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  • 1.
    Abbasinejad Enger, Shirin
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Dosimetry Studies of Different Radiotherapy Applications using Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Calculations2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Developing radiation delivery systems for optimisation of absorbed dose to the target without normal tissue toxicity requires advanced calculations for transport of radiation. In this thesis absorbed dose and fluence in different radiotherapy applications were calculated by using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations.

    In paper I-III external neutron activation of gadolinium (Gd) for intravascular brachytherapy (GdNCB) and tumour therapy (GdNCT) was investigated. MC codes MCNP and GEANT4 were compared. MCNP was chosen for neutron capture reaction calculations. Gd neutron capture reaction includes both very short range (Auger electrons) and long range (IC electrons and gamma) products. In GdNCB the high-energetic gamma gives an almost flat absorbed dose delivery pattern, up to 4 mm around the stent. Dose distribution at the edges and inside the stent may prevent stent edge and in-stent restenosis. For GdNCT the absorbed dose from prompt gamma will dominate over the dose from IC and Auger electrons in an in vivo situation. The absorbed dose from IC electrons will enhance the total absorbed dose in the tumours and contribute to the cell killing.

    In paper IV a model for calculation of inter-cluster cross-fire radiation dose from β-emitting radionuclides in a breast cancer model was developed. GEANT4 was used for obtaining absorbed dose. The dose internally in cells binding the isotope (self-dose) increased with decreasing β-energy except for the radionuclides with substantial amounts of conversion electrons and Auger electrons. An effective therapy approach may be a combination of radionuclides where the high self-dose from nuclides with low β-energy should be combined with the inter-cell cluster cross-fire dose from high energy β-particles.

    In paper V MC simulations using correlated sampling together with importance sampling were used to calculate spectra perturbations in detector volumes caused by the detector silicon chip and its encapsulation. Penelope and EGSnrc were used and yielded similar results. The low energy part of the electron spectrum increased but to a less extent if the silicon detector was encapsulated in low z-materials.

    List of papers
    1. Monte Carlo calculations of thermal neutron capture in gadolinium: a comparison of GEANT4 and MCNP with measurements.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Monte Carlo calculations of thermal neutron capture in gadolinium: a comparison of GEANT4 and MCNP with measurements.
    2006 In: Medical Physics, ISSN 0094-2405, Vol. 33, no 2, 337-341 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-97526 (URN)
    Available from: 2008-09-19 Created: 2008-09-19Bibliographically approved
    2. Gadolinium neutron capture brachytherapy (GdNCB), a new treatment method for intravascular brachytherapy.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gadolinium neutron capture brachytherapy (GdNCB), a new treatment method for intravascular brachytherapy.
    2006 In: Medical Physics, ISSN 0094-2405, Vol. 33, no 1, 46-51 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-97527 (URN)
    Available from: 2008-09-19 Created: 2008-09-19Bibliographically approved
    3. Dosimetry for gadolinium neutron capture therapy (GdNCT)
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dosimetry for gadolinium neutron capture therapy (GdNCT)
    Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-97528 (URN)
    Available from: 2008-09-19 Created: 2008-09-19 Last updated: 2010-01-13Bibliographically approved
    4. Cross-fire doses from β-emitting radionuclides in targeted radiotherapy: A theoretical study based on experimentally measured tumor characteristics
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cross-fire doses from β-emitting radionuclides in targeted radiotherapy: A theoretical study based on experimentally measured tumor characteristics
    2008 (English)In: Physics in Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0031-9155, E-ISSN 1361-6560, Vol. 53, no 7, 1909-1920 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A mathematical model based upon histological findings of cell cluster distributions in primary breast cancers and lymph node metastases was developed. The model is unique because it accounts for tumor cell cluster formations within both primary tumors and metastases. The importance of inter-cell cluster cross-fire radiation dose for beta-emitting radionuclides of different energies was studied. The cell clusters were simulated as spheres with 15, 25 and 50 microm radii having a homogeneous radioactivity distribution. The self-dose as well as the dose distribution around the spheres was calculated for seven radionuclides, (90)Y, (188)Re, (32)P, (186)Re, (159)Gd, (131)I and (177)Lu using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code. Generally, the self-dose was decreasing with increasing energy of the emitted beta particles. An exception was (188)Re which, compared to (32)P, had higher beta energy as well as higher self-dose. This was due to the higher emission of conversion and Auger electrons in the (188)Re-decay. When the cell clusters had a mean distance that was shorter than the maximum range of beta-particles, then the inter-cluster cross-fire radiation contributed significantly to the absorbed dose. Thus, high-energy beta-particles may, in spite of a low self-dose to single clusters, still be favorable to use due to the contribution of inter-cluster cross-fire radiation.

    Keyword
    Cancer, tumor, radiation, therapy
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-97529 (URN)10.1088/0031-9155/53/7/007 (DOI)000254175900007 ()18364546 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2008-09-19 Created: 2008-09-19 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    5. Determination of self perturbations of spectra in detectors in photon fields
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Determination of self perturbations of spectra in detectors in photon fields
    Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-97530 (URN)
    Available from: 2008-09-19 Created: 2008-09-19 Last updated: 2010-01-13Bibliographically approved
  • 2.
    Abdsaleh, Shahin
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Core Biopsy of Breast and Axillary Lesions: Technical and Clinical Aspects2006Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this work were to image and analyze the needle behavior at automated core biopsy, to investigate the clinical utility of an alternative core biopsy technique using a semiautomated gun in breast and axillary lesions, and also to compare core biopsy with surgical specimens in malignant breast lesions regarding histologic features and hormone receptor expression.

    In two experimental studies, using butter and silicon phantoms, respectively, the needle pass was imaged and its dynamic behavior studied. It was shown that the needle took a curved course in phantoms. It deviated to the same side as where the tip lay, and the degree of the curvature increased with increasing hardness of the phantoms. Our experimental methods can be applied for imaging of needle behavior and thereby improvement of needle configuration.

    In two clinical studies, a semiautomated gun was used for large needle core biopsy of breast and axillary lesions in two series of 145 and 21 patients, respectively. The sensitivity of the method for diagnosis of malignancy was 87% (108/124), and in 37% (31/83) of cases the full length of the needle notch was filled with specimen. No injury to the neurovascular structures of the axillary area was observed. It was concluded that the semiautomated gun can be used as an alternative to the automated gun when the size and location of the lesion render use of the automatic device uncertain or dangerous, e.g., in small breast lesions or lesions located in the axilla.

    In a series of 129 cases of breast cancer, comparison of core biopsy and surgical specimens showed that core biopsy provided enough information on the histologic type and grade of the lesions. Also, there was moderate to high concordance between the two methods for assessment of progesterone receptors and estrogen receptors (Spearman`s kappa 0.67 and 0.89, respectively).

    List of papers
    1. Behaviour of the 2.1-mm (14 G) Automated Biopsy Needle in Phantoms.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Behaviour of the 2.1-mm (14 G) Automated Biopsy Needle in Phantoms.
    2002 In: Acta Radiologica, Vol. 43, no 2, 225-229 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-94101 (URN)
    Available from: 2006-03-03 Created: 2006-03-03Bibliographically approved
    2. Semiautomatic Core Biopsy.: A Modified Biopsy Technique in Breast Diseases.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Semiautomatic Core Biopsy.: A Modified Biopsy Technique in Breast Diseases.
    2003 In: Acta Radiologica, Vol. 44, no 1, 47-51 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-94102 (URN)
    Available from: 2006-03-03 Created: 2006-03-03Bibliographically approved
    3. Ultrasound-guided Large Needle Core Biopsy of the Axilla.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ultrasound-guided Large Needle Core Biopsy of the Axilla.
    2004 In: Acta Radiologica, Vol. 45, no 2, 193-196 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-94103 (URN)
    Available from: 2006-03-03 Created: 2006-03-03Bibliographically approved
    4. Dynamic Behaviour of Core Biosy Needle:: High-speed Video Imaging of the Needle Course in Silicon Phantoms.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dynamic Behaviour of Core Biosy Needle:: High-speed Video Imaging of the Needle Course in Silicon Phantoms.
    Show others...
    Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-94104 (URN)
    Available from: 2006-03-03 Created: 2006-03-03 Last updated: 2010-01-13Bibliographically approved
    5. Comparison of Core Needle Biopsy and Surgical Specimens in Malignant Breast Lesions Regarding Histologic Features and Hormone Receptor Expression.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparison of Core Needle Biopsy and Surgical Specimens in Malignant Breast Lesions Regarding Histologic Features and Hormone Receptor Expression.
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-94105 (URN)
    Available from: 2006-03-03 Created: 2006-03-03 Last updated: 2010-02-03Bibliographically approved
  • 3.
    Abu Hamdeh, Sami
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lannsjö, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Howells, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    MRI analysis of diffuse axonal injury - Hemorrhagic lesions in the mesencephalon idicate poor long-term outcome2016In: MRI analysis of diffuse axonal injury - Hemorrhagic lesions in the mesencephalon idicate poor long-term outcome, Springer, 2016, Vol. 7, Suppl. 1, B-0814Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Clinical outcome after traumatic diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is difficult to predict. Three MRI techniques were compared in demonstrating acute brain lesions.  Relationship of the anatomical distribution of the lesions in combination with clinical prognostic factors to outcome after 6 months was evaluated.  

    Methods and Materials: Thirty patients, aged 16-60 years (mean 31.2 years) with severe DAI (Glasgow Motor Score = GMS < 6) were examined with MRI at 1.5T within one week after the injury. A diffusion-weighted (DW) sequence (SE-EPI, b value 1000 s/mm2), a T2*-weighted gradient echo (T2*GRE) sequence and a susceptibility-weighted (SWI) sequence were evaluated by two independent reviewers with short and long neuroradiological experiences. Clinical outcome was assessed with Extended Glasgow Outcome Score (GOSE) after ≥ 6 months.

    Results: Interreviewer agreement for DAI classification was very good (ҡ 0.82 – 0.91) with all three sequences. SWI visualized more lesions than the T2*GRE or DW sequence.  In univariate analysis, number of DW lesions in the deep gray matter area including the internal capsules, number of SWI lesions in the mesencephalon, age, and GMS at admission and discharge correlated significantly with poor outcome.  Multivariate analysis only revealed an independent relation with poor outcome for age (p = 0.011) and lesions in the mesencephalic region including crura cerebri, substantia nigra and tegmentum on SWI (p = 0.032).

    Conclusion: SWI is the most sensitive technique to visualize lesions in DAI. Age over 30 years and hemorrhagic mesencephalic lesions anterior to the tectum are indicators of poor long-term outcome in DAI.

  • 4.
    Acosta Ruiz, Vanessa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Lönnemark, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Brekkan, Einar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Dahlman, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wernroth, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Magnusson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Predictive factors for complete renal tumor ablation using RFA2016In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 57, no 7, 886-893 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) can be used to treat renal masses in patients where surgery is preferably avoided. As tumor size and location can affect ablation results, procedural planning needs to identify these factors to limit treatment to a single session and increase ablation success.

    PURPOSE: To identify factors that may affect the primary efficacy of complete renal tumor ablation with radiofrequency after a single session.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: Percutaneous RFA (using an impedance based system) was performed using computed tomography (CT) guidance. Fifty-two renal tumors (in 44 patients) were retrospectively studied (median follow-up, 7 months). Data collection included patient demographics, tumor data (modified Renal Nephrometry Score, histopathological diagnosis), RFA treatment data (electrode placement), and follow-up results (tumor relapse). Data were analyzed through generalized estimating equations.

    RESULTS: Primary efficacy rate was 83%. Predictors for complete ablation were optimal electrode placement (P = 0.002, OR = 16.67) and increasing distance to the collecting system (P = 0.02, OR = 1.18). Tumor size was not a predictor for complete ablation (median size, 24 mm; P = 0.069, OR = 0.47), but all tumors ≤2 cm were completely ablated. All papillary tumors and oncocytomas were completely ablated in a single session; the most common incompletely ablated tumor type was clear cell carcinoma (6 of 9).

    CONCLUSION: Optimal electrode placement and a long distance from the collecting system are associated with an increased primary efficacy of renal tumor RFA. These variables need to be considered to increase primary ablation success. Further studies are needed to evaluate the effect of RFA on histopathologically different renal tumors.

  • 5.
    Adamczuk, Katarzyna
    et al.
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Cognit Neurol, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Leuven Inst Neurosci & Dis, Alzheimer Res Ctr, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Schaeverbeke, Jolien
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Cognit Neurol, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Leuven Inst Neurosci & Dis, Alzheimer Res Ctr, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Nelissen, Natalie
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Cognit Neurol, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Univ Oxford, Dept Psychiat, Oxford OX3 7JX, England..
    Neyens, Veerle
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Cognit Neurol, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Leuven Inst Neurosci & Dis, Alzheimer Res Ctr, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Vandenbulcke, Mathieu
    Univ Hosp Leuven, Dept Old Age Psychiat, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Goffin, Karolien
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Nucl Med & Mol Imaging Dept, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Univ Hosp Leuven, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Lilja, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. GE Healthcare, S-75323 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Hilven, Kelly
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Neuroimmunol, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Dupont, Patrick
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Cognit Neurol, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Leuven Inst Neurosci & Dis, Alzheimer Res Ctr, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Van Laere, Koen
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Leuven Inst Neurosci & Dis, Alzheimer Res Ctr, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Nucl Med & Mol Imaging Dept, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Univ Hosp Leuven, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Vandenberghe, Rik
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Cognit Neurol, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Leuven Inst Neurosci & Dis, Alzheimer Res Ctr, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Univ Hosp Leuven, Dept Neurol, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Amyloid imaging in cognitively normal older adults: comparison between F-18-flutemetamol and C-11-Pittsburgh compound B2016In: European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, ISSN 1619-7070, E-ISSN 1619-7089, Vol. 43, no 1, 142-151 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Preclinical, or asymptomatic, Alzheimer's disease (AD) refers to the presence of positive AD biomarkers in the absence of cognitive deficits. This research concept is being applied to define target populations for clinical drug development. In a prospective community-recruited cohort of cognitively intact older adults, we compared two amyloid imaging markers within subjects: F-18-flutemetamol and C-11-Pittsburgh compound B (PIB). Methods In 32 community-recruited cognitively intact older adults aged between 65 and 80 years, we determined the concordance between binary classification based on F-18-flutemetamol versus C-11-PIB according to semiquantitative assessment (standardized uptake value ratio in composite cortical volume, SUVRcomp) and, alternatively, according to visual reads. We also determined the correlation between F-18-flutemetamol and C-11-PIB SUVR and evaluated how this was affected by the reference region chosen (cerebellar grey matter versus pons) and the use of partial volume correction (PVC) in this population. Results Binary classification based on semiquantitative assessment was concordant between F-18-flutemetamol and C-11-PIB in 94 % of cases. Concordance of blinded binary visual reads between tracers was 84 %. The Spearman correlation between F-18-flutemetamol and C-11-PIB SUVRcomp with cerebellar grey matter as reference region was 0.84, with a slope of 0.98. Correlations in neocortical regions were significantly lower with the pons as reference region. PVC improved the correlation in striatum and medial temporal cortex. Conclusion For the definition of preclinical AD based on F-18-flutemetamol, concordance with C-11-PIB was highest using semiquantitative assessment with cerebellar grey matter as reference region.

  • 6.
    Adams, Christopher
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences.
    Kjeldsen, Frank
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Ion Physics.
    Patriksson, Alexandra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    van Der Spoel, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Gräslund, Astrid
    Papadopolous, Evangelos
    Zubarev, Roman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Probing Solution-Phase and Gas-Phase Structures of Trp-cage Cations by Chiral Substitution and Spectroscopic Techniques2006In: International Journal of Mass Spectrometry, ISSN 1387-3806, E-ISSN 1873-2798, Vol. 253, no 3, 263-273 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relevance of gas-phase protein structure to its solution structure is of the utmost importance in studying biomolecules by mass spectrometry. D-Amino acid substitutions within a minimal protein. Trp-cage. were used to correlate solution-phase properties as measured by circular dichroism with solution/gas-phase conformational features of protein cations probed via charge state distribution (CSD) in electrospray ionization. and gas-phase features revealed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The gas-phase features were additionally supported by force-field molecular dynamics simulations. CD data showed that almost any single-residue D-substitution destroys the most prominent CD feature of the "native" all-L isomer, alpha-helicity. CSD was able to qualitatively assess the degree of compactness of solution-phase molecular structures. CSD results were consistent with the all-L form being the most compact in solution among all studied stereoisomers except for the D-Asn(1) isomer. D-substitutions of the aromatic Y(3), W(6) and Q(5) residues generated the largest deviations in CSD data among single amino acid substitutions. consistent with the critical role of these residues in Trp-cage stability. Electron capture dissociation of the stereoisomer dications gave an indication that some gas-phase structural features of Trp-cage are similar to those in solution. This result is supported by MDS data oil five of the studied stereoisomer dications in the gas-phase. The MDS-derived minimum-energy structures possessed more extensive hydrogen bonding than the solution-phase structure of the native form, deviating from the latter by 3-4 angstrom and were not 'inside-out' compared to native structures. MDS data could be correlated with CD data and even with ECD results. which aided in providing a long-range structural constraint for MDS. The overall conclusion is the general resemblance, despite the difference on the detailed level, of the preferred structures in both phases for the mini protein Trp-cage.

  • 7. Aguilar, Carlos
    et al.
    Edholm, Kaijsa
    Simmons, Andrew
    Cavallin, Lena
    Muller, Susanne
    Skoog, Ingmar
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Axelsson, Rimma
    Wahlund, Lars-Olof
    Westman, Eric
    Automated CT-based segmentation and quantification of total intracranial volume2015In: European Radiology, ISSN 0938-7994, E-ISSN 1432-1084, Vol. 25, no 11, 3151-3160 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To develop an algorithm to segment and obtain an estimate of total intracranial volume (tICV) from computed tomography (CT) images.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-six CT examinations from 18 patients were included. Ten patients were examined twice the same day and eight patients twice six months apart (these patients also underwent MRI). The algorithm combines morphological operations, intensity thresholding and mixture modelling. The method was validated against manual delineation and its robustness assessed from repeated imaging examinations. Using automated MRI software, the comparability with MRI was investigated. Volumes were compared based on average relative volume differences and their magnitudes; agreement was shown by a Bland-Altman analysis graph.

    RESULTS: We observed good agreement between our algorithm and manual delineation of a trained radiologist: the Pearson's correlation coefficient was r = 0.94, tICVml[manual] = 1.05 × tICVml[automated] - 33.78 (R(2) = 0.88). Bland-Altman analysis showed a bias of 31 mL and a standard deviation of 30 mL over a range of 1265 to 1526 mL.

    CONCLUSIONS: tICV measurements derived from CT using our proposed algorithm have shown to be reliable and consistent compared to manual delineation. However, it appears difficult to directly compare tICV measures between CT and MRI.

    KEY POINTS: • Automated estimation of tICV is in good agreement with manual tracing. • Consistent tICV estimations from repeated measurements demonstrate the robustness of the algorithm. • Automatically segmented volumes seem less variable than those from manual tracing. • Unbiased and automated tlCV estimation is possible from CT.

  • 8.
    Ahlgren, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Molecular Radionuclide Imaging Using Site-specifically Labelled Recombinant Affibody Molecules: Preparation and Preclinical Evaluation2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Radionuclide molecular imaging is an emerging multidisciplinary technique that is used in modern medicine to visualise diseases at cellular and molecular levels. This thesis is based on five papers (I-V) and focuses on the development of site-specific radiolabelled recombinant anti-HER2 Affibody molecules and preclinical evaluations in vitro and in vivo of the labelled conjugates. This work is part of a preclinical development of an Affibody molecule-based tracer for molecular imaging of HER2 expressing tumours.

    Papers I and II report the evaluation of the Affibody molecule ZHER2:2395-C, site-specifically labelled with the radiometals 111In (for SPECT) and 57Co (as a surrogate for 55Co, suitable for PET applications) using a thiol reactive DOTA derivative as a chelator. Both conjugates demonstrated very suitable biodistribution properties, enabling high contrast imaging just a few hours after injection.

    Papers III and IV report the development and optimization of a technique for site-specific labelling of ZHER2:2395-C with 99mTc using an N3S chelating peptide sequence. 99mTc-ZHER2:2395-C demonstrated high and specific tumour uptake and rapid clearance of non-bound tracer from the blood, resulting in high tumour-to-non-tumour ratios shortly after injection, enabling high contrast imaging. In addition, in the study described in paper IV, freeze-dried kits previously developed for 99mTc-labelling were optimised, resulting in the development of a kit in which all the reagents and protein needed for labelling of ZHER2:2395-C with 99mTc were contained in a single vial.

    Paper V reports the evaluation of an anti-HER2 Affibody molecule, ABY-025, with a fundamentally re-engineered scaffold. Despite the profound re-engineering, the biodistribution pattern of 111In-ABY-025 was very similar to that of two variants of the parental molecule.

    It seems reasonable to believe that these results will also be applicable to Affibody molecules towards other targets. Hopefully, this work will also be helpful in the development of other small proteinaceous tracers.

    List of papers
    1. Evaluation of maleimide derivative of DOTA for site-specific labeling of recombinant affibody molecules
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of maleimide derivative of DOTA for site-specific labeling of recombinant affibody molecules
    Show others...
    2008 (English)In: Bioconjugate chemistry, ISSN 1043-1802, E-ISSN 1520-4812, Vol. 19, no 1, 235-243 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Affibody molecules are a new class of small (7 kDa) scaffold affinity proteins, which demonstrate promising properties as agents for in vivo radionuclide targeting. The Affibody scaffold is cysteine-free and therefore independent of disulfide bonds. Thus, a single thiol group can be engineered into the protein by introduction of one cysteine. Coupling of thiol-reactive bifunctional chelators can enable site-specific labeling of recombinantly produced Affibody molecules. In this study, the use of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7-tris-acetic acid-10-maleimidoethylacetamide (MMA-DOTA) for 111 In-labeling of anti-HER2 Affibody molecules His 6-Z HER2:342-Cys and Z HER2:2395-Cys has been evaluated. The introduction of a cysteine residue did not affect the affinity of the proteins, which was 29 pM for His 6-Z HER2:342-Cys and 27 pM for Z HER2:2395-Cys, comparable with 22 pM for the parental Z HER2:342. MMA-DOTA was conjugated to DTT-reduced Affibody molecules with a coupling efficiency of 93% using a 1:1 molar ratio of chelator to protein. The conjugates were labeled with 111 In to a specific radioactivity of up to 7 GBq/mmol, with preserved binding for the target HER2. In vivo, the non-His-tagged variant 111 In-[MMA-DOTA-Cys61]-Z HER2:2395-Cys demonstrated appreciably lower liver uptake than its His-tag-containing counterpart. In mice bearing HER2-expressing LS174T xenografts, 111 In-[MMA-DOTA-Cys61]-Z HER2:2395-Cys showed specific and rapid tumor localization, and rapid clearance from blood and nonspecific compartments, leading to a tumor-to-blood-ratio of 18 +/- 8 already 1 h p.i. Four hours p.i., the tumor-to-blood ratio was 138 +/- 8. Xenografts were clearly visualized already 1 h p.i.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-104530 (URN)10.1021/bc700307y (DOI)000252520300030 ()18163536 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2009-05-29 Created: 2009-05-28 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Evaluation of the Radiocobalt-Labeled [MMA-DOTA-Cys61]-ZHER2:2395-Cys Affibody Molecule for Targeting of HER2-Expressing Tumors
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of the Radiocobalt-Labeled [MMA-DOTA-Cys61]-ZHER2:2395-Cys Affibody Molecule for Targeting of HER2-Expressing Tumors
    2010 (English)In: Molecular Imaging and Biology, ISSN 1536-1632, E-ISSN 1860-2002, Vol. 12, no 1, 54-62 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Imaging using positron emission tomography (PET) in the field of nuclear medicine is becoming increasingly important. The aim of this study was to develop a method for labeling of affibody molecules with radiocobalt for PET applications. PROCEDURES: The human epidermal growth factor receptors type 2 (HER2) binding affibody molecule DOTA-Z(2395)-C was radiolabeled with (57)Co (used as a surrogate of (55)Co). The binding specificity and cellular processing of the labeled compound was studied in vitro followed by in vivo characterization in normal and tumor-bearing mice. Furthermore, a comparative biodistribution study was performed with a (111)In-labeled counterpart. RESULTS: DOTA-Z(2395)-C was successfully labeled with radiocobalt with nearly quantitative yield. The compound displayed good retention on cells over time and high tumor accumulation of radioactivity in animal studies. Imaging studies showed clear visualization of HER2-positive tumors. Furthermore, the radiocobalt label provided better tumor-to-organ ratios than (111)In. CONCLUSIONS: Radiocobalt is a promising label for affibody molecules for future PET applications.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-122173 (URN)10.1007/s11307-009-0238-8 (DOI)000273479300008 ()19557480 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2010-04-07 Created: 2010-04-07 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
    3. Targeting of HER2-expressing tumors with a site-specifically 99mTc-labeled recombinant affibody molecule, ZHER2:2395, with C-terminally engineered cysteine
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Targeting of HER2-expressing tumors with a site-specifically 99mTc-labeled recombinant affibody molecule, ZHER2:2395, with C-terminally engineered cysteine
    Show others...
    2009 (English)In: Journal of Nuclear Medicine, ISSN 0161-5505, E-ISSN 1535-5667, Vol. 50, no 5, 781-789 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The detection of human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) expression in malignant tumors provides important information influencing patient management. Radionuclide in vivo imaging of HER2 may permit the detection of HER2 in both primary tumors and metastases by a single noninvasive procedure. Small (7 kDa) high-affinity anti-HER2 Affibody molecules may be suitable tracers for SPECT visualization of HER2-expressing tumors. The use of generator-produced (99m)Tc as a label would facilitate the prompt translation of anti-HER2 Affibody molecules into use in clinics. METHODS: A C-terminal cysteine was introduced into the Affibody molecule Z(HER2:342) to enable site-specific labeling with (99m)Tc. Two recombinant variants, His(6)-Z(HER2:342)-Cys (dissociation constant [K(D)], 29 pM) and Z(HER2:2395)-Cys, lacking a His tag (K(D), 27 pM), were labeled with (99m)Tc in yields exceeding 90%. The binding specificity and the cellular processing of Affibody molecules were studied in vitro. Biodistribution and gamma-camera imaging studies were performed in mice bearing HER2-expressing xenografts. RESULTS: (99m)Tc-His(6)-Z(HER2:342)-Cys was capable of targeting HER2-expressing SKOV-3 xenografts in SCID mice, but the liver radioactivity uptake was high. A series of comparative biodistribution experiments indicated that the presence of the His tag caused elevated accumulation in the liver. (99m)Tc-Z(HER2:2395)-Cys, not containing a His tag, showed low uptake in the liver and high and specific uptake in HER2-expressing xenografts. Four hours after injection, the radioactivity uptake values (percentage of injected activity per gram of tissue [%IA/g]) were 6.9 +/- 2.5 (mean +/- SD) %IA/g in LS174T xenografts (moderate level of HER2 expression) and 15 +/- 3 %IA/g in SKOV-3 xenografts (high level of HER2 expression). The corresponding tumor-to-blood ratios were 88 +/- 24 and 121 +/- 24, respectively. Both LS174T and SKOV-3 xenografts were clearly visualized with a clinical gamma-camera 1 h after injection of (99m)Tc-Z(HER2:2395)-Cys. CONCLUSION: The Affibody molecule (99m)Tc-Z(HER2:2395)-Cys is a promising tracer for SPECT visualization of HER2-expressing tumors.

    Keyword
    Affibody molecule, technetium, imaging, HER2, C-terminal cysteine
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-122172 (URN)10.2967/jnumed.108.056929 (DOI)000272487900017 ()19372467 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2010-04-07 Created: 2010-04-07 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
    4. Kit formulation for 99mTc-labeling of recombinant anti-HER2 Affibody molecules with a C-terminally engineered cysteine
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Kit formulation for 99mTc-labeling of recombinant anti-HER2 Affibody molecules with a C-terminally engineered cysteine
    2010 (English)In: Nuclear Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0969-8051, E-ISSN 1872-9614, Vol. 37, no 5, 539-546 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Molecular imaging of HER2-expression in malignant tumors provides potentially important information for patient management. Affibody molecules have shown to be suitable tracers for imaging applications using SPECT or PET. Results from an earlier evaluation of the application of site specific 99mTc-labeling on the Affibody molecule, ZHER2:2395-C, were favorable.

    Methods: As a preparation for clinical application of this tracer we have developed and evaluated a robust single-vial freeze-dried kit, allowing labeling of the Affibody molecule, ZHER2:2395-C, with 99mTc.

    Results: The composition of the kit (containing glucoheptonate, EDTA and tin(II)-chloride), as well as the protein amount and the pertechnetate volume were optimized for a high labeling yield (> 90 %) and minimal presence of reduced hydrolyzed technetium colloids (< 1 %). The specificity to HER2 receptors, the binding competence and the stability in PBS and murine serum were verified in vitro. The shelf-life was also evaluated in vitro, showing no reduction in labeling yield or binding capacity to HER2-expressing cells after over 400 days of storage of the single-vial freeze-dried kit.

    Conclusions: ZHER2:2395-C labeled with 99mTc using the lyophilized kit was stable and resulted in a favorable biodistribution in an in vivo evaluation in normal NMRI mice.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-122175 (URN)10.1016/j.nucmedbio.2010.02.009 (DOI)000279412400002 ()20610158 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2010-04-07 Created: 2010-04-07 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
    5. Targeting of HER2-Expressing Tumors Using 111In-ABY-025, a Second-Generation Affibody Molecule with a Fundamentally Reengineered Scaffold
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Targeting of HER2-Expressing Tumors Using 111In-ABY-025, a Second-Generation Affibody Molecule with a Fundamentally Reengineered Scaffold
    Show others...
    2010 (English)In: Journal of Nuclear Medicine, ISSN 0161-5505, E-ISSN 1535-5667, Vol. 51, no 7, 1131-1138 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Overexpression of HER2 in breast carcinomas predicts response to trastuzumab therapy. Affibody molecules based on a non-immunoglobulin scaffold have demon-strated high potential for in vivo molecular imaging of HER2-expressing tumors. Re-engineering of the molecular scaffold has led to a second generation of optimized Affibody molecules, having a surface distinctly different from the parental protein domain from staphylococcal protein A. The new tracer showed further increased melting point, stability and overall hydrophilicity compared to the parental molecule, and was shown to be more amenable for chemical peptide synthesis. The goal of this study was to assess potential effects of this extensive re-engineering on HER2 targeting, using ABY-025, a DOTA conjugated variant of the novel tracer.

    Methods: 111In-ABY-025 was compared with previously evaluated parent HER2-binding Affibody tracers in vitro and in vivo. The in vivo behavior was further evaluated in mice bearing SKOV-3 xenografts, in rats and in cynomolgus macaques.

    Results: 111In-ABY-025 bound specifically to HER2 in vitro and in vivo. Direct comparison with the previous generation of HER2-binding tracers showed that ABY-025 retained excellent targeting properties. Rapid blood clearance was shown in mice, rats and macaques. A highly specific tumor uptake of 16.7 ± 2.5 %IA/g was seen at 4 h after injection. The tumor-to-blood ratio was 6.3 at 0.5 h, 88 at 4 h, and increased up to 3 days after injection. Gamma camera imaging of tumors was already possible 0.5 h after injection. Furthermore, repeated i.v. administration of ABY-025 did not induce antibody formation in rats.

    Conclusions: The biodistribution of 111In-ABY-025 was in remarkably good agreement with the parent tracers, despite profound re-engineering of the non-binding surface. The molecule displayed rapid blood clearance in all species investigated and excellent targeting capacity in tumor bearing mice, leading to high tumor-to-organ-ratios and high contrast imaging shortly after injection.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-122176 (URN)10.2967/jnumed.109.073346 (DOI)000279430900021 ()20554729 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2010-04-07 Created: 2010-04-07 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
  • 9.
    Ahlinder, Linnea
    et al.
    Swedish Def Res Agcy, FOI, Cementvagen 20, SE-90182 Umea, Sweden..
    Lindstrom, Susanne Wiklund
    Swedish Def Res Agcy, FOI, Cementvagen 20, SE-90182 Umea, Sweden..
    Lejon, Christian
    Swedish Def Res Agcy, FOI, Cementvagen 20, SE-90182 Umea, Sweden..
    Geladi, Paul
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Forest Biomat & Technol, SE-90183 Umea, Sweden..
    Österlund, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Physics.
    Noise Removal with Maintained Spatial Resolution in Raman Images of Cells Exposed to Submicron Polystyrene Particles2016In: NANOMATERIALS, ISSN 2079-4991, Vol. 6, no 5, UNSP 83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The biodistribution of 300 nm polystyrene particles in A549 lung epithelial cells has been studied with confocal Raman spectroscopy. This is a label-free method in which particles and cells can be imaged without using dyes or fluorescent labels. The main drawback with Raman imaging is the comparatively low spatial resolution, which is aggravated in heterogeneous systems such as biological samples, which in addition often require long measurement times because of their weak Raman signal. Long measurement times may however induce laser-induced damage. In this study we use a super-resolution algorithm with Tikhonov regularization, intended to improve the image quality without demanding an increased number of collected pixels. Images of cells exposed to polystyrene particles have been acquired with two different step lengths, i.e., the distance between pixels, and compared to each other and to corresponding images treated with the super-resolution algorithm. It is shown that the resolution after application of super-resolution algorithms is not significantly improved compared to the theoretical limit for optical microscopy. However, to reduce noise and artefacts in the hyperspectral Raman images while maintaining the spatial resolution, we show that it is advantageous to use short mapping step lengths and super-resolution algorithms with appropriate regularization. The proposed methodology should be generally applicable for Raman imaging of biological samples and other photo-sensitive samples.

  • 10. Ahlstedt, J.
    et al.
    Orbom, A.
    Akesson, A.
    Frejd, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Strand, S.
    Tran, T.
    Simultaneous dual-radionuclide SPECT-imaging of HER2 expression using 99mTc-Affibody/111In-trastuzumab2014In: European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, ISSN 1619-7070, E-ISSN 1619-7089, Vol. 41, no S2, S274-S274 p., OP522Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Ahmed, Adan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Bemötande av barn på röntgen2016Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Barnen är oftast rädda och oroliga då de kommer till en röntgenundersökning på grund av att det är en främmande miljö utrustad med högteknologisk apparatur som är skrämmande för barnet. För att bemöta dessa barn behöver röntgensjuksköterskan ha kunskap och färdigheter om bemötande av barn. Ett bra samspel mellan röntgensjuksköterskan och barnen som bygger på ömsesidig tillit och respekt ger trygghet hos barnet och det kan samarbeta bättre under röntgenundersökningen. På en kort tid, ofta mindre än 5 minuter, måste en röntgensjuksköterska överföra viktig information om undersökningen till barnet. Därför är det viktigt för röntgensjuksköterskan att ha kunskap om gott bemötande av barn.

  • 12.
    Ahnesjö, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    van Veelen, Bob
    Elekta Brachytherapy, NL-3905 TH Veenendaal, Netherlands..
    Tedgren, Asa Carlsson
    Linkoping Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Dept Med & Hlth Sci IMH, Radiat Phys, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Phys, Sect Radiotherapy Phys & Engn, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Collapsed cone dose calculations for heterogeneous tissues in brachytherapy using primary and scatter separation source data2017In: Computer Methods and Programs in Biomedicine, ISSN 0169-2607, E-ISSN 1872-7565, Vol. 139, 17-29 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Objective: Brachytherapy is a form of radiation therapy using sealed radiation sources inserted within or in the vicinity of the tumor of, e.g., gynecological, prostate or head and neck cancers. Accurate dose calculation is a crucial part of the treatment planning. Several reviews have called for clinical software with model-based algorithms that better take into account the effects of patient individual distribution of tissues, source-channel and shielding attenuation than the commonly employed TG-43 formalism which simply map homogeneous water dose distributions onto the patient. In this paper we give a comprehensive and thorough derivation of such an algorithm based on collapsed cone point-kernel superposition, and describe details of its implementation into a commercial treatment planning system for clinical use. Methods: A brachytherapy version of the collapsed-cone algorithm using analytical raytraces of the primary photon radiation followed by successive scattering dose calculation for once and multiply scattered photons is described in detail, including derivation of the corresponding set of recursive equations for energy transport along cone axes/transport lines and the coupling to clinical source modeling. Specific implementation issues for setting up of the calculation grid, handling of intravoxel gradients and voxels partly containing non patient applicator material are given. Results: Sample runs for two clinical cases are shown, one being a gynecological application with a tungsten-shielded applicator and one a breast implant. These two cases demonstrate the impact of improved dose calculation versus TG-43 formalism. Conclusions: Use of model-based dose calculation algorithms for brachytherapy taking the three-dimensional treatment geometry into account increases the dosimetric accuracy in planning and follow up of treatments. The comprehensive description and derivations provided gives a rigid background for further clinical, educational and research applications.

  • 13.
    Akhter, Tansim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Larsson, Marita
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Naessén, Tord
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Thicknesses of individual layers of artery wall indicate increased cardiovascular risk in severe pre-eclampsia2014In: Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 0960-7692, E-ISSN 1469-0705, Vol. 43, no 6, 675-680 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Pre-eclampsia, especially severe pre-eclampsia, is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease later in life. However, ultrasound assessments of the common carotid artery intima-media thickness (CCA-IMT) do not convincingly demonstrate this. The aim of this study was to assess whether the individual thickness of the CCA intima and media layers and calculation of intima/media ratio (I/M) indicate an increased cardiovascular risk in women with previous severe pre-eclampsia.

    METHODS: The thicknesses of the CCA intima and media layers were obtained by non-invasive high-frequency ultrasound (22 MHz) in 42 women with previous severe pre-eclampsia and 44 women with previous normal pregnancies. A thick intima, thin media and high I/M are signs of a less healthy artery wall.

    RESULTS: Women with previous severe pre-eclampsia had a thicker CCA intima and a higher I/M than women with previous normal pregnancies, also after adjustment for mean arterial pressure, body mass index and CCA-IMT (all p < 0.0001). CCA-IMT did not differ significantly between the groups. In receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, intima thickness and I/M clearly discriminated between women with and without previous pre-eclampsia (c value about 0.95), whereas CCA-IMT did not (c = 0.52).

    CONCLUSIONS: Estimation of the individual CCA intima and media layers using high-frequency ultrasound and calculation of the I/M clearly demonstrated the well known increased cardiovascular risk in women with pre-eclampsia, whereas CCA-IMT did not. This method appears preferable to measuring CCA-IMT for imaging arterial effects and the increased cardiovascular risk in women with previous severe pre-eclampsia.

  • 14. Alcorn, S. R.
    et al.
    Nilsson, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Dieckmann, K.
    McNutt, T. R.
    Chen, M. J.
    Ermoian, R. P.
    Ford, E. C.
    MacDonald, S.
    Nechesnyuk, A.
    Tryggestad, E. J.
    Smith, K.
    Villar, R. C.
    Winey, B.
    Terezakis, S. A.
    Predictors of Setup Accuracy in Image-Guided CNS Radiation Therapy: Prospective Data From a Multinational Pediatrics Consortium2014In: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics, ISSN 0360-3016, E-ISSN 1879-355X, Vol. 90, no S1, S723-S723 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Alemany, Montserrat
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Stenborg, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Terent, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Sonninen, Pirkko
    Röntgenavdelningen, Åbo universitetssjukhus, Åbo, Finland.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Coexistence of microhemorrhages and acute spontaneous brain hemorrhage: correlation with signs of microangiopathy and clinical data2006In: Radiology, ISSN 0033-8419, E-ISSN 1527-1315, Vol. 238, no 1, 240-7 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To evaluate prospectively with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging the coexistence of microhemorrhages (MHs) in white patients with acute spontaneous intraparenchymal hemorrhage (IPH) and acute ischemic stroke and to study the association with imaging findings of microangiopathy and various clinical data. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Before examinations, informed consents were signed by either the patient or a relative. The study was carried out with the approval of the local ethics committee. MR imaging was performed in 90 patients with acute stroke: 45 with acute spontaneous IPHs (24 men and 21 women; median age, 65 and 68 years, respectively) and 45 age-matched control subjects without intracranial hemorrhages (26 men and 19 women; median age for both, 67 years), as determined at computed tomography. MR imaging included transverse T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo, transverse fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, transverse and coronal T2*-weighted gradient-echo, and, in 50 patients, diffusion-weighted sequences. Presence of MHs and signs of microangiopathy, such as T2 hyperintensities or lacunae, were recorded in the white and deep gray matter. The relationships between MH and IPH and between MH and T2 hyperintensities were analyzed by means of regression analysis. Different clinical features, such as arterial hypertension or diabetes, were registered and correlated with the image findings by means of regression analysis. RESULTS: MHs were found in 64% of patients with IPH (29 of 45) and 18% of control subjects (eight of 45). A statistically significant relationship between MH and IPH was determined (P < .001). Among the 29 patients with IPH and MH, 24 (83%) had T2 hyperintensities and 13 (45%) had lacunae; among the 16 patients without MH, seven (44%) had T2 hyperintensities and three (19%) had lacunae. A relationship between MH and occurrence and extent of T2 hyperintensities was also identified (P < .001). There was no clear relationship with the clinical data studied. CONCLUSION: The results support a correlation between the presence of imaging signs of cerebral microangiopathy, clinically silent MHs, and acute IPHs. RSNA, 2006.

  • 16.
    Alemany Ripoll, Montserrat
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    MRI Diagnosis of Intracranial Hemorrhage: Experimental and Clinical Studies2003Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this work was to improve the diagnosis of intracranial hemorrhage with MRI, using, among others, T2*-w GE sequences. Various sequences were tested in rabbits at two magnetic field strengths. Then, the most effective technique was applied to stroke patients.

    Experimental studies: The MR detectability of small experimental haematomas in the brain and of blood in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces of 30 rabbits was evaluated. MRI examinations were performed at determined intervals. The last MR images were compared to formalin fixed brain sections and, in 16 rabbits, also to the histological findings. T2*-weighted GE sequences revealed all the intraparenchymal haematomas at 1.5 T, appearing strongly hypointense. Their signal patterns remained unchanged during the follow-up. Blood in the CSF spaces was best detected at 1.5T with T2*-weighted GE sequences during the first 2 days. FLAIR and SE sequences were rather insensitive.

    Clinical studies: MR examinations were performed at 1.5T, including T1- and T2-w SE, FLAIR and T2*-w GE sequences. In the first clinical study, 66 intraparenchymal hematomas (IPH) of different sizes and ages were examined. T2*-w GE sequence was the most sensitive. On all the sequences, we found a big variety of signal patterns, without a clear relationship to the age of the hematomas.

    In a second clinical study, MR examinations were performed to 83 patients with acute stroke: 43 presented acute IPH and 40 were used as controls. Old microhemorrhages (OMHs) were found in 60% of the patients with IPH, and in 15% of the controls.

    Conclusion: T2*-weighted GE sequences are capable of revealing very small intraparenchymal hemorrhages at any stage, and blood in CSF spaces during at least the first 2 days. The age of IPHs cannot reliably be estimated with MRI. We have found a correlation between the presence of OMHs and acute intraparenchymal hematomas.

  • 17.
    Almqvist, Ylva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Orlova, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Sjöström, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Jensen, Holger J.
    Danmark.
    Lundqvist, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Sundin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    In vitro characterization of 211 At-labeled antibody A33: a potential therapeutic agent against metastatic colorectal carcinoma2005In: Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals, ISSN 1084-9785, E-ISSN 1557-8852, Vol. 20, no 5, 514-523 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The humanized antibody A33 binds to the A33 antigen, expressed in 95% of primary and metastatic colorectal carcinomas. The restricted pattern of expression in normal tissue makes this antigen a possible target for radioimmunotherapy of colorectal micrometastases. In this study, the A33 antibody was labeled with the therapeutic nuclide 211At using N-succinimidyl para-(tri-methylstannyl)benzoate (SPMB). The in vitro characteristics of the 211At-benzoate-A33 conjugate (211At-A33) were investigated and found to be similar to those of 125I-benzoate-A33 (125I-A33) in different assays. Both conjugates bound with high affinity to SW1222 cells (Kd = 1.7 ± 0.2 nM, and 1.8 ± 0.1 nM for 211At-A33 and 125I-A33, respectively), and both showed good intracellular retention (70% of the radioactivity was still cell associated after 20 hours). The cytotoxic effect of 211At-A33 was also confirmed. After incubation with 211At-A33, SW1222 cells had a survival of approximately 0.3% when exposed to some 150 decays per cell (DPC). The cytotoxic effect was found to be dose-dependent, as cells exposed to only 56 DPC had a survival of approximately 5%. The 211At-A33 conjugate shows promise as a potential radioimmunotherapy agent for treatment of micrometastases originating from colorectal carcinoma.

  • 18.
    Altai, Mohamed
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Honarvar, Hadis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Wållberg, Helena
    Strand, Joanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Varasteh, Zohreh
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.
    Orlova, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.
    Dunås, Finn
    Sandström, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science.
    Rosestedt, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.
    Löfblom, John
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Ståhl, Stefan
    Selection of an optimal cysteine-containing peptide-based chelator for labeling of Affibody molecules with 188-Re2013In: European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, ISSN 1619-7070, E-ISSN 1619-7089, Vol. 40, no Suppl. 2, S219-S220 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Affibody molecules constitute a class of small (7 kDa) scaffold proteins that can be engineered to have excellent tumor targeting properties. High reabsorption in kidneys complicates development of affibody molecules for radionuclide therapy. In this study, we evaluated the influence of the composition of cysteine-containing C-terminal peptide-based chelators on the biodistribution and renal retention of 188Re-labeled anti-HER2 affibody molecules. Biodistribution of affibody molecules containing GGXC or GXGC peptide chelators (where X is G, S, E or K) was compared with biodistribution of a parental affibody molecule ZHER2:2395 having a KVDC peptide chelator. All constructs retained low picomolar affinity to HER2-expressing cells after labeling. The biodistribution of all 188Re-labeled affibody molecules was in general comparable, with the main observed difference found in the uptake and retention of radioactivity in excretory organs. The 188Re-ZHER2:V2 affibody molecule with a GGGC chelator provided the lowest uptake in all organs and tissues. The renal retention of 188Re-ZHER2:V2 (3.1±0.5 %ID/g at 4 h after injection) was 55-fold lower than retention of the parental 188Re-ZHER2:2395 (172±32 %ID/g). We show that engineering of cysteine-containing peptide-based chelators can be used for significant improvement of biodistribution of 188Re-labeled scaffold proteins, particularly reduction of their uptake in excretory organs.

  • 19.
    Altai, Mohamed
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Liu, H.
    KTH, Div Prot Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Orlova, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Molecular Imaging.
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Gräslund, T.
    KTH, Div Prot Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Improving of molecular design of a novel Affibody-fused HER2-recognising anticancer toxin using radionuclide-based techniques2016In: European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, ISSN 1619-7070, E-ISSN 1619-7089, Vol. 43, S178-S178 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Altai, Mohamed
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Perols, Anna
    Tsourma, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Mitran, Bogdan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.
    Honarvar, Hadis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Robillard, Marc
    Rossin, Raffaella
    Ten Hoeve, Wolter
    Lubberink, Mark
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Orlova, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.
    Eriksson Karlström, Amelie
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Feasibility of affibody-based bioorthogonal chemistry-mediated radionuclide pretargeting2016In: Journal of Nuclear Medicine, ISSN 0161-5505, E-ISSN 1535-5667, Vol. 57, no 3, 431-436 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Affibody molecules constitute a new class of probes for radionuclide tumor targeting. The small size of affibody molecules is favorable for rapid localization in tumors and clearance from circulation. However, high renal re-absorption of affibody molecules prevents the use of residualizing radiometals, including a number of promising low energy beta- and alpha-emitters, for radionuclide therapy. We tested a hypothesis that affibody-based pretargeting mediated by a bioorthogonal interaction between trans-cyclooctene (TCO) and tetrazine would provide higher accumulation of radiometals in tumor xenografts than in the kidneys.

    Methods:

    TCO was conjugated to the anti-HER2 affibody molecule Z2395. DOTA-tetrazine was labeled with indium-111 and lutetium-177. In vitro pretargeting was studied in HER2-expressing SKOV-3 and BT474 cell lines. In vivo studies were performed on BALB/C nu/nu mice bearing SKOV-3 xenografts.

    Results:

    125I-Z2395-TCO bound specifically to HER2-expressing cells in vitro with an affinity of 45±16 pM. 111In-tetrazine bound specifically and selectively to Z2395-TCO pre-treated cells. In vivo studies demonstrated HER2-specific 125I-Z2395-TCO accumulation in xenografts. TCO-mediated 111In-tetrazine localization was shown in tumors, when the radiolabeled tracer was injected 4 h after an injection of Z2395-TCO. At 1 h post injection, the tumor uptake of 111In-tetrazine and 177Lu-tetrazine was ca. 2-fold higher than the renal uptake. Pretargeting provided more than a 56-fold reduction of renal uptake of 111In in comparison with direct targeting.

    Conclusion:

    The feasibility of affibody-based bioorthogonal chemistry-mediated pretargeting was demonstrated. The use of pretargeting provides a substantial reduction of radiometal accumulation in kidneys, creating preconditions for palliative radionuclide therapy.

  • 21.
    Altai, Mohamed
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Tsourma, M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Dept Immunol Genet & Pathol, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Mitran, Bogdan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform. Preclin PET Platform, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Honarvar, Hadis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science. Dept Immunol Genet & Pathol, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Perols, A.
    KTH, Div Prot Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Robillard, M.
    Tagworks Pharmaceut, Eindhoven, Netherlands..
    Rossin, R.
    Tagworks Pharmaceut, Eindhoven, Netherlands..
    ten Hoeve, W.
    Syncom BV, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Sandström, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Orlova, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Karlstrom, A. Eriksson
    KTH, Div Prot Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Affibody-based bioorthogonal chemistry-mediated radionuclide pretargeting: proof-of-principle2015In: European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, ISSN 1619-7070, E-ISSN 1619-7089, Vol. 42, no S1, S246-S246 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Altai, Mohamed
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Westerlund, K.
    KTH, Div Prot Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Velletta, J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Honarvar, Hadis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Orlova, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Eriksson-Karlström, A.
    KTH, Div Prot Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Comparative evaluation of Lu-177-HP2 and In-111-HP2, secondary agents for affibody-based PNA-mediated radionuclide pretargeting2016In: European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, ISSN 1619-7070, E-ISSN 1619-7089, Vol. 43, S237-S237 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Altai, Mohamed
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Wållberg, Helena
    Honarvar, Hadis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Strand, Joanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Orlova, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.
    Varasteh, Zohreh
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.
    Sandström, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Medical Radiation Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET.
    Löfblom, John
    Larsson, Erik
    Strand, Sven-Erik
    Lubberink, Mark
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Medical Physics.
    Ståhl, Stefan
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    188Re-ZHER2:V2, a promising affibody-based targeting agent against HER2-expressing tumors: preclinical assessment2014In: Journal of Nuclear Medicine, ISSN 0161-5505, E-ISSN 1535-5667, Vol. 55, no 11, 1842-1848 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Affibody molecules are small (7 kDa) nonimmunoglobulin scaffold proteins with favorable tumor-targeting properties. Studies concerning the influence of chelators on biodistribution of 99mTc-labeled Affibody molecules demonstrated that the variant with a C-terminal glycyl-glycyl-glycyl-cysteine peptide–based chelator (designated ZHER2:V2) has the best biodistribution profile in vivo and the lowest renal retention of radioactivity. The aim of this study was to evaluate 188Re-ZHER2:V2 as a potential candidate for radionuclide therapy of human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2)–expressing tumors.

    Methods:

    ZHER2:V2 was labeled with 188Re using a gluconate-containing kit. Targeting of HER2-overexpressing SKOV-3 ovarian carcinoma xenografts in nude mice was studied for a dosimetry assessment.

    Results:

    Binding of 188Re-ZHER2:V2 to living SKOV-3 cells was demonstrated to be specific, with an affinity of 6.4 ± 0.4 pM. The biodistribution study showed a rapid blood clearance (1.4 ± 0.1 percentage injected activity per gram [%ID/g] at 1 h after injection). The tumor uptake was 14 ± 2, 12 ± 2, 5 ± 2, and 1.8 ± 0.5 %IA/g at 1, 4, 24, and 48 h after injection, respectively. The in vivo targeting of HER2-expressing xenografts was specific. Already at 4 h after injection, tumor uptake exceeded kidney uptake (2.1 ± 0.2 %IA/g). Scintillation-camera imaging showed that tumor xenografts were the only sites with prominent accumulation of radioactivity at 4 h after injection. Based on the biokinetics, a dosimetry evaluation for humans suggests that 188Re-ZHER2:V2 would provide an absorbed dose to tumor of 79 Gy without exceeding absorbed doses of 23 Gy to kidneys and 2 Gy to bone marrow. This indicates that future human radiotherapy studies may be feasible.

    Conclusion:

    188Re-ZHER2:V2 can deliver high absorbed doses to tumors without exceeding kidney and bone marrow toxicity limits.

  • 24.
    Andersson, Camilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Johansson, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala Univ, Oncol, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Patient experience of 18F-FDG-PET/CT in a mask fixation2016In: European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, ISSN 1619-7070, E-ISSN 1619-7089, Vol. 43, S666-S666 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Andersson, Camilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Johansson, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Wassberg, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Johansson, Silvia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wikehult, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Patient Experience of an 18F-FDG-PET/CT Examination:: Need for Improvements in Patient Care2015In: Journal of Radiology Nursing, ISSN 1546-0843, Vol. 34, no 2, 100-108 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this study were to investigate the patients' knowledge about and experience of an 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) examination and to investigate the self-reported feelings of stress, level of physical activity, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and to find out if this was related to how they experienced the examination. A cross-sectional survey was used to collect information on 198 patients with known or suspected malignancy. As many as 32% to 63% were satisfied with the nursing staff, the communication, and the professional skills. Most patients did not know beforehand what an FDG-PET/CT examination was. The HRQoL, level of perceived stress, and physical activity were relatively low. A better HRQoL, lower level of perceived stress, and a higher level of physical activity were correlated to a more positive experience and higher education to more knowledge about the examination (p < .01–.05). The information before the examination needs to be improved. The results may be used to improve patient care and optimize imaging procedures.

  • 26.
    Andersson, Camilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Johansson, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Wassberg, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Johansson, Silvia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Sundin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Häkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Assessment of Whether Patients' Knowledge, Satisfaction, and Experience Regarding Their 18F-Fluoride PET/CT Examination Affects Image Quality.2016In: Journal of Nuclear Medicine Technology, ISSN 0091-4916, E-ISSN 1535-5675, Vol. 44, no 1, 21-5 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate patients’ previous knowledge, satisfaction and experience regarding a (18F)-fluoride positron emission tomography / computed tomography examination ((18F)-fluoride PET/CT) and to explore whether experienced discomfort during the examination or pain was associated with reduced image quality. A further aim was to explore whether patients’ health-related quality of life (HRQoL) was associated with their satisfaction and experiences of the examination. Methods: Fifty consecutive patients with a histopathological diagnosis of prostate cancer who were scheduled for (18F)-fluoride PET/CT were asked to participate in the study, which was performed between November 2011 and April 2013. A questionnaire was used to collect information regarding the patients’ previous knowledge and experience of the examination. Image quality assessment was performed according to an arbitrary scale. The EORTC-QLQ-C30 and QLQ-PR25 were used to assess HRQoL. Results: Forty-six patients (96%) completed the questionnaires. Twenty-six per cent of participants did not know at all what a (18F)-fluoride PET/CT examination was. The majority (52-70%) were to a very high degree satisfied with the care provided by the nursing staff but less satisfied with the information given prior to the examination. The image quality was similar in patients who were exhausted or claustrophobic during the examination and those who were not. No correlations between HRQoL and the participants’ experience of (18F)-fluoride PET/CT were found. Conclusion: The majority of participants were satisfied with the care provided by the nursing staff, but there is still room for improvement especially regarding the information prior to the examination. Long examination time may be strenuous, for the patient but there was no difference in image quality between patients who felt discomfort during the examination or pain and those who did not.

  • 27.
    Andersson, Jennie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.
    Rosestedt, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.
    Asplund, Veronika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.
    Yavari, Nazila
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.
    Orlova, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.
    In Vitro Therapy Modeling of HER2 Targeting Therapy in Disseminated Prostate Cancer2014In: International Journal of Oncology, ISSN 1019-6439, Vol. 45, no 5, 2153-2158 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common cancer type among men. Treatments against advanced PCa are limited and in many cases only palliative. In a later, androgent independent, stage of PCa androgen receptors can be activated without interaction with ligand, i.e., by receptors of tyrosine kinase (RTK) family in the outlaw pathway. Human epidermal growth factor receptors HER2 and EGFR belong to RTK-family. HER2 is one of the main actors in the outlaw pathway with EGFR as the preferable heterodimerizing partner. We hypothesized that information on HER2 expression in advanced PCa could be useful for selection of patients for anti-RTK therapy and monitoring of therapy response. A panel of PCa cell lines (LNCap, PC3, DU-145) was subjected to a 8-week treatment using drugs influencing the RTK: trastuzumab (anti‑HER2), 17-DMAG (Hsp90 inhibitor), alone or in combination, and their HER2 and EGFR expressions were compared with non-treated cells. Treatment with trastuzumab decreased proliferation of LNCap and DU-145 cell lines, while 17-DMAG and trastuzumab/17‑DMAG combination affected all three cell lines. HER2 expression was significantly increased in PC3 cells, the most resistant cell line. On the contrary, in responding cells (LNCap and DU-145) HER2 expression decreased, accompanied by increased EGFR expression. However, additional treatment of cells with cetuximab (anti‑EGFR) did not give any additive effect to trastuzumab. In this study the response to anti-RTK therapy proved to vary between different PCa cell lines. We have demonstrated that RTK targeting treatments may affect the phenotypic profile of PCa tumor cells that correlates with therapy outcome. Observation of such changes during treatment could be used for monitoring and an improved therapy outcome.

  • 28. Andersson, Jesper L
    et al.
    Sundin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET.
    Valind, Sven
    A method for coregistration of PET and MR brain images1995In: Journal of Nuclear Medicine, ISSN 0161-5505, E-ISSN 1535-5667, Vol. 36, no 7, 1307-1315 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Combining MRI morphological data with functional PET data offers significant advantages in research as well as in many clinical situations. Automatic methods are needed, however, to coregister the data from the two modalities.

    METHODS:

    Simulated PET images were created by simple and automatic segmentation of MR images followed by the assignment of different uptake values to various tissue types. The simulated PET images were registered to actual PET images using a pixel-by-pixel, PET-PET registration method. The transformation matrix was then applied to the MR images. The method was used to register MRI data to PET transmission scans and emission scans obtained with FDG, nomifensine and raclopride. Validation was performed by comparing the results to those obtained by matching internal points manually defined in both volumes.

    RESULTS:

    Emission and transmission PET images were successfully registered to MR data. Comparison to the manual method indicated a registration accuracy on the order of 1-2 mm in each direction. No difference in accuracy between the different tracers was found. The error sensitivity for the method's assumptions seemed to be sufficiently low to allow complete automation of the method.

    CONCLUSION:

    We present a rapid, robust and fully automated method to register PET and MR brain images with sufficient accuracy for most clinical applications.

  • 29. Andersson, K. G.
    et al.
    Varasteh, Zohreh
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.
    Rosestedt, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.
    Malm, M.
    Sandström, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Medical Radiation Sciences.
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Lofblom, J.
    Stahl, S.
    Orlova, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.
    111In-labeled NOTA-conjugated Affibody molecules for visualization of HER3 expression in malignant tumors2014In: European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, ISSN 1619-7070, E-ISSN 1619-7089, Vol. 41, no S2, S311-S311 p., OP681Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30. Andersson, Karin M.
    et al.
    Ahnesjö, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Medical Radiation Sciences.
    Dahlgren, Christina Vallhagen
    Evaluation of a metal artifact reduction algorithm in CT studies used for proton radiotherapy treatment planning2014In: Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics, ISSN 1526-9914, E-ISSN 1526-9914, Vol. 15, no 5, 112-119 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metal objects in the body such as hip prostheses cause artifacts in CT images. When CT images degraded by artifacts are used for treatment planning of radiotherapy, the artifacts can yield inaccurate dose calculations and, for particle beams, erroneous penetration depths. A metal artifact reduction software (O-MAR) installed on a Philips Brilliance Big Bore CT has been tested for applications in treatment planning of proton radiotherapy. Hip prostheses mounted in a water phantom were used as test objects. Images without metal objects were acquired and used as reference data for the analysis of artifact-affected regions outside of the metal objects in both the O-MAR corrected and the uncorrected images. Water equivalent thicknesses (WET) based on proton stopping power data were calculated to quantify differences in the calculated proton beam penetration for the different image sets. The WET to a selected point of interest between the hip prostheses was calculated for several beam directions of clinical relevance. The results show that the calculated differences in WET relative to the reference case were decreased when the O-MAR algorithm was applied. WET differences up to 2.0 cm were seen in the uncorrected case while, for the O-MAR corrected case, the maximum difference was decreased to 0.4 cm. The O-MAR algorithm can significantly improve the accuracy in proton range calculations. However, there are some residual effects, and the use of proton beam directions along artifact streaks should only be used with caution and appropriate margins.

  • 31.
    Ange Marie, Ingabire
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Mina, Narmashiri
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    För och nackdelar med CT lågdos protokoll: En kvalitativ litteraturstudie2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: Antal röntgenundersökningar som utförs med Computer Tomografi (CT) ökar ständigt i sjukvården, vilket har lett till en ökad mängd farlig strålning som patienter och vårdpersonal utsätts för och därmed följer en rad risker. Därför är det eftersträvansvärt att minimera denna stråldos men även bibehålla bildkvalité och diagnostisk säkerhet. Detta kommer dock med en mängd utmaningar som kräver nya tekniker och protokoll. För att dessa ska appliceras korrekt krävs även att den ansvariga vårdpersonalen besitter god kunskap inom området. 

    Syfte: Syfte med denna studie är att beskriva fördelar och nackdelar med lågdos CT (LDCT) vid buk undersökningar.

    Metod: Den systematiska litteraturstudien sammanställer vetenskapliga artiklar från bland annat PubMed vars kvantitativa eller kvalitativa svar anses kunna besvara den kvalitativa frågeställningen. 

    Resultat: Lågdosprotokoll för CT ger i många fall en liknande diagnostisk säkerhet som konventionell CT samtidigt som dosen sänks kraftigt. Dock begränsas effektiviteten av lågdosprotokollen för bukundersökningar i fall där patienten är överviktig och kan ibland inte appliceras alls om de patologiska fenomenen är för små. Överlag överväger fördelarna med lågdos CT dess nackdelar i de flesta fall.

    Slutsats: Resultatet har visat att lågdos CT kan uppnå samma diagnostiska säkerhet som CT undersökningar med standarddos. Vårdpersonal bör dock vara medveten om begränsningarna med lågdosprotokollen för att undvika risken för upprepning av undersökningar. Mer forskning kring ämnet kan potentiellt driva ner stråldosen ytterligare och med bättre kunskap bland personalen kan diagnoser ställas korrekt och risken för strålskador med CT kan minimeras.  

  • 32.
    Antoni, Gunnar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.
    Lubberink, Mark
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET.
    Estrada, Sergio
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.
    Axelsson, Jan
    Carlson, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Lindsjö, Lars
    Kero, Tanja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET.
    Långström, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry.
    Granstam, Sven-Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Rosengren, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Vedin, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Wassberg, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET.
    Wikström, Gerhard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Westermark, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Sörensen, Jens
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET.
    In Vivo Visualization of Amyloid Deposits in the Heart with 11C-PIB and PET2013In: Journal of Nuclear Medicine, ISSN 0161-5505, E-ISSN 1535-5667, Vol. 54, no 2, 213-220 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cardiac amyloidosis is a differential diagnosis in heart failure and is associated with high mortality. There is currently no noninvasive imaging test available for specific diagnosis. N-[methyl-11C]2-(4′-methylamino-phenyl)-6-hydroxybenzothiazole (11C-PIB) PET is used in the evaluation of brain amyloidosis. We evaluated the potential use of 11C-PIB PET in systemic amyloidosis affecting the heart.

    Methods:

    Patients (n = 10) diagnosed with systemic amyloidosis—including heart involvement of either monoclonal immunoglobulin light-chain (AL) or transthyretin (ATTR) type—and healthy volunteers (n = 5) were investigated with PET/CT using 11C-PIB to study cardiac amyloid deposits and with 11C-acetate to measure myocardial blood flow to study the impact of global and regional perfusion on PIB retention.

    Results:

    Myocardial 11C-PIB uptake was visually evident in all patients 15–25 min after injection and was not seen in any volunteer. A significant difference in 11C-PIB retention in the heart between patients and healthy controls was found. The data indicate that myocardial amyloid deposits in patients diagnosed with systemic amyloidosis could be visualized with 11C-PIB. No correlation between 11C-PIB retention index and myocardial blood flow as measured with 11C-acetate was found on the global level, whereas a positive correlation on the segmental level was seen in a single patient.

    Conclusion:

    11C-PIB and PET could be a method to study systemic amyloidosis of type AL and ATTR affecting the heart and should be investigated further both as a diagnostic tool and as a noninvasive method for treatment follow-up.

  • 33. Antoni, Gunnar
    et al.
    Omura, H
    Bergström, Mats
    Furuya, Y
    Moulder, R
    Roberto, A
    Sundin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET.
    Watanabe, Y
    Långström, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.
    Synthesis of l-2,4-Diamino[4-11C]butyric acid and its use in some In vitro and In vivo tumour models1997In: Nuclear Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0969-8051, E-ISSN 1872-9614, Vol. 24, no 6, 595-601 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    l-2,4-Diamino[4-11C]butyric acid (DAB) was synthesized by an enzyme catalysed carrier added (0.1 μmol KCN) reaction of hydrogen [11C]cyanide with O-acetyl-l-serine followed by reduction. l-[11C]DAB was obtained with a radiochemical purity higher than 96% and with a decay corrected radiochemical yield of 30–40% within a 32 min reaction time. The enantiomeric excess was 98%. The uptake of l-[11C]DAB was investigated in multicellular aggregates of six different cell lines and animal tumour models. l-[11C]DAB is potentially useful for the assessment of pharmacokinetics of l-DAB in vivo for part of its evaluation as an antitumoural agent, although its use for diagnostic purposes seems limited.

  • 34. Antoni, Gunnar
    et al.
    Sörensen, Jens
    Hall, Håkan
    Molecular Imaging of Transporters with Positron Emission Tomography2009In: Transporters as Targets for Drugs / [ed] Susan Napier & Matilda Bingham, Berlin: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2009, Vol. 4, 155-186 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Positron emission tomography (PET) visualization of brain components in vivo is a rapidly growing field. Molecular imaging with PET is also increasingly used in drug development, especially for the determination of drug receptor interaction for CNS-active drugs. This gives the opportunity to relate clinical efficacy to per cent receptor occupancy of a drug on a certain targeted receptor and to relate drug pharmacokinetics in plasma to interaction with target protein. In the present review we will focus on the study of transporters, such as the monoamine transporters, the P-glycoprotein (Pgp) transporter, the vesicular monoamine transporter type 2, and the glucose transporter using PET radioligands. Neurotransmitter transporters are presynaptically located and in vivo imaging using PET can therefore be used for the determination of the density of afferent neurons. Several promising PET ligands for the noradrenaline transporter (NET) have been labeled and evaluated in vivo including in man, but a really useful PET ligand for NET still remains to be identified. The most promising tracer to date is (S,S)-[18F]FMeNER-D2. The in vivo visualization of the dopamine transporter (DAT) may give clues in the evaluation of conditions related to dopamine, such as Parkinson's disease and drug abuse. The first PET radioligands based on cocaine were not selective, but more recently several selective tracers such as [11C]PE2I have been characterized and shown to be suitable as PET radioligands. Although there are a large number of serotonin transporter inhibitors used today as SSRIs, it was not until very recently, when [11C]McN5652 was synthesized, that this transporter was studied using PET. New candidates as PET radioligands for the SERT have subsequently been developed and [11C]DASB and [11C]MADAM and their analogues are today the most promising ligands. The existing radioligands for Pgp transporters seem to be suitable tools for the study of both peripheral and central drug–Pgp interactions, although [11C]verapamil and [18F]fluoropaclitaxel are probably restricted to use in studies of the blood–brain barrier. The vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) is another interesting target for diagnostic imaging and [11C]DTBZ is a promising tracer. The noninvasive imaging of transporter density as a function of disease progression or availability following interaction with blocking drugs is highlighted, including the impact on both development of new therapies and the process of developing new drugs. Although CNS-related work focusing on psychiatric disorders is the main focus of this review, other applications of PET ligands, such as diagnosis of cancer, diabetes research, and drug interactions with efflux systems, are also discussed. The use of PET especially in terms of tracer development is briefly described. Finally, it can be concluded that there is an urgent need for new, selective radioligands for the study of the transporter systems in the human brain using PET.

  • 35.
    Appel, Lieuwe
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Jonasson, My
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Danfors, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Nyholm, Dag
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Askmark, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Lubberink, Mark
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Sörensen, Jens
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Use of C-11-PE2I PET in Differential Diagnosis of Parkinsonian Disorders2015In: Journal of Nuclear Medicine, ISSN 0161-5505, E-ISSN 1535-5667, Vol. 56, no 2, 234-242 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In idiopathic Parkinson disease and atypical parkinsonian disorders, central dopaminergic and overall brain functional activity are altered to different degrees, causing difficulties in achieving an unambiguous clinical diagnosis. A dual examination using I-123-FP-CIT (I-123-N-omega-fluoropropyl- 2 beta-carbomethoxy-3 beta-(4-iodophenyl) nortropane, or I-123-ioflupane) SPECT and F-18-FDG PET provides complementary information on dopamine transporter (DAT) availability and overall brain functional activity, respectively. Parametric images based on a single, dynamic C-11-PE2I (N-(3-iodoprop-2E-enyl)-2 beta-carbomethoxy-3 beta-(4-methyl-phenyl) nortropane) scan potentially supply both DAT availability (nondisplaceable binding potential [BPND]) and relative cerebral blood flow (relative delivery [R-1]) at voxel level. This study aimed to evaluate the validity of C-11-PE2I PET against the dual-modality approach using I-123-FP-CIT SPECT and F-18-FDG PET.

    Methods: Sixteen patients with parkinsonian disorders had a dual examination with F-18-FDG PET and I-123-FP-CIT SPECT following clinical routines and additionally an experimental C-11-PE2I PET scan. Parametric BPND and R-1 images were generated using receptor parametric mapping with the cerebellum as a reference. T1-weighted MR imaging was used for automated definition of volumes of interest (VOI). The DAT VOIs included the basal ganglia, whereas the overall brain functional activity was examined using VOIs across the brain. BPND and R-1 values were compared with normalized I-123-FP-CIT and F-18-FDG uptake values, respectively, using Pearson correlations and regression analyses. In addition, 2 masked interpreters evaluated the images visually, in both the routine and the experimental datasets, for comparison of patient diagnoses.

    Results: Parametric C-11-PE2I BPND and R-1 images showed high consistency with I-123-FP-CIT SPECT and F-18-FDG PET images. Correlations between C-11-PE2I BPND and I-123-FP-CIT uptake ratios were 0.97 and 0.76 in the putamen and caudate nucleus, respectively. Regional C-11-PE2I R-1 values were moderately to highly correlated with normalized F-18-FDG values (range, 0.61-0.94). Visual assessment of DAT availability showed a high consistency between C-11-PE2I BPND and I-123-FP-CIT images, whereas the consistency was somewhat lower for appraisal of overall brain functional activity using I-123-FP-CIT and F-18-FDG images. Substantial differences were found between clinical diagnosis and both neuro-imaging diagnoses.

    Conclusion: A single, dynamic C-11-PE2I PET investigation is a powerful alternative to a dual examination with I-123-FP-CIT SPECT and F-18-FDG PET for differential diagnosis of parkinsonian disorders. A large-scale patient study is, however, needed to further investigate distinct pathologic patterns in overall brain functional activity for various parkinsonian disorders.

  • 36.
    Axbåge, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Werner, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Mobil Radiologi: Radiologins Roll i Samhället2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 37.
    Axelsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Physics, Department of Nuclear and Particle Physics.
    Studies of collective excitations in rare earth nuclei2000Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Badoud, Simon
    et al.
    Univ Hosp Geneva, Neurol Unit, Dept Clin Neurosci, Geneva, Switzerland.;Univ Fribourg CH, Neurophysiol Unit, Dept Med, Fribourg, Switzerland.;Univ Geneva, Fac Med, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Nicastro, Nicolas
    Univ Hosp Geneva, Neurol Unit, Dept Clin Neurosci, Geneva, Switzerland.;Univ Geneva, Fac Med, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Garibotto, Valentina
    Univ Geneva, Fac Med, Geneva, Switzerland.;Geneva Univ Hosp, Nucl Med & Mol Imaging Unit, Dept Med Imaging, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Burkhard, Pierre R.
    Univ Hosp Geneva, Neurol Unit, Dept Clin Neurosci, Geneva, Switzerland.;Univ Geneva, Fac Med, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Haller, Sven
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. Univ Geneva, Fac Med, Geneva, Switzerland.;Ctr Diagnost Radiolog Carouge, Geneva, Switzerland.;Univ Hosp Freiburg, Dept Neuroradiol, Freiburg, Germany..
    Distinct spatiotemporal patterns for disease duration and stage in Parkinson's disease2016In: European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, ISSN 1619-7070, E-ISSN 1619-7089, Vol. 43, no 3, 509-516 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose To assess correlations between the degree of dopaminergic depletion measured using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and different clinical parameters of disease progression in Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods This retrospective study included 970 consecutive patients undergoing I-123-ioflupane SPECT scans in our institution between 2003 and 2013, from which we selected a study population of 411 patients according to their clinical diagnosis: 301 patients with PD (69.4 +/- 11.0 years, of age, 163 men) and 110 patients with nondegenerative conditions included as controls (72.7 +/- 8.0 years of age, 55 men). Comprehensive and operator-independent data analysis included spatial normalization into standard space, estimation of the mean uptake values in the striatum (caudate nucleus + putamen) and voxel-wise correlation between SPECT signal intensity and disease stage as well as disease duration in order to investigate the spatiotemporal pattern of the dopaminergic nigrostriatal degeneration. To compensate for potential interactions between disease stage and disease duration, one parameter was used as nonexplanatory coregressor for the other. Results Increasing disease stage was associated with an exponential decrease in I-123-ioflupane uptake (R (2) = 0.1501) particularly in the head of the ipsilateral caudate nucleus (p < 0.0001), whereas increasing disease duration was associated with a linear decrease in I-123-ioflupane uptake (p < 0.0001; R (2) = 0.1532) particularly in the contralateral anterior putamen (p < 0.0001). Conclusion We observed two distinct spatiotemporal patterns of posterior to anterior dopaminergic depletion associated with disease stage and disease duration in patients with PD. The developed operator-independent reference database of 411 I-123-ioflupane SPECT scans can be used for clinical and research applications.

  • 39. Badoud, Simon
    et al.
    Van De Ville, Dimitri
    Nicastro, Nicolas
    Garibotto, Valentina
    Burkhard, Pierre R
    Haller, Sven
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Discriminating among degenerative parkinsonisms using advanced (123)I-ioflupane SPECT analyses2016In: NeuroImage: Clinical, ISSN 0353-8842, E-ISSN 2213-1582, Vol. 12, 234-240 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    (123)I-ioflupane single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a sensitive and well established imaging tool in Parkinson's disease (PD) and atypical parkinsonian syndromes (APS), yet a discrimination between PD and APS has been considered inconsistent at least based on visual inspection or simple region of interest analyses. We here reappraise this issue by applying advanced image analysis techniques to separate PD from the various APS. This study included 392 consecutive patients with degenerative parkinsonism undergoing (123)I-ioflupane SPECT at our institution over the last decade: 306 PD, 24 multiple system atrophy (MSA), 32 progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and 30 corticobasal degeneration (CBD) patients. Data analysis included voxel-wise univariate statistical parametric mapping and multivariate pattern recognition using linear discriminant classifiers. MSA and PSP showed less ioflupane uptake in the head of caudate nucleus relative to PD and CBD, yet there was no difference between MSA and PSP. CBD had higher uptake in both putamen relative to PD, MSA and PSP. Classification was significant for PD versus APS (AUC 0.69, p < 0.05) and between APS subtypes (MSA vs CBD AUC 0.80, p < 0.05; MSA vs PSP AUC 0.69 p < 0.05; CBD vs PSP AUC 0.69 p < 0.05). Both striatal and extra-striatal regions contain classification information, yet the combination of both regions does not significantly improve classification accuracy. PD, MSA, PSP and CBD have distinct patterns of dopaminergic depletion on (123)I-ioflupane SPECT. The high specificity of 84-90% for PD versus APS indicates that the classifier is particularly useful for confirming APS cases.

  • 40. Bahce, Idris
    et al.
    Smit, Egbert F
    Lubberink, Mark
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET.
    van der Veldt, Astrid A M
    Yaqub, Maqsood
    Windhorst, Albert D
    Schuit, Robert C
    Thunnissen, Erik
    Heideman, Daniëlle A M
    Postmus, Pieter E
    Lammertsma, Adriaan A
    Hendrikse, N Harry
    Development of [11C]erlotinib Positron Emission Tomography for In Vivo Evaluation of EGF Receptor Mutational Status2013In: Clinical Cancer Research, ISSN 1078-0432, E-ISSN 1557-3265, Vol. 19, no 1, 183-193 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To evaluate whether, in patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), tumor uptake of [(11)C]erlotinib can be quantified and imaged using positron emission tomography and to assess whether the level of tracer uptake corresponds with the presence of activating tumor EGF receptor (EGFR) mutations.EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Ten patients with NSCLCs, five with an EGFR exon 19 deletion, and five without were scanned twice (test retest) on the same day with an interval of at least 4 hours. Each scanning procedure included a low-dose computed tomographic scan, a 10-minute dynamic [(15)O]H(2)O scan, and a 1-hour dynamic [(11)C]erlotinib scan. Data were analyzed using full tracer kinetic modeling. EGFR expression was evaluated using immunohistochemistry.RESULTS: The quantitative measure of [(11)C]erlotinib uptake, that is, volume of distribution (V(T)), was significantly higher in tumors with activating mutations, that is, all with exon 19 deletions (median V(T), 1.76; range, 1.25-2.93), than in those without activating mutations (median V(T), 1.06; range, 0.67-1.22) for both test and retest data (P = 0.014 and P = 0.009, respectively). Good reproducibility of [(11)C]erlotinib V(T) was seen (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.88). Intergroup differences in [(11)C]erlotinib uptake were not correlated with EGFR expression levels, nor tumor blood flow.CONCLUSION: [(11)C]erlotinib V(T) was significantly higher in NSCLCs tumors with EGFR exon 19 deletions.

  • 41.
    Bajic, Dragan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Radiological Studies on Hippocampal Development: Morphological Variants and their Relationship to Epilepsy2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    During fetal development, the hippocampal structures are folded forming the hippocampal sulcus which penetrates into the temporal lobe and then the entity rotates.  During this process, the hippocampal sulcus will be closed and the inverted hippocampus takes a rounded form. After complete inversion, the hippocampus has an oval form in a plane perpendicular to its long axis. If this process has not been completed the hippocampus remains the rounded form. That condition is called incomplete hippocampal inversion (IHI).

    The aims of this study was to evaluate the frequency of IHI in non-epileptic and epileptic children and adults and to explore the development of the hippocampal region by studying premature neonates and fetuses.

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of 201 epilepsy patients and 150 non-epileptic subjects were evaluated without knowing clinical data. IHI was found in 19 % in seizure free controls (20 left-sided and 8 bilateral). 30% of the 201 epilepsy patients had IHI (40 left-sided, 4 right-sided, 16 bilateral). The difference was statistically significant (p<0.02). 25% of the temporal lobe epilepsy patients had IHI. The frequency was not significantly higher than in controls. There is no causality between temporal lobe epilepsy and IHI. 44% of the Rolandic epilepsy patients and 57% of the cryptogenic generalized epilepsy patients had IHI. IHI can be a sign of possible disturbed cerebral development in other parts of the brain.

    Cranial ultrasound examinations of 160 premature children were analyzed. The age at examination was 23-24 GW in 24 children, 25-28 GW in 72 children, and 29-36 GW in 64 children. IHI was found in 50%, 25% and 14%, respectively. The frequency difference between the children < 25 GW and > 25 GW was statistically significant (p< 0.001). From 25 GW onwards, the frequency and laterality of IHI is similar to that in the adult population.

    MRIs of 63 fetuses without intracranial pathology were reviewed independently by two radiologists. Three MRIs were performed post mortem at gestation week (GW) 17-18 and 60 in utero at GW 19-35. The hippocampal sulcus was open, bi- or unilaterally, in 35 fetuses at GW 17-32. The oldest of them was at GW 32.  The sulcus was closed at GW 21 at the earliest, unilaterally, and always from GW 33 onwards bilaterally. In 26/63 fetuses (41%), the hippocampal development was asymmetric and in 23 fetuses, the right side had developed faster.

    List of papers
    1. Incomplete inversion of the hippocampus: a common developmental anomaly
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Incomplete inversion of the hippocampus: a common developmental anomaly
    Show others...
    2008 (English)In: European Radiology, ISSN 0938-7994, E-ISSN 1432-1084, Vol. 18, no 1, 138-142 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Incomplete inversion of the hippocampus, an imperfect fetal development, has been described in patients with epilepsy or severe midline malformations. We studied this condition in a nonepileptic population without obvious developmental anomalies. We analyzed the coronal MR images of 50 women and 50 men who did not have epilepsy. Twenty of them were healthy volunteers and 80 were patients without obvious intracranial developmental anomalies, intracranial masses, hydrocephalus or any condition affecting the temporal lobes. If the entire hippocampus (the head could not be evaluated) were affected, the incomplete inversion was classified as total, otherwise as partial. Incomplete inversion of the hippocampus was found in 19/100 subjects (9 women, 10 men). It was unilateral, always on the left side, in 13 subjects (4 women, 9 men): 9 were of the total type, 4 were partial. It was bilateral in six subjects (five women, one man): four subjects had total types bilaterally, two had a combination of total and partial types. The collateral sulcus was vertically oriented in all subjects with a deviating hippocampal shape. We conclude that incomplete inversion of the hippocampus is not an unusual morphologic variety in a nonepileptic population without other obvious intracranial developmental anomalies.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-15863 (URN)10.1007/s00330-007-0735-6 (DOI)000252593500016 ()17828540 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2008-06-18 Created: 2008-06-18 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
    2. Incomplete hippocampal inversion-is there a relation to epilepsy?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Incomplete hippocampal inversion-is there a relation to epilepsy?
    Show others...
    2009 (English)In: European Radiology, ISSN 0938-7994, E-ISSN 1432-1084, Vol. 19, no 10, 2544-2550 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Incomplete hippocampal inversion (IHI) has been described in patients with epilepsy or severe midline malformations but also in nonepileptic subjects without obvious developmental anomalies. We studied the frequency of IHI in different epilepsy syndromes to evaluate their relationship. Three hundred patients were drawn from the regional epilepsy register. Of these, 99 were excluded because of a disease or condition affecting the temporal lobes or incomplete data. Controls were 150 subjects without epilepsy or obvious intracranial developmental anomalies. The coronal MR images were analysed without knowledge of the clinical data. Among epilepsy patients, 30% had IHI (40 left-sided, 4 right-sided, 16 bilateral). Of controls, 18% had IHI (20 left-sided, 8 bilateral). The difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05). Of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients, 25% had IHI, which was not a significantly higher frequency than in controls (P = 0.34). There was no correlation between EEG and IHI laterality. A total of 44% of Rolandic epilepsy patients and 57% of cryptogenic generalised epilepsy patients had IHI. The IHI frequency was very high in some epileptic syndromes, but not significantly higher in TLE compared to controls. No causality between TLE and IHI could be found. IHI can be a sign of disturbed cerebral development affecting other parts of the brain, maybe leading to epilepsy.

    Keyword
    Hippocampus, Developmental brain anomalies, MRI, Epilepsy
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-105372 (URN)10.1007/s00330-009-1438-y (DOI)000270268700029 ()19440714 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2009-06-03 Created: 2009-06-03 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    3. Hippocampal development at gestation weeks 23 to 36: An ultrasound study on preterm neonates
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hippocampal development at gestation weeks 23 to 36: An ultrasound study on preterm neonates
    2010 (English)In: Neuroradiology, ISSN 0028-3940, E-ISSN 1432-1920, Vol. 52, no 6, 489-494 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: During fetal development, the hippocampal structures fold around the hippocampal sulcus into the temporal lobe. According to the literature, this inversion should be completed at gestation week (GW) 21. Thereafter, the hippocampal shape should resemble the adult shape. However, incomplete hippocampal inversion (IHI) is found in 19% of the common population. The aim of this study was to study fetal hippocampal development by examining neonates born preterm. METHODS: We analyzed cranial ultrasound examinations, performed as a part of the routine assessment of all preterm infants, over a 3-year period and excluded the infants with brain pathology. The final material consisted of 158 children born <35 GW. A rounded form (the ratio between the horizontal and vertical diameters of the hippocampal body <25 GW and >/=25 GW was statistically highly significant (p < 0.001). The frequency of bilateral IHI was highest in the youngest age group. In the other groups, the left-sided IHI was the most common. CONCLUSION: In about 50% of the neonates, hippocampal inversion is not completed up to GW 24; but from 25 GW onwards, the frequency and laterality of IHI is similar to that in the adult population.

    Keyword
    Fetal development, Ultrasonography, Hippocampus, Premature infants, Gestational age, Malrotation
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-124857 (URN)10.1007/s00234-010-0673-x (DOI)000277790000003 ()20352419 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2010-05-06 Created: 2010-05-06 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
    4. Asymmetric Development of the Hippocampal Region Is Common: A Fetal MR Imaging Study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Asymmetric Development of the Hippocampal Region Is Common: A Fetal MR Imaging Study
    2012 (English)In: American Journal of Neuroradiology, ISSN 0195-6108, E-ISSN 1936-959X, Vol. 33, no 3, 513-518 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Hippocampal development is poorly understood. This study evaluated the normal development of the hippocampal region during the fetal period by using MR imaging.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: MR images of 63 fetuses without intracranial pathology were reviewed independently by 2 radiologists with no knowledge of the fetal GA. Three MR images were performed postmortem and 60 in vivo. The progress of hippocampal inversion was analyzed in coronal sections, and the left and right sides of the hippocampal region were compared in every case.

    RESULTS: The fetuses in the postmortem examinations were at GWs 17-18 and in the in vivo examinations, at GWs 19-36. The hippocampal sulcus was open, bi- or unilaterally, in 39 fetuses. The oldest was at GW 32. The sulcus was closed at GW 21 at the earliest, unilaterally. In 26/63 fetuses (41%), the deepening or closure of the hippocampal sulcus or hippocampal inversion was asymmetric; in 23 fetuses, the right side developed faster. A shallow collateral sulcus was found earliest at GW 17. A deep collateral sulcus was visible earliest at GW 26 unilaterally, but in all fetuses from GW 31 onward, it was seen bilaterally. The orientation of the collateral sulcus was not related to the GA.

    CONCLUSIONS: There are wide individual temporal variations in the development and the inversion process of the hippocampal sulcus as well as in the formation of the collateral sulcus. Asymmetric development is common, and in most of the asymmetric cases, the right hippocampus develops faster.

    National Category
    Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
    Research subject
    Radiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-131994 (URN)10.3174/ajnr.A2814 (DOI)000301870300024 ()
    Available from: 2010-10-12 Created: 2010-10-12 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
  • 42.
    Bajic, Dragan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Canto Moreira, Nuno
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Asymmetric Development of the Hippocampal Region Is Common: A Fetal MR Imaging Study2012In: American Journal of Neuroradiology, ISSN 0195-6108, E-ISSN 1936-959X, Vol. 33, no 3, 513-518 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Hippocampal development is poorly understood. This study evaluated the normal development of the hippocampal region during the fetal period by using MR imaging.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: MR images of 63 fetuses without intracranial pathology were reviewed independently by 2 radiologists with no knowledge of the fetal GA. Three MR images were performed postmortem and 60 in vivo. The progress of hippocampal inversion was analyzed in coronal sections, and the left and right sides of the hippocampal region were compared in every case.

    RESULTS: The fetuses in the postmortem examinations were at GWs 17-18 and in the in vivo examinations, at GWs 19-36. The hippocampal sulcus was open, bi- or unilaterally, in 39 fetuses. The oldest was at GW 32. The sulcus was closed at GW 21 at the earliest, unilaterally. In 26/63 fetuses (41%), the deepening or closure of the hippocampal sulcus or hippocampal inversion was asymmetric; in 23 fetuses, the right side developed faster. A shallow collateral sulcus was found earliest at GW 17. A deep collateral sulcus was visible earliest at GW 26 unilaterally, but in all fetuses from GW 31 onward, it was seen bilaterally. The orientation of the collateral sulcus was not related to the GA.

    CONCLUSIONS: There are wide individual temporal variations in the development and the inversion process of the hippocampal sulcus as well as in the formation of the collateral sulcus. Asymmetric development is common, and in most of the asymmetric cases, the right hippocampus develops faster.

  • 43.
    Bajic, Dragan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Canto Moreira, Nuno
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Development of the hippocampal region demonstrated on fetal MRI: A preliminary report2011In: NRJ Digital, ISSN 2239-7493, Vol. 1, no 12, 555-557 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coronal slices of three fetal MRIs performed post mortem and 37 performed in utero, all without intracranial pathology, was assessed. Progress of the hippocampal inversion was analyzed, the left and right sides were compared and occurrence of the collateral sulcus was revealed. The fetuses in the post mortem examinations were at gestation weeks (GW) 17-18 and in the in utero examinations at GW 19-35. The symmetric development of the hippocampal sulcus was revealed in 26 subjects and asymmetric in 14. The non-ovoid hippocampal formation could be evaluated at GW 24 at earliest and an ovoid hippocampus at GW 29. The collateral sulcus could be recognized at GW 17 in post mortem and at GW 22 in in utero examinations. From GW 29 onwards it was seen in all fetuses and it was symmetric in all but one case. Evaluation of the hippocampi is difficult on fetal MRI, especially in in utero examinations. The hippocampal development is not fulfilled at GW 21 as presumed. There is a wide temporal variation in the development of the hippocampal region, and the developmental process does not progress simultaneously in the right and left side of the same individual.

  • 44.
    Bajic, Dragan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Kumlien, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Incomplete hippocampal inversion in patients with focal epilepsy without known etiology and focal MRI abnormalities.2016In: Neuroradiology Vol 58: Suppl.1, Springer, 2016, Vol. 58, S21- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Incomplete hippocampal inversion in patients with focal epilepsy without known etiology and focal MRI abnormalities

    PURPOSE: Incomplete hippocampal inversion (IHI) is more common in patients with epilepsy than in subjects without epilepsy but is probably not an etiological factor. IHI frequency varies in different types of epilepsy. Our purpose was to evaluate the hippocampi of patients having focal epilepsy with unknown etiology and without focal abnormalities on MRI (EPue).

    METHODS: MRIs of 58 patients with EPue and 147 neurologically healthy controls were evaluated. Hippocampal volumetry could be performed in 54 of the patients. 47 controls, preferably those having IHI, were chosen for volumetry. The findings were compared with seizure semiology and EEG findings.

    RESULTS: 30/58 patients (52%) had IHI (18 left, 12 bilateral). 28/147 controls (19%) had IHI (20 left, 8 bilateral) (p<0.001). In subjects studied with volumetry, 27/54 patients (50%) and 23/47 selected controls (49%) had IHI. In patients, IHI was found on the left in 15 and bilaterally in 12. In controls, the numbers were 16 and 5, respectively. The left hippocampus was smaller in 48 patients and in 46 controls.  Asymmetry index (AI) was >0.10 in 16 patients (30%) and in 3 controls (6.5%) (p<0.01).  Among 10 patients having IHI and AI >0.10, six had temporal lobe semiology. One of them had bilateral IHI, 5 had IHI on the left. EEG foci were ipsilateral to IHI in 3, contralateral in 2.

    CONCLUSIONS: IHI was significantly more common in EPue patients than in controls. Hippocampal volume asymmetry was more prominent in the patients. Temporal semiology and EEG focus were not obviously related to IHI.

  • 45.
    Barnaure, I.
    et al.
    Univ Hosp Geneva, Div Neuroradiol, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Montandon, M-L.
    Univ Hosp Geneva, Dept Mental Hlth & Psychiat, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Rodriguez, C.
    Univ Hosp Geneva, Dept Mental Hlth & Psychiat, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Herrmann, F.
    Univ Hosp Geneva, Dept Internal Med, Geneva, Switzerland; Univ Hosp Geneva, Dept Rehabil, Geneva, Switzerland; Univ Hosp Geneva, Dept Geriatr, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Lövblad, K. O.
    Univ Hosp Geneva, Div Neuroradiol, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Giannakopoulos, P.
    Univ Hosp Geneva, Dept Mental Hlth & Psychiat, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Haller, Sven
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. Univ Hosp Freiburg, Dept Neuroradiol, Freiburg, Germany; Univ Geneva, Fac Med, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Clinicoradiologic Correlations of Cerebral Microbleeds in Advanced Age2017In: American Journal of Neuroradiology, ISSN 0195-6108, E-ISSN 1936-959X, Vol. 38, 39-45 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The presence of cerebral microbleeds has been associated with dementia and cognitive decline, although studies report conflicting results. Our aim was to determine the potential role of the presence and location of cerebral microbleeds in early stages of cognitive decline.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Baseline 3T MR imaging examinations including SWI sequences of 328 cognitively intact community-dwelling controls and 72 subjects with mild cognitive impairment were analyzed with respect to the presence and distribution of cerebral microbleeds. A neuropsychological follow-up of controls was performed at 18 months post inclusion and identified cases with subtle cognitive deficits were referred to as controls with a deteriorating condition. Group differences in radiologic parameters were studied by using nonparametric tests, 1-way analysis of variance, and Spearman correlation coefficients.

    RESULTS: Cerebral microbleed prevalence was similar in subjects with mild cognitive impairment and controls with stable and cognitively deteriorating conditions (25%-31.9%). In all diagnostic groups, lobar cerebral microbleeds were more common. They occurred in 20.1% of all cases compared with 6.5% of cases with deep cerebral microbleeds. None of the investigated variables (age, sex, microbleed number, location and depth, baseline Mini-Mental State Examination score, and the Fazekas score) were significantly associated with cognitive deterioration with the exception of education of >12 years showing a slight but significant protective effect (OR, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.22-0.92; P = .028). The Mini-Mental State Examination and the Buschke total score were correlated with neither the total number nor lobar-versus-deep location of cerebral microbleeds.

    CONCLUSIONS: Cerebral microbleed presence, location, and severity are not related to the early stages of cognitive decline in advanced age.

  • 46.
    Baron, Tomasz
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Flachskampf, Frank A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Simultaneous 4-Chamber Strain More and Faster Analysis, But Is It Good Enough?2016In: Circulation Cardiovascular Imaging, ISSN 1941-9651, E-ISSN 1942-0080, Vol. 9, no 3, e004544Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 47. Barral, Joëlle K.
    et al.
    Gudmundson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Systems and Control. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Automatic control.
    Stikov, Nikola
    Etezadi-Amoli, Maryam
    Stoica, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Systems and Control. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Automatic control.
    Nishimura, Dwight G.
    A Robust Methodology for In Vivo T1 Mapping2010In: Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, ISSN 0740-3194, E-ISSN 1522-2594, Vol. 64, no 4, 1057-1067 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48. Barta, P.
    et al.
    Volkova, M.
    Buijs, Jos
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Trejtnar, F.
    Andersson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Application of Automatic Radioimmunoassay to Facilitate In Vitro Tracer Development2014In: European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, ISSN 1619-7070, E-ISSN 1619-7089, Vol. 41, no S2, S441-S441 p., P291Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Batista Borges, João
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Hedenstierna laboratory. Univ Sao Paulo, Hosp Clin, Pulm Div Heart Inst InCor, Sao Paulo, Brazil..
    Hansen, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Hedenstierna laboratory.
    Hedenstierna, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Hedenstierna laboratory.
    The "normal" ventilated airspaces suffer the most damaging effects of mechanical ventilation2017In: Intensive Care Medicine, ISSN 0342-4642, E-ISSN 1432-1238, Vol. 43, no 7, 1057-1058 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 50. Benedek, Hunor
    et al.
    Isacsson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Olevik-Dunder, Maria
    Westermark, Mathias
    Hallstrom, Per
    Olofsson, Jorgen
    Gustafsson, Magnus
    Strategies for quality assurance of intensity modulated radiation therapy2015In: 8TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON 3D RADIATION DOSIMETRY (IC3DDOSE), 2015, Vol. 573, 012015- p., 012015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In late 2011 The Swedish Society of Radiation Physics formed a working group to concentrate on the Quality Assurance of modern radiation therapy techniques. The given task was to identify and summarise the different QA strategies in Sweden and also the international recommendations. This was used to formulate recommendations for practical guidelines within Sweden. In this paper a brief summery of the group's work is presented. All the Swedish radiation therapy centres do a pre treatment verification measurement as QA for every new IMRT and VMAT plan. Physicists do it and they believe it to be time consuming. A general standpoint from all the centres was that new guidelines and legislation is needed to allow QA that does not require a measurement. Based on various international publications and recommendations the working group has presented two strategies, one where all new plans are checked through measurement and one where no measurement is needed. The measurement-based strategy is basically the same as the one used today with an extended machine QA part. The other presented strategy is process oriented where all the different parts of the treatment chain are checked separately. The final report can be found in Swedish on http://www.radiofysik.org.

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