literature on temporary abdominal closure (TAC) after abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. Methods: This was a systematic review of observational studies. A PubMed, EM BASE and Cochrane search from 2007 to July 2015 was performed combining the Medical Subject Headings "aortic aneurysm" and "temporary abdominal closure", "delayed abdominal closure", "open abdomen", "abdominal compartment syndrome", "negative pressure wound therapy", or "vacuum assisted wound closure". Results: Seven original studies were found. The methods used for TAC were the vacuum pack system with (n = 1) or without (n = 2) mesh bridge, vacuum assisted wound closure (VAWC; n = 1) and the VAWC with mesh mediated fascial traction (VACM; n = 3). The number of patients included varied from four to 30. Three studies were exclusively after open repair, one after endovascular aneurysm repair, and three were mixed series. The frequency of ruptured AAA varied from 60% to 100%. The primary fascia] closure rate varied from 79% to 100%. The median time to closure of the open abdomen was 10.5 and 17 days in two prospective studies with a fascia] closure rate of 100% and 96%, respectively; the inclusion criterion was an anticipated open abdomen therapy time >= 5 days using the VACM method. The graft infection rate was 0% in three studies. No patient with longterm open abdomen therapy with the VACM in the three studies was left with a planned ventral hernia. The in hospital survival rate varied from 46% to 80%. Conclusions: A high fascial closure rate without planned ventral hernia is possible to achieve with VACM, even after long-term open abdomen therapy. There are, however, few publications reporting specific results of open abdomen treatment after AAA repair, and there is a need for randomized controlled trials to determine the most efficient and safe TAC method during open abdomen treatment after AAA repair.

  • 38.
    Acosta, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    On Acute Thrombo-Embolic Occlusion of the Superior Mesenteric Artery2004Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Acute thrombo-embolic occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) with intestinal infarction is a lethal disease, difficult to diagnose in time, with unknown incidence and cause-specific mortality. The aim of this thesis was to characterize the disease and to develop diagnostic methods.

    Two laboratory studies were conducted on patients with suspected acute SMA occlusion. A pilot-study showed that the fibrinolytic marker D-dimer was elevated in six patients with the disease. In the subsequent study including 101 patients, D-dimer was the only elevated coagulation marker in nine patients with the disease. In a prospective study 24 patients (median age 84 years) were identified, of whom four were diagnosed at autopsy, despite an autopsy-rate of 10%. One-fourth were initially nursed in non-surgical wards. Length of the intestinal infarction was a predictor for death. An analysis of patients from the three studies showed that D-Dimer was elevated in all 16 tested patients with the disease.

    Sixty patients with acute SMA occlusion underwent intestinal revascularisation and were registered in the Swedish Vascular Registry (SWEDVASC). One-year survival-rate was 40%. Previous vascular surgery was a negative risk-factor.

    A population-based study was conducted in Malmö, based on an autopsy-rate of 87%. Among 270 patients with the disease, 2/3 were diagnosed only at autopsy and 1/2 were managed in non-surgical wards. The incidence was 8.6 per 100000 person years. The age-standardized incidence increased exponentially without gender differences. The diagnosis was the cause of death in 1.2% among octogenarians and beyond. Thrombotic occlusions were located proximally within the SMA and associated with extensive intestinal infarctions. Synchronous embolism, often multiple, occurred in 2/3 of the patients with embolic occlusions.

    Conclusions: A normal D-dimer at presentation most likely excludes the diagnosis. Acute SMA occlusion was more frequent than previously estimated from clinical series. The patients were often nursed in non-surgical wards.

    List of papers
    1. Preliminary study of D-dimer as a possible marker of acute bowel ischaemia
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preliminary study of D-dimer as a possible marker of acute bowel ischaemia
    2001 In: Br J Surg, Vol. 88, p. 385 - 388Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91561 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-04-14 Created: 2004-04-14Bibliographically approved
    2. D-dimer testing in patients with suspected acute thromboembolic occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>D-dimer testing in patients with suspected acute thromboembolic occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery
    2004 (English)In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168, Vol. 91, no 8, p. 991-994Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    There is no accurate non-invasive method available for the diagnosis of acute thromboembolic occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA). The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic properties of the fibrinolytic marker D-dimer.

    METHODS:

    From September 2000 to April 2003 consecutive patients aged over 50 years admitted to hospital with acute abdominal pain were studied. Patients with possible acute SMA occlusion at presentation had blood samples taken within 24 h of the onset of the pain for analysis of D-dimer, plasma fibrinogen, activated partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time and antithrombin. The value of D-dimer testing to diagnose SMA occlusion was assessed by means of likelihood ratios.

    RESULTS:

    Nine of 101 patients included had acute SMA occlusion. The median D-dimer concentration was 1.6 (range 0.4-5.6) mg/l, which was higher than that in 25 patients with inflammatory disease (P = 0.007) or in 14 patients with intestinal obstruction (P = 0.005). The combination of a D-dimer level greater than 1.5 mg/l, atrial fibrillation and female sex resulted in a likelihood ratio for acute SMA occlusion of 17.5, whereas no patient with a D-dimer concentration of 0.3 mg/l or less had acute SMA occlusion.

    CONCLUSION:

    D-dimer testing may be useful for the exclusion of patients with suspected acute SMA occlusion.

    Keywords
    Abdominal Pain/*etiology, Aged, Aged; 80 and over, Female, Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/*analysis, Humans, Male, Mesenteric Artery; Superior, Mesenteric Vascular Occlusion/*diagnosis, Middle Aged, Sensitivity and Specificity, Thromboembolism/*diagnosis
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91562 (URN)10.1002/bjs.4645 (DOI)15286959 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2004-04-14 Created: 2004-04-14 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    3. Acute thrombo-embolic occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery: A prospective study in a well defined population
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acute thrombo-embolic occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery: A prospective study in a well defined population
    2003 In: Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg, Vol. 26, p. 179-183Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91563 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-04-14 Created: 2004-04-14Bibliographically approved
    4. Revascularization of the superior mesenteric artery after acute thromboembolic occlusion
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Revascularization of the superior mesenteric artery after acute thromboembolic occlusion
    Show others...
    2002 In: Br J Surg, Vol. 89, p. 923-927Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91564 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-04-14 Created: 2004-04-14Bibliographically approved
    5. Incidence of acute thrombo-embolic occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery - a population-based study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Incidence of acute thrombo-embolic occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery - a population-based study
    Show others...
    2004 In: Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg, Vol. 27, p. 145 - 150Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91565 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-04-14 Created: 2004-04-14Bibliographically approved
    6. Autopsy findings in 213 patients with fatal acute thrombo-embolic occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Autopsy findings in 213 patients with fatal acute thrombo-embolic occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery
    Show others...
    (English)Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91566 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-04-14 Created: 2004-04-14 Last updated: 2013-08-14Bibliographically approved
  • 39. Acosta, Stefan
    et al.
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Petersson, Ulf
    Vacuum-assisted wound closure and mesh-mediated fascial traction for open abdomen therapy: a systematic review2017In: Anaesthesiology intensive therapy, ISSN 1731-2515, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 139-145Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this paper was to review the literature on vacuum-assisted wound closure and mesh-mediated fascial traction (VAWCM) in open abdomen therapy. It was designed as systematic review of observational studies.

    METHODS: A Pub Med, EMBASE and Cochrane search from 2007/01-2016/07 was performed combining the Medical Subject Headings "vacuum", "mesh-mediated fascial traction", "temporary abdominal closure", "delayed abdominal closure", "open abdomen", "abdominal compartment syndrome", "negative pressure wound therapy" or "vacuum assisted wound closure".

    RESULTS: Eleven original studies were found including patients numbering from 7 to 111. Six studies were prospective and five were retrospective. Nine studies were on mixed surgical (n = 9), vascular (n = 6) and trauma (n = 6) patients, while two were exclusively on vascular patients. The primary fascial closure rate per protocol varied from 80-100%. The time to closure of the open abdomen varied between 9-32 days. The entero-atmospheric fistula rate varied from 0-10.0%. The in-hospital survival rate varied from 57-100%. In the largest prospective study, the incisional hernia rate among survivors at 63 months of median follow-up was 54% (27/50), and 16 (33%) repairs out of 48 incisional hernias were performed throughout the study period. The study patients reported lower short form health survey (SF-36) scores than the mean reference population, mainly dependent on the prevalence of major co-morbidities. There was no difference in SF-36 scores or a modified ventral hernia pain questionnaire (VHPQ) at 5 years of follow up between those with versus those without incisional hernias.

    CONCLUSIONS: A high primary fascial closure rate can be achieved with the vacuum-assisted wound closure and meshmediated fascial traction technique in elderly, mainly non-trauma patients, in need of prolonged open abdomen therapy.

  • 40. Acosta, Stefan
    et al.
    Seternes, Arne
    Venermo, Maarit
    Vikatmaa, Leena
    Sörelius, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Wanhainen, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Svensson, Mats
    Djavani, Khatereh
    Department of Surgery, Gävle Hospital, Gävle, Sweden.
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Open Abdomen Therapy with Vacuum and Mesh Mediated Fascial Traction After Aortic Repair: an International Multicentre Study2017In: European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, ISSN 1078-5884, E-ISSN 1532-2165, Vol. 54, no 6, p. 697-705Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES:

    Open abdomen therapy may be necessary to prevent or treat abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS). The aim of the study was to analyse the primary delayed fascial closure (PDFC) rate and complications after open abdomen therapy with vacuum and mesh mediated fascial traction (VACM) after aortic repair and to compare outcomes between those treated with open abdomen after primary versus secondary operation.

    METHODS:

    This was a retrospective cohort, multicentre study in Sweden, Finland, and Norway, including consecutive patients treated with open abdomen and VACM after aortic repair at six vascular centres in 2006-2015. The primary endpoint was PDFC rate.

    RESULTS:

    Among 191 patients, 155 were men. The median age was 71 years (IQR 66-76). Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA) occurred in 69.1%. Endovascular/hybrid and open repairs were performed in 49 and 142 patients, respectively. The indications for open abdomen were inability to close the abdomen (62%) at primary operation and ACS (80%) at secondary operation. Duration of open abdomen was 11 days (IQR 7-16) in 157 patients alive at open abdomen termination. The PDFC rate was 91.8%. Open abdomen initiated at primary (N=103), compared with secondary operation (N=88), was associated with less severe initial open abdomen status (p=.006), less intestinal ischaemia (p=.002), shorter duration of open abdomen (p=.007), and less renal replacement therapy (RRT, p<.001). In hospital mortality was 39.3%, and after entero-atmospheric fistula (N=9) was 88.9%. Seven developed graft infection within 6 months, 1 year mortality was 28.6%. Intestinal ischaemia (OR 3.71, 95% CI 1.55-8.91), RRT (OR 3.62, 95% CI 1.72-7.65), and age (OR 1.12, 95% CI 1.06-1.12), were independent factors associated with in hospital mortality, but not open abdomen initiated at primary versus secondary operation.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    VACM was associated with a high PDFC rate after prolonged open abdomen therapy following aortic repair. Patient outcomes seemed better when open abdomen was initiated at primary, compared with secondary operation but a selection effect is possible.

  • 41.
    Adalberth, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Total knee arthroplasty: Alternative aspects on fixation, design and postoperative treatment2000Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Total knee arthroplasty as a treatment of severe gonarthrosis has become a great success, but tibial component loosening is still a major reason for failure. When total knee arthroplasty was introduced, only all-polyethylene (AP) tibial components were available. Based on mostly theoretical data, AP components were more or less abandoned during the 1980:ies in favor of metal-backed (MB) tibial components. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether insufficient fixation would result, using an all-polyethylene tibial component instead of a more costly metal-backed prosthesis. Further, to compare different antibiotic loaded bone cements, and to investigate whether post- operative drainage is beneficial in total knee arthroplasty. Radiostereometric analysis (RSA) was used to obtain accurate and standardized evaluations facilitating comparison between prosthetic designs.

    Magnitude and pattern of migration of a moderately conforming AP tibial component was analyzed in 22 patients. Migration was on par with a more conforming previously used frequently, AP component, indicating a favorable prognosis regarding future aseptic loosening. Another 34 arthroplasties with a flat on flat (non-conforming) articulating geometry were randomized to an AP or MB cemented tibial component. There were no differences in migration between the groups. None of the AP implants displayed any continuous migration between 1 and 2 years postoperative. In a similar randomized series of 38 arthroplasties with a semiconstrained articulation, fixation measured with RSA was not inferior for AP implants compared with MB. Both studies indicate a good long-term prognosis using an AP component. A new antibiotic loaded bone cement was prospectively randomized against a more commonly used bone cement in a series of 51 arthroplasties. Neither fixation of the tibial component nor the radiographic and clinical results differed between the cements, indicating a good prognosis for the new cement. Postoperative drainage of knee arthroplasty is widely used. 90 patients were prospectively randomized into three groups: no drain, ordinary drain system and a retransfusable drain system. Postoperative drainage in knee arthroplasty has no adverse clinical consequences but seems not to be necessary.

  • 42. Adam, René
    et al.
    de Gramont, Aimery
    Figueras, Joan
    Kokudo, Norihiro
    Kunstlinger, Francis
    Loyer, Evelyne
    Poston, Graeme
    Rougier, Philippe
    Rubbia-Brandt, Laura
    Sobrero, Alberto
    Teh, Catherine
    Tejpar, Sabine
    Van Cutsem, Eric
    Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas
    Påhlman, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Colorectal Surgery.
    Managing synchronous liver metastases from colorectal cancer: A multidisciplinary international consensus2015In: Cancer Treatment Reviews, ISSN 0305-7372, E-ISSN 1532-1967, Vol. 41, no 9, p. 729-741Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An international panel of multidisciplinary experts convened to develop recommendations for managing patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) and synchronous liver metastases (CRCLM). A modified Delphi method was used. CRCLM is defined as liver metastases detected at or before diagnosis of the primary CRC. Early and late metachronous metastases are defined as those detected ⩽12months and >12months after surgery, respectively. To provide information on potential curability, use of high-quality contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) before chemotherapy is recommended. Magnetic resonance imaging is increasingly being used preoperatively to aid detection of subcentimetric metastases, and alongside CT in difficult situations. To evaluate operability, radiology should provide information on: nodule size and number, segmental localization and relationship with major vessels, response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy, non-tumoral liver condition and anticipated remnant liver volume. Pathological evaluation should assess response to preoperative chemotherapy for both the primary tumour and metastases, and provide information on the tumour, margin size and micrometastases. Although the treatment strategy depends on the clinical scenario, the consensus was for chemotherapy before surgery in most cases. When the primary CRC is asymptomatic, liver surgery may be performed first (reverse approach). When CRCLM are unresectable, the goal of preoperative chemotherapy is to downsize tumours to allow resection. Hepatic resection should not be denied to patients with stable disease after optimal chemotherapy, provided an adequate liver remnant with inflow and outflow preservation remains. All patients with synchronous CRCLM should be evaluated by a hepatobiliary multidisciplinary team.

  • 43.
    Adamczuk, Katarzyna
    et al.
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Cognit Neurol, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Leuven Inst Neurosci & Dis, Alzheimer Res Ctr, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Schaeverbeke, Jolien
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Cognit Neurol, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Leuven Inst Neurosci & Dis, Alzheimer Res Ctr, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Nelissen, Natalie
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Cognit Neurol, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Univ Oxford, Dept Psychiat, Oxford OX3 7JX, England..
    Neyens, Veerle
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Cognit Neurol, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Leuven Inst Neurosci & Dis, Alzheimer Res Ctr, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Vandenbulcke, Mathieu
    Univ Hosp Leuven, Dept Old Age Psychiat, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Goffin, Karolien
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Nucl Med & Mol Imaging Dept, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Univ Hosp Leuven, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Lilja, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. GE Healthcare, S-75323 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Hilven, Kelly
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Neuroimmunol, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Dupont, Patrick
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Cognit Neurol, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Leuven Inst Neurosci & Dis, Alzheimer Res Ctr, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Van Laere, Koen
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Leuven Inst Neurosci & Dis, Alzheimer Res Ctr, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Nucl Med & Mol Imaging Dept, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Univ Hosp Leuven, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Vandenberghe, Rik
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Cognit Neurol, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Leuven Inst Neurosci & Dis, Alzheimer Res Ctr, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Univ Hosp Leuven, Dept Neurol, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Amyloid imaging in cognitively normal older adults: comparison between F-18-flutemetamol and C-11-Pittsburgh compound B2016In: European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, ISSN 1619-7070, E-ISSN 1619-7089, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 142-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Preclinical, or asymptomatic, Alzheimer's disease (AD) refers to the presence of positive AD biomarkers in the absence of cognitive deficits. This research concept is being applied to define target populations for clinical drug development. In a prospective community-recruited cohort of cognitively intact older adults, we compared two amyloid imaging markers within subjects: F-18-flutemetamol and C-11-Pittsburgh compound B (PIB). Methods In 32 community-recruited cognitively intact older adults aged between 65 and 80 years, we determined the concordance between binary classification based on F-18-flutemetamol versus C-11-PIB according to semiquantitative assessment (standardized uptake value ratio in composite cortical volume, SUVRcomp) and, alternatively, according to visual reads. We also determined the correlation between F-18-flutemetamol and C-11-PIB SUVR and evaluated how this was affected by the reference region chosen (cerebellar grey matter versus pons) and the use of partial volume correction (PVC) in this population. Results Binary classification based on semiquantitative assessment was concordant between F-18-flutemetamol and C-11-PIB in 94 % of cases. Concordance of blinded binary visual reads between tracers was 84 %. The Spearman correlation between F-18-flutemetamol and C-11-PIB SUVRcomp with cerebellar grey matter as reference region was 0.84, with a slope of 0.98. Correlations in neocortical regions were significantly lower with the pons as reference region. PVC improved the correlation in striatum and medial temporal cortex. Conclusion For the definition of preclinical AD based on F-18-flutemetamol, concordance with C-11-PIB was highest using semiquantitative assessment with cerebellar grey matter as reference region.

  • 44.
    Adamczuk, Katarzyna
    et al.
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Cognit Neurol, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Leuven Inst Neurosci & Dis, Alzheimer Res Ctr, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium..
    Schaeverbeke, Jolien
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Cognit Neurol, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Leuven Inst Neurosci & Dis, Alzheimer Res Ctr, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium..
    Vanderstichele, Hugo M. J.
    ADx NeuroSci, B-9052 Ghent, Belgium..
    Lilja, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. GE Healthcare, S-75125 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Nelissen, Natalie
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Cognit Neurol, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium.;Univ Oxford, Dept Psychiat, Oxford OX3 7JX, England..
    Van Laere, Koen
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Leuven Inst Neurosci & Dis, Alzheimer Res Ctr, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Nucl Med & Mol Imaging Dept, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven Hosp, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium..
    Dupont, Patrick
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Cognit Neurol, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Leuven Inst Neurosci & Dis, Alzheimer Res Ctr, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium..
    Hilven, Kelly
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Neuroimmunol, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium..
    Poesen, Koen
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Mol Neurobiomarker Res, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium.;UZ Leuven, Lab Med, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium..
    Vandenberghe, Rik
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Cognit Neurol, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Leuven Inst Neurosci & Dis, Alzheimer Res Ctr, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium.;Univ Hosp Leuven, Dept Neurol, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium..
    Diagnostic value of cerebrospinal fluid A beta ratios in preclinical Alzheimer's disease2015In: Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, ISSN 0065-6755, E-ISSN 1758-9193, Vol. 7, article id 75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: In this study of preclinical Alzheimer's disease (AD) we assessed the added diagnostic value of using cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) A beta ratios rather than A beta 42 in isolation for detecting individuals who are positive on amyloid positron emission tomography (PET). Methods: Thirty-eight community-recruited cognitively intact older adults (mean age 73, range 65-80 years) underwent F-18-flutemetamol PET and CSF measurement of A beta 1-42, A beta 1-40, A beta 1-38, and total tau (ttau). F-18-flutemetamol retention was quantified using standardized uptake value ratios in a composite cortical region (SUVRcomp) with reference to cerebellar grey matter. Based on a prior autopsy validation study, the SUVRcomp cut-off was 1.57. Sensitivities, specificities and cut-offs were defined based on receiver operating characteristic analysis with CSF analytes as variables of interest and F-18-flutemetamol positivity as the classifier. We also determined sensitivities and CSF cut-off values at fixed specificities of 90 % and 95 %. Results: Seven out of 38 subjects (18 %) were positive on amyloid PET. A beta 42/ttau, A beta 42/A beta 40, A beta 42/A beta 38, and A beta 42 had the highest accuracy to identify amyloid-positive subjects (area under the curve (AUC) >= 0.908). A beta 40 and A beta 38 had significantly lower discriminative power (AUC = 0.571). When specificity was fixed at 90 % and 95 %, A beta 42/ttau had the highest sensitivity among the different CSF markers (85.71 % and 71.43 %, respectively). Sensitivity of A beta 42 alone was significantly lower under these conditions (57.14 % and 42.86 %, respectively). Conclusion: For the CSF-based definition of preclinical AD, if a high specificity is required, our data support the use of A beta 42/ttau rather than using A beta 42 in isolation.

  • 45. Adami, Hans-Olov
    et al.
    Bill-Axelson, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Johansson, Jan-Erik
    Management of Early Prostate Cancer REPLY2014In: New England Journal of Medicine, ISSN 0028-4793, E-ISSN 1533-4406, Vol. 370, no 22, p. 2151-2151Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Adams, Christopher
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences.
    Kjeldsen, Frank
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Ion Physics.
    Patriksson, Alexandra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    van Der Spoel, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Gräslund, Astrid
    Papadopolous, Evangelos
    Zubarev, Roman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Probing Solution-Phase and Gas-Phase Structures of Trp-cage Cations by Chiral Substitution and Spectroscopic Techniques2006In: International Journal of Mass Spectrometry, ISSN 1387-3806, E-ISSN 1873-2798, Vol. 253, no 3, p. 263-273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relevance of gas-phase protein structure to its solution structure is of the utmost importance in studying biomolecules by mass spectrometry. D-Amino acid substitutions within a minimal protein. Trp-cage. were used to correlate solution-phase properties as measured by circular dichroism with solution/gas-phase conformational features of protein cations probed via charge state distribution (CSD) in electrospray ionization. and gas-phase features revealed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The gas-phase features were additionally supported by force-field molecular dynamics simulations. CD data showed that almost any single-residue D-substitution destroys the most prominent CD feature of the "native" all-L isomer, alpha-helicity. CSD was able to qualitatively assess the degree of compactness of solution-phase molecular structures. CSD results were consistent with the all-L form being the most compact in solution among all studied stereoisomers except for the D-Asn(1) isomer. D-substitutions of the aromatic Y(3), W(6) and Q(5) residues generated the largest deviations in CSD data among single amino acid substitutions. consistent with the critical role of these residues in Trp-cage stability. Electron capture dissociation of the stereoisomer dications gave an indication that some gas-phase structural features of Trp-cage are similar to those in solution. This result is supported by MDS data oil five of the studied stereoisomer dications in the gas-phase. The MDS-derived minimum-energy structures possessed more extensive hydrogen bonding than the solution-phase structure of the native form, deviating from the latter by 3-4 angstrom and were not 'inside-out' compared to native structures. MDS data could be correlated with CD data and even with ECD results. which aided in providing a long-range structural constraint for MDS. The overall conclusion is the general resemblance, despite the difference on the detailed level, of the preferred structures in both phases for the mini protein Trp-cage.

  • 47.
    Adamski, Jan
    et al.
    via media, S-75655 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Goraj, Radoslaw
    Reg Specialist Hosp Olsztyn, Dept Anaesthesiol & Intens Care, Olsztyn, Poland..
    Onichimowski, Dariusz
    Reg Specialist Hosp Olsztyn, Dept Anaesthesiol & Intens Care, Olsztyn, Poland..
    Gawlikowska, Ewa
    Reg Specialist Hosp Olsztyn, Dept Anaesthesiol & Intens Care, Olsztyn, Poland..
    Weigl, Wojciech
    Uppsala Univ, Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Surg Sci Anaesthesiol & Intens Care, Uppsala, Sweden..
    The differences between two selected intensive care units located in central and northern Europe: preliminary observation2015In: ANAESTHESIOLOGY INTENSIVE THERAPY, ISSN 1642-5758, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 117-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate possible differences in the functioning of two selected intensive care units in Poland and Finland. The activity of the units was analysed over a period of one year. Methods: The following parameters were compared: demography of treated populations, site of admission, category of illness, severity of illness (APACHE-II scale), mean length of stay, demanded workload (TISS-28 scale), mortality (both ICU and hospital) and standardized mortality ratio (SMR). Results: The results of this study indicated that most of the patients in the Polish ICU, regardless of age, diagnosis and APACHE II score, presented significantly longer lengths of stay (14.65 +/- 13.6 vs 4.1 +/- 4.7 days, P = 0.0001), higher mean TISS-28 score (38.9 +/- 9.1 vs 31.2 +/- 6.1, P = 0.0001) and higher ICU and hospital mortality (41.5% vs 10.2% and 44.7% vs 21.8%, respectively, P = 0.0001). The values of SMR were 0.9 and 0.85 for the Finnish and Polish ICUs, respectively. Conclusion: The collected data indicate huge differences in the utilisation of critical care resources. Treatment in Polish ICU is concentrated on much more severely ill patients which might be sometimes accompanied by futility of care. In order to verify and correctly interpret the presented phenomena, further studies are needed.

  • 48.
    Adde, Magdalena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Aggressive B-cell Lymphomas: Studies of Treatment, FDG-PET Evaluation and Prognostic Factors2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    To improve outcome in young, high-risk lymphoma patients, treatment was intensified, adding etoposide and rituximab to standard CHOP treatment. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) enabled treatment bi-weekly. Results were promising: overall (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) 79% and 60% respectively, median follow up 27 months. Single infusion Ara-C, contrary to expectations, did not prevent relapse in CNS.

    DLBCL were classified as germinal center (GC) or non-GC derived, using immunohistochemical markers, CD10, BCL6 and MUM1. We investigated the outcome for both phenotypes after adding rituximab to chemotherapy. For 106 patients treated with CHOP alone, the GC phenotype displayed significantly better OS and EFS. In contrast, GC phenotype did not predict outcome in 95 patients treated with immunochemotherapy . Thus, addition of rituximab seems to eliminate the prognostic value of immunohistochemically defined GC phenotypes in DLBCL.

    To improve evaluation and find non-responders, mid-treatment FDG-PET CT was incorporated into clinical routine for patients with high-risk aggressive lymphoma. For those with positive PET, biopsy followed by treatment intensification was recommended. Twenty-five patients were examined, five with positive PET. Two of these had lymphoma in the biopsy. Two had a negative biopsy, and one had a false positive investigation. Seven patients had increased uptake of uncertain significance. Two patients with uncertain PET, and two with negative PET have relapsed, giving a negative predictive value of 85%.

    In case of relapse of aggressive lymphoma or if not obtaining CR, high dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell support (HDT) is standard treatment. HDT outcome for 38 patients with transformed follicular lymphoma was compared to outcome for 79 patients with de novo B-cell lymphoma. At median follow-up of 11.5 years both OS and EFS were superior in the transformed group, OS 67% and 33%, EFS 55% and 27% respectively. Treatment related mortality was less than reported in other studies.

    List of papers
    1. Outcome for young high-risk aggressive B-cell lymphoma patients treated with CHOEP-14 and rituximab (R-CHOEP-14).
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Outcome for young high-risk aggressive B-cell lymphoma patients treated with CHOEP-14 and rituximab (R-CHOEP-14).
    Show others...
    2006 (English)In: Med Oncol, ISSN 1357-0560, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 283-93Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Keywords
    Adult, Aged, Antibodies; Monoclonal/administration & dosage, Antimetabolites; Antineoplastic, Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/*administration & dosage, Central Nervous System Neoplasms/mortality/*prevention & control/secondary, Cyclophosphamide/administration & dosage, Cytarabine/administration & dosage, Disease-Free Survival, Doxorubicin/administration & dosage, Etoposide/administration & dosage, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor; Recombinant, Humans, Lymphoma; B-Cell/complications/*drug therapy/mortality, Male, Middle Aged, Prednisolone/administration & dosage, Recurrence, Retrospective Studies, Vincristine/administration & dosage
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-25280 (URN)16720929 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2007-04-02 Created: 2007-04-02 Last updated: 2011-01-11
    2. Prognostic impact of immunohistochemically defined germinal center phenotype in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients treated with immunochemotherapy
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prognostic impact of immunohistochemically defined germinal center phenotype in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients treated with immunochemotherapy
    Show others...
    2007 (English)In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 109, no 11, p. 4930-4935Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Germinal center (GC) and non-GC phenotypes are predictors of outcome in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and can be used to stratify chemotherapy-treated patients into low- and high-risk groups. To determine how combination of rituximab with chemotherapy influences GC-associated clinical outcome, GC and non-GC phenotypes were identified immunohistochemically from samples of 90 de novo DLBCL patients treated with rituximab in combination with CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone)-like regimen (immunochemotherapy). One hundred and four patients previously treated with chemotherapy served as a control group. Consistent with previous studies, chemotherapy-treated patients with immunohistochemically defined GC phenotype displayed a significantly better overall (OS) and failure-free survival (FFS) than the non-GC group (OS, 70% vs 47%, P = .012; FFS, 59% vs 30%, P = .001). In contrast, immunohistochemically defined GC phenotype did not predict outcome in immunochemotherapy-treated patients (OS, 77% vs 76%, P = ns; FFS, 68% vs 63%, P = ns). In comparison, International Prognostic Index (IPI) could separate the high-risk patients from low- and intermediate-risk groups (OS, 84% vs 63%, P = .030; FFS, 79% vs 52%, P = .028). We conclude that rituximab in combination with chemotherapy seems to eliminate the prognostic value of immunohistochemically defined GC- and non-GC phenotypes in DLBCL.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-10681 (URN)10.1182/blood-2006-09-047068 (DOI)000246946100053 ()17299093 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2007-04-20 Created: 2007-04-20 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
    3. Little usefullness of mid-treatment FDG-PET and biopsy for treatment intensification in patients with aggressive lymphoma
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Little usefullness of mid-treatment FDG-PET and biopsy for treatment intensification in patients with aggressive lymphoma
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To evaluate the experiences of introducing mid-treatment FDG-PET in patients with aggressive lymphoma, in a population based program with decentralized examinations, with emphasis on finding patients who would benefit from dose-escalation.

    Patients and Methods: Twenty-five patients with aggressive lymphoma were included. Twenty-four (95%) of these having an aggressive B-cell lymphoma (84% diffuse large B-cell lymphoma) were treated with CHOP-like treatment given at two week intervals + rituximab. One patient having an anaplastic T-cell lymphoma was treated with CHOEP-14. Mid-treatment FDG-PET was performed and assessed as positive, uncertain or negative for remaining lymphoma. The intention was to perform a biopsy in those with a positive FDG-PET, and, to change to a platina-containing therapy and consolidate with high-dose therapy if viable lymphoma was found. Retrospective review of the PET investigations was done. Living patients were followed for a median of 22 months.

    Results: At primary analysis five patients (20%) had positive uptake on FDG-PET. Two of them had biopsy-proven viable tumor but did not complete the planned salvage treatment, one due to chemotherapy toxicity and one due to progressive disease during salvage therapy. Two patients had a negative biopsy and one patient had no biopsy due to technical difficulties at diagnosis. These three patients remain in remission after standard treatment. Out of seven patients (28%) having “uncertain” uptake two relapsed. Thirteen patients (52%) were negative,two of whom relapsed giving a negative predictive value of 85%.

    Conclusion: Mid-treatment FDG PET-CT in order to find patients with biopsy-proven aggressive lymphoma, who can be salvaged with dose escalation, was not feasible in clinical routine.

    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-100255 (URN)
    Available from: 2009-03-29 Created: 2009-03-29 Last updated: 2010-01-14
    4. Superior outcome in transformed follicular lymphoma compared to de novo aggressive B-cell lymphoma treated with high-dose therapy and autologous stem-cell support
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Superior outcome in transformed follicular lymphoma compared to de novo aggressive B-cell lymphoma treated with high-dose therapy and autologous stem-cell support
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To assess the outcome of high–dose therapy with autologous stem cell support (HDT) in patients with transformed follicular lymphoma compared to patients with de novo aggressive B-cell lymphoma, in a retrospective analysis of patients treated at two Swedish university hospitals.

    Patients and Methods: 117 patients, mean age 48 years (21-65), 79 with de novo aggressive B-cell lymphoma and 38 with transformed follicular lymphoma, were treated with high-dose-therapy (HDT) as consolidation. Thirteen patients with transformed follicular lymphoma had been treated with a single alkylating agent and 25 were chemonaive at transformation. After transformation, nine patients had HDT as part of first line aggressive therapy, and a further eight failed to obtain CR and had HDT upfront. Twenty-one patients received more than one treatment regimen before HDT. In the de novo aggressive lymphoma group five patients with high risk criteria, and 16 patients who failed to obtain CR, received HDT upfront (CR1), Fifty-eight patients received more than one regimen before HDT because of relapse. Rituximab was given as a single dose to five patients for in vivo purging of the stem cell graft.

    Results: With a median follow up of 11.5 years (8-20), event free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) were 35% and 44% respectively. When comparing the two groups, the ten- year EFS rates were 27% in the de novo group and 55% in the transformed group and the ten-year OS was 33 % and 67% respectively. Treatment related mortality was acceptable with 4% early and 3.5% late mortality. In a multivariate analysis, “transformed vs de novo aggressive” histopathology was the only factor significantly related to outcome.

    Conclusion: Both EFS and OS were much better in patients with transformed follicular lymphoma compared to patients with de novo aggressive B-cell lymphoma Although the introduction of rituximab certainly has improved the outcome in both groups, HDT should still be considered as a salvage strategy not only in cases of de novo aggressive B-cell lymphoma and especially in transformed follicular lymphoma relapsing after first line treatment..

    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-100257 (URN)
    Available from: 2009-03-29 Created: 2009-03-29 Last updated: 2010-01-14
  • 49.
    Addo, Rebecka N.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Stockholm Univ, Dept Psychol, Gosta Ekman Lab, Frescati Hagvag 9A, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wiens, Stefan
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Psychol, Gosta Ekman Lab, Frescati Hagvag 9A, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nord, Marie
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Psychol, Gosta Ekman Lab, Frescati Hagvag 9A, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Larsson, Maria
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Psychol, Gosta Ekman Lab, Frescati Hagvag 9A, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Olfactory Functions in Adults With Autism Spectrum Disorders2017In: Perception, ISSN 0301-0066, E-ISSN 1468-4233, Vol. 46, no 3-4, p. 530-537Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are often characterized by atypical sensory behavior (hyperor hyporeactivity) although evidence is scarce regarding olfactory abilities in ASD; 16 adults with high-functioning ASD (mean age: 38.2, SD: 9.7) and 14 healthy control subjects (mean age: 42.0 years, SD: 12.5) were assessed in odor threshold, free and cued odor identification, and perceived pleasantness, intensity, and edibility of everyday odors. Although results showed no differences between groups, the Bayes Factors (close to 1) suggested that the evidence for no group differences on the threshold and identification tests was inconclusive. In contrast, there was some evidence for no group differences on perceived edibility (BF01 = 2.69) and perceived intensity (BF01 = 2.80). These results do not provide conclusive evidence for or against differences between ASD and healthy controls on olfactory abilities. However, they suggest that there are no apparent group differences in subjective ratings of odors.

  • 50.
    Aden, U.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hugoson, P.
    Karolinska Inst, Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kostilainen, K.
    Univ Helsinki, Childrens Hosp, Helsinki, Finland..
    Mikkola, K.
    Univ Helsinki, Childrens Hosp, Helsinki, Finland..
    Mårtensson, G.
    Karolinska Inst, Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lagercrantz, H.
    Karolinska Inst, Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Westrup, B.
    Karolinska Inst, Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Fellman, V.
    Lund Univ, Pediat, Lund, Sweden..
    Huotilainen, Minna
    Uppsala University, The Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study in the Social Sciences (SCASSS).
    The impacts of maternal singing during kangaroo care on mothers and infants2016In: European Journal of Pediatrics, ISSN 0340-6199, E-ISSN 1432-1076, Vol. 175, no 11, p. 1425-1425Article in journal (Refereed)
1234567 1 - 50 of 11131
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