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  • 1. Aavik, Einari
    et al.
    Lumivuori, Henri
    Leppänen, Olli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Wirth, Thomas
    Hakkinen, Sanna-Kaisa
    Braesen, Jan-Hinrich
    Beschorner, Ulrich
    Zeller, Thomas
    Braspenning, Maarten
    van Criekinge, Wim
    Makinen, Kimmo
    Yla-Herttuala, Seppo
    Global DNA methylation analysis of human atherosclerotic plaques reveals extensive genomic hypomethylation and reactivation at imprinted locus 14q32 involving induction of a miRNA cluster2015In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 36, no 16, p. 993-U23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims Genetics can explain just above 10% of the observed heritability in cardiovascular diseases. Epigenetics is about to provide some further explanations, but the information needed for that is in the accumulation phase. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis has revealed thousands of genes, which are epigenetically differentially regulated in atherosclerotic plaques. Our results point to an additional level of complexity that needs to be integrated into the aetiology of atherogenesis.We conducted a genome-wide analysis to identify differentially methylated genes in atherosclerotic lesions. Methods DNA methylation at promoters, exons and introns was identified by massive parallel sequencing. Gene expression was analysed by microarrays, qPCR, immunohistochemistry and western blots. Results Globally, hypomethylation of chromosomal DNA predominates in atherosclerotic plaques and two-thirds of genes showing over 2.5-fold differential in DNA methylation are up-regulated in comparison to healthy mammary arteries. The imprinted chromatin locus 14q32 was identified for the first time as an extensively hypomethylated area in atherosclerosis with highly induced expression of miR127, -136, -410, -431, -432, -433 and capillary formation-associated gene RTL1. The top 100 list of hypomethylated promoters exhibited over 1000-fold enrichment for miRNAs, many of which mapped to locus 14q32. Unexpectedly, also gene body hypermethylation was found to correlate with stimulated mRNA expression. Conclusion Significant changes in genomic methylation were identified in atherosclerotic lesions. The most prominent gene cluster activated via hypomethylation was detected at imprinted chromosomal locus 14q32 with several clustered miRNAs that were up-regulated. These results suggest that epigenetic changes are involved in atherogenesis and may offer new potential therapeutic targets for vascular diseases.

  • 2. Abbott, A. L.
    et al.
    Adelman, M. A.
    Alexandrov, A. V.
    Barnett, H. J. M.
    Beard, J.
    Bell, P.
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Blacker, D.
    Buckley, C. J.
    Cambria, R. P.
    Comerota, A. J.
    Connolly, E. S., Jr.
    Davies, A. H.
    Eckstein, H. H.
    Faruqi, R.
    Fraedrich, G.
    Gloviczki, P.
    Hankey, G. J.
    Harbaugh, R. E.
    Heldenberg, E.
    Kittner, S. J.
    Kleinig, T. J.
    Mikhailidis, D. P.
    Moore, W. S.
    Naylor, R.
    Nicolaides, A.
    Paraskevas, K. I.
    Pelz, D. M.
    Prichard, J. W.
    Purdie, G.
    Ricco, J. B.
    Riles, T.
    Rothwell, P.
    Sandercock, P.
    Sillesen, H.
    Spence, J. D.
    Spinelli, F.
    Tan, A.
    Thapar, A.
    Veith, F. J.
    Zhou, W.
    Why the United States Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Should not Extend Reimbursement Indications for Carotid Artery Angioplasty/Stenting2012In: European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, ISSN 1078-5884, E-ISSN 1532-2165, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 247-251Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3. Abbott, Anne L.
    et al.
    Adelman, Mark A.
    Alexandrov, Andrei V.
    Barnett, Henry J. M.
    Beard, Jonathan
    Bell, Peter
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Blacker, David
    Buckley, Clifford J.
    Cambria, Richard P.
    Comerota, Anthony J.
    Connolly, E. Sander
    Davies, Alun H.
    Eckstein, Hans-Henning
    Faruqi, Rishad
    Fraedrich, Gustav
    Gloviczki, Peter
    Hankey, Graeme J.
    Harbaugh, Robert E.
    Heldenberg, Eitan
    Kittner, Steven J.
    Kleinig, Timothy J.
    Mikhailidis, Dimitri P.
    Moore, Wesley S.
    Naylor, Ross
    Nicolaides, Andrew
    Paraskevas, Kosmas I.
    Pelz, David M.
    Prichard, James W.
    Purdie, Grant
    Ricco, Jean-Baptiste
    Riles, Thomas
    Rothwell, Peter
    Sandercock, Peter
    Sillesen, Henrik
    Spence, J. David
    Spinelli, Francesco
    Tan, Aaron
    Thapar, Ankur
    Veith, Frank J.
    Zhou, Wei
    Why the United States Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services should not extend reimbursement indications for carotid artery angioplasty/stenting2012In: VASCULAR, ISSN 1708-5381, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 1-7Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4. Aboyans, Victor
    et al.
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Brodmann, Marianne
    Collet, Jean-Philippe
    Czerny, Martin
    De Carlo, Marco
    Naylor, A Ross
    Roffi, Marco
    Tendera, Michal
    Vlachopoulos, Charalambos
    Ricco, Jean-Baptiste
    Questions and answers on diagnosis and management of patients with Peripheral Arterial Diseases: a companion document of the 2017 ESC Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Peripheral Arterial Diseases, in collaboration with the European Society for Vascular Surgery (ESVS)2018In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 39, no 9, p. E35-E41Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5. Aboyans, Victor
    et al.
    Ricco, Jean-Baptiste
    Bartelink, Marie-Louise E L
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Brodmann, Marianne
    Cohnert, Tina
    Collet, Jean-Philippe
    Czerny, Martin
    De Carlo, Marco
    Debus, Sebastian
    Espinola-Klein, Christine
    Kahan, Thomas
    Kownator, Serge
    Mazzolai, Lucia
    Naylor, A Ross
    Roffi, Marco
    Röther, Joachim
    Sprynger, Muriel
    Tendera, Michal
    Tepe, Gunnar
    Venermo, Maarit
    Vlachopoulos, Charalambos
    Desormais, Ileana
    2017 ESC Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Peripheral Arterial Diseases, in collaboration with the European Society for Vascular Surgery (ESVS): Document covering atherosclerotic disease of extracranial carotid and vertebral, mesenteric, renal, upper and lower extremity arteries2018In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 39, no 9, p. 763-816Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6. Aboyans, Victor
    et al.
    Ricco, Jean-Baptiste
    Bartelink, Marie-Louise E L
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Brodmann, Marianne
    Cohnert, Tina
    Collet, Jean-Philippe
    Czerny, Martin
    De Carlo, Marco
    Debus, Sebastian
    Espinola-Klein, Christine
    Kahan, Thomas
    Kownator, Serge
    Mazzolai, Lucia
    Naylor, A Ross
    Roffi, Marco
    Röther, Joachim
    Sprynger, Muriel
    Tendera, Michal
    Tepe, Gunnar
    Venermo, Maarit
    Vlachopoulos, Charalambos
    Desormais, Ileana
    Widimsky, Petr
    Kolh, Philippe
    Agewall, Stefan
    Bueno, Héctor
    Coca, Antonio
    De Borst, Gert J
    Delgado, Victoria
    Dick, Florian
    Erol, Cetin
    Ferrini, Marc
    Kakkos, Stavros
    Katus, Hugo A
    Knuuti, Juhani
    Lindholt, Jes
    Mattle, Heinrich
    Pieniazek, Piotr
    Piepoli, Massimo Francesco
    Scheinert, Dierk
    Sievert, Horst
    Simpson, Iain
    Sulzenko, Jakub
    Tamargo, Juan
    Tokgozoglu, Lale
    Torbicki, Adam
    Tsakountakis, Nikolaos
    Tuñón, José
    de Ceniga, Melina Vega
    Windecker, Stephan
    Zamorano, Jose Luis
    2017 ESC Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Peripheral Arterial Diseases, in collaboration with the European Society for Vascular Surgery (ESVS)2018In: European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, ISSN 1078-5884, E-ISSN 1532-2165, Vol. 55, no 3, p. 305-368Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Acosta, S.
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Vasc Ctr, Malmo, Sweden..
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Wanhainen, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Negative-pressure wound therapy for prevention and treatment of surgical-site infections after vascular surgery2017In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168, Vol. 104, no 2, p. E75-E84Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundIndications for negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in vascular surgical patients are expanding. The aim of this review was to outline the evidence for NPWT on open and closed wounds. MethodsA PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane Library search from 2007 to June 2016 was performed combining the medical subject headings terms wound infection', abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA)', fasciotomy', vascular surgery' and NPWT' or VAC'. ResultsNPWT of open infected groin wounds was associated with shorter duration of wound healing by 47 days, and was more cost-effective than alginate dressings in one RCT. In one RCT and six observational studies, NPWT-related major bleeding and graft preservation rates were 0-10 and 83-100 per cent respectively. One retrospective comparative study showed greater wound size reduction per day, fewer dressing changes, quicker wound closure and shorter hospital stay with NPWT compared with gauze dressings for lower leg fasciotomy. NPWT and mesh-mediated fascial traction after AAA repair and open abdomen was associated with high primary fascial closure rates (96-100 per cent) and low risk of graft infection (0-7 per cent). One retrospective comparative study showed a significant reduction in surgical-site infection, from 30 per cent with standard wound care to 6 per cent with closed incisional NPWT. ConclusionNPWT has a central role in open and infected wounds after vascular surgery; the results of prophylactic care of closed incisions are promising.

  • 8.
    Acosta, S.
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Vasc Ctr, Dept Clin Sci, Malmo, Sweden..
    Wanhainen, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Temporary Abdominal Closure After Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: A Systematic Review of Contemporary Observational Studies2016In: European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, ISSN 1078-5884, E-ISSN 1532-2165, Vol. 51, no 3, p. 371-378Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of this paper was to review the literature on temporary abdominal closure (TAC) after abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. Methods: This was a systematic review of observational studies. A PubMed, EM BASE and Cochrane search from 2007 to July 2015 was performed combining the Medical Subject Headings "aortic aneurysm" and "temporary abdominal closure", "delayed abdominal closure", "open abdomen", "abdominal compartment syndrome", "negative pressure wound therapy", or "vacuum assisted wound closure". Results: Seven original studies were found. The methods used for TAC were the vacuum pack system with (n = 1) or without (n = 2) mesh bridge, vacuum assisted wound closure (VAWC; n = 1) and the VAWC with mesh mediated fascial traction (VACM; n = 3). The number of patients included varied from four to 30. Three studies were exclusively after open repair, one after endovascular aneurysm repair, and three were mixed series. The frequency of ruptured AAA varied from 60% to 100%. The primary fascia] closure rate varied from 79% to 100%. The median time to closure of the open abdomen was 10.5 and 17 days in two prospective studies with a fascia] closure rate of 100% and 96%, respectively; the inclusion criterion was an anticipated open abdomen therapy time >= 5 days using the VACM method. The graft infection rate was 0% in three studies. No patient with longterm open abdomen therapy with the VACM in the three studies was left with a planned ventral hernia. The in hospital survival rate varied from 46% to 80%. Conclusions: A high fascial closure rate without planned ventral hernia is possible to achieve with VACM, even after long-term open abdomen therapy. There are, however, few publications reporting specific results of open abdomen treatment after AAA repair, and there is a need for randomized controlled trials to determine the most efficient and safe TAC method during open abdomen treatment after AAA repair.

  • 9.
    Ahmad, Shafqat
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Harvard Med Sch, Brigham & Womens Hosp, Prevent Med Div, Boston, MA 02215 USA;Harvard Med Sch, Brigham & Womens Hosp, Ctr Lipid Metabol, 900 Commonwealth Ave, Boston, MA 02215 USA;Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Nutr, Boston, MA USA;Harvard Med Sch, Brigham & Womens Hosp, Cardiovasc Div, Boston, MA 02215 USA.
    Moorthy, M. Vinayaga
    Harvard Med Sch, Brigham & Womens Hosp, Prevent Med Div, Boston, MA 02215 USA;Harvard Med Sch, Brigham & Womens Hosp, Ctr Lipid Metabol, 900 Commonwealth Ave, Boston, MA 02215 USA.
    Demler, Olga, V
    Harvard Med Sch, Brigham & Womens Hosp, Prevent Med Div, Boston, MA 02215 USA;Harvard Med Sch, Brigham & Womens Hosp, Cardiovasc Div, Boston, MA 02215 USA.
    Hu, Frank B.
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Nutr, Boston, MA USA;Brigham & Womens Hosp, Dept Med, Channing Div Network Med, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA 02215 USA.
    Ridker, Paul M.
    Harvard Med Sch, Brigham & Womens Hosp, Prevent Med Div, Boston, MA 02215 USA;Harvard Med Sch, Brigham & Womens Hosp, Cardiovasc Div, Boston, MA 02215 USA.
    Chasman, Daniel, I
    Harvard Med Sch, Brigham & Womens Hosp, Prevent Med Div, Boston, MA 02215 USA.
    Mora, Samia
    Harvard Med Sch, Brigham & Womens Hosp, Prevent Med Div, Boston, MA 02215 USA;Harvard Med Sch, Brigham & Womens Hosp, Ctr Lipid Metabol, 900 Commonwealth Ave, Boston, MA 02215 USA;Harvard Med Sch, Brigham & Womens Hosp, Cardiovasc Div, Boston, MA 02215 USA.
    Assessment of Risk Factors and Biomarkers Associated With Risk of Cardiovascular Disease Among Women Consuming a Mediterranean Diet2018In: JAMA NETWORK OPEN, ISSN 2574-3805, Vol. 1, no 8, article id e185708Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IMPORTANCE Higher Mediterranean diet (MED) intake has been associated with lower risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), but limited data are available about the underlying molecular mechanisms of this inverse disease association in human populations.

    OBJECTIVE To better characterize the relative contribution of traditional and novel factors to the MED-related risk reduction in CVD events in a US population.

    DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Using a prospective cohort design, baseline MED intake was assessed in 25 994 initially healthy US women in theWomen's Health Study who were followed up to 12 years. Potential mediating effects of a panel of 40 biomarkers were evaluated, including lipids, lipoproteins, apolipoproteins, inflammation, glucose metabolism and insulin resistance, branched-chain amino acids, small-molecule metabolites, and clinical factors. Baseline study information and samples were collected between April 30, 1993, and January 24, 1996. Analyses were conducted between August 1, 2017, and October 30, 2018.

    EXPOSURES Intake of MED is a 9-category measure of adherence to a Mediterranean dietary pattern. Participants were categorized into 3 levels based on their adherence to the MED.

    MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Incident CVD confirmed through medical records and the proportion of CVD risk reduction explained by mediators.

    RESULTS Among 25 994women (mean [SD] age, 54.7 [7.1] years), those with low, middle, and upper MED intakes composed 39.0%, 36.2%, and 24.8% of the study population and experienced 428 (4.2%), 356 (3.8%), and 246 (3.8%) incident CVD events, respectively. Compared with the reference group who had low MED intake, CVD risk reductions were observed for the middle and upper groups, with respective HRs of 0.77 (95% CI, 0.67-0.90) and 0.72 (95% CI, 0.61-0.86) (P for trend < .001). The largest mediators of the CVD risk reduction of MED intake were biomarkers of inflammation (accounting for 29.2% of the MED-CVD association), glucose metabolism and insulin resistance (27.9%), and body mass index (27.3%), followed by blood pressure (26.6%), traditional lipids (26.0%), high-density lipoprotein measures (24.0%) or very low-density lipoprotein measures (20.8%), with lesser contributions from low-density lipoproteins (13.0%), branched-chain amino acids (13.6%), apolipoproteins (6.5%), or other small-molecule metabolites (5.8%).

    CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE In this study, higher MED intake was associated with approximately one-fourth relative risk reduction in CVD events, which could be explained in part by known risk factors, both traditional and novel.

  • 10.
    Aimo, Alberto
    et al.
    Scuola Super Sant Anna, Pisa, Italy.
    Januzzi, James L
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Boston, MA, USA; Harvard Clin Res Inst, Boston, MA USA.
    Vergaro, Giuseppe
    Scuola Super Sant Anna, Pisa, Italy; Fdn Toscana Gabriele Monasterio, Pisa, Italy.
    Ripoli, Andrea
    Fdn Toscana Gabriele Monasterio, Pisa, Italy.
    Latini, Roberto
    IRCCS Ist Ric Farmacol Mario Negri, Dept Cardiovasc Res, Milan, Italy.
    Masson, Serge
    IRCCS Ist Ric Farmacol Mario Negri, Dept Cardiovasc Res, Milan, Italy.
    Magnoli, Michela
    IRCCS Ist Ric Farmacol Mario Negri, Dept Cardiovasc Res, Milan, Italy.
    Anand, Inder S
    Univ Minnesota, Div Cardiovasc Med, Minneapolis, MN, USA; VA Med Ctr, Dept Cardiol, Minneapolis, MN USA.
    Cohn, Jay N
    Univ Minnesota, Div Cardiovasc Med, Minneapolis, MN, USA.
    Tavazzi, Luigi
    ES Hlth Sci Fdn, GVM Hosp Care & Res, Cotignola, Italy.
    Tognoni, Gianni
    IRCCS Ist Ric Farmacol Mario Negri, Dept Cardiovasc Res, Milan, Italy.
    Gravning, Jørgen
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Ulleval, Norway; Univ Oslo, Ctr Heart Failure Res, Oslo, Norway.
    Ueland, Thor
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Rikshosp, Internal Med Res Inst, Oslo, Norway; Univ Oslo, Fac Med, Oslo, Norway; Univ Tromso, Jebsen Thrombosis Res & Expertise Ctr, Tromso, Norway.
    Nymo, Ståle H
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Rikshosp, Internal Med Res Inst, Oslo, Norway.
    Brunner-La Rocca, Hans-Peter
    Maastricht Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Cardiol, Maastricht, Netherlands.
    Bayes-Genis, Antoni
    Hosp Badalona Germans Trias & Pujol, Badalona, Barcelona, Spain.
    Lupón, Josep
    Hosp Badalona Germans Trias & Pujol, Badalona, Barcelona, Spain.
    de Boer, Rudolf A
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Yoshihisa, Akiomi
    Fukushima Med Univ, Dept Cardiovasc Med, Fukushima, Japan.
    Takeishi, Yasuchika
    Fukushima Med Univ, Dept Cardiovasc Med, Fukushima, Japan.
    Egstrup, Michael
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Rigshosp, Dept Cardiol, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Gustafsson, Ida
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Rigshosp, Dept Cardiol, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Gaggin, Hanna K
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Boston, MA, USA; Harvard Clin Res Inst, Boston, MA, USA.
    Eggers, Kai M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Huber, Kurt
    Wilhelminenspital Stadt Wien, Fac Internal Med, Vienna, Austria; Sigmund Freud Univ, Med Sch, Vienna, Austria.
    Tentzeris, Ioannis
    Wilhelminenspital Stadt Wien, Fac Internal Med, Vienna, Austria; Sigmund Freud Univ, Med Sch, Vienna, Austria.
    Tang, Wai H.W.
    Cleveland Clin, Inst Heart & Vasc, Cleveland, OH, USA.
    Grodin, Justin
    Univ Texas Southwestern Med Ctr Dallas, Dept Internal Med, Dallas, TX USA.
    Passino, Claudio
    Scuola Super Sant Anna, Pisa, Italy; Fdn Toscana Gabriele Monasterio, Pisa, Italy.
    Emdin, Michele
    Scuola Super Sant Anna, Pisa, Italy; Fdn Toscana Gabriele Monasterio, Pisa, Italy.
    Prognostic Value of High-Sensitivity Troponin T in Chronic Heart Failure: An Individual Patient Data Meta-Analysis2018In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 137, no 3, p. 286-297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Most patients with chronic heart failure have detectable troponin concentrations when evaluated by high-sensitivity assays. The prognostic relevance of this finding has not been clearly established so far. We aimed to assess high-sensitivity troponin assay for risk stratification in chronic heart failure through a meta-analysis approach.

    Methods: Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and Scopus were searched in April 2017 by 2 independent authors. The terms were “troponin” AND “heart failure” OR “cardiac failure” OR “cardiac dysfunction” OR “cardiac insufficiency” OR “left ventricular dysfunction.” Inclusion criteria were English language, clinical stability, use of a high-sensitivity troponin assay, follow-up studies, and availability of individual patient data after request to authors. Data retrieved from articles and provided by authors were used in agreement with the PRISMA statement. The end points were all-cause death, cardiovascular death, and hospitalization for cardiovascular cause.

    Results: Ten studies were included, reporting data on 11 cohorts and 9289 patients (age 66±12 years, 77% men, 60% ischemic heart failure, 85% with left ventricular ejection fraction <40%). High-sensitivity troponin T data were available for all patients, whereas only 209 patients also had high-sensitivity troponin I assayed. When added to a prognostic model including established risk markers (sex, age, ischemic versus nonischemic etiology, left ventricular ejection fraction, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and N-terminal fraction of pro-B-type natriuretic peptide), high-sensitivity troponin T remained independently associated with all-cause mortality (hazard ratio, 1.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.41–1.55), cardiovascular mortality (hazard ratio, 1.40; 95% confidence interval, 1.33–1.48), and cardiovascular hospitalization (hazard ratio, 1.42; 95% confidence interval, 1.36–1.49), over a median 2.4-year follow-up (all P<0.001). High-sensitivity troponin T significantly improved risk prediction when added to a prognostic model including the variables above. It also displayed an independent prognostic value for all outcomes in almost all population subgroups. The area under the curve–derived 18 ng/L cutoff yielded independent prognostic value for the 3 end points in both men and women, patients with either ischemic or nonischemic etiology, and across categories of renal dysfunction.

    Conclusions: In chronic heart failure, high-sensitivity troponin T is a strong and independent predictor of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, and of hospitalization for cardiovascular causes, as well. This biomarker then represents an additional tool for prognostic stratification.

  • 11.
    Aimo, Alberto
    et al.
    Scuola Super Sant Anna, Pisa, Italy.
    Januzzi, James L.
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Harvard Clin Res Inst, Boston, MA USA.
    Vergaro, Giuseppe
    Scuola Super Sant Anna, Pisa, Italy; Fdn Toscana G Monasterio, Pisa, Italy.
    Ripoli, Andrea
    Fdn Toscana G Monasterio, Pisa, Italy.
    Latini, Roberto
    IRCCS Ist Ric Farmacol Mario Negri, Dept Cardiovasc Res, Milan, Italy.
    Masson, Serge
    IRCCS Ist Ric Farmacol Mario Negri, Dept Cardiovasc Res, Milan, Italy.
    Magnoli, Michela
    IRCCS Ist Ric Farmacol Mario Negri, Dept Cardiovasc Res, Milan, Italy.
    Anand, Inder S.
    Univ Minnesota, Div Cardiovasc Med, Minneapolis, MN USA; VA Med Ctr, Dept Cardiol, Minneapolis, MN USA.
    Cohn, Jay N
    Univ Minnesota, Div Cardiovasc Med, Minneapolis, MN USA.
    Tavazzi, Luigi
    ES Hlth Sci Fdn, GVM Hosp Care & Res, Cotignola, Italy.
    Tognoni, Gianni
    IRCCS Ist Ric Farmacol Mario Negri, Dept Cardiovasc Res, Milan, Italy.
    Gravning, Jørgen
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Oslo, Norway; Univ Oslo, Ctr Heart Failure Res, Oslo, Norway.
    Ueland, Thor
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Res Inst Internal Med, Rikshosp, Oslo, Norway; Univ Oslo, Fac Med, Oslo, Norway; Univ Tromso, KG Jebsen Thrombosis Res & Expertise Ctr, Tromso, Norway .
    Nymo, Ståle H
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Res Inst Internal Med, Rikshosp, Oslo, Norway.
    Rocca, Hans-Peter Brunner-La
    Maastricht Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Cardiol, Maastricht, Netherland.
    Bayes-Genis, Antoni
    Hosp Badalona Germans Trias & Pujol, Barcelona, Spain.
    Lupón, Josep
    Hosp Badalona Germans Trias & Pujol, Barcelona, Spain.
    de Boer, Rudolf A.
    Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Yoshihisa, Akiomi
    Fukushima Med Univ, Dept Cardiovasc Med, Fukushima, Japan.
    Takeishi, Yasuchika
    Fukushima Med Univ, Dept Cardiovasc Med, Fukushima, Japan.
    Egstrup, Michael
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Rigshosp, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Gustafsson, Ida
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Rigshosp, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Gaggin, Hanna K.
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Harvard Clin Res Inst, Boston, MA USA.
    Eggers, Kai M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Huber, Kurt
    Wilhelminenspital Stadt Wien, Fac Internal Med, Vienna, Austria; Sigmund Freud Univ, Med Sch, Vienna, Austria.
    Tentzeris, Ioannis
    Wilhelminenspital Stadt Wien, Fac Internal Med, Vienna, Austria; Sigmund Freud Univ, Med Sch, Vienna, Austria.
    Wilson Tang, W. H.
    Cleveland Clin, Heart & Vasc Inst, Cleveland, OH USA.
    Grodin, Justin L
    Univ Texas Southwestern Med Ctr Dallas, Dept Internal Med, Div Cardiol, Dallas, TX USA.
    Passino, Claudio
    Scuola Super Sant Anna, Pisa, Italy; Fdn Toscana G Monasterio, Pisa, Italy.
    Emdin, Michele
    Scuola Super Sant Anna, Pisa, Italy; Fdn Toscana G Monasterio, Pisa, Italy.
    High-sensitivity troponin T, NT-proBNP and glomerular filtration rate: A multimarker strategy for risk stratification in chronic heart failure2019In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 277, p. 166-172, article id S0167-5273(18)32769-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In a recent individual patient data meta-analysis, high-sensitivity troponin T (hs-TnT) emerged as robust predictor of prognosis in stable chronic heart failure (HF). In the same population, we compared the relative predictive performances of hs-TnT, N-terminal fraction of pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), hs-C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) for prognosis.

    Methods and results: 9289 patients (66 ± 12 years, 77% men, 85% LVEF <40%, 60% ischemic HF) were evaluated over a 2.4-year median follow-up. Median eGFR was 58 mL/min/1.73 m2 (interquartile interval 46–70; n = 9220), hs-TnT 16 ng/L (8–20; n = 9289), NT-proBNP 1067 ng/L (433–2470; n = 8845), and hs-CRP 3.3 mg/L (1.4–7.8; n = 7083). In a model including all 3 biomarkers, only hs-TnT and NT-proBNP were independent predictors of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality and cardiovascular hospitalization. hs-TnT was a stronger predictor than NT-proBNP: for example, the risk for all-cause death increased by 54% per doubling of hs-TnT vs. 24% per doubling of NT-proBNP. eGFR showed independent prognostic value from both hs-TnT and NT-proBNP. The best hs-TnT and NT-proBNP cut-offs for the prediction of all-cause death increased progressively with declining renal function (eGFR ≥ 90: hs-TnT 13 ng/L and NT-proBNP 825 ng/L; eGFR < 30: hs-TnT 40 ng/L and NT-proBNP 4608 ng/L). Patient categorization according to these cut-offs effectively stratified patient prognosis across all eGFR classes.

    Conclusions: hs-TnT conveys independent prognostic information from NT-proBNP, while hs-CRP does not. Concomitant assessment of eGFR may further refine risk stratification. Patient classification according to hs-TnT and NT-proBNP cut-offs specific for the eGFR classes holds prognostic significance.

  • 12.
    Akhter, Tansim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Wikström, Gerhard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Larsson, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Naessén, Tord
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Dimethylarginines correlate to common carotid artery wall layer dimensions and cardiovascular risk factors in pregnant women with and without preeclampsia2018In: Atherosclerosis, ISSN 0021-9150, E-ISSN 1879-1484, Vol. 275, p. E69-E70Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Alabas, O. A.
    et al.
    Univ Leeds, Leeds, W Yorkshire, England..
    Rutherford, M.
    Univ Leicester, Leicester, Leics, England..
    Hall, M.
    Univ Leeds, Leeds, W Yorkshire, England..
    Szummer, K.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med H7, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Gale, C. P.
    Univ Leeds, Leeds, W Yorkshire, England..
    Jernberg, T.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med H7, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lower long term relative survival and higher excess mortality in women and in elderly after acute myocardial infarction: a national cohort study using 180,368 cases from the SWEDEHEART registry2016In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 37, no Suppl. 1, p. 1385-1385Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Alabas, Oras A.
    et al.
    Univ Leeds, Leeds Inst Cardiovasc & Metab Med, Bioinformat Ctr, MRC, Leeds, W Yorkshire, England..
    Gale, Chris P.
    Univ Leeds, Leeds Inst Cardiovasc & Metab Med, Bioinformat Ctr, MRC, Leeds, W Yorkshire, England.;York Teaching Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, Dept Cardiol, York, N Yorkshire, England..
    Hall, Marlous
    Univ Leeds, Leeds Inst Cardiovasc & Metab Med, Bioinformat Ctr, MRC, Leeds, W Yorkshire, England..
    Rutherford, Mark J.
    Univ Leicester, Dept Hlth Sci, Leicester, Leics, England..
    Szummer, Karolina
    Dept Med, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Lawesson, Sofia Sederholm
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Karolinska Inst, Danderyds Hosp, Dept Clin Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sex Differences in Treatments, Relative Survival, and Excess Mortality Following Acute Myocardial Infarction: National Cohort Study Using the SWEDEHEART Registry2017In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 6, no 12, article id e007123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background - This study assessed sex differences in treatments, all-cause mortality, relative survival, and excess mortality following acute myocardial infarction.

    Methods and Results - A population-based cohort of all hospitals providing acute myocardial infarction care in Sweden (SWEDEHEART [Swedish Web System for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-Based Care in Heart Disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies]) from 2003 to 2013 was included in the analysis. Excess mortality rate ratios (EMRRs), adjusted for clinical characteristics and guideline-indicated treatments after matching by age, sex, and year to background mortality data, were estimated. Although there were no sex differences in all-cause mortality adjusted for age, year of hospitalization, and comorbidities for ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and non-STEMI at 1 year (mortality rate ratio: 1.01 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.96-1.05] and 0.97 [95% CI, 0.95-.99], respectively) and 5 years (mortality rate ratio: 1.03 [95% CI, 0.99-1.07] and 0.97 [95% CI, 0.95-.99], respectively), excess mortality was higher among women compared with men for STEMI and non-STEMI at 1 year (EMRR: 1.89 [95% CI, 1.66-2.16] and 1.20 [95% CI, 1.16-1.24], respectively) and 5 years (EMRR: 1.60 [95% CI, 1.48-1.72] and 1.26 [95% CI, 1.21-1.32], respectively). After further adjustment for the use of guideline-indicated treatments, excess mortality among women with non-STEMI was not significant at 1 year (EMRR: 1.01 [95% CI, 0.97-1.04]) and slightly higher at 5 years (EMRR: 1.07 [95% CI, 1.02-1.12]). For STEMI, adjustment for treatments attenuated the excess mortality for women at 1 year (EMRR: 1.43 [95% CI, 1.26-1.62]) and 5 years (EMRR: 1.31 [95% CI, 1.19-1.43]).

    Conclusions - Women with acute myocardial infarction did not have statistically different all-cause mortality, but had higher excess mortality compared with men that was attenuated after adjustment for the use of guideline-indicated treatments. This suggests that improved adherence to guideline recommendations for the treatment of acute myocardial infarction may reduce premature cardiovascular death among women.

  • 15.
    Albåge, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Thoracic Surgery.
    Jideus, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Thoracic Surgery.
    Liden, Hans
    Schersten, Henrik
    The Berglin apical stitch: a simple technique to straighten things out in atrial fibrillation surgery2014In: Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1569-9293, E-ISSN 1569-9285, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 685-686Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the Cox-Maze IV procedure, or in endocardial left atrial ablation, correct positioning of the surgical ablation probe within the left atrium might be difficult due to bulging or folds in the posterior left atrial wall. The Berglin apical stitch is a simple trick of the trade to create a smooth surface in the posterior left atrium that facilitates performing a safe transmural lesion and, consequently, may increase antiarrhythmic efficiency.

  • 16. Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Aaseth, Jan
    Alexander, Jan
    Svensson, Erland
    Johansson, Peter
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Less fibrosis in elderly subjects supplemented with selenium and coenzyme Q10-A mechanism behind reduced cardiovascular mortality?2018In: Biofactors, ISSN 0951-6433, E-ISSN 1872-8081, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 137-147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: In an intervention study where 221 healthy elderly persons received selenium and coenzyme Q10 as a dietary supplement, and 222 received placebo for 4 years we observed improved cardiac function and reduced cardiovascular mortality. As fibrosis is central in the aging process, we investigated the effect of the intervention on biomarkers of fibrogenic activity in a subanalysis of this intervention study.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: In the present subanalysis 122 actively treated individuals and 101 controls, the effect of the treatment on eight biomarkers of fibrogenic activity were assessed. These biomarkers were: Cathepsin S, Endostatin, Galectin 3, Growth Differentiation Factor-15 (GDF-15), Matrix Metalloproteinases 1 and 9, Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinases 1 (TIMP 1) and Suppression of Tumorigenicity 2 (ST-2). Blood concentrations of these biomarkers after 6 and 42 months were analyzed by the use of T-tests, repeated measures of variance, and factor analyses.

    RESULTS: Compared with placebo, in those receiving supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10, all biomarkers except ST2 showed significant decreased concentrations in blood. The changes in concentrations, that is, effects sizes as given by partial eta2 caused by the intervention were considered small to medium.

    CONCLUSION: The significantly decreased biomarker concentrations in those on active treatment with selenium and coenzyme Q10 compared with those on placebo after 36 months of intervention presumably reflect less fibrogenic activity as a result of the intervention. These observations might indicate that reduced fibrosis precedes the reported improvement in cardiac function, thereby explaining some of the positive clinical effects caused by the intervention. © 2017 BioFactors, 2017.

  • 17.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Div Cardiovasc Med, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Alexander, Jan
    Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, N-0403 Oslo, Norway.
    Aaseth, Jan
    Innlandet Hosp Trust, Res Dept, Brumunddal, Norway;Inland Norway Univ Appl Sci, N-2411 Elverum, Norway.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Decrease in inflammatory biomarker concentration by intervention with selenium and coenzyme Q10: a subanalysis of osteopontin, osteoprotergerin, TNFr1, TNFr2 and TWEAK2019In: Journal of Inflammation, ISSN 1476-9255, E-ISSN 1476-9255, Vol. 16, article id 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Inflammation is central to the pathogenesis of many diseases. Supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10 has been shown to reduce cardiovascular mortality, and increase cardiac function in elderly persons with a low intake of selenium. There are indications that one of the mechanisms of this positive effect is a decrease in inflammation.

    Methods:

    Osteopontin, osteoprotegerin, sTNF receptor 1, sTNF receptor 2 and the tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis called TWEAK, were determined in plasma after 6 months and 42months in 219 community-living elderly persons, of whom 119 received supplements of selenium (200g/day) and coenzyme Q10 (200mg/day), and 101 received a placebo. Repeated measures of variance were used to evaluate the levels, and the results were validated through ANCOVA analyses with adjustments for important covariates.

    Results:

    Significantly lower concentrations of four of the five biomarkers for inflammation were observed as a result of the intervention with the supplements. Only TWEAK did not show significant differences.

    Conclusion:

    In this sub-analysis of the intervention with selenium and coenzyme Q10 or placebo in an elderly community-living population, biomarkers for inflammation were evaluated. A significantly lower concentration in four of the five biomarkers tested could be demonstrated as a result of the supplementation, indicating a robust effect on the inflammatory system. The decrease in inflammation could be one of the mechanisms behind the positive clinical results on reduced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality reported earlier as a result of the intervention. The study is small and should be regarded as hypothesis-generating, but nonetheless adds important data about mechanisms presently known to increase the risk of clinical effects such as reduced cardiovascular mortality, increased cardiac function and better health-related quality of life scoring, as previously demonstrated in the active treatment group.

  • 18.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, SE-581 85 Linköping, Sweden..
    Alexander, Jan
    Norwegian Institute of Public Health, N-0403 Oslo, Norway..
    Aaseth, Jan
    Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, N-2411 Elverum, Norway..
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Decrease in inflammatory biomarker concentration by intervention with selenium and coenzyme Q10: a subanalysis of osteopontin, osteoprotergerin, TNFr1, TNFr2 and TWEAK.2019In: Journal of Inflammation, ISSN 1476-9255, E-ISSN 1476-9255, Vol. 16, article id 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Inflammation is central to the pathogenesis of many diseases. Supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10 has been shown to reduce cardiovascular mortality, and increase cardiac function in elderly persons with a low intake of selenium. There are indications that one of the mechanisms of this positive effect is a decrease in inflammation.

    Methods: Osteopontin, osteoprotegerin, sTNF receptor 1, sTNF receptor 2 and the tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis called TWEAK, were determined in plasma after 6 months and 42 months in 219 community-living elderly persons, of whom 119 received supplements of selenium (200 μg/day) and coenzyme Q10 (200 mg/day), and 101 received a placebo. Repeated measures of variance were used to evaluate the levels, and the results were validated through ANCOVA analyses with adjustments for important covariates.

    Results: Significantly lower concentrations of four of the five biomarkers for inflammation were observed as a result of the intervention with the supplements. Only TWEAK did not show significant differences.

    Conclusion: In this sub-analysis of the intervention with selenium and coenzyme Q10 or placebo in an elderly community-living population, biomarkers for inflammation were evaluated. A significantly lower concentration in four of the five biomarkers tested could be demonstrated as a result of the supplementation, indicating a robust effect on the inflammatory system. The decrease in inflammation could be one of the mechanisms behind the positive clinical results on reduced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality reported earlier as a result of the intervention. The study is small and should be regarded as hypothesis-generating, but nonetheless adds important data about mechanisms presently known to increase the risk of clinical effects such as reduced cardiovascular mortality, increased cardiac function and better health-related quality of life scoring, as previously demonstrated in the active treatment group .

    Trial registration: The intervention study was registered at Clinicaltrials.gov, and has the identifier NCT01443780 and registered on 09/30/2011.

  • 19.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ, Div Cardiovasc Med, Fac Med & Hlth Sci, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Wågsäter, Dick
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Gender difference and genetic variance in lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 is associated with mortality2019In: BIOMEDICAL REPORTS, ISSN 2049-9434, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 3-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cardiovascular diseases are an important health resource problem and studies have shown a genetic association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and cardiovascular diseases. According to the literature, lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is associated with coronary artery disease. The aim of the present study was to evaluate a possible association between different genotypes of LRP1 and all-cause and cardiovascular mortality from a gender perspective. In the present study, 489 elderly community-living people were invited to participate. Clinical examination, echocardiography and blood sampling including SNP analyses of LRP1 (rs1466535) were performed, including the T/T, C/T and C/C genotypes, and the participants were followed for 6.7 years. During the follow-up period, 116 (24%) all-cause and 75 (15%) cardiovascular deaths were registered. In the female population, the LRP1 of the T/T or C/T genotype exhibited a 5.6-fold increased risk of cardiovascular mortality and a 2.8-fold increased risk of all-cause mortality compared with the C/C genotype. No such genotype differences could be seen in the male population. Gender differences could be seen regarding the risk of mortality in the different genotypes. Females with the LRP1 T/T or C/T genotypes exhibited a significantly increased risk of both all-cause and cardiovascular mortality compared with the C/C genotypes. Therefore, more individualized cardiovascular prevention and treatment should be prioritized. However, since this was a small study, the observations should only be regarded as hypothesis-generating.

  • 20.
    Alexander, J.
    et al.
    Duke Clin Res Inst, Durham, NC USA..
    Andersson, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Lopes, R. D.
    Duke Clin Res Inst, Durham, NC USA..
    Hijazi, Ziad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Sci, Cardiol, Uppsala, Sweden.;Uppsala Univ, Uppsala Clin Res Ctr, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Hohnloser, S. H.
    Goethe Univ Frankfurt, Div Cardiac Electrophysiol, D-60054 Frankfurt, Germany..
    Ezekowitz, J.
    Univ Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada..
    Halvorsen, S.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Oslo, Norway..
    Hanna, M.
    Bristol Myers Squibb Co, Princeton, NJ USA..
    Granger, C. B.
    Duke Clin Res Inst, Durham, NC USA..
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Stroke and bleeding outcomes with apixaban versus warfarin in patients with high creatinine, low body weight or high age receiving standard dose apixaban for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation2015In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 36, no Suppl. 1, p. 345-345Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21. Alexander, John H
    et al.
    Andersson, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Lopes, Renato D
    Hijazi, Ziad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Hohnloser, Stefan H
    Ezekowitz, Justin A
    Halvorsen, Sigrun
    Hanna, Michael
    Commerford, Patrick
    Ruzyllo, Witold
    Huber, Kurt
    Al-Khatib, Sana M
    Granger, Christopher B
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Apixaban 5 mg Twice Daily and Clinical Outcomes in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation and Advanced Age, Low Body Weight, or High Creatinine: A Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Clinical Trial2016In: JAMA cardiology, ISSN 2380-6583, E-ISSN 2380-6591, Vol. 1, no 6, p. 673-681Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IMPORTANCE: In the Apixaban for Reduction of Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Complications in Atrial Fibrillation (ARISTOTLE) trial, the standard dose of apixaban was 5 mg twice daily; patients with at least 2 dose-reduction criteria-80 years or older, weight 60 kg or less, and creatinine level 1.5 mg/dL or higher-received a reduced dose of apixaban of 2.5 mg twice daily. Little is known about patients with 1 dose-reduction criterion who received the 5 mg twice daily dose of apixaban.

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of 1 dose-reduction criterion and whether the effects of the 5 mg twice daily dose of apixaban on stroke or systemic embolism and bleeding varied among patients with 1 or no dose-reduction criteria.

    DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Among 18 201 patients in the ARISTOTLE trial, 17 322 were included in this analysis. Annualized event rates of stroke or systemic embolism and major bleeding and hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs were evaluated. Interactions between the effects of apixaban vs warfarin and the presence of 1 or no dose-reduction criteria were assessed. The first patient was enrolled in the ARISTOTLE trial on December 19, 2006, and follow-up was completed on January 30, 2011. Data were analyzed from January 2015 to May 30, 2016.

    MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Analysis of major bleeding included events during study drug treatment. Analysis of stroke or systemic embolism was based on intention to treat.

    RESULTS: Of the patients with 1 or no dose-reduction criteria assigned to receive the 5 mg twice daily dose of apixaban or warfarin, 3966 had 1 dose-reduction criterion; these patients had higher rates of stroke or systemic embolism (HR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.20-1.81) and major bleeding (HR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.62-2.20) compared with those with no dose-reduction criteria (n = 13 356). The benefit of the 5 mg twice daily dose of apixaban (n = 8665) compared with warfarin (n = 8657) on stroke or systemic embolism in patients with 1 dose-reduction criterion (HR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.66-1.32) and no dose-reduction criterion (HR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.62-0.97) were similar (P for interaction = .36). Similarly, the benefit of 5 mg twice daily dose of apixaban compared with warfarin on major bleeding in patients with 1 dose-reduction criterion (HR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.53-0.87) and no dose-reduction criterion (HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.60-0.86) were similar (P for interaction = .71). Similar patterns were seen for each dose-reduction criterion and across the spectrum of age, body weight, creatinine level, and creatinine clearance.

    CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Patients with atrial fibrillation and isolated advanced age, low body weight, or renal dysfunction have a higher risk of stroke or systemic embolism and major bleeding but show consistent benefits with the 5 mg twice daily dose of apixaban vs warfarin compared with patients without these characteristics. The 5 mg twice daily dose of apixaban is safe, efficacious, and appropriate for patients with only 1 dose-reduction criterion.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00412984.

  • 22. Alexander, Karen P
    et al.
    Brouwer, Marc A
    Mulder, Hillary
    Vinereanu, Dragos
    Lopes, Renato D
    Proietti, Marco
    Al-Khatib, Sana M
    Hijazi, Ziad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Halvorsen, Sigrun
    Hylek, Elaine M
    Verheugt, Freek W A
    Alexander, John H
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Granger, Christopher B
    Outcomes of apixaban versus warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation and multi-morbidity: Insights from the ARISTOTLE trial.2018In: American Heart Journal, ISSN 0002-8703, E-ISSN 1097-6744, article id S0002-8703(18)30296-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) often have multi-morbidity, defined as ≥3 comorbid conditions. Multi-morbidity is associated with polypharmacy, adverse events, and frailty potentially altering response to anticoagulation. We sought to describe the prevalence of multi-morbidity among older patients with AF and determine the association between multi-morbidity, clinical outcomes, and the efficacy and safety of apixaban compared with warfarin.

    METHODS: In this post-hoc subgroup analysis of the ARISTOTLE trial, we studied enrolled patients age ≥ 55 years (n = 16,800). Patients were categorized by the number of comorbid conditions at baseline: no multi-morbidity (0-2 comorbid conditions), moderate multi-morbidity (3-5 comorbid conditions), and high multi-morbidity (≥6 comorbid conditions). Association between multi-morbidity and clinical outcomes were analyzed by treatment with a median follow-up of 1.8 (1.3-2.3) years.

    RESULTS: Multi-morbidity was present in 64% (n = 10,713) of patients; 51% (n = 8491) had moderate multi-morbidity, 13% (n = 2222) had high multi-morbidity, and 36% (n = 6087) had no multi-morbidity. Compared with the no multi-morbidity group, the high multi-morbidity group was older (74 vs 69 years), took twice as many medications (10 vs 5), and had higher CHA2DS2-VASc scores (4.9 vs 2.7) (all P < .001). Adjusted rates per 100 patient-years for stroke/systemic embolism, death, and major bleeding increased with multi-morbidity (Reference no multi-morbidity; moderate multi-morbidity 1.42 [1.24-1.64] and high multi-morbidity 1.92 [1.59-2.31]), with no interaction in relation to efficacy or safety of apixaban.

    CONCLUSIONS: Multi-morbidity is prevalent among the population with AF; efficacy and safety of apixaban is preserved in this subgroup supporting extension of trial results to the most complex AF patients.

  • 23.
    Alexander, Karen P.
    et al.
    Duke Clin Res Inst, Durham, NC USA.;Duke Univ, Durham, NC 27710 USA..
    Weisz, Giora
    Shaare Zedek Med Ctr, Jerusalem, Israel.;Cardiovasc Res Fdn, New York, NY USA..
    Prather, Kristi
    Duke Clin Res Inst, Durham, NC USA.;Duke Univ, Durham, NC 27710 USA..
    James, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Mark, Daniel B.
    Duke Clin Res Inst, Durham, NC USA.;Duke Univ, Durham, NC 27710 USA..
    Anstrom, Kevin J.
    Duke Clin Res Inst, Durham, NC USA.;Duke Univ, Durham, NC 27710 USA..
    Davidson-Ray, Linda
    Duke Clin Res Inst, Durham, NC USA.;Duke Univ, Durham, NC 27710 USA..
    Witkowski, Adam
    Inst Cardiol, Dept Intervent Cardiol & Angiol, Warsaw, Poland..
    Mulkay, Angel J.
    Holy Name Med Ctr, Hackensack, NJ USA..
    Osmukhina, Anna
    Gilead Sci Inc, Foster City, CA 94404 USA..
    Farzaneh-Far, Ramin
    Gilead Sci Inc, Foster City, CA 94404 USA..
    Ben-Yehuda, Ori
    Cardiovasc Res Fdn, New York, NY USA.;Columbia Univ, Med Ctr, New York Presbyterian Hosp, New York, NY 10027 USA..
    Stone, Gregg W.
    Columbia Univ, Med Ctr, New York Presbyterian Hosp, New York, NY 10027 USA..
    Ohman, E. Magnus
    Duke Clin Res Inst, Durham, NC USA.;Duke Univ, Durham, NC 27710 USA..
    Effects of Ranolazine on Angina and Quality of Life After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention With Incomplete Revascularization Results From the Ranolazine for Incomplete Vessel Revascularization (RIVER-PCI) Trial2016In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 133, no 1, p. 39-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Angina often persists or returns in populations following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). We hypothesized that ranolazine would be effective in reducing angina and improving quality of life (QOL) in incomplete revascularization (ICR) post-PCI patients. Methods and Results In RIVER-PCI, 2604 patients with a history of chronic angina who had ICR post-PCI were randomized 1:1 to oral ranolazine versus placebo; QOL analyses included 2389 randomized subjects. Angina and QOL questionnaires were collected at baseline and months 1, 6, and 12. Ranolazine patients were more likely than placebo to discontinue study drug by month 6 (20.4% versus 14.1%, P<0.001) and 12 (27.2% versus 21.3%, P<0.001). Following qualifying index PCI, the primary QOL outcome (Seattle Angina Questionnaire [SAQ] angina frequency score) improved markedly, but similarly, in the ranolazine and placebo groups, respectively, from baseline (67.324.5 versus 69.724.0, P=0.01) to month 1 (86.6 +/- 18.1 versus 85.8 +/- 18.5, P=0.27) and month 12 (88.4 +/- 17.8 versus 88.5 +/- 17.8, P=0.94). SAQ angina frequency repeated measures did not differ in adjusted analysis between groups post baseline (mean difference 1.0; 95% CI -0.2, 2.2; P=0.11). Improvement in SAQ angina frequency was observed with ranolazine at month 6 among diabetics (mean difference 3.3; 95% CI 0.6, 6.1; P=0.02) and those with more angina (baseline SAQ angina frequency 60; mean difference 3.4; 95% CI 0.6, 6.2; P=0.02), but was not maintained at month 12. Conclusions Despite ICR following PCI, there was no incremental benefit in angina or QOL measures by adding ranolazine in this angiographically-identified population. These measures markedly improved within 1 month of PCI and persisted up to 1 year in both treatment arms. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01442038.

  • 24. Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Clayton, Tim
    Damman, Peter
    Fox, Keith A. A.
    Fredriksson, Mats
    Lagerqvist, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    de Winter, Robbert J.
    Swahn, Eva
    Impact of an invasive strategy on 5 years outcome in men and women with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes2014In: American Heart Journal, ISSN 0002-8703, E-ISSN 1097-6744, Vol. 168, no 4, p. 522-529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background A routine invasive (RI) strategy in non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE ACS) has been associated with better outcome compared with a selective invasive (SI) strategy in men, but results in women have yielded disparate results. The aim of this study was to assess gender differences in long-term outcome with an SI compared with an RI strategy in NSTE ACS. Methods Individual patient data were obtained from the FRISC II trial, ICTUS trial, and RITA 3 trial for a collaborative meta-analysis. Results Men treated with an RI strategy had significantly lower rate of the primary outcome 5-year cardiovascular (CV) death/myocardial infarction (MI) compared with men treated with an SI strategy (15.6% vs 19.8%, P = .001); risk-adjusted hazards ratio (HR) 0.73 (95% CI 0.63-0.86). In contrast, there was little impact of an RI compared with an SI strategy on the primary outcome among women (16.5% vs 15.1%, P = .324); risk-adjusted HR 1.13 (95% CI 0.89-1.43), interaction P = .01. For the individual components of the primary outcome, a similar pattern was seen with lower rate of MI (adjusted HR 0.69, 95% CI 0.57-0.83) and CV death (adjusted HR 0.71, 95% CI 0.56-0.89) in men but without obvious difference in women in MI (adjusted HR 1.13, 95% CI 0.85-1.50) or CV death (adjusted HR 0.97, 95% CI 0.68-1.39). Conclusions In this meta-analysis comparing an SI and RI strategy, benefit from an RI strategy during long-term follow-up was confirmed in men. Conversely, in women, there was no evidence of benefit.

  • 25. Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Lindbäck, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Swahn, Eva
    Similar outcome with an invasive strategy in men and women with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes: From the Swedish Web-System for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-Based Care in Heart Disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies (SWEDEHEART)2011In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 32, no 24, p. 3128-3136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    To assess gender differences in outcome with an early invasive or non-invasive strategy in patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE ACS).

    Methods and results

    We included 46 455 patients [14 819 women (32%) and 31 636 men (68%)] from the SWEDEHEART register, with NSTE ACS, between 2000 and 2006, and followed them for 1 year. In the non-invasive strategy arm, the relative risk (RR) of death was (women vs. men) 1.02 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.94-1.11] and in the invasive strategy arm 1.12 (95% CI, 0.96-1.29). After adjustment for baseline differences between the genders, with propensity score and discharge medication, there was a similar trend towards better outcome among women in both the early non-invasive cohort [RR 0.90 (95% CI, 0.82-0.99)] and the early invasive cohort [RR 0.90 (95% CI, 0.76-1.06)], although it did not reach statistical significance in the early invasive cohort. Results were similar with the combined endpoint death/myocardial infarction. An early invasive treatment was associated with a marked, and similar, mortality reduction in women [RR 0.46 (95% CI, 0.38-0.55)] and men [RR 0.45 (95% CI, 0.40-0.52)], without interaction with gender.

    Conclusion

    In this large cohort of patients with NSTE ACS, reflecting real-life management, women and men had similar and better outcome associated with an invasive strategy.

  • 26.
    Allemann, H.
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Liljeroos, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Thylen, I.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden;Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Stromberg, A.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden;Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Information and Communication Technology (ICT) as a supportive aid; perceptions amongst family caregivers to persons with heart failure2018In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 17, no suppl 1, p. 100-100Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Almeida, Joao G.
    et al.
    Ctr Hosp Gaia Espinho, Dept Cardiol, R Conceicao Fernandes 1079, Vila Nova De Gaia, Portugal.
    Fontes-Carvalho, Ricardo
    Ctr Hosp Gaia Espinho, Dept Cardiol, R Conceicao Fernandes 1079, Vila Nova De Gaia, Portugal; Univ Porto, Dept Surg & Physiol, Fac Med, Alameda Prof Hernani Monteiro, P-4200319 Porto, Portugal.
    Sampaio, Francisco
    Ctr Hosp Gaia Espinho, Dept Cardiol, R Conceicao Fernandes 1079, Vila Nova De Gaia, Portugal.
    Ribeiro, Jose
    Ctr Hosp Gaia Espinho, Dept Cardiol, R Conceicao Fernandes 1079, Vila Nova De Gaia, Portugal.
    Bettencourt, Paulo
    Univ Porto, Dept Med, Fac Med, Alameda Prof Hernani Monteiro, P-4200319 Porto, Portugal.
    Flachskampf, Frank
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Leite-Moreira, Adelino
    Univ Porto, Dept Surg & Physiol, Fac Med, Alameda Prof Hernani Monteiro, P-4200319 Porto, Portugal; Sao Joao Hosp Ctr, Dept Cardiothorac Surg, Alameda Prof Hernani Monteiro, P-4200319 Porto, Portugal.
    Azevedo, Ana
    Univ Porto, Dept Clin Epidemiol, Predict Med & Publ Hlth, Fac Med, Alameda Prof Hernani Monteiro, P-4200319 Porto, Portugal; Univ Porto ISPUP, Inst Publ Hlth, Epidemiol Res Unit, EPIUnit, Rua Taipas 135, P-4050600 Porto, Portugal.
    Impact of the 2016 ASE/EACVI recommendations on the prevalence of diastolic dysfunction in the general population2018In: European Heart Journal Cardiovascular Imaging, ISSN 2047-2404, E-ISSN 2047-2412, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 380-386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Diastolic dysfunction (DD) is frequent in the general population; however, the assessment of diastolic function remains challenging. We aimed to evaluate the impact of the recent 2016 American Society of Echocardiography (ASE)/European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging (EACVI) recommendations in the prevalence and grades of DD compared with the 2009 guidelines and the Canberra Study Criteria (CSC).

    Methods and results: Within a population-based cohort, a total of 1000 individuals, aged ≥45 years, were evaluated retrospectively. Patients with previously known cardiac disease or ejection fraction <50% were excluded. Diastolic function was assessed by transthoracic echocardiography. DD prevalence and grades were determined according to the three classifications. The mean age was 62.0 ± 10.5 years and 37% were men. The prevalence of DD was 1.4% (n = 14) with the 2016 recommendations, 38.1% (n = 381) with the 2009 recommendations, and 30.4% (n = 304) using the CSC. The concordance between the updated recommendations and the other two was poor (from k = 0.13 to k = 0.18, P < 0.001). Regarding the categorization in DD grades, none of the 14 individuals with DD by the 2016 guidelines were assigned to Grade 1 DD, 64% were classified as Grade 2, 7% had Grade 3, and 29% had indeterminate grade.

    Conclusion: The application of the new 2016 ASE/EACVI recommendations resulted in a much lower prevalence of DD. The concordance between the classifications was poor. The updated algorithm seems to be able to diagnose only the most advanced cases.

  • 28.
    Al-Saadi, Jonathan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg. Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mattsson, Gustav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Kader, Rozh
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg. Med Univ Gdansk, Gdansk, Poland.
    Magnusson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg. Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Cardiol Res Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with preexcitation presenting as a myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke with a history of recurrent syncope: A case report2019In: Clinical Case Reports, E-ISSN 2050-0904, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 816-820Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Key Clinical Message Contrast-enhanced echocardiography or cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is of value in the diagnosis of apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is rare in Caucasians, and gene negativity does not rule out the diagnosis. Risk stratification for sudden cardiac death and decisions about anticoagulation in cases with atrial fibrillation should be based on guidelines.

  • 29. Alsén, Martin
    et al.
    Hagström, Emil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Eggers, Kai
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Johnston, Nina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    »HEART score« – lösningen på säker handläggning av patienter med misstänkt akut kranskärlsjukdom på akutmottagningen?: ["HEART score"--the solution for secure management of patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome in the emergency department?]2013In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 110, no 27-28, p. 1297-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Ambavane, Apoorva
    et al.
    Modeling and Simulation, Evidera, London, United Kingdom.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Giannitsis, Evangelos
    Medizinische Klinik III, University Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany .
    Roiz, Julie
    Modeling and Simulation, Evidera, London, United Kingdom .
    Mendivil, Joan
    Market Access, Roche Diagnostics International Ltd., Rotkreuz, Switzerland .
    Frankenstein, Lutz
    Department of Cardiology, Angiology, Pulmonology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany .
    Body, Richard
    Emergency Department, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, United Kingdom .
    Christ, Michael
    Department of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Paracelsus Medical University, Nuremberg General Hospital, Nuremberg, Germany .
    Bingisser, Roland
    Emergency Department, University of Basel, University Hospital, Basel, Switzerland .
    Alquezar, Aitor
    Servei de Urgencies. Hospital de Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain .
    Mueller, Christian
    Department of Cardiology and Cardiovascular Research Institute Basel, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland .
    Economic evaluation of the one-hour rule-out and rule-in algorithm for acute myocardial infarction using the high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T assay in the emergency department2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 11, article id e0187662Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The 1-hour (h) algorithm triages patients presenting with suspected acute myocardial infarction (AMI) to the emergency department (ED) towards "rule-out," "rule-in," or "observation," depending on baseline and 1-h levels of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin (hs-cTn). The economic consequences of applying the accelerated 1-h algorithm are unknown.

    METHODS AND FINDINGS: We performed a post-hoc economic analysis in a large, diagnostic, multicenter study of hs-cTnT using central adjudication of the final diagnosis by two independent cardiologists. Length of stay (LoS), resource utilization (RU), and predicted diagnostic accuracy of the 1-h algorithm compared to standard of care (SoC) in the ED were estimated. The ED LoS, RU, and accuracy of the 1-h algorithm was compared to that achieved by the SoC at ED discharge. Expert opinion was sought to characterize clinical implementation of the 1-h algorithm, which required blood draws at ED presentation and 1h, after which "rule-in" patients were transferred for coronary angiography, "rule-out" patients underwent outpatient stress testing, and "observation" patients received SoC. Unit costs were for the United Kingdom, Switzerland, and Germany. The sensitivity and specificity for the 1-h algorithm were 87% and 96%, respectively, compared to 69% and 98% for SoC. The mean ED LoS for the 1-h algorithm was 4.3h-it was 6.5h for SoC, which is a reduction of 33%. The 1-h algorithm was associated with reductions in RU, driven largely by the shorter LoS in the ED for patients with a diagnosis other than AMI. The estimated total costs per patient were £2,480 for the 1-h algorithm compared to £4,561 for SoC, a reduction of up to 46%.

    CONCLUSIONS: The analysis shows that the use of 1-h algorithm is associated with reduction in overall AMI diagnostic costs, provided it is carefully implemented in clinical practice. These results need to be prospectively validated in the future.

  • 31. Andell, P.
    et al.
    Erlinge, D.
    Smith, J. G.
    James, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Koul, S.
    The effect of beta-blockers on mortality in COPD patients after myocardial infarction: A Swedish nation-wide observational study2014In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 35, p. 686-687Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Andell, P.
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Lund, Sweden..
    Karlsson, S.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Lund, Sweden..
    Mohammad, M.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Lund, Sweden..
    Gotberg, M.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Lund, Sweden..
    James, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Jensen, J.
    Capio St Goran Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Frobert, O.
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Orebro, Sweden..
    Angeras, O.
    Sahlgrens Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Nilsson, J.
    Umea Univ Hosp, Umea, Sweden..
    Omerovic, E.
    Sahlgrens Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Lagerqvist, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Persson, J.
    Danderyd Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Koul, S.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Lund, Sweden..
    Erlinge, D.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Lund, Sweden..
    Intravascular ultrasound guidance is associated with lower mortality in patients undergoing stenting for unprotected left main coronary artery lesions compared to angiography-guided stent implantation2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33. Andell, Pontus
    et al.
    Erlinge, David
    Smith, J. Gustav
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    James, Stefan K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Koul, Sasha
    beta-Blocker Use and Mortality in COPD Patients After Myocardial Infarction: A Swedish Nationwide Observational Study2015In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 4, no 4, article id e001611Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background-Patients with myocardial infarction (MI) and concomitant chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) constitute a high-risk group with increased mortality. beta-Blocker therapy has been shown to reduce mortality, prevent arrhythmias, and delay heart failure development after an MI in broad populations. However, the effect of beta-blockers in COPD patients is less well established and they may also be less treated due to fear of adverse reactions. We investigated beta-blocker prescription at discharge in patients with COPD after MI. ethods and Results-Patients hospitalized for MI between 2005 and 2010 were identified from the nationwide Swedish SWEDEHEART registry. Patients with COPD who were alive and discharged after an MI were selected as the study population. In this cohort, patients who were discharged with beta-blockers were compared to patients not discharged with beta-blockers. The primary end point was all-cause mortality. A total of 4858 patients were included, of which 4086 (84.1%) were discharged with a beta-blocker while 772 (15.9%) were not. After adjusting for potential confounders including baseline characteristics, comorbidities, and in-hospital characteristics, patients discharged with a beta-blocker had lower all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 0.87, 95% CI 0.78 to 0.98) during the total follow-up time (maximum 7.2 years). In the subgroup of patients with a history of heart failure, the corresponding hazard ratio was 0.77 (95% CI 0.63 to 0.95). Conclusions-Patients with COPD discharged with beta-blockers after an MI had a lower all-cause mortality compared to patients not prescribed beta-blockers. The results indicate that MI patients with COPD may benefit from beta-blockers.

  • 34.
    Andell, Pontus
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Cardiol, Clin Sci, S-22185 Lund, Sweden..
    James, Stefan K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Cannon, Christopher P.
    Brigham & Womens Hosp, Div Cardiovasc, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Harvard Clin Res Inst, Boston, MA USA..
    Cyr, Derek D.
    Duke Univ, Med Ctr, Duke Clin Res Inst, Durham, NC USA..
    Himmelmann, Anders
    AstraZeneca Res & Dev, Molndal, Sweden..
    Husted, Steen
    Hosp Unit West, Dept Med, Herning Holstebro, Denmark..
    Keltai, Matyas
    Semmelweis Univ, Hungarian Inst Cardiol, H-1085 Budapest, Hungary..
    Koul, Sasha
    Lund Univ, Dept Cardiol, Clin Sci, S-22185 Lund, Sweden..
    Santoso, Anwar
    Univ Indonesia, Natl Cardiovasc Ctr, Harapan Kita Hosp, Dept Cardiol,Vasc Med,Fac Med, Jakarta, Indonesia. INSERM, U1148, Paris, France. Hop Bichat Claude Bernard, AP HP, Dept Hosp Univ FIRE, F-75877 Paris, France. Univ Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris, France. Royal Brompton Hosp, ICMS, NHLI Imperial Coll, London SW3 6LY, England..
    Steg, Gabriel
    Storey, Robert F.
    Univ Sheffield, Dept Cardiovasc Sci, Sheffield S10 2TN, S Yorkshire, England..
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Erlinge, David
    Lund Univ, Dept Cardiol, Clin Sci, S-22185 Lund, Sweden..
    Ticagrelor Versus Clopidogrel in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndromes and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: An Analysis From the Platelet Inhibition and Patient Outcomes (PLATO) Trial2015In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 4, no 10, article id e002490Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background-Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) experiencing acute coronary syndromes (ACS) are at high risk for clinical events. In the Platelet Inhibition and Patient Outcomes (PLATO) trial, ticagrelor versus clopidogrel reduced the primary endpoint of death from vascular causes, myocardial infarction, or stroke after ACS, but increased the incidence of dyspnea, which may lead clinicians to withhold ticagrelor from COPD patients. Methods and Results-In 18 624 patients with ACS randomized to treatment with ticagrelor or clopidogrel, history of COPD was recorded in 1085 (5.8%). At 1 year, the primary endpoint occurred in 17.7% of patients with COPD versus 10.4% in those without COPD (P<0.001). The 1-year event rate for the primary endpoint in COPD patients treated with ticagrelor versus clopidogrel was 14.8% versus 20.6% (hazard ratio [HR]=0.72; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.54 to 0.97), for death from any cause 8.4% versus 12.4% (HR=0.70; 95% CI: 0.47 to 1.04), and for PLATO-defined major bleeding rates at 1 year 14.6% versus 16.6% (HR=0.85; 95% CI: 0.61 to 1.17). Dyspnea occurred more frequently with ticagrelor (26.1% vs. 16.3%; HR=1.71; 95% CI: 1.28 to 2.30). There was no differential increase in the relative risk of dyspnea compared to non-COPD patients (HR=1.85). No COPD status-by-treatment interactions were found, showing consistency with the main trial results. Conclusions-In this post-hoc analysis, COPD patients experienced high rates of ischemic events. Ticagrelor versus clopidogrel reduced and substantially decreased the absolute risk of ischemic events (5.8%) in COPD patients, without increasing overall major bleeding events. The benefit-risk profile supports the use of ticagrelor in patients with ACS and concomitant COPD.

  • 35.
    Andell, Pontus
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Clin Sci, Lund, Sweden..
    Karlsson, Sofia
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Clin Sci, Lund, Sweden..
    Mohammad, Moman A.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Clin Sci, Lund, Sweden..
    Gotberg, Matthias
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Clin Sci, Lund, Sweden..
    James, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Jensen, Jens
    Karolinska Inst, Soder Sjukhuset, Dept Clin Sci & Educ, Stockholm, Sweden.;Capio St Gorans Sjukhus, Unit Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Frobert, Ole
    Orebro Univ, Fac Hlth, Dept Cardiol, Orebro, Sweden..
    Angeras, Oskar
    Sahlgrens Acad, Inst Med, Dept Mol & Clin Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Johan
    Umea Univ Hosp, Heart Ctr, Dept Cardiol, Umea, Sweden..
    Omerovic, Elmir
    Sahlgrens Acad, Inst Med, Dept Mol & Clin Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Lagerqvist, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Persson, Jonas
    Danderyd Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci, Div Cardiovasc Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Koul, Sasha
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Clin Sci, Lund, Sweden..
    Erlinge, David
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Clin Sci, Lund, Sweden..
    Intravascular Ultrasound Guidance Is Associated With Better Outcome in Patients Undergoing Unprotected Left Main Coronary Artery Stenting Compared With Angiography Guidance Alone2017In: Circulation. Cardiovascular Interventions, ISSN 1941-7640, E-ISSN 1941-7632, Vol. 10, no 5, article id e004813Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Small observational studies have indicated better outcome with intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) guidance when performing unprotected left main coronary artery (LMCA) percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), but the overall picture remains inconclusive and warrants further investigation. We studied the impact of IVUS guidance on outcome in patients undergoing unprotected LMCA PCI in a Swedish nationwide observational study.

    Methods and Results: Patients who underwent unprotected LMCA PCI between 2005 and 2014 because of stable coronary artery disease or acute coronary syndrome were included from the nationwide SCAAR (Swedish Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Registry). Of 2468 patients, IVUS guidance was used in 621 (25.2%). The IVUS group was younger (median age, 70 versus 75 years) and had fewer comorbidities but more complex lesions. IVUS was associated with larger stent diameters (median, 4 mm versus 3.5 mm). After adjusting for potential confounders, IVUS was associated with significantly lower occurrence of the primary composite end point of all-cause mortality, restenosis, or definite stent thrombosis (hazard ratio, 0.65; 95% confidence interval, 0.50-0.84) and all-cause mortality alone (hazard ratio, 0.62; 95% confidence interval, 0.47-0.82). In 340 propensity score-matched pairs, IVUS was also associated with significantly lower occurrence of the primary end point (hazard ratio, 0.54; 95% confidence interval, 0.37-0.80).

    Conclusions: IVUS was associated with an independent and significant outcome benefit when performing unprotected LMCA PCI. Potential mediators of this benefit include larger and more appropriately sized stents, perhaps translating into lower risk of subsequent stent thrombosis. Although residual confounding cannot be ruled out, our findings indicate a possible hazard when performing unprotected LMCA PCI without IVUS guidance.

  • 36.
    Andell, Pontus
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Cardiol, Clin Sci, S-22185 Lund, Sweden.;Skane Univ Hosp, S-22185 Lund, Sweden..
    Sjogren, Johan
    Skane Univ Hosp, S-22185 Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Dept Cardiothorac Surg, Clin Sci, Lund, Sweden..
    Batra, Gorav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Szummer, Karolina
    Dept Med, Huddinge, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Koul, Sasha
    Lund Univ, Dept Cardiol, Clin Sci, S-22185 Lund, Sweden.;Skane Univ Hosp, S-22185 Lund, Sweden..
    Outcome of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and severe coronary artery disease who had a coronary artery bypass graft or a percutaneous coronary intervention2017In: European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1010-7940, E-ISSN 1873-734X, Vol. 52, no 5, p. 930-936Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who also have acute coronary syndromes are a high-risk population with a high mortality rate. Little is known about these patients following coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). METHODS: Patients presenting with acute coronary syndromes between 2006 and 2014 with an angiogram showing 3-vessel disease or left main coronary artery involvement who were treated with CABG or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) only were included from the nationwide SWEDEHEART registry. Patients were stratified according to COPD status and compared with regard to outcome. The primary end-point was the 5-year mortality rate; secondary outcomes were the 30-day mortality rate and in-hospital complications after CABG. RESULTS: We identified 6985 patients in the population who had CABG (COPD prevalence = 8.0%) and 14 209 who had PCI only (COPD = 8.2%). Patients with COPD were older and had more comorbidities than patients without COPD. The 5-year mortality rate was nearly doubled in patients with COPD versus patients without COPD (CABG: 27.2% vs 14.5%, P < 0.001; PCI only: 50.1% vs 29.1%, P < 0.001). After adjusting for age, sex and comorbidities, patients with COPD in both CABG-treated [hazard ratio = 1.52 (1.25-1.86), P < 0.001] and PCI-treated populations still had a significantly higher 5-year mortality rate. COPD was also independently associated with significantly more postoperative infections in need of antibiotics [odds ratio = 1.48 (1.07-2.04), P = 0.017] and pneumonia [odds ratio = 2.21 (1.39-3.52), P = 0.001]. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with COPD presenting with acute coronary syndromes and severe coronary artery disease are a high-risk population following CABG or PCI only, with higher risk of long-term and short-term death and postoperative infections. Preventive measures, including careful monitoring for signs of infection and prompt antibiotic treatment when indicated, should be considered.

  • 37.
    Andersen, Kasper
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Physical Activity and Cardiovascular Disease2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to investigate associations of fitness and types and levels of physical activity with subsequent risk of cardiovascular disease.

    Four large-scale longitudinal cohort studies were used. The exposures were different measures related to physical activity and the outcomes were obtained through linkage to the Swedish In-Patient Register. In a cohort of 466 elderly men without pre-existing cardiovascular disease, we found that skeletal muscle morphology was associated with risk of cardiovascular events. A high amount of type I (slow-twitch, oxidative) skeletal muscle fibres was associated with lower risk of cardiovascular events and high amount of type IIx was associated with higher risk of cardiovascular events. This association was only seen among physically active men. Among 39,805 participants in a fundraising event, higher levels of both total and leisure time physical activity were associated with lower risk of heart failure. The associations were strongest for leisure time physical activity. In a cohort of 53,755 participants in the 90 km skiing event Vasaloppet, a higher number of completed races was associated with higher risk of atrial fibrillation and a higher risk of bradyarrhythmias. Further, better relative performance was associated with a higher risk of bradyarrhythmias. Among 1,26 million Swedish 18-year-old men, exercise capacity and muscle strength were independently associated with lower risk of vascular disease. The associations were seen across a range of major vascular disease events (ischemic heart disease, heart failure, stroke and cardiovascular death). Further, high exercise capacity was associated with higher risk of atrial fibrillation and a U-shaped association with bradyarrhythmias was found. Higher muscle strength was associated with lower risk of bradyarrhythmias and lower risk of ventricular arrhythmias.

    These findings suggest a higher rate of atrial fibrillation with higher levels of physical activity. The higher risk of atrial fibrillation does not appear to lead to a higher risk of stroke. In contrast, we found a strong inverse association of higher exercise capacity and muscle strength with vascular disease. Further, high exercise capacity and muscle strength are related to lower risk of cardiovascular death, including arrhythmia deaths. From a population perspective, the total impact of physical activity on cardiovascular disease is positive.

    List of papers
    1. Skeletal muscle morphology and risk of cardiovascular disease in elderly men
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Skeletal muscle morphology and risk of cardiovascular disease in elderly men
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, ISSN 2047-4873, E-ISSN 2047-4881, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 231-239Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    While it is well known that physical inactivity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, there is still a search for the mechanisms by which exercise exerts its positive effect. Skeletal muscle fibre type can be affected to some extent by exercise, and different fibre types possess different anti-inflammatory and glucometabolic properties that may influence cardiovascular disease risk.

    DESIGN:

    Population-based cohort study.

    METHODS:

    We investigated relations of skeletal muscle morphology to risk of cardiovascular events in a sample of 466 71-year-old men without cardiovascular disease, of which 295 were physically active (strenuous physical activity at least 3 h/week).

    RESULTS:

    During a median of 13.1 years of follow up, 173 major cardiovascular events occurred. Among physically active men, 10% higher proportion of type-I (slow-twitch oxidative) fibres was associated with a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.84 (95% confidence interval 0.74-0.95) for cardiovascular events, and 10% higher proportion of type-IIx (fast-twitch glycolytic) fibres was associated with a HR of 1.24 (1.06-1.45), adjusting for age. Similar results were observed in several sets of multivariable-adjusted models. No association of muscle fibre type with risk of cardiovascular events was observed among physically inactive men.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Higher skeletal muscle proportion of type-I fibres was associated with lower risk of cardiovascular events and a higher proportion of type-IIx fibres was associated with higher risk of cardiovascular events. These relations were only observed in physically active men. Skeletal muscle fibre composition may be a mediator of the protective effects of exercise against cardiovascular disease.

    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-210441 (URN)10.1177/2047487313506828 (DOI)000348115400014 ()24092874 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2013-11-08 Created: 2013-11-08 Last updated: 2018-08-24Bibliographically approved
    2. Dose–Response Relationship of Total and Leisure Time Physical Activity to Risk of Heart Failure: a prospective cohort study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dose–Response Relationship of Total and Leisure Time Physical Activity to Risk of Heart Failure: a prospective cohort study
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: Circulation Heart Failure, ISSN 1941-3289, E-ISSN 1941-3297, Vol. 7, no 5, p. 16p. 701-708Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background—The nature of the association between levels of physical activity and risk of heart failure is little known. We investigated nonlinear associations of total and leisure time physical activity with risk of heart failure.

    Methods and Results—In 1997, 39 805 persons without heart failure completed a questionnaire of lifestyle factors and medical history. We used Cox regression models to investigate total (adjusting for education and previous myocardial infarction) and direct (multivariable-adjusted) effects of self-reported total and leisure time physical activity on risk of heart failure of any cause and heart failure of nonischemic origin. Heart failure diagnoses were obtained until December 31, 2010. Higher leisure time physical activity was associated with lower risk of heart failure of any cause; hazard ratio of the total effect of leisure time physical activity was for fifth versus first quintile 0.54; 95% confidence interval was 0.44 to 0.66. The direct effect was similar. High total daily physical activity level was associated with lower risk of heart failure, although the effect was less pronounced than for leisure time physical activity (total effect hazard ratio, 0.81; 95% confidence interval, 0.69–0.95; fifth versus first quintile). A similar direct effect observed.

    Conclusions—Leisure time physical activity was inversely related to risk of developing heart failure in a dose–response fashion. This was reflected in a similar but less pronounced association of total physical activity with risk of heart failure. Only part of the effects appeared to be mediated by traditional risk factors.

    Publisher
    p. 16
    Keywords
    heart failure, physical exercise, cohort study, primary prevention, epidemiology
    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Research subject
    Cardiology; Epidemiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-216862 (URN)10.1161/CIRCHEARTFAILURE.113.001010 (DOI)000342490900003 ()25185250 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2014-02-01 Created: 2014-01-27 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    3. Risk of arrhythmias in 52 755 long-distance cross-country skiers: a cohort study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Risk of arrhythmias in 52 755 long-distance cross-country skiers: a cohort study
    Show others...
    2013 (English)In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 34, no 47, p. 3624-3631Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS:

    We aimed to investigate the association of number of completed races and finishing time with risk of arrhythmias among participants of Vasaloppet, a 90 km cross-country skiing event.

    METHODS AND RESULTS:

    All the participants without cardiovascular disease who completed Vasaloppet during 1989-98 were followed through national registries until December 2005. Primary outcome was hospitalization for any arrhythmia and secondary outcomes were atrial fibrillation/flutter (AF), bradyarrhythmias, other supraventricular tachycardias (SVT), and ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation/cardiac arrest (VT/VF/CA). Among 52 755 participants, 919 experienced arrhythmia during follow-up. Adjusting for age, education, and occupational status, those who completed the highest number of races during the period had higher risk of any arrhythmias [hazard ratio (HR)1.30; 95% CI 1.08-1.58; for ≥5 vs. 1 completed race], AF (HR 1.29; 95% CI 1.04-1.61), and bradyarrhythmias (HR 2.10; 95% CI 1.28-3.47). Those who had the fastest relative finishing time also had higher risk of any arrhythmias (HR 1.30; 95% CI 1.04-1.62; for 100-160% vs. >240% of winning time), AF (1.20; 95% CI 0.93-1.55), and bradyarrhythmias (HR 1.85; 95% CI 0.97-3.54). SVT or VT/VF/CA was not associated with finishing time or number of completed races.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Among male participants of a 90 km cross-country skiing event, a faster finishing time and a high number of completed races were associated with higher risk of arrhythmias. This was mainly driven by a higher incidence of AF and bradyarrhythmias. No association with SVT or VT/VF/CA was found.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-205089 (URN)10.1093/eurheartj/eht188 (DOI)000329134300012 ()23756332 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2013-08-13 Created: 2013-08-13 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    4. Exercise capacity and muscle strength and risk of vascular disease and arrhythmias: A cohort study of 1.26 million young men
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exercise capacity and muscle strength and risk of vascular disease and arrhythmias: A cohort study of 1.26 million young men
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    While physical activity and exercise protects against cardiovascular disease, athletes have higher risk of atrial fibrillation and other arrhythmias. Graded independent and joint influences of exercise capacity and muscle strength on these diseases are unknown.

    Methods:

    All 1.26 million Swedish men who participated in mandatory military conscription between 1972 and 1995 (at a median age of 18.2 years) contributed. Multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the associations of maximal exercise capacity and muscle strength at conscription to subsequent risk of vascular disease and arrhythmias, as identified in national registries.

    Results:

    During a median follow-up of 26.3 years, about 26,000 hospitalizations for vascular disease events and 17,000 for arrhythmias occurred. Exercise capacity was inversely associated with risk of vascular disease (hazard ratio [HR] 0.64; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.61-0.67]; for 5th vs. 1st quintile) and so was muscle strength (HR 0.79; 0.76-0.83; for 5th vs. 1st quintile ). Similar associations were seen across a range of major vascular disease events. Exercise capacity was associated with incidence of arrhythmias in a U-shaped fashion (HR 0.91; 0.86-0.96; for 3rd vs. 1st quintile, and 0.99; 0.94-1.04; for 5th vs. 1st quintile). Higher muscle strength was associated with lower risk of arrhythmias (HR 0.87; 0.83-0.91; for 5th vs. 1st quintile). 

    Conclusion:

    Exercise capacity and muscle strength in late adolescence are independently and jointly associated with long-term risk of vascular disease and arrhythmias. The lower risk of vascular events with higher exercise capacity was not outweighed by higher risk of arrhythmias.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Research subject
    Cardiology; Epidemiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-217308 (URN)
    Available from: 2014-02-01 Created: 2014-02-01 Last updated: 2016-01-18Bibliographically approved
  • 38.
    Andersen, Kasper
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Daniela, Mariosa
    Adami, Hans-Olov
    Held, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Lagerros, Ylva Trolle
    Nyren, Olof
    Ye, Weimin
    Bellocco, Rino
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Dose–Response Relationship of Total and Leisure Time Physical Activity to Risk of Heart Failure: a prospective cohort study2014In: Circulation Heart Failure, ISSN 1941-3289, E-ISSN 1941-3297, Vol. 7, no 5, p. 16p. 701-708Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background—The nature of the association between levels of physical activity and risk of heart failure is little known. We investigated nonlinear associations of total and leisure time physical activity with risk of heart failure.

    Methods and Results—In 1997, 39 805 persons without heart failure completed a questionnaire of lifestyle factors and medical history. We used Cox regression models to investigate total (adjusting for education and previous myocardial infarction) and direct (multivariable-adjusted) effects of self-reported total and leisure time physical activity on risk of heart failure of any cause and heart failure of nonischemic origin. Heart failure diagnoses were obtained until December 31, 2010. Higher leisure time physical activity was associated with lower risk of heart failure of any cause; hazard ratio of the total effect of leisure time physical activity was for fifth versus first quintile 0.54; 95% confidence interval was 0.44 to 0.66. The direct effect was similar. High total daily physical activity level was associated with lower risk of heart failure, although the effect was less pronounced than for leisure time physical activity (total effect hazard ratio, 0.81; 95% confidence interval, 0.69–0.95; fifth versus first quintile). A similar direct effect observed.

    Conclusions—Leisure time physical activity was inversely related to risk of developing heart failure in a dose–response fashion. This was reflected in a similar but less pronounced association of total physical activity with risk of heart failure. Only part of the effects appeared to be mediated by traditional risk factors.

  • 39.
    Andersen, Kasper
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Held, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Neovius, Martin
    Tynelius, Per
    Rasmussen, Finn
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Exercise capacity and muscle strength and risk of vascular disease and arrhythmias: A cohort study of 1.26 million young menManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    While physical activity and exercise protects against cardiovascular disease, athletes have higher risk of atrial fibrillation and other arrhythmias. Graded independent and joint influences of exercise capacity and muscle strength on these diseases are unknown.

    Methods:

    All 1.26 million Swedish men who participated in mandatory military conscription between 1972 and 1995 (at a median age of 18.2 years) contributed. Multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the associations of maximal exercise capacity and muscle strength at conscription to subsequent risk of vascular disease and arrhythmias, as identified in national registries.

    Results:

    During a median follow-up of 26.3 years, about 26,000 hospitalizations for vascular disease events and 17,000 for arrhythmias occurred. Exercise capacity was inversely associated with risk of vascular disease (hazard ratio [HR] 0.64; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.61-0.67]; for 5th vs. 1st quintile) and so was muscle strength (HR 0.79; 0.76-0.83; for 5th vs. 1st quintile ). Similar associations were seen across a range of major vascular disease events. Exercise capacity was associated with incidence of arrhythmias in a U-shaped fashion (HR 0.91; 0.86-0.96; for 3rd vs. 1st quintile, and 0.99; 0.94-1.04; for 5th vs. 1st quintile). Higher muscle strength was associated with lower risk of arrhythmias (HR 0.87; 0.83-0.91; for 5th vs. 1st quintile). 

    Conclusion:

    Exercise capacity and muscle strength in late adolescence are independently and jointly associated with long-term risk of vascular disease and arrhythmias. The lower risk of vascular events with higher exercise capacity was not outweighed by higher risk of arrhythmias.

  • 40.
    Andersen, Kasper
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Byberg, Liisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Skeletal muscle morphology and risk of cardiovascular disease in elderly men2015In: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, ISSN 2047-4873, E-ISSN 2047-4881, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 231-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    While it is well known that physical inactivity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, there is still a search for the mechanisms by which exercise exerts its positive effect. Skeletal muscle fibre type can be affected to some extent by exercise, and different fibre types possess different anti-inflammatory and glucometabolic properties that may influence cardiovascular disease risk.

    DESIGN:

    Population-based cohort study.

    METHODS:

    We investigated relations of skeletal muscle morphology to risk of cardiovascular events in a sample of 466 71-year-old men without cardiovascular disease, of which 295 were physically active (strenuous physical activity at least 3 h/week).

    RESULTS:

    During a median of 13.1 years of follow up, 173 major cardiovascular events occurred. Among physically active men, 10% higher proportion of type-I (slow-twitch oxidative) fibres was associated with a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.84 (95% confidence interval 0.74-0.95) for cardiovascular events, and 10% higher proportion of type-IIx (fast-twitch glycolytic) fibres was associated with a HR of 1.24 (1.06-1.45), adjusting for age. Similar results were observed in several sets of multivariable-adjusted models. No association of muscle fibre type with risk of cardiovascular events was observed among physically inactive men.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Higher skeletal muscle proportion of type-I fibres was associated with lower risk of cardiovascular events and a higher proportion of type-IIx fibres was associated with higher risk of cardiovascular events. These relations were only observed in physically active men. Skeletal muscle fibre composition may be a mediator of the protective effects of exercise against cardiovascular disease.

  • 41.
    Andersen, Kasper
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Rasmussen, F.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Neovius, M.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Tynelius, P.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Anthropometric measures and risk of atrial fibrillation - a cohort study of 1.2 million young men2015In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 36, no Suppl. 1, p. 910-910Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Andersen, Kasper
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Rasmussen, F.
    Lund Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, Lund, Sweden.
    Neovius, M.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tynelius, P.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Stockholm, Sweden;Stockholm Cty Council, Ctr Epidemiol & Community Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Body size and risk of atrial fibrillation: a cohort study of 1.1 million young men2018In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 283, no 4, p. 346-355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Whilst tall stature has been related to lower risk of vascular disease, it has been proposed as a risk factor for atrial fibrillation. Little is known about other anthropometric measures and their joint effects on risk of atrial fibrillation.

    Objectives: We aim to investigate associations and potential joint effects of height, weight, body surface area (BSA) and body mass index (BMI) with risk of atrial fibrillation.

    Methods: In a cohort covering 1 153 151 18-year-old men participating in the Swedish military conscription (1972-1995), Cox regression was used to investigate associations of height, weight, BSA and BMI with risk of atrial fibrillation.

    Results: During a median of 26.3 years of follow-up, higher height was associated with higher risk of atrial fibrillation (hazard ratio [HR] 2.80; 95% CI 2.63-2.98; for 5th vs. 1st quintile) and so was larger BSA (HR 3.05; 95% CI 2.82-3.28; for 5th vs. 1st quintile). Higher weight and BMI were to a lesser extent associated with risk of atrial fibrillation (BMI: 1.42; 95% CI 1.33-1.52, for 5th vs. 1st quintile). We found a multiplicative joint effect of height and weight. Adjusting for muscle strength, exercise capacity and diseases related to atrial fibrillation attenuated these measures.

    Conclusions: Higher height and weight are strongly associated with higher risk of atrial fibrillation. These associations are multiplicative and independent of each other and are summarized in a strong association of body surface area with risk of atrial fibrillation. The mechanisms remain unknown but may involve increased atrial volume load with larger body size.

  • 43.
    Andersen, Kasper
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Rasmussen, Finn
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Child & Adolescent Publ Hlth Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Held, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Neovius, Martin
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Tynelius, Per
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Child & Adolescent Publ Hlth Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Exercise capacity and muscle strength and risk of vascular disease and arrhythmia in 1.1 million young Swedish men: cohort study2015In: BMJ-BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, ISSN 1756-1833, Vol. 351, article id h4543Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the associations of exercise capacity and muscle strength in late adolescence with risk of vascular disease and arrhythmia. DESIGN Cohort study. SETTING General population in Sweden. PARTICIPANTS 1.1 million men who participated in mandatory military conscription between 1 August 1972 and 31 December 1995, at a median age of 18.2 years. Participants were followed until 31 December 2010. MAIN OUTCOMES Associations between exercise capacity and muscle strength with risk of vascular disease and subgroups (ischaemic heart disease, heart failure, stroke, and cardiovascular death) and risk of arrhythmia and subgroups (atrial fibrillation or flutter, bradyarrhythmia, supraventricular tachycardia, and ventricular arrhythmia or sudden cardiac death). Maximum exercise capacity was estimated by the ergometer bicycle test, and muscle strength was measured as handgrip strength by a hand dynamometer. High exercise capacity or muscle strength was deemed as above the median level. RESULTS During a median follow-up of 26.3 years, 26 088 vascular disease events and 17 312 arrhythmia events were recorded. Exercise capacity was inversely associated with risk of vascular disease and its subgroups. Muscle strength was also inversely associated with vascular disease risk, driven by associations of higher muscle strength with lower risk of heart failure and cardiovascular death. Exercise capacity had a U shaped association with risk of arrhythmia, driven by a direct association with risk of atrial fibrillation and a U shaped association with bradyarrhythmia. Higher muscle strength was associated with lower risk of arrhythmia (specifically, lower risk of bradyarrhythmia and ventricular arrhythmia). The combination of high exercise capacity and high muscle strength was associated with a hazard ratio of 0.67 (95% confidence interval 0.65 to 0.70) for vascular events and 0.92 (0.88 to 0.97) for arrhythmia compared with the combination of low exercise capacity and low muscle strength. CONCLUSIONS Exercise capacity and muscle strength in late adolescence are independently and jointly associated with long term risk of vascular disease and arrhythmia. The health benefit of lower risk of vascular events with higher exercise capacity was not outweighed by higher risk of arrhythmia.

  • 44.
    Andersson, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Vårdcentralen Centrum Flen, Sweden; Research and Development Centre, Sörmland County Council.
    Nordgren, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Research and Development Centre, Sörmland County Council.
    Heart Failure Patients' Perceptions of Received and Wanted Information: A Cross-Sectional Study2019In: Clinical Nursing Research, ISSN 1054-7738, E-ISSN 1552-3799, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 340-355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to investigate heart failure patients’ perceptions of received and wanted information and to identify differences regarding received and wanted information in relation to sociodemographic variables. A cross-sectional descriptive design was used. Patients with heart failure (n = 192) were recruited from six primary health care centers in Sweden. Data were collected by a postal questionnaire. A majority of the respondents had received information about the condition and the medication. Within primary health care, most respondents had been informed about medication. The respondents wanted more information about continued care and treatment, medication, and the condition. There were significant differences between sociodemographic groups concerning what information they wanted. Clinical nurses can support patients with heart failure by using evidence-based methods that strengthen the patients’ self-efficacy and by individualized information that increases patients’ knowledge and improves their self-care behaviors. Future studies are needed to identify informational needs of particular fragile groups of patients.

  • 45.
    Andersson, Mikael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiotherapy. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Ronmark, Eva
    Lindberg, Anne
    Emtner, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiotherapy.
    Physical activity and fatigue in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - A population based study2015In: Respiratory Medicine, ISSN 0954-6111, E-ISSN 1532-3064, Vol. 109, no 8, p. 1048-1057Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), symptoms of fatigue, concomitant heart disease and low physical activity levels are more frequently described than in subjects without COPD. However, there are no population-based studies addressing the relationship between physical activity, fatigue and heart disease in COPD. The aim was to compare physical activity levels among subjects with and without COPD in a population based study, and to evaluate if concomitant heart disease and fatigue was associated to physical activity. Methods: In this, 470 subjects with COPD and 659 subjects without COPD (non-COPD) participated in examinations including structured interview and spirometry. A ratio of the forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)/best of forced vital capacity (FVC) and vital capacity (VC) <0.7 was used to define COPD. Physical activity was assessed with the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), and fatigue with the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy - Fatigue scale (FACIT-F). Results: The prevalence of low physical activity was higher among subjects with FEV1 <80% predicted compared to non-COPD subjects (22.4% vs. 14.6%, p = 0.041). The factors most strongly associated with low physical activity in subjects with COPD were older age, OR 1.52, (95% CI 1.12-2.06), a history of heart disease, OR 2.11 (1.10-4.08), and clinically significant fatigue, OR 2.33 (1.31-4.13); while obesity was the only significant factor among non-COPD subjects, OR 2.26 (1.17-4.35). Conclusion: Physical activity levels are reduced when lung function is decreased below 80% of predicted, and the factors associated with low physical activity are different among subject with and without COPD. We propose that the presence of fatigue and heart disease are useful to evaluate when identifying subjects for pulmonary rehabilitation.

  • 46. Andersson, Tommy
    et al.
    Magnuson, Anders
    Bryngelsson, Ing-Liss
    Frobert, Ole
    Henriksson, Karin M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Edvardsson, Nils
    Poci, Dritan
    Gender-related differences in risk of cardiovascular morbidity and all-cause mortality in patients hospitalized with incident atrial fibrillation without concomitant diseases: A nationwide cohort study of 9519 patients2014In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 177, no 1, p. 91-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous studies of patients with "lone" and "idiopathic" atrial fibrillation (AF) have provided conflicting evidence concerning the development, management and prognosis of this condition. Methods: In this nation-wide, retrospective, cohort study, we studied patients diagnosed with incidental AF recorded in national Swedish registries between 1995 and 2008. Controls were matched for age, sex and calendar year of the diagnosis of AF in patients. All subjects were free of any in-hospital diagnosis from 1987 and until patients were diagnosed with AF and also free of any diagnosis within one year from the time of inclusion. Follow-up continued until 2009. We identified 9519 patients (31% women) and 12,468 matched controls. Results: Relative risks (RR) versus controls for stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) in women were 19.6, 4.4, 3.4 and 2.5 in the age categories <55, 55-64, 65-74 and 75-85, years respectively. Corresponding figures for men were 3.4, 2.5, 1.7 and 1.9. RR for heart failure were 6.6, 6.6, 6.3 and 3.8 in women and 7.8, 4.6, 4.9 and 2.9 in men. All RR were statistically significant with p < 0.01. RR for myocardial infarction and all-cause mortality were statistically significantly increased only in the two oldest age categories in women and 65-74 years in men. Conclusions: Patients with AF and no co-morbidities at inclusion had at least a doubled risk of stroke or TIA and a tripled risk of heart failure, through all age categories, as compared to controls. Women were at higher RR of stroke or TIA than men. 

  • 47.
    Andersson, Tommy
    et al.
    Orebro Univ, Sch Med Sci, Dept Cardiol, Orebro, Sweden..
    Magnuson, Anders
    Orebro Univ, Sch Med Sci, Clin Epidemiol & Biostat, Orebro, Sweden..
    Bryngelsson, Ing-Liss
    Orebro Univ, Sch Med Sci, Dept Occupat & Environm Med, Orebro, Sweden..
    Frobert, Ole
    Orebro Univ, Sch Med Sci, Dept Cardiol, Orebro, Sweden..
    Henriksson, Karin M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology. AstraZeneca R&D, Molndal, Sweden..
    Edvardsson, Nils
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Poci, Dritan
    Orebro Univ, Sch Med Sci, Dept Cardiol, Orebro, Sweden..
    Patients without comorbidities at the time of diagnosis of atrial fibrillation: causes of death during long-term follow-up compared to matched controls2017In: Clinical Cardiology, ISSN 0160-9289, E-ISSN 1932-8737, Vol. 40, no 11, p. 1076-1082Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundLittle is known about the long-term, cause-specific mortality risk in patients without comorbidities at the time of diagnosis of atrial fibrillation (AF). MethodsFrom a nation-wide registry of patients hospitalized with incident AF between 1995 and 2008 we identified 9 519 patients with a first diagnosed AF and no comorbidities at the time of AF diagnosis. They were matched with 12 468 controls. The follow-up continued until December 2008. Causes of death were classified according to the ICD-10 codes. ResultsDuring follow-up, 11.1% of patients with AF and 8.3% of controls died. Cardiovascular diseases were the most common causes of death and the only diagnoses which showed significantly higher relative risk in patients with AF than controls (HR 2.0, 95% CI 1.8-2.3), and the relative risk was significantly higher in women than in men. Stroke was a more common cause among patients with AF, 13.1% versus 9.7% (HR 2.7, 95% CI 1.8-4.0), while cerebral hemorrhage was more common among controls, 4.7% versus 10.2% (HR 0.9, 95% CI 0.6-1.5). The time from AF diagnosis to death was 6.03.1years. ConclusionsIn patients with incident AF and no known comorbidities at the time of AF diagnosis, only cardiovascular diseases were more often causes of death as compared to controls. Women carried a significantly higher relative risk than men.

  • 48. Andersson, Tommy
    et al.
    Nagy, Peter
    Niazi, Mohammad
    Nylander, Sven
    Galbraith, Hal
    Ranjan, Santosh
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Effect of Esomeprazole With/Without Acetylsalicylic Acid, Omeprazole and Lansoprazole on Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Clopidogrel in Healthy Volunteers2014In: American Journal of Cardiovascular Drugs, ISSN 1175-3277, E-ISSN 1179-187X, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 217-227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of clopidogrel was assessed in two healthy volunteer crossover studies. Study 1: subjects received clopidogrel alone (300-mg loading dose, then 75 mg/day for 28 days) and two of three PPIs (omeprazole 80 mg, esomeprazole 40 mg or lansoprazole 60 mg) plus clopidogrel for 29 days in three treatment periods (randomized treatment sequence assignment). Study 2: subjects received clopidogrel alone (75 mg/day for 9 days) and clopidogrel alone for 4 days followed by clopidogrel plus fixed-combination esomeprazole 20 mg/low-dose acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) 81 mg for 5 days in two treatment periods (randomized treatment sequence assignment). Pharmacokinetic effects were estimated by measuring active metabolite of clopidogrel, and pharmacodynamic effects by inhibition of adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation. There was a relative decrease of up to 50 % in exposure to the active metabolite of clopidogrel with the different PPIs (study 1), and close to 40 % with esomeprazole/low-dose ASA (study 2), compared with clopidogrel alone. There was an absolute decrease of up to 17 % in inhibition of ADP-induced platelet aggregation with co-administration of different PPIs, compared with clopidogrel alone; however, no differences in platelet inhibition were observed during co-administration with the esomeprazole/low-dose ASA fixed-dose combination. Omeprazole, esomeprazole and lansoprazole decreased systemic exposure to the active metabolite of clopidogrel in healthy volunteers, leading to modest decreases in its antiplatelet effect. However, no apparent differences in platelet inhibition were observed when esomeprazole was co-administered with low-dose ASA as a fixed-dose combination.

  • 49.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Linkoping Univ, Div Nursing Sci, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Arestedt, Kristofer
    Linnaeus Univ, Fac Hlth & Life Sci, Kalmar, Sweden;Res Sect, Kalmar, Region Kalmar C, Sweden.
    Evangelista, Lorraine
    Univ Calif Irvine, Sue & Bill Gross Sch Nursing, Irvine, CA USA.
    Stromberg, Anna
    Linkoping Univ, Div Nursing Sci, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden;Univ Calif Irvine, Sue & Bill Gross Sch Nursing, Irvine, CA USA;Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden.
    The relationship between physical activity and appetite in patients with heart failure: A prospective observational study2019In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 410-417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Physical activity and appetite are important components for maintaining health. Yet, the association between physical activity and appetite in heart failure (HF) populations is not completely understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between physical activity, functional capacity, and appetite in patients with HF. Methods: This was a prospective observational study. In total, 186 patients diagnosed with HF, New York Heart Association (NYHA) class II-IV (mean age 70.7, 30% female), were included. Physical activity was measured using a multi-sensor actigraph for seven days and with a self-reported numeric rating scale. Physical capacity was measured by the six-minute walk test. Appetite was measured using the Council on Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire. Data were collected at inclusion and after 18 months. A series of linear regression analyses, adjusted for age, NYHA class, and B-type natriuretic peptide were conducted. Results: At baseline, higher levels of physical activity and functional capacity were significantly associated with a higher level of appetite in the unadjusted models. In the adjusted models, number of steps (p = 0.019) and the six-minute walk test (p = 0.007) remained significant. At the 18-month follow-up, all physical activity variables and functional capacity were significantly associated with appetite in the unadjusted regression models. In the adjusted models, number of steps (p = 0.001) and metabolic equivalent daily averages (p = 0.040) remained significant. Conclusion: A higher level of physical activity measured by number of steps/day was associated with better self-reported appetite, both at baseline and the 18-month follow-up. Further research is needed to establish causality and explore the intertwined relationship between activity and appetite in patients with HF.

  • 50.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Linköping Univ, Linköping, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping Univ, Div Nursing Sci, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linköping, Sweden; Linköping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linköping, Sweden; Univ Calif Irvine, Program Nursing Sci, Irvine, CA USA.
    Chung, Misook L.
    Univ Kentucky, Coll Nursing, Lexington, KY USA.
    Hjelm, Carina
    Linköping Univ, Div Nursing Sci, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linköping, Sweden.
    Arestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping Univ, Div Nursing Sci, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linköping, Sweden; Kalmar Cty Hosp, Dept Res, Kalmar, Sweden; Linnaeus Univ, Fac Hlth & Life Sci, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Depressive Symptoms Moderate the Association Between Appetite and Health Status in Patients With Heart Failure2018In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 33, no 2, p. E15-E20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Decreased appetite and depressive symptoms are clinical problems in patients with heart failure. Both may result in impaired health status.

    Objective: The aims of this study were to investigate the association between appetite and health status in patients with heart failure and to explore whether depressive symptoms moderate this association.

    Methods: In this cross-sectional study, patients with heart failure (n = 186; mean age, 71 years), New York Heart Association class II to IV, participated. Data on appetite (Council of Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire), depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-9), and health status (EQ-5D 3-level scale [EQ-5D-3L] descriptive system, EQ-5D-3L index, and EQ Visual Analog Scale) were collected by self-rating questionnaires. Pearson correlation was used to investigate the association between appetite and health status. Multiple regression was performed to examine whether depressive symptoms moderate the association between appetite and health status.

    Results: There was a significant association between appetite and health status for EQ-5D-3L descriptive system, mobility (P < .001), pain/discomfort (P < .001), and anxiety/depression (P < .001). This association was also shown in EQ-5D-3L index (P < .001) and EQ Visual Analog Scale (P < .001). Simple slope analysis showed that the association between appetite and health status was only significant for patients without depressive symptoms (B = 0.32, t = 4.66, P < .001).

    Conclusions: Higher level of appetite was associated with better health status. In moderation analysis, the association was presented for patients without depressive symptoms. Decreased appetite is an important sign of poor health status. To improve health status, health professionals should have greater attention on appetite, as well on signs of depressive symptoms.

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