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  • 1. Abedini, Sadollah
    et al.
    Holme, Ingar
    Fellström, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Jardine, Alan
    Cole, Ed
    Maes, Bart
    Holdaas, Hallvard
    Cerebrovascular events in renal transplant recipients2009In: Transplantation, ISSN 0041-1337, E-ISSN 1534-6080, Vol. 87, no 1, p. 112-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The incidence of stroke and risk factors for different subtypes of cerebrovascular (CBV) events in renal transplant recipients have not been examined in any large prospective controlled trial. METHODS: The Assessment of Lescol in Renal Transplantation was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of the effect of fluvastatin (40-80 mg) daily on cardiovascular, and renal outcomes in renal transplant recipients. Patients initially randomized to fluvastatin or placebo in the 5 to 6 year trial was offered open-label fluvastatin in a 2-year extension to the original study. We investigated the incidence of stroke and risk factors for ischemic and hemorrhagic CBV events in 2102 renal graft recipients participating in the Assessment of Lescol in Renal Transplantation core and extension trial with a mean follow-up of 6.7 years. RESULTS: The incidence and type of CBV events did not differ between the lipid lowering arm and the placebo arm. A total of 184 (8.8%, 95% confidence interval 4.6-12.9) of 2102 patients experienced a CBV event during follow-up, corresponding to an incidence of 1.3% CBV event per year. The mortality for patients experiencing a hemorrhagic stroke was 48% (13 of 27), whereas the mortality for ischemic strokes was 6.0% (8 of 133). Diabetes mellitus, previous CBV event, age, and serum creatinine were independent risk factors for cerebral ischemic events. The risk of a hemorrhagic cerebral event was increased by diabetes mellitus, polycystic kidney disease, left ventricular hypertrophy, and systolic blood pressure. INTERPRETATION: Risk factors for CBV events in renal transplant recipients differ according to subtype.

  • 2. Abedini, Sadollah
    et al.
    Holme, Ingar
    März, Winfried
    Weihrauch, Gisela
    Fellström, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Jardine, Alan
    Cole, Edward
    Maes, Bart
    Neumayer, Hans-Hellmut
    Grönhagen-Riska, Carola
    Ambühl, Patrice
    Holdaas, Halvard
    Inflammation in renal transplantation2009In: Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, ISSN 1046-6673, E-ISSN 1533-3450, Vol. 4, no 7, p. 1246-1254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Renal transplant recipients experience premature cardiovascular disease and death. The association of inflammation, all-cause mortality, and cardiovascular events in renal transplant recipients has not been examined in a large prospective controlled trial. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS: ALERT was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of the effect of fluvastatin on cardiovascular and renal outcomes in 2102 renal transplant recipients. Patients initially randomized to fluvastatin or placebo in the 5- to 6-yr trial were offered open-label fluvastatin in a 2-yr extension to the original study. The association between inflammation markers, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), and IL-6 on cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality was investigated. RESULTS: The baseline IL-6 value was 2.9 +/- 1.9 pg/ml (n = 1751) and that of hsCRP was 3.8 +/- 6.7 mg/L (n = 1910). After adjustment for baseline values for established risk factors, the hazard ratios for a major cardiac event and all-cause mortality for IL-6 were 1.08 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01 to 1.15, P = 0.018] and 1.11 (95% CI, 1.05 to 1.18, P < 0.001), respectively. The adjusted hazard ratio for hsCRP for a cardiovascular event was 1.10 (95% CI, 1.01 to 1.20, P = 0.027) and for all-cause mortality was 1.15 (95% CI, 1.06 to 1.1.25, P = 0.049). CONCLUSIONS: The inflammation markers IL-6 and hsCRP are independently associated with major cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality in renal transplant recipients.

  • 3. Abedini, Sadollah
    et al.
    Meinitzer, Andreas
    Holme, Ingar
    März, Winfried
    Weihrauch, Gisela
    Fellström, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Jardine, Alan
    Holdaas, Halvard
    Asymmetrical dimethylarginine is associated with renal and cardiovascular outcomes and all-cause mortality in renal transplant recipients2010In: Kidney International, ISSN 0085-2538, E-ISSN 1523-1755, Vol. 77, no 1, p. 44-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased plasma levels of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) are associated with endothelial dysfunction and predict the progression to dialysis and death in patients with chronic kidney disease. The effects of these increased ADMA levels in renal transplant recipients, however, are unknown. We used the data from ALERT, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of the effect of fluvastatin on cardiovascular and renal outcomes in 2102 renal transplant recipients with stable graft function on enrollment. Patients who were initially randomized to fluvastatin or placebo in the 5- to 6-year trial were offered open-label fluvastatin in a 2-year extension of the original study. After adjustment for baseline values for established factors in this post hoc analysis, ADMA was found to be a significant risk factor for graft failure or doubling of serum creatinine (hazard ratio 2.78), major cardiac events (hazard ratio 2.61), cerebrovascular events (hazard ratio 6.63), and all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 4.87). In this trial extension, the number of end points increased with increasing quartiles of plasma ADMA levels. All end points were significantly increased in the fourth compared to the first quartile. Our study shows that elevated plasma levels of ADMA are associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and the deterioration of graft function in renal transplant recipients.

  • 4.
    Acosta Ruiz, Vanessa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Ladjevardi, Sam
    Brekkan, Einar
    Häggman, Michael
    Lönnemark, M
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wernroth, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Magnusson, A
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Periprocedural outcome after laparoscopic partial nephrectomy versus radiofrequency ablation for T1 renal tumors:: A modified R.E.N.A.L nephrometry score adjusted comparison.2018In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, article id 284185118780891Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Comparable oncological outcomes have been seen after surgical nephrectomy and thermal ablation of renal tumors recently. However, periprocedural outcome needs to be assessed for aiding treatment decision. Purpose To compare efficacy rates and periprocedural outcome (technical success, session time, hospitalization time, and complications) after renal tumor treatment with laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN) or radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Material and Methods The initial experience with 49 (treated with LPN) and 84 (treated with RFA) consecutive patients for a single renal tumor (diameter ≤ 5 cm, limited to the kidney) during 2007-2014 was evaluated. Patient and tumor characteristics, efficacy rates, and periprocedural outcome were collected retrospectively. The stratified Mantel Haenzel and Van Elteren tests, adjusted for tumor complexity (with the modified R.E.N.A.L nephrometry score [m-RNS]), were used to assess differences in treatment outcomes. Results Primary efficacy rate was 98% for LPN and 85.7% for RFA; secondary efficacy rate was 93.9% for LPN and 95.2% for RFA; and technical success rate was 87.8% for LPN and 100% for RFA. Median session (m-RNS adjusted P < 0.001; LPN 215 min, RFA 137 min) and median hospitalization time were longer after LPN (m-RNS adjusted P < 0.001; LPN 5 days, RFA 2 days). Side effects were uncommon (LPN 2%, RFA 4.8%). Complications were more frequent after LPN (m-RNS adjusted P < 0.001; LPN 42.9%, RFA 10.7%). Conclusion Both methods achieved equivalent secondary efficacy rates. RFA included several treatment sessions, but session and hospitalization times were shorter, and complications were less frequent than for LPN. The differences remained after adjustment for renal tumor complexity.

  • 5.
    Ajalloueian, Fatemeh
    et al.
    Tech Univ Denmark, DTU Food, Nanobio Sci Res Grp, Lyngby, Denmark.
    Lemon, Greg
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol CLINTEC, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Polymer Chemistry.
    Chronakis, Ioannis S.
    Tech Univ Denmark, DTU Food, Nanobio Sci Res Grp, Lyngby, Denmark.
    Fossum, Magdalena
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, CMM 02, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Astrid Lindgren Childrens Hosp, Dept Paediat Surg, Sect Urol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bladder biomechanics and the use of scaffolds for regenerative medicine in the urinary bladder2018In: Nature reviews. Urology, ISSN 1759-4812, E-ISSN 1759-4820, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 155-174Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The urinary bladder is a complex organ with the primary functions of storing urine under low and stable pressure and micturition. Many clinical conditions can cause poor bladder compliance, reduced capacity, and incontinence, requiring bladder augmentation or use of regenerative techniques and scaffolds. To replicate an organ that is under frequent mechanical loading and unloading, special attention towards fulfilling its biomechanical requirements is necessary. Several biological and synthetic scaffolds are available, with various characteristics that qualify them for use in bladder regeneration in vitro and in vivo, including in the treatment of clinical conditions. The biomechanical properties of the native bladder can be investigated using a range of mechanical tests for standardized assessments, as well as mathematical and computational bladder biomechanics. Despite a large body of research into tissue engineering of the bladder wall, some features of the native bladder and the scaffolds used to mimic it need further elucidation. Collection of comparable reference data from different animal models would be a helpful tool for researchers and will enable comparison of different scaffolds in order to optimize characteristics before entering preclinical and clinical trials.

  • 6.
    Akre, Olof
    et al.
    Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Garmo, Hans
    Regional Oncological Center, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Adolfsson, Jan
    Oncological Center, CLINTEC Department, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lambe, Mats
    Oncological Center, CLINTEC Department, andDepartment of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bratt, Ola
    Department of Urology, Helsingborg Hospital, Lund University, Sweden.
    Stattin, Pär
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative sciences, Urology and Andrology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Mortality Among Men with Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer Managed with Noncurative Intent: A Nationwide Study in PCBaSe Sweden2011In: European Urology, ISSN 0302-2838, E-ISSN 1873-7560, Vol. 60, no 3, p. 554-563Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    There are limited prognostic data for locally advanced prostate cancer PCa to guide in the choice of treatment.

    Objective

    To assess mortality in different prognostic categories among men with locally advanced PCa managed with noncurative intent.

    Design, setting, and participants

    We conducted a register-based nationwide cohort study within the Prostate Cancer DataBase Sweden. The entire cohort of locally advanced PCa included 14 908 men. After the exclusion of 2724 (18%) men treated with curative intent, 12 184 men with locally advanced PCa either with local clinical stage T3 or T4 or with T2 with serum levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) between 50 and 99 ng/ml and without signs of metastases remained for analysis.

    Measurements

    We followed up the patient cohort in the Cause of Death Register for ≤11 yr and assessed cumulative incidence of PCa -specific death stratified by age and clinical characteristics.

    Results and limitations

    The PCa -specific mortality at 8 yr of follow-up was 28% (95% confidence interval [CI], 25–32%) for Gleason score (GS) 2–6, 41% (95% CI, 38–44%) for GS 7, 52% (95% CI, 47–57%) for GS 8, and 64% (95% CI, 59–69%) for GS 9–10. Even for men aged >85 yr at diagnosis with GS 8–10, PCa was a major cause of death: 42% (95% CI, 37–47%). Men with locally advanced disease and a PSA < 4 ng/ml at diagnosis were at particularly increased risk of dying from PCa. One important limitation is the lack of bone scans in 42% of the patient cohort, but results remained after exclusion of patients with unknown metastasis status.

    Conclusions

    The PCa-specific mortality within 8 yr of diagnosis is high in locally advanced PCa, suggesting undertreatment, particularly among men in older age groups. Our results underscore the need for more studies of treatment with curative intent for locally advanced tumors.

  • 7.
    Al Ahmadi, Ibrahim
    et al.
    King Faisal Hosp & Res Ctr, Organ Transplant Ctr, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia..
    Abasi, Amira
    King Faisal Hosp & Res Ctr, Organ Transplant Ctr, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia..
    Syed, Raza
    King Faisal Hosp & Res Ctr, Organ Transplant Ctr, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia..
    Broering, Dieter-C.
    King Faisal Hosp & Res Ctr, Organ Transplant Ctr, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia..
    Biglarnia, Ali-Reza
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Transplantation Surgery.
    Initial Experience From Implementation of Hand-Assisted Retroperitoneoscopic Live Donor Nephrectomy in Saudi Arabia2013In: Annals of Saudi Medicine, ISSN 0256-4947, E-ISSN 0975-4466, Vol. 33, no 2, p. S58-S59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Donor risks and morbidity are consequences of the invasiveness of donor nephrectomy procedure. The flank incision is currently the default donor nephrectomy procedure at the King Faisal Hospital in Saudi Arabia. In order to minimize the surgical-related trauma, we are implementing the hand-assisted retroperitoneoscopic live donor nephrectomy (HARS), which previously has been shown to promote donor safety. Here, we present our initial experience with this procedure. Material and Methods: The HARS technique was implemented at our center in 2010. We present a survey of our data regarding operative characteristics as well as donor/recipient outcome. Given the small number of cases, data are presented as median with range. Results: Between 2010 and 2013, 18 left -sided HARS nephrectomy procedures were performed. The median donor age and BMI were 26.5 (18-43) and 24.1 (18.7-30.7), respectively. The median hospitalization was 4 days (3-5). One donor presented wound seroma in the pfannenstiell incision with no need for intervention. Another donor presented unspecific thoracoabdominal pain on postoperative day 2. No intra-and postoperative bleeding was observed. The median creatinine at the current follow-up was 90 mu mol/L with 100% graft survival. Conclusion: HARS is a feasible and safe technique. However, for implementation of HARS as the default donor nephrectomy procedure more practice is needed.

  • 8.
    Aldenbratt, Annika
    et al.
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Nephrol, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Christopher
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Neurol, Neuromuscular Ctr, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Svensson, Maria K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Reduced renal function in patients with Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 and the association to CTG expansion and other potential risk factors for chronic kidney disease2017In: Neuromuscular Disorders, ISSN 0960-8966, E-ISSN 1873-2364, Vol. 27, no 11, p. 1038-1042Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) affects several organs. Disease severity and age at onset are correlated to the CTG repeat expansion. The aim of this study was to assess renal function and the association to numbers of CTG repeat expansion in patients with DM1. Ninety-eight patients with DM1 were included. Glomerular filtration rate (measured GFR) was measured using iohexol clearance. Data on CTG repeats were available in 83/98 (85%) patients. The overall mGFR was 74 (16) ml/min/1.73 m(2) (range 38-134). Sixty-four patients (69%) had a mild and sixteen patients (17%) a moderate decrease in renal function (mGFR 60-89 and 30-59 ml/min/1.73 m(2), respectively). No correlations were found between CTG repeats and mGFR (r = 0.10, p = 0.4) or between CTG repeats and serum cystatin C (r = 0.12, p = 0.29). CTG repeats was positively correlated to creatinine-based estimates of GFR (eGFR) (modified diet in renal disease r = 0.49, p < 0.001, CKD-EPI creatinine equation; r = 0.50, p < 0.001), but analyses using Structural Equation Modeling showed no correlation. The correlation was explained by an indirect effect via serum creatinine and skeletal muscle mass index. In conclusion, patients with DM1 seem to have a slight decrease in renal function but there is no association between renal function and the number of CTG repeats, a marker of disease severity.

  • 9.
    Alderson, Helen V.
    et al.
    Vascular Research Group, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK;Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, Salford, UK..
    Ritchie, James P
    Vascular Research Group, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK;Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, Salford, UK..
    Middleton, Rachel
    Vascular Research Group, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK;Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, Salford, UK..
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Larsson, Tobias E
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Renal Unit, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kalra, Philip A
    Vascular Research Group, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK;Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, Salford, UK..
    FGF-23 and Osteoprotegerin but not Fetuin-A are associated with death and enhance risk prediction in non-dialysis chronic kidney disease stages 3-52016In: Nephrology (Carlton. Print), ISSN 1320-5358, E-ISSN 1440-1797, Vol. 21, no 7, p. 566-573Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: Numerous biomarkers have been shown to associate with clinical endpoints in chronic kidney disease (CKD). There is limited evidence whether biomarkers improve risk prediction in relation to clinical outcomes. Our study investigates whether a small suite of key chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder biomarkers could be used to enhance risk assessment in CKD.

    METHODS: Fetuin-A, fibroblast growth factor-23 and osteoprotegerin were measured on baseline plasma samples from 463 patients recruited to the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Standards Implementation Study. The biomarkers were analysed in relation to progression to end stage kidney disease, death and major cardiovascular events.

    RESULTS: Over a median follow up of 46 months (interquartile range 21-69), fibroblast growth factor-23 was associated with risk for renal replacement therapy (hazard ratio (HR) 1.35, P = 0.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.001-1.820), cardiovascular events (HR 1.74 P < 0.001, 95% CI 1.303-1.305) and death (HR 1.4 P = 0.005, 95% CI 1.109-1.767). Osteoprotegerin was associated with risk for death (HR 1.06, P = 0.03, 95% CI 1.006-1.117). There was no clear association between Fetuin-A and any of the clinical endpoints. The addition of biomarkers to risk models led to marginal improvement in model discrimination and reclassification.

    CONCLUSION: Biomarkers are often associated with clinical endpoints, and we observed such associations in our study of patients with advanced CKD. However, the markers analysed in our study were of limited benefit in improving the prediction of these outcomes. Any extra information biomarkers may provide to improve risk prediction in clinical practice needs to be carefully balanced against the potential cost of these tools.

  • 10.
    Al-Mashhadi, Ammar Nadhom Farman
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Paediatric Surgery.
    Checa, Antonio
    Karolinska Institute.
    Wåhlin, Nils
    Karolinska Institute.
    Nevéus, Tryggve
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research.
    Fossum, Magdalena
    Karolinska institute.
    Wheelock, Craig E.
    Karolinska Institute.
    Karanikas, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Paediatric Surgery.
    Stenberg, Arne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Paediatric Surgery.
    Persson, A. Erik G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Carlström, Mattias
    Karolinska Institute.
    Changes in arterial pressure and markers of nitric oxide homeostasis and oxidative stress following surgical correction of hydronephrosis in children2018In: Pediatric nephrology (Berlin, West), ISSN 0931-041X, E-ISSN 1432-198X, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 639-649Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Recent clinical studies have suggested an increased risk of elevated arterial pressure in patients with hydronephrosis. Animals with experimentally induced hydronephrosis develop hypertension, which is correlated to the degree of obstruction and increased oxidative stress. In this prospective study we investigated changes in arterial pressure, oxidative stress, and nitric oxide (NO) homeostasis following correction of hydronephrosis.

    Methods Ambulatory arterial pressure (24 h) was monitored in pediatric patients with hydronephrosis (n = 15) before and after surgical correction, and the measurements were compared with arterial pressure measurements in two control groups, i.e. healthy controls (n = 8) and operated controls (n = 8). Markers of oxidative stress and NO homeostasis were analyzed in matched urine and plasma samples.

    Results The preoperative mean arterial pressure was significantly higher in hydronephrotic patients [83 mmHg; 95% confidence interval (CI) 80–88 mmHg] than in healthy controls (74 mmHg; 95% CI 68–80 mmHg; p < 0.05), and surgical correction of ureteral obstruction reduced arterial pressure (76 mmHg; 95% CI 74–79 mmHg; p < 0.05). Markers of oxidative stress (i.e., 11- dehydroTXB2, PGF2α, 8-iso-PGF2α, 8,12-iso-iPF2α-VI) were significantly increased (p < 0.05) in patients with hydronephrosis compared with both control groups, and these were reduced following surgery (p < 0.05). Interestingly, there was a trend for increased NO synthase activity and signaling in hydronephrosis, which may indicate compensatory mechanism(s).

    Conclusion This study demonstrates increased arterial pressure and oxidative stress in children with hydronephrosis compared with healthy controls, which can be restored to normal levels by surgical correction of the obstruction. Once reference data on ambulatory blood pressure in this young age group become available, we hope cut-off values can be defined for deciding whether or not to correct hydronephrosis surgically.

    Keywords Blood pressure . Hydronephrosis . Hypertension . Nitric oxide . Oxidative stress . Ureteral obstruction 

  • 11.
    Al-Mashhadi, Ammar Nadhom Farman
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Nevéus, Tryggve
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Stenberg, Arne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Karanikas, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Persson, A. Erik G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Carlstrom, Mattias
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wahlin, Nils
    Department of Pediatric Surgery, Astrid Lindgren Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Surgical treatment reduces blood pressure in children with unilateral congenital hydronephrosis2015In: Journal of Pediatric Urology, ISSN 1477-5131, E-ISSN 1873-4898, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 91.e1-91.e6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Renal disorders can cause hypertension, but less is known about the influence of hydronephrosis on blood pressure. Hydronephrosis due to pelvo-ureteric junction obstruction (PUJO) is a fairly common condition (incidence in newborns of 0.5-1%). Although hypertensive effects of hydronephrosis have been suggested, this has not been substantiated by prospective studies in humans [1-3]. Experimental studies with PUJO have shown that animals with induced hydronephrosis develop salt-sensitive hypertension, which strongly correlate to the degree of obstruction [4-7]. Moreover, relief of the obstruction normalized blood pressure [8]. In this first prospective study our aim was to study the blood pressure pattern in pediatric patients with hydronephrosis before and after surgical correction of the ureteral obstruction. Specifically, we investigated if preoperative blood pressure is reduced after surgery and if split renal function and renographic excretion curves provide any prognostic information. Patients and methods Twelve patients with unilateral congenital hydronephrosis were included in this prospective study. Ambulatory blood pressure (24 h) was measured preoperatively and six months after surgery. Preoperative evaluations of bilateral renal function by Tc99m-MAG3 scintigraphy, and renography curves, classified according to O'Reilly, were also performed. Results As shown in the summary figure, postoperative systolic (103 +/- 2 mmHg) and diastolic (62 +/- 2 mmHg) blood pressure were significantly lower than those obtained preoperatively (110 +/- 4 and 69 +/- 2 mmHg, respectively), whereas no changes in circadian variation or pulse pressure were observed. Renal functional share of the hydronephrotic kidney ranged from 11 to 55%. There was no correlation between the degree of renal function impairment and the preoperative excretory pattern, or between the preoperative excretory pattern and the blood pressure reduction postoperatively. However, preoperative MAG3 function of the affected kidney correlated with the magnitude of blood pressure change after surgery. Discussion Correction of the obstruction lowered blood pressure, and the reduction in blood pressure appeared to correlate with the degree of renal functional impairment, but not with the excretory pattern. Thus, in the setting of hypertension, it appears that the functional share of the hydronephrotic kidney should be considered an indicator of the need for surgery, whereas the renography curve is less reliable. The strength of the present study is the prospective nature and that ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was used. Future longitudinal prolonged follow-up studies are warranted to confirm the present findings, and to understand if a real nephrogenic hypertension with potential necessity of treatment will develop. Conclusion This novel prospective study in patients with congenital hydronephrosis demonstrates a reduction in blood pressure following relief of the obstruction. Based on the present results, we propose that the blood pressure level should also be taken into account when deciding whether to correct hydronephrosis surgically or not.

  • 12.
    Anderberg, S. B.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Luther, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Frithiof, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Physiological aspects of Toll-like receptor 4 activation in sepsis-induced acute kidney injury2017In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 219, no 3, p. 575-590Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sepsis-induced acute kidney injury (SI-AKI) is common and associated with high mortality. Survivors are at increased risk of chronic kidney disease. The precise mechanism underlying SI-AKI is unknown, and no curative treatment exists. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activates the innate immune system in response to exogenous microbial products. The result is an inflammatory reaction aimed at clearing a potential infection. However, the consequence may also be organ dysfunction as the immune response can cause collateral damage to host tissue. The purpose of this review is to describe the basis for how ligand binding to TLR4 has the potential to cause renal dysfunction and the mechanisms by which this may take place in gram-negative sepsis. In addition, we highlight areas for future research that can further our knowledge of the pathogenesis of SI-AKI in relation to TLR4 activation. TLR4 is expressed in the kidney. Activation of TLR4 causes cytokine and chemokine release as well as renal leucocyte infiltration. It also results in endothelial and tubular dysfunction in addition to altered renal metabolism and circulation. From a physiological standpoint, inhibiting TLR4 in large animal experimental SI-AKI significantly improves renal function. Thus, current evidence indicates that TLR4 has the ability to mediate SI-AKI by a number of mechanisms. The strong experimental evidence supporting a role of TLR4 in the pathogenesis of SI-AKI in combination with the availability of pharmacological tools to target TLR4 warrants future human studies.

  • 13. Andersson, Gustav
    et al.
    Wennersten, Christoffer
    Gaber, Alexander
    Boman, Karolina
    Nodin, Bjorn
    Uhlen, Mathias
    Segersten, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Malmström, Per-Uno
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Jirstrom, Karin
    Reduced expression of ezrin in urothelial bladder cancer signifies more advanced tumours and an impaired survival: validatory study of two independent patient cohorts2014In: BMC Urology, ISSN 1471-2490, E-ISSN 1471-2490, Vol. 14, p. 36-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Reduced membranous expression of the cytoskeleton-associated protein ezrin has previously been demonstrated to correlate with tumour progression and poor prognosis in patients with T1G3 urothelial cell carcinoma of the bladder treated with non-maintenance Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (n = 92), and the associations with adverse clinicopathological factors have been validated in another, unselected, cohort (n = 104). In the present study, we examined the prognostic significance of ezrin expression in urothelial bladder cancer in a total number of 442 tumours from two independent patient cohorts. Methods: Immunohistochemical expression of ezrin was evaluated in tissue microarrays with tumours from one retrospective cohort of bladder cancer (n = 110; cohort I) and one population-based cohort (n = 342; cohort II). Classification regression tree analysis was applied for selection of prognostic cutoff. Kaplan-Meier analysis, log rank test and Cox regression proportional hazards' modeling were used to evaluate the impact of ezrin on 5-year overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Results: Ezrin expression could be evaluated in tumours from 100 and 342 cases, respectively. In both cohorts, reduced membranous ezrin expression was significantly associated with more advanced T-stage (p < 0.001), high grade tumours (p < 0.001), female sex (p = 0.040 and p = 0.013), and membranous expression of podocalyxin-like protein (p < 0.001 and p = 0.009). Moreover, reduced ezrin expression was associated with a significantly reduced 5-year OS in both cohorts (HR = 3.09 95% CI 1.71-5.58 and HR = 2.15(1.51-3.06), and with DSS in cohort II (HR = 2.77, 95% CI 1.78-4.31). This association also remained significant in adjusted analysis in Cohort I (HR1.99, 95% CI 1.05-3.77) but not in Cohort II. In pTa and pT1 tumours in cohort II, there was no significant association between ezrin expression and time to progression. Conclusions: The results from this study validate previous findings of reduced membranous ezrin expression in urothelial bladder cancer being associated with unfavourable clinicopathological characteristics and an impaired survival. The utility of ezrin as a prognostic biomarker in transurethral resection specimens merits further investigation.

  • 14.
    Arthur, R.
    et al.
    Kings Coll London, Fac Life Sci & Med, Div Canc Studies, TOUR, London, England;Albert Einstein Coll Med, Dept Epidemiol & Populat Hlth, Bronx, NY 10467 USA.
    Williams, R.
    Kings Coll London, Fac Life Sci & Med, Div Canc Studies, TOUR, London, England.
    Garmo, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. Kings Coll London, Fac Life Sci & Med, Div Canc Studies, TOUR, London, England.
    Holmberg, L.
    Kings Coll London, Fac Life Sci & Med, Div Canc Studies, TOUR, London, England.
    Stattin, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology. Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Malmstrom, H.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden;Swedish Orphan Biovitrum, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lambe, M
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hammar, N.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden;AstraZeneca, Global Med Dev Med Evidence & Observat Res, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Walldius, G.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Robinsson, D.
    Ryhov Hosp, Dept Urol, Jonkoping, Sweden.
    Jungner, I.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden;CALAB Res, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Van Hemelrijck, M.
    Kings Coll London, Fac Life Sci & Med, Div Canc Studies, TOUR, London, England;Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Serum inflammatory markers in relation to prostate cancer severity and death in the Swedish AMORIS study2018In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 142, no 11, p. 2254-2262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inflammation is a well-documented driver of cancer development and progression. However, little is known about its role in prostate carcinogenesis. Thus, we examined the association of C-reactive protein (CRP), haptoglobin, albumin and white blood cells (WBC) with prostate cancer (PCa) severity (defined by PCa risk category and clinicopathological characteristics) and progression (defined by PCa death). We selected 8,471 Swedish men with newly diagnosed PCa who had exposure measurements taken approximately 14 years prior to diagnosis. We calculated odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the associations between the inflammatory markers and PCa severity using logistic regression, while Cox proportional hazard regression was used for the associations with overall and PCa death. Serum CRP levels were associated with increased odds of high risk and metastatic PCa, and high PSA levels (20 mu g/L) (OR: 1.29; 95% CI: 1.06-1.56, 1.32; 1.05-1.65 and 1.51; 1.26-1.81, respectively). Similarly, higher haptoglobin levels were associated with increased odds of metastatic PCa, high PSA level and possibly high grade PCa (1.38; 1.10-1.74, 1.50; 1.17-1.93 and 1.25; 1.00-1.56, respectively). Albumin was positively associated with Gleason 4+3 tumour (1.38; 1.02-1.86) and overall death (HRunit increase in log: 1.60; 95% CI: 1.11-2.30), but inversely associated with high risk PCa and high PSA levels (20 mu g/L) (0.71; 0.56-0.89 and 0.72; 0.5 9-0.90). WBC was associated with increased odds of T3-T4 PCa. Except for albumin, none of these markers were associated with PCa death or overall death. Systemic inflammation as early as 14 years prior to diagnosis may influence prostate cancer severity. What's new? High levels of C-reactive protein can presage a particularly malignant prostate cancer, new results show. Cancers certainly arise in the wake of chronic inflammation, but it's not known exactly how markers of inflammation initiate prostate cancer. Here, the authors show that systemic inflammation can worsen the severity of the cancer, even if it occurred long before the cancer's onset. High levels of CRP and haptoglobin, they found, were associated with prostate cancer with high PSA and metastasis. The question remains whether inflammation pushes cancer cells into a more malignant mode, or selects for the more dangerous cells early on.

  • 15. Augsten, Martin
    et al.
    Hägglöf, Christina
    Olsson, Eleonor
    Stolz, Claudia
    Tsagozis, Panagiotis
    Levchenko, Tetyana
    Frederick, Mitchell J.
    Borg, Åke
    Micke, Patrick
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Egevad, Lars
    Östman, Arne
    CXCL14 is an autocrine growth factor for fibroblasts and acts as a multi-modal stimulator of prostate tumor growth2009In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 106, no 9, p. 3414-3419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explored the role of secreted fibroblast-derived factors in prostate cancer growth. Analyses of matched normal and tumor tissue revealed up-regulation of CXCL14 in cancer-associated fibroblasts of a majority of prostate cancer. Fibroblasts over-expressing CXCL14 promoted the growth of prostate cancer xenografts, and increased tumor angiogenesis and macrophage infiltration. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that autocrine CXCL14-stimulation of fibroblasts stimulate migration and ERK-dependent proliferation of fibroblasts. CXCL14-stimulation of monocyte migration was also demonstrated. Furthermore, CXCL14-producing fibroblasts, but not recombinant CXCL14, enhanced in vitro proliferation and migration of prostate cancer cells and in vivo angiogenesis. These studies thus identify CXCL14 as a novel autocrine stimulator of fibroblast growth and migration, with multi-modal tumor-stimulatory activities. In more general terms, our findings suggest autocrine stimulation of fibroblasts as a previously unrecognized mechanism for chemokine-mediated stimulation of tumor growth, and suggest a novel mechanism whereby cancer-associated fibroblasts achieve their pro-tumorigenic phenotype.

  • 16.
    Austin, Paul F.
    et al.
    Washington Univ, St Louis Childrens Hosp, Div Urol, St Louis, MO 63110 USA..
    Bauer, Stuart B.
    Harvard Univ, Childrens Hosp, Sch Med, Dept Urol, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Bower, Wendy
    Skejby Univ Hosp, Pediat Nephrol Sect, Aarhus, Denmark..
    Chase, Janet
    Cabrini Hosp, Childrens Ctr, Melbourne, Vic, Australia..
    Franco, Israel
    New York Med Coll, Valhalla, NY 10595 USA..
    Hoebeke, Piet
    Ghent Univ Hosp, Pediat Urol & Nephrol, Ghent, Belgium..
    Rittig, Soren
    Skejby Univ Hosp, Pediat Nephrol Sect, Aarhus, Denmark..
    Vande Walle, Johan
    Ghent Univ Hosp, Pediat Urol & Nephrol, Ghent, Belgium..
    von Gontard, Alexander
    Saarland Univ Hosp, Dept Child & Adolescent Psychiat, Saarbrucken, Germany..
    Wright, Anne
    St Thomas Hosp, Evelina Childrens Hosp, Pediat, London, England..
    Yang, Stephen S.
    Buddhist Med Fdn, Taipei Tzu Chi Hosp, Div Urol, New Taipei, Taiwan.;Buddhist Tzu Chi Univ, Sch Med, Hualien, Taiwan..
    Nevéus, Tryggve
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    The standardization of terminology of lower urinary tract function in children and adolescents: Update report from the standardization committee of the International Children's Continence Society2016In: Neurourology and Urodynamics, ISSN 0733-2467, E-ISSN 1520-6777, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 471-481Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimThe impact of the original International Children's Continence Society (ICCS) terminology document on lower urinary tract (LUT) function resulted in the global establishment of uniformity and clarity in the characterization of LUT function and dysfunction in children across multiple healthcare disciplines. The present document serves as a stand-alone terminology update reflecting refinement and current advancement of knowledge on pediatric LUT function. MethodsA variety of worldwide experts from multiple disciplines within the ICCS leadership who care for children with LUT dysfunction were assembled as part of the standardization committee. A critical review of the previous ICCS terminology document and the current literature was performed. Additionally, contributions and feedback from the multidisciplinary ICCS membership were solicited. ResultsFollowing a review of the literature over the last 7 years, the ICCS experts assembled a new terminology document reflecting current understanding of bladder function and LUT dysfunction in children using the resources from the literature review, expert opinion and ICCS member feedback. ConclusionsThe present ICCS terminology document provides a current and consensus update to the evolving terminology and understanding of LUT function in children.

  • 17. Baigent, C
    et al.
    Blackwell, L
    Emberson, J
    Holland, LE
    Reith, C
    Bhala, N
    Peto, R
    Barnes , EH
    Keech, A
    Simes, J
    Collins, R
    Efficacy and safety of more intensive lowering of LDL cholesterol: a meta-analysis of data from 170,000 participants in 26 randomized trials2010In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 376, no 9753, p. 1670-1681Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Lowering of LDL cholesterol with standard statin regimens reduces the risk of occlusive vascular events in a wide range of individuals. We aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of more intensive lowering of LDL cholesterol with statin therapy.

    Methods

    We undertook meta-analyses of individual participant data from randomised trials involving at least 1000 participants and at least 2 years' treatment duration of more versus less intensive statin regimens (five trials; 39 612 individuals; median follow-up 5·1 years) and of statin versus control (21 trials; 129 526 individuals; median follow-up 4·8 years). For each type of trial, we calculated not only the average risk reduction, but also the average risk reduction per 1·0 mmol/L LDL cholesterol reduction at 1 year after randomisation.

    Findings

    In the trials of more versus less intensive statin therapy, the weighted mean further reduction in LDL cholesterol at 1 year was 0·51 mmol/L. Compared with less intensive regimens, more intensive regimens produced a highly significant 15% (95% CI 11–18; p<0·0001) further reduction in major vascular events, consisting of separately significant reductions in coronary death or non-fatal myocardial infarction of 13% (95% CI 7–19; p<0·0001), in coronary revascularisation of 19% (95% CI 15–24; p<0·0001), and in ischaemic stroke of 16% (95% CI 5–26; p=0·005). Per 1·0 mmol/L reduction in LDL cholesterol, these further reductions in risk were similar to the proportional reductions in the trials of statin versus control. When both types of trial were combined, similar proportional reductions in major vascular events per 1·0 mmol/L LDL cholesterol reduction were found in all types of patient studied (rate ratio [RR] 0·78, 95% CI 0·76–0·80; p<0·0001), including those with LDL cholesterol lower than 2 mmol/L on the less intensive or control regimen. Across all 26 trials, all-cause mortality was reduced by 10% per 1·0 mmol/L LDL reduction (RR 0·90, 95% CI 0·87–0·93; p<0·0001), largely reflecting significant reductions in deaths due to coronary heart disease (RR 0·80, 99% CI 0·74–0·87; p<0·0001) and other cardiac causes (RR 0·89, 99% CI 0·81–0·98; p=0·002), with no significant effect on deaths due to stroke (RR 0·96, 95% CI 0·84–1·09; p=0·5) or other vascular causes (RR 0·98, 99% CI 0·81–1·18; p=0·8). No significant effects were observed on deaths due to cancer or other non-vascular causes (RR 0·97, 95% CI 0·92–1·03; p=0·3) or on cancer incidence (RR 1·00, 95% CI 0·96–1·04; p=0·9), even at low LDL cholesterol concentrations.

    Interpretation

    Further reductions in LDL cholesterol safely produce definite further reductions in the incidence of heart attack, of revascularisation, and of ischaemic stroke, with each 1·0 mmol/L reduction reducing the annual rate of these major vascular events by just over a fifth. There was no evidence of any threshold within the cholesterol range studied, suggesting that reduction of LDL cholesterol by 2–3 mmol/L would reduce risk by about 40–50%.

    Funding

    UK Medical Research Council, British Heart Foundation, European Community Biomed Programme, Australian National Health and Medical Research Council, and National Heart Foundation.

  • 18.
    Beukers, Willemien
    et al.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Pathol, POB 2040, NL-3000 CA Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    van der Keur, Kirstin A.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Pathol, POB 2040, NL-3000 CA Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Kandimalla, Raju
    Erasmus MC, Dept Pathol, POB 2040, NL-3000 CA Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Vergouwe, Yvonne
    Erasmus MC, Dept Publ Hlth, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Steyerberg, Ewout W.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Publ Hlth, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Boormans, Joost L.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Urol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Jensen, Jorgen B.
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Dept Urol, Aarhus, Denmark..
    Lorente, Jose A.
    Hosp del Mar, Serv Urol, Barcelona, Spain..
    Real, Francisco X.
    Univ Pompeu Fabra, Dept Ciencies Expt & Salut, Barcelona, Spain.;Spanish Natl Canc Res Centre CNIO, Canc Cell Biol Programme, Epithelial Carcinogenesis Grp, Madrid, Spain..
    Segersten, Ulrike
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Orntoft, Torben F.
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Dept Mol Med, Aarhus, Denmark..
    Malats, Nuria
    Spanish Natl Canc Res Centre CNIO, Canc Cell Biol Programme, Epithelial Carcinogenesis Grp, Madrid, Spain..
    Malmström, Per-Uno
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Dyrskjot, Lars
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Dept Mol Med, Aarhus, Denmark..
    Zwarthoff, Ellen C.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Pathol, POB 2040, NL-3000 CA Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    FGFR3, TERT and OTX1 as a Urinary Biomarker Combination for Surveillance of Patients with Bladder Cancer in a Large Prospective Multicenter Study2017In: Journal of Urology, ISSN 0022-5347, E-ISSN 1527-3792, Vol. 197, no 6, p. 1410-1418Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Patients with nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer are followed with frequent cystoscopies. In this study FGFR3, TERT and OTX1 were investigated as a diagnostic urinary marker combination during followup of patients with primary nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer.

    Materials and Methods: In this international, multicenter, prospective study 977 patients with nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer were included. A total of 2,496 urine samples were collected prior to cystoscopy during regular visits. Sensitivity was estimated to detect concomitant recurrences. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to estimate the development of future recurrences after urinalysis and a negative cystoscopy.

    Results: Sensitivity of the assay combination for recurrence detection was 57% in patients with primary low grade, nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer. However, sensitivity was 83% for recurrences that were pT1 or muscle invasive bladder cancer. Of the cases 2% progressed to muscle invasive bladder cancer. Sensitivity for recurrence detection in patients with primary high grade disease was 72% and 7% of them had progression to muscle invasive bladder cancer. When no concomitant tumor was found by cystoscopy, positive urine samples were more frequently followed by a recurrence over time compared to a negative urine sample (58% vs 36%, p < 0.001). High stage recurrences were identified within 1 year after a positive urine test and a negative cystoscopy.

    Conclusions: Recurrences in patients with primary nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer can be detected by a combination of urine assays. This study supports the value of urinalysis as an alternative diagnostic tool in patients presenting with low grade tumors and as a means to identify high stage tumors earlier.

  • 19.
    Bill-Axelson, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Bratt, Ola
    Re: Screening and Prostate Cancer Mortality: Results of the European Randomised Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC) at 13 Years of Follow-up2015In: European Urology, ISSN 0302-2838, E-ISSN 1873-7560, Vol. 67, no 1, p. 175-175Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Bjartell, Anders
    et al.
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Urol, SE-20502 Malmo, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Div Urol Canc, Dept Translat Med, S-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Bottai, Matteo
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Persson, Josefin
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiothorac Surg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Bratt, Ola
    Lund Univ, Div Urol Canc, Dept Translat Med, S-22100 Lund, Sweden.;Cambridge Univ Hosp, Dept Urol, Cambridge, England..
    Damber, Jan-Erik
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Clin Sci Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Urol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Stattin, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology. Umea Univ, Dept Surg & Perioperat Sci Urol & Androl, Umea, Sweden..
    Akre, Olof
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Urol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Prediction of clinical progression after radical prostatectomy in a nationwide population-based cohort2016In: Scandinavian journal of urology, ISSN 2168-1805, E-ISSN 2168-1813, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 255-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to create a model for predicting progression-free survival after radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer. Material and methods: The risk of biochemical recurrence (BCR) was modelled in a cohort of 3452 men aged 70 years or younger who were primarily treated with radical prostatectomy after being diagnosed between 2003 and 2006 with localized prostate cancer [clinical stage T1c-T2, Gleason score 5-10, N0/NX, M0/MX, prostate-specific antigen (PSA)<20 ng/ml]. The cohort was split into two: one cohort for model development (n = 3452) and one for validation (n = 1762). BCR was defined as two increasing PSA values of at least 0.2 ng/ml, initiation of secondary therapy, distant metastases or death from prostate cancer. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression was applied, predictive performance was assessed using the bootstrap resampling technique to calculate the c index, and calibration of the model was evaluated by comparing predicted and observed Kaplan-Meier 1 year BCR. Results: The overall 5 year progression-free survival was 83% after a median follow-up time of 6.8 years in the development cohort and 7.3 years in the validation cohort. The final model included T stage, PSA level, primary and secondary Gleason grade, and number of positive and negative biopsies. The c index for discrimination between high and low risk of recurrence was 0.68. The probability of progression-free survival ranged from 22% to 97% over the range of risk scores in the study population. Conclusions: This model is based on nationwide population-based data and can be used with a fair predictive accuracy to guide decisions on clinical follow-up after prostatectomy. An online calculator for convenient clinical use of the model is available at www.npcr.se/nomogram

  • 21. Björk, Jonas
    et al.
    Grubb, Anders
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Hansson, Lars-Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Flodin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Sterner, Gunnar
    Lindström, Veronica
    Nyman, Ulf
    Accuracy of GFR estimating equations combining standardized cystatin C and creatinine assays: a cross-sectional study in Sweden2015In: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, ISSN 1434-6621, E-ISSN 1437-4331, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 403-414Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Background: The recently established international cystatin C calibrator makes it possible to develop non-laboratory specific glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimating (eGFR) equations. This study compares the performance of the arithmetic mean of the revised Lund-Malmö creatinine and CAPA cystatin C equations (MEANLM-REV+CAPA), the arithmetic mean of the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation (CKD-EPI) creatinine and cystatin C equations (MEANCKD-EPI), and the composite CKD-EPI equation (CKD-EPICREA+CYSC) with the corresponding single marker equations using internationally standardized calibrators for both cystatin C and creatinine.

    Methods: The study included 1200 examinations in 1112 adult Swedish patients referred for measurement of GFR (mGFR) 2008-2010 by plasma clearance of iohexol (median 51 mL/min/1.73 m2). Bias, precision (interquartile range, IQR) and accuracy (percentage of estimates ±30% of mGFR; P30) were compared.

    Results: Combined marker equations were unbiased and had higher precision and accuracy than single marker equations. Overall results of MEANLM-REV+CAPA/MEANCKD-EPI/CKD-EPICREA+CYSC were: median bias -2.2%/-0.5%/-1.6%, IQR 9.2/9.2/8.8 mL/min/1.73 m2, and P30 91.3%/91.0%/91.1%. The P30 figures were about 7-14 percentage points higher than the single marker equations. The combined equations also had a more stable performance across mGFR, age and BMI intervals, generally with P30 ≥90% and never <80%. Combined equations reached P30 of 95% when the difference between eGFRCREA and eGFRCYSC was <10% but decreased to 82% at a difference of ≥40%.

    Conclusions: Combining cystatin C and creatinine assays improves GFR estimations with P30 ≥90% in adults. Reporting estimates of both single and combined marker equations in clinical settings makes it possible to assess the validity of the combined equation based on the agreement between the single marker equations.

  • 22.
    Brandstrom, Per
    et al.
    Gothenburg Univ, Sahlgrenska Acad, Queen Silvia Childrens Hosp, Dept Pediat, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Storby, Kerstin Abelson
    Cent Hosp Vaxjo, Dept Pediat, Vaxjo, Sweden..
    Bekassy, Zivile
    Lund Univ, Dept Pediat, Clin Sci Lund, Lund, Sweden..
    Herthelius, Maria
    Karolinska Inst, Div Paediat, Clintec Dept, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nevéus, Tryggve
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Rundqvist, Simon
    Cty Hosp Ryhov, Dept Pediat, Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Swerkersson, Svante
    Gothenburg Univ, Sahlgrenska Acad, Queen Silvia Childrens Hosp, Dept Pediat, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    WennerstrOm, Martin
    Gothenburg Univ, Sahlgrenska Acad, Queen Silvia Childrens Hosp, Dept Pediat, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Hansson, Sverker
    Gothenburg Univ, Sahlgrenska Acad, Queen Silvia Childrens Hosp, Dept Pediat, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Swedish UTI Guidelines2015In: Pediatric nephrology (Berlin, West), ISSN 0931-041X, E-ISSN 1432-198X, Vol. 30, no 9, p. 1574-1575Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 23. Bratt, O.
    et al.
    Häggman, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Ahlgren, G.
    Nordle, O.
    Björk, A.
    Damber, Jan-Erik
    Open-label, clinical phase I studies of tasquinimod in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer2009In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, E-ISSN 1532-1827, Vol. 101, no 8, p. 1233-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Tasquinimod is a quinoline-3-carboxamide derivative with anti-angiogenic activity. Two open-label phase I clinical trials in patients were conducted to evaluate the safety and tolerability of tasquinimod, with additional pharmacokinetic and efficacy assessments. METHODS: Patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer with no previous chemotherapy were enrolled in this study. The patients received tasquinimod up to 1 year either at fixed doses of 0.5 or 1.0 mg per day or at an initial dose of 0.25 mg per day that escalated to 1.0 mg per day. RESULTS: A total of 32 patients were enrolled; 21 patients were maintained for >or=4 months. The maximum tolerated dose was determined to be 0.5 mg per day; but when using stepwise intra-patient dose escalation, a dose of 1.0 mg per day was well tolerated. The dose-limiting toxicity was sinus tachycardia and asymptomatic elevation in amylase. Common treatment-emergent adverse events included transient laboratory abnormalities, anaemia, nausea, fatigue, myalgia and pain. A serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) decline of >or=50% was noted in two patients. The median time to PSA progression (>25%) was 19 weeks. Only 3 out of 15 patients (median time on study: 34 weeks) developed new bone lesions. CONCLUSION: Long-term continuous oral administration of tasquinimod seems to be safe, and the overall efficacy results indicate that tasquinimod might delay disease progression.

  • 24.
    Bratt, Ola
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Div Urol Canc, Dept Translat Med Urol, Lund, Sweden.;Cambridge Univ Hosp, CamPARI Clin, Dept Urol, Cambridge, England..
    Drevin, Linda
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Reg Canc Ctr, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Akre, Olof
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Urol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Garmo, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Stattin, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology. Umea Univ, Dept Surg & Perioperat Sci Urol & Androl, Umea, Sweden..
    Family History and Probability of Prostate Cancer, Differentiated by Risk Category: A Nationwide Population-Based Study2016In: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, ISSN 0027-8874, E-ISSN 1460-2105, Vol. 108, no 10, article id djw110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Familial prostate cancer risk estimates are inflated by clinically insignificant low-risk cancer, diagnosed after prostate-specific antigen testing. We provide age-specific probabilities of non-low-and high-risk prostate cancer. Methods: Fifty-one thousand, eight hundred ninety-seven brothers of 32 807 men with prostate cancer were identified in Prostate Cancer data Base Sweden (PCBaSe). Nelson-Aalen estimates with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for cumulative, family history-stratified probabilities of any, non-low-(any of Gleason score >= 7, prostate-specific antigen [PSA] >= 10 ng/mL, T3-4, N1, and/or M1) and high-risk prostate cancer (Gleason score >= 8 and/or T3-4 and/or PSA >= 20 ng/mL and/or N1 and/or M1). Results: The population probability of any prostate cancer was 4.8% (95% CI = 4.8% to 4.9%) at age 65 years and 12.9% (95% CI = 12.8% to 12.9%) at age 75 years, of non-low-risk prostate cancer 2.8% (95% CI = 2.7% to 2.8%) at age 65 years and 8.9% (95% CI = 8.8% to 8.9%) at age 75 years, and of high-risk prostate cancer 1.4% (95% CI = 1.3% to 1.4%) at age 65 years and 5.2% (95% CI = 5.1% to 5.2%) at age 75 years. For men with one affected brother, probabilities of any prostate cancer were 14.9% (95% CI = 14.1% to 15.8%) at age 65 years and 30.3% (95% CI = 29.3% to 31.3%) at age 75 years, of non-low-risk prostate cancer 7.3% (95% CI = 6.7% to 7.9%) at age 65 years and 18.8% (95% CI = 17.9% to 19.6%) at age 75 years, and of high-risk prostate cancer 3.0% (95% CI = 2.6% to 3.4%) at age 65 years and 8.9% (95% CI = 8.2% to 9.5%) at age 75 years. Probabilities were higher for men with a stronger family history. For example, men with two affected brothers had a 13.6% (95% CI = 9.9% to 17.6 %) probability of high-risk cancer at age 75 years. Conclusions: The age-specific probabilities of non-low-and high-risk cancer presented here are more informative than relative risks of any prostate cancer and more suitable to use for counseling men with a family history of prostate cancer.

  • 25. Bratt, Ola
    et al.
    Folkvaljon, Yasin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Eriksson, Marie Hjalm
    Akre, Olof
    Carlsson, Stefan
    Drevin, Linda
    Lissbrant, Ingela Franck
    Makarov, Danil
    Loeb, Stacy
    Stattin, Par
    Undertreatment of Men in Their Seventies with High-risk Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer2015In: European Urology, ISSN 0302-2838, E-ISSN 1873-7560, Vol. 68, no 1, p. 53-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Many elderly men with high-risk nonmetastatic prostate cancer (HRnMPCa) do not receive radical treatment, despite the high mortality associated with conservative management. Objective: To investigate how age and comorbidity affect treatment of men with HRnMPCa. Design, setting, and participants: This was an observational nationwide register study during 2001-2012. We identified 19 190 men of <80 yr of age diagnosed with HRnMPCa in the National Prostate Cancer Register of Sweden and 95 948 age-matched men without prostate cancer in the register of the total population. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis: The outcome was the proportion of men with HRnMPCa receiving radical treatment (radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy). Vital status and the Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) were obtained from nationwide registers. The 10-yr survival of men without prostate cancer, stratified by age and CCI, was used as a measure of the life expectancy of the men with prostate cancer. Results and limitations: The proportions receiving radical treatment varied with life expectancy among men younger than 70 yr, whereas use of these treatments did not match the long life expectancy of men in their seventies with CCI 0-1. Only 10% of men aged 75-80 yr with CCI 0 received radical treatment despite 52% probability of 10-yr life expectancy, compared with approximately half of the men younger than 70 yr with a similar life expectancy. The use of radical treatment for HRnMPCa increased with time in all Swedish counties, but a threefold difference between counties remained in 2009-2012 for patients aged 70-80 yr with CCI 0-1. Uncertain external validity is a study limitation, and the impact of physician versus patient preferences on treatment selection could not be assessed. Conclusions: Otherwise healthy men in their seventies with HRnMPCa were less likely to receive radical treatment than younger men with a similar life expectancy, although increasing use of radical treatment was observed during the study period. Our findings highlight the need for improved methods for clinical decision-making, including improved assessment of life expectancy. Patient summary: We performed a nationwide register study that showed that many healthy men in their seventies live for at least another 10 yr. Despite this long life expectancy, men in their seventies with high-risk nonmetastatic prostate cancer were often not treated with radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy, possibly because their life expectancy was underestimated. Our study highlights the need for improved clinical decision-making, which should incorporate an assessment of the patient's life expectancy.

  • 26. Bruck, Katharina
    et al.
    Jager, Kitty J.
    Dounousi, Evangelia
    Kainz, Alexander
    Nitsch, Dorothea
    Ärnlov, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Rothenbacher, Dietrich
    Browne, Gemma
    Capuano, Vincenzo
    Ferraro, Pietro Manuel
    Ferrieres, Jean
    Gambaro, Giovanni
    Guessous, Idris
    Hallan, Stein
    Kastarinen, Mika
    Navis, Gerjan
    Otero Gonzalez, Alfonso
    Palmieri, Luigi
    Romundstad, Solfrid
    Spoto, Belinda
    Stengel, Benedicte
    Tomson, Charles
    Tripepi, Giovanni
    Voelzke, Henry
    Wiecek, Andrzej
    Gansevoort, Ron
    Schoettker, Ben
    Wanner, Christoph
    Vinhas, Jose
    Zoccali, Carmine
    Van Biesen, Wim
    Stel, Vianda S.
    Methodology used in studies reporting chronic kidney disease prevalence: a systematic literature review2015In: Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation, ISSN 0931-0509, E-ISSN 1460-2385, Vol. 30, no S4, p. 6-16Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Many publications report the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the general population. Comparisons across studies are hampered as CKD prevalence estimations are influenced by study population characteristics and laboratory methods. Methods. For this systematic review, two researchers independently searched PubMed, MEDLINE and EMBASE to identify all original research articles that were published between 1 January 2003 and 1 November 2014 reporting the prevalence of CKD in the European adult general population. Data on study methodology and reporting of CKD prevalence results were independently extracted by two researchers. Results. We identified 82 eligible publications and included 48 publications of individual studies for the data extraction. There was considerable variation in population sample selection. The majority of studies did not report the sampling frame used, and the response ranged from 10 to 87%. With regard to the assessment of kidney function, 67% used a Jaffe assay, whereas 13% used the enzymatic assay for creatinine determination. Isotope dilution mass spectrometry calibration was used in 29%. The CKD-EPI (52%) and MDRD (75%) equations were most often used to estimate glomerular filtration rate (GFR). CKD was defined as estimated GFR (eGFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) in 92% of studies. Urinary markers of CKD were assessed in 60% of the studies. CKD prevalence was reported by sex and age strata in 54 and 50% of the studies, respectively. In publications with a primary objective of reporting CKD prevalence, 39% reported a 95% confidence interval. Conclusions. The findings from this systematic review showed considerable variation in methods for sampling the general population and assessment of kidney function across studies reporting CKD prevalence. These results are utilized to provide recommendations to help optimize both the design and the reporting of future CKD prevalence studies, which will enhance comparability of study results.

  • 27.
    Bruck, Katharina
    et al.
    Amsterdam Med Ctr, European Renal Assoc European Dialysis & Transpla, Dept Med Informat, Meibergdreef 9, NL-1100 DD Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Stel, Vianda S.
    Amsterdam Med Ctr, European Renal Assoc European Dialysis & Transpla, Dept Med Informat, Meibergdreef 9, NL-1100 DD Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Gambaro, Giovanni
    Univ Cattolica Sacro Cuore, Columbus Gemelli Univ Hosp, Div Nephrol & Dialysis, I-00168 Rome, Italy..
    Hallan, Stein
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Fac Med, St Olavs Hosp, Dept Nephrol, N-7034 Trondheim, Norway..
    Volzke, Henry
    Univ Med Greifswald, Dept Clin Epidemiol Res, Greifswald, Germany..
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Kastarinen, Mika
    Kuopio Natl Inst Hlth & Welf, Dept Internal Med & Nephrol, Finnish Med Agcy, Helsinki, Finland..
    Guessous, Idris
    Univ Hosp Geneva, Dept Community Med Primary Care & Emergency Med, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Vinhas, Jose
    Setubal Hosp Ctr, Dept Med, Setubal, Portugal..
    Stengel, Benedicte
    INSERM, U1018, Res Ctr Epidemiol & Populat Hlth, Villejuif, France..
    Brenner, Hermann
    Heidelberg Univ, German Canc Res Ctr, Network Aging Res, Div Clin Epidemiol & Aging Res, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Chudek, Jerzy
    Med Univ Silesia, Dept Nephrol Endocrinol & Metab Dis, Med Fac, Dept Pathophysiol, Katowice, Poland..
    Romundstad, Solfrid
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Levanger Hosp, Hlth Trust Nord Trendelag, Dept Nephrol, N-7034 Trondheim, Norway..
    Tomson, Charles
    Freeman Rd Hosp, Dept Nephrol, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England..
    Otero Gonzalez, Alfonso
    Univ Hosp Orense, Dept Nephrol, Orense, Spain..
    Bello, Aminu K.
    Univ Alberta, Dept Med, Edmonton, AB, Canada..
    Ferrieres, Jean
    Toulouse Univ, Sch Med, Rangueil Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Toulouse, France..
    Palmieri, Luigi
    Ist Super Sanita, Dept Epidemiol Cerebro & Cardiovasc Dis, Viale Regina Elena 299, I-00161 Rome, Italy..
    Browne, Gemma
    Univ Coll Cork, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Cork, Ireland.;Mercy Univ Hosp, Cork, Ireland..
    Capuano, Vincenzo
    Mercato S Severino Hosp, Unite Operat Cardiol, Salerno, Italy.;Mercato S Severino Hosp, UTIC, Salerno, Italy..
    Van Biesen, Wim
    Ghent Univ Hosp, Dept Nephrol, Ghent, Belgium..
    Zoccali, Carmine
    CNR, Ist Fisiol Clin, Clin Epidemiol & Pathophysiol Renal Dis & Hyperte, Reggio Di Calabria, Italy..
    Gansevoort, Ron
    Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Grad Sch Med Sci, Dept Nephrol, NL-9713 AV Groningen, Netherlands..
    Navis, Gerjan
    Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Internal Med, Div Nephrol, NL-9713 AV Groningen, Netherlands..
    Rothenbacher, Dietrich
    Univ Ulm, Inst Epidemiol & Med Biometry, D-89069 Ulm, Germany..
    Ferraro, Pietro Manuel
    Univ Cattolica Sacro Cuore, Columbus Gemelli Univ Hosp, Div Nephrol & Dialysis, I-00168 Rome, Italy..
    Nitsch, Dorothea
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Dept Noncommunicable Dis Epidemiol, London WC1, England.;UCL, London, England..
    Wanner, Christoph
    Univ Hosp Wurzburg, Dept Nephrol, Wurzburg, Germany..
    Jager, Kitty J.
    Amsterdam Med Ctr, European Renal Assoc European Dialysis & Transpla, Dept Med Informat, Meibergdreef 9, NL-1100 DD Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Consortium, European C. K. D. Burden
    CKD Prevalence Varies across the European General Population2016In: Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, ISSN 1046-6673, E-ISSN 1533-3450, Vol. 27, no 7, p. 2135-2147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CKD prevalence estimation is central to CKD management and prevention planning at the population level. This study estimated CKD prevalence in the European adult general population and investigated international variation in CKD prevalence by age, sex, and presence of diabetes, hypertension, and obesity. We collected data from 19 general-population studies from 13 European countries. CKD stages 1-5 was defined as eGFR <60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2), as calculated by the CKD-Epidemiology Collaboration equation, or albuminuria >30 mg/g, and CKD stages 3-5 was defined as eGFR<60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2). CKD prevalence was age- and sex-standardized to the population of the 27 Member States of the European Union (EU27). We found considerable differences in both CKD stages 1-5 and CKD stages 3-5 prevalence across European study populations. The adjusted CKD stages 1-5 prevalence varied between 3.31% (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 3.30% to 3.33%) in Norway and 17.3% (95% Cl, 16.5% to 18.1%) in northeast Germany. The adjusted CKD stages 3-5 prevalence varied between 1.0% (95% CI, 0.7% to 1.3%) in central Italy and 5.9% (95% CI, 5.2% to 6.6%) in northeast Germany. The variation in CKD prevalence stratified by diabetes, hypertension, and obesity status followed the same pattern as the overall prevalence. In conclusion, this large-scale attempt to carefully characterize CKD prevalence in Europe identified substantial variation in CKD prevalence that appears to be due to factors other than the prevalence of diabetes, hypertension, and obesity.

  • 28.
    Carlsson, Axel C
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Stanford Univ, Dept Med, Div Cardiovasc Med, Sch Med, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Carrero, Juan Jesus
    Gustafsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Feldreich, Tobias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Stenemo, Markus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Use of Proteomics To Investigate Kidney Function Decline over 5 Years2017In: American Society of Nephrology. Clinical Journal, ISSN 1555-9041, E-ISSN 1555-905X, Vol. 12, no 8, p. 1226-1235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Using a discovery/replication approach, we investigated associations between a multiplex panel of 80 circulating proteins associated with cardiovascular pathology or inflammation, and eGFR decline per year and CKD incidence.

    DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS: We used two cohorts, the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors Study (PIVUS; n=687, mean age of 70 years, 51% women) and the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (ULSAM; n=360 men, mean age of 78 years), with 5-year follow-up data on eGFR. There were 231 and 206 incident cases of CKD during follow-up in the PIVUS and ULSAM studies, respectively. Proteomic profiling of 80 proteins was assessed by a multiplex assay (proximity extension assay). The assay uses two antibodies for each protein and a PCR step to achieve a high-specific binding and the possibility to measure multiple proteins in parallel, but gives no absolute concentrations.

    RESULTS: In the discovery cohort from the PIVUS Study, 28 plasma proteins were significantly associated with eGFR decline per year, taking into account the multiple testing. Twenty of these proteins were significantly associated with eGFR decline per year in the replication cohort from the ULSAM Study after adjustment for age, sex, cardiovascular risk factors, medications, and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (in order of significance: TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand receptor 2*, CD40L receptor, TNF receptor 1*, placenta growth factor*, thrombomodulin*, urokinase plasminogen activator surface receptor*, growth/differentiation factor 15*, macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1, fatty acid-binding protein*, cathepsin D, resistin, kallikrein 11*, C-C motif chemokine 3, proteinase-activated receptor 1*, cathepsin L, chitinase 3-like protein 1, TNF receptor 2*, fibroblast growth factor 23*, monocyte chemotactic protein 1, and kallikrein 6). Moreover, 11 of the proteins predicted CKD incidence (marked with * above). No protein consistently predicted eGFR decline per year independently of baseline eGFR in both cohorts.

    CONCLUSIONS: Several circulating proteins involved in phosphate homeostasis, inflammation, apoptosis, extracellular matrix remodeling, angiogenesis, and endothelial dysfunction were associated with worsening kidney function. Multiplex proteomics appears to be a promising way of discovering novel aspects of kidney disease pathology.

  • 29.
    Carlsson, Axel C
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Helmersson-Karlqvist, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Larsson, Tobias E
    Bottai, Matteo
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Urinary Kidney Injury Molecule-1 and the Risk of Cardiovascular Mortality in Elderly Men2014In: Clinical journal of the American Society of Nephrology : CJASN, ISSN 1555-905X, Vol. 9, no 8, p. 1393-1401Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and objectives

    Kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) has been suggested as a clinically relevant highly specific biomarker of acute kidney tubular damage. However, community-based data on the association between urinary levels of KIM-1 and the risk for cardiovascular mortality are lacking. This study aimed to investigate the association between urinary KIM-1 and cardiovascular mortality.

    Design, setting, participants, & measurements

    This was a prospective study, using the community-based Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (N=590; mean age 77 years; baseline period, 1997–2001; median follow-up 8.1 years; end of follow-up, 2008).

    Results

    During follow-up, 89 participants died of cardiovascular causes (incidence rate, 2.07 per 100 person-years at risk). Models were adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors (age, systolic BP, diabetes, smoking, body mass index, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, antihypertensive treatment, lipid-lowering treatment, aspirin treatment, and history of cardiovascular disease) and for markers of kidney dysfunction and damage (cystatin C–based eGFR and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio). Higher urinary KIM-1/creatinine (from 24-hour urine collections) was associated with a higher risk for cardiovascular mortality (hazard ratio per SD increase, 1.27; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.05 to 1.54; P=0.01). Participants with a combination of high KIM-1/creatinine (upper quintile, ≥175 ng/mmol), low eGFR (≤60 ml/min per 1.73 m2), and microalbuminuria/macroalbuminuria (albumin/creatinine ratio≥3 g/mol) had a >8-fold increased risk compared with participants with low KIM-1/creatinine (<175 ng/mmol), normal eGFR (>60 ml/min per 1.73 m2), and normoalbuminuria (albumin/creatinine ratio<3 g/mol) (hazard ratio, 8.56; 95% CI, 4.17 to 17.56; P<0.001).

    Conclusions

    These findings suggest that higher urinary KIM-1 may predispose to a higher risk of cardiovascular mortality independently of established cardiovascular risk factors, eGFR, and albuminuria. Additional studies are needed to further assess the utility of measuring KIM-1 in the clinical setting.

  • 30.
    Carlsson, Axel C
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Larsson, Tobias E
    Helmersson-Karlqvist, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Soluble TNF Receptors and Kidney Dysfunction in the Elderly2014In: Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, ISSN 1046-6673, E-ISSN 1533-3450, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 1313-1320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of TNF-α and its soluble receptors (sTNFR1 and sTNFR2) in the development of kidney disease is being unraveled. Yet, community-based data regarding the role of sTNFRs are lacking. We assessed serum sTNFRs and aspects of kidney damage cross-sectionally in two independent community-based cohorts of elderly participants: Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (n=815; mean age, 75 years; 51% women) and Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (n=778; mean age, 78 years). Serum sTNFR1 correlated substantially with different aspects of kidney pathology in the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men cohort (R=-0.52 for estimated GFR, R=0.22 for urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio, and R=0.17 for urinary kidney injury molecule-1; P<0.001 for all), with similar correlations in the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors cohort. These associations remained significant after adjustment for age, sex, inflammatory markers, and cardiovascular risk factors and were also evident in participants without diabetes. Serum sTNFR2 was associated with all three markers in the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors cohort (P<0.001 for all). Our findings from two independent community-based cohorts confirm and extend results of previous studies supporting circulating sTNFRs as relevant biomarkers for kidney damage and dysfunction in elderly individuals, even in the absence of diabetes.

  • 31.
    Carlsson, Axel C
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology. Division of Family Medicine, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Nordquist, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Larsson, Tobias E.
    Carrero, Juan-Jesús
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology. gSchool of Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun , Sweden.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Soluble Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 1 Is Associated with Glomerular Filtration Rate Progression and Incidence of Chronic Kidney Disease in Two Community-Based Cohorts of Elderly Individuals2015In: Cardiorenal Medicine, ISSN 1664-3828, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 278-288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: We aimed to explore and validate the longitudinal associations between soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (sTNFR1), glomerular filtration rate (GFR) progression, and chronic kidney disease (CKD) incidence in two independent community-based cohorts of elderly individuals with prespecified subgroup analyses in individuals without prevalent diabetes. Research Design and Methods: Two community-based cohorts of elderly individuals were used with 5-year follow-up data on estimated GFR: the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (ULSAM; n = 437 men; mean age: 78 years) and the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS; n = 703; mean age: 70 years; 51% women). GFR categories were defined as >= 60, 30-60, and = 60 ml/min/1.73 m(2) at baseline, higher sTNFRs were associated with incident CKD after 5 years in both cohorts [ULSAM: OR per SD increase 1.49 (95% CI 1.16-1.9) and PIVUS: OR 1.84 (95% CI 1.50-2.26)]. Associations were similar in individuals without diabetes. Conclusions: Higher circulating sTNFR1 independently predicts the progression to a worse GFR category and CKD incidence in elderly individuals even in the absence of diabetes. Further studies are warranted to investigate the underlying mechanisms, and to evaluate the clinical relevance of our findings.

  • 32.
    Carlsson, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Ronquist, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Elisasson, Rune
    Sophia Hosp, Androl Lab, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Dubois, Louise
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Ronquist, Karl Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    High Concentrations of the Angiogenic Peptide VEGF-A in Seminal Fluid and its Association to Prostasomes2016In: Clinical Laboratory, ISSN 1433-6510, Vol. 62, no 8, p. 1515-1520Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Angiogenesis is the formation of new blood vessels by capillary sprouting from pre-existing vessels. This process is associated with increased expression of angiogenic factors like vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The VEGF family consists of five members denoted VEGF-A, B, C, D and placenta growth factor (PlGF). Prostasomes are exosome-like extracellular vesicles existing in seminal plasma. The present study aimed at investigating the possible relationship between VEGF-A in seminal fluid and blood plasma and the prostasomal association of VEGF-A.

    Methods: Measurement of VEGF-A concentrations was carried out in seminal plasma from 40 males and in blood plasma from 40 male blood donors utilizing commercial ELISA kits. The prostasomal association of VEGF-A was investigated by flow cytometry.

    Results: We found highly elevated concentrations of VEGF-A in seminal fluid (median value 150000 pg/mL) compared with those of blood plasma. Flow cytometric analysis showed that VEGF-A is bound to the surface of prostasomes.

    Conclusions: Prostasomes and seminal plasma contain the angiogenic factor VEGF-A in high concentrations exceeding that of blood plasma by 1000 times.

  • 33. Carlsson, Sigrid
    et al.
    Berglund, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Sjoberg, Daniel
    Khatami, Ali
    Stranne, Johan
    Bergdahl, Svante
    Lodding, Par
    Aus, Gunnar
    Vickers, Andrew
    Hugosson, Jonas
    Effects of surgeon variability on oncologic and functional outcomes in a population-based setting2014In: BMC Urology, ISSN 1471-2490, E-ISSN 1471-2490, Vol. 14, p. 25-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Oncologic and functional outcomes after radical prostatectomy (RP) can vary between surgeons to a greater extent than is expected by chance. We sought to examine the effects of surgeon variation on functional and oncologic outcomes for patients undergoing RP for prostate cancer in a European center. Methods: The study comprised 1,280 men who underwent open retropubic RP performed by one of nine surgeons at an academic institution in Sweden between 2001 and 2008. Potency and continence outcomes were measured preoperatively and 18 months postoperatively by patient-administered questionnaires. Biochemical recurrence (BCR) was defined as a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value > 0.2 ng/mL with at least one confirmatory rise. Multivariable random effect models were used to evaluate heterogeneity between surgeons, adjusting for case mix (age, PSA, pathological stage and grade), year of surgery, and surgical experience. Results: Of 679 men potent at baseline, 647 provided data at 18 months with 122 (19%) reporting potency. We found no evidence for heterogeneity of potency outcomes between surgeons (P = 1). The continence rate for patients at 18 months was 85%, with 836 of the 979 patients who provided data reporting continence. There was statistically significant heterogeneity between surgeons (P = 0.001). We did not find evidence of an association between surgeons' adjusted probabilities of functional recovery and 5-year probability of freedom from BCR. Conclusions: Our data support previous studies regarding a large heterogeneity among surgeons in continence outcomes for patients undergoing RP. This indicates that some patients are receiving sub-optimal care. Quality assurance measures involving performance feedback, should be considered. When surgeons are aware of their outcomes, they can improve them to provide better care to patients.

  • 34.
    Carlsson, Sigrid
    et al.
    Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Dept Surg, Urol Serv, New York, NY 10021 USA.;Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Urol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Drevin, Linda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Loeb, Stacy
    NYU, New York, NY USA.;Manhattan Vet Affairs Med Ctr, New York, NY USA..
    Widmark, Anders
    Umea Univ, Oncol, Dept Radiat Sci, Umea, Sweden..
    Lissbrant, Ingela Franck
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Oncol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Robinson, David
    Umea Univ Hosp, Dept Surg & Perioperat Sci Urol & Androl, S-90185 Umea, Sweden.;Ryhov Cty Hosp, Dept Urol, Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Johansson, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Stattin, Par
    Umea Univ Hosp, Dept Surg & Perioperat Sci Urol & Androl, S-90185 Umea, Sweden..
    Fransson, Per
    Umea Univ, Dept Nursing, Umea, Sweden..
    Population-based study of long-term functional outcomes after prostate cancer treatment2016In: BJU International, ISSN 1464-4096, E-ISSN 1464-410X, Vol. 117, no 6B, p. E36-E45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To evaluate long-term urinary, sexual and bowel functional outcomes after prostate cancer treatment at a median (interquartile range) follow-up of 12 (11-13) years. Patients and Methods In this nationwide, population-based study, we identified 6 003 men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer (clinical local stage T1-2, any Gleason score, prostate-specific antigen <20 ng/mL, NX or N0, MX or M0) between 1997 and 2002 from the National Prostate Cancer Register, Sweden. The men were aged <= 70 years at diagnosis. A control group of 1 000 men without prostate cancer were also selected, matched for age and county of residence. Functional outcomes were evaluated with a validated self-reported questionnaire. Results Responses were obtained from 3 937/6 003 cases (66%) and 459/1 000 (46%) controls. At 12 years after diagnosis and at a median age of 75 years, the proportion of cases with adverse symptoms was 87% for erectile dysfunction/sexual inactivity, 20% for urinary incontinence and 14% for bowel disturbances. The corresponding proportions for controls were 62, 6 and 7%, respectively. Men with prostate cancer, except those on surveillance, had an increased risk of erectile dysfunction compared with the men in the control group. Radical prostatectomy was associated with an increased risk of urinary incontinence (odds ratio [OR] 1.89, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.36-2.62) and radiotherapy increased the risk of bowel dysfunction (OR 2.46, 95% CI 1.73-3.49) compared with men in the control group. Multimodal treatment, in particular treatment including androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), was associated with the highest risk of adverse effects; for instance, radical prostatectomy followed by radiotherapy and ADT was associated with an OR of 3.74 (95% CI 1.76-7.95) for erectile dysfunction and an OR of 3.22 (95% CI 1.93-5.37) for urinary incontinence. Conclusion The proportion of men who experienced a long-term impact on functional outcomes after prostate cancer treatment was substantial.

  • 35.
    Carrero, Juan J.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Renal Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Varenhorst, Christoph
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Jensevik, Karin
    Szummer, Karolina
    Karolinska Inst, Cardiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lagerqvist, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala Univ, Uppsala Clin Res Ctr, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Evans, Marie
    Karolinska Inst, Renal Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Spaak, Jonas
    Karolinska Inst, Clin Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Held, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Psychology in Healthcare.
    James, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Karolinska Inst, Cardiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Clinical Outcomes Associated With The Duration Of Dual Antiplatelet Therapy With Clopidogrel And Aspirin In Chronic Kidney Disease Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome2016In: Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation, ISSN 0931-0509, E-ISSN 1460-2385, Vol. 31, p. 1441-1441Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Carrero, Juan Jesus
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, Div Renal Med & Baxter Novum, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Grams, Morgan E.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Div Nephrol, Baltimore, MD USA.;Johns Hopkins Bloomberg Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Baltimore, MD USA..
    Sang, Yingying
    Johns Hopkins Bloomberg Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Baltimore, MD USA..
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Dalarna Univ, Sch Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden..
    Gasparini, Alessandro
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, Div Renal Med & Baxter Novum, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Matsushita, Kunihiro
    Johns Hopkins Bloomberg Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Baltimore, MD USA..
    Qureshi, Abdul R.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, Div Renal Med & Baxter Novum, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Evans, Marie
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, Div Renal Med & Baxter Novum, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Barany, Peter
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, Div Renal Med & Baxter Novum, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lindholm, Bengt
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, Div Renal Med & Baxter Novum, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ballew, Shoshana H.
    Johns Hopkins Bloomberg Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Baltimore, MD USA..
    Levey, Andrew S.
    Tufts Med Ctr, Div Nephrol, Boston, MA USA..
    Gansevoort, Ron T.
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Nephrol, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Elinder, Carl G.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, Div Renal Med & Baxter Novum, Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Cty Council, Publ Healthcare Serv Comm, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Coresh, Josef
    Johns Hopkins Bloomberg Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Baltimore, MD USA..
    Albuminuria changes are associated with subsequent risk of end-stage renal disease and mortality2017In: Kidney International, ISSN 0085-2538, E-ISSN 1523-1755, Vol. 91, no 1, p. 244-251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current guidelines for chronic kidney disease (CKD) recommend using albuminuria as well as estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) to stage CKD. However, CKD progression is solely defined by change in eGFR with little regard to the risk implications of change in albuminuria. This is an observational study from the Stockholm CREAtinine Measurements (SCREAM) project, a health care utilization cohort from Stockholm, Sweden, with laboratory measures from 2006-2011 and follow-up through December 2012. Included were 31,732 individuals with two or more ambulatory urine albumin to creatinine ratio (ACR) tests. We assessed the association between change in ACR during a baseline period of 1, 2, or 3 years and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) or death. Using a 2-year baseline period, there were 378 ESRD events and 1712 deaths during a median of 3 years of follow-up. Compared to stable ACR, a 4-fold increase in ACR was associated with a 3.08-times (95% confidence interval 2.59 to 3.67) higher risk of ESRD while a 4-fold decrease in ACR was associated with a 0.34-times (0.26 to 0.45) lower risk of ESRD. Similar associations were found in people with and without diabetes mellitus, with and without hypertension, and also when adjusted for the change in eGFR during the same period. The association between change in ACR and mortality was weaker: ACR increase was associated with mortality, but the relationship was largely flat for ACR decline. Results were consistent for 1-, 2-, and 3-year ACR changes. Thus, changes in albuminuria are strongly and consistently associated with the risk of ESRD and death.

  • 37. Carter, H Ballentine
    et al.
    Albertsen, Peter C
    Barry, Michael J
    Etzioni, Ruth
    Freedland, Stephen J
    Greene, Kirsten Lynn
    Holmberg, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Kantoff, Philip
    Konety, Badrinath R
    Murad, Mohammad Hassan
    Penson, David F
    Zietman, Anthony L
    Early detection of prostate cancer: AUA Guideline2013In: Journal of Urology, ISSN 0022-5347, E-ISSN 1527-3792, Vol. 190, no 2, p. 419-426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    The guideline purpose is to provide the urologist with a framework for the early detection of prostate cancer in asymptomatic average risk men.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS:

    A systematic review was conducted and summarized evidence derived from over 300 studies that addressed the predefined outcomes of interest (prostate cancer incidence/mortality, quality of life, diagnostic accuracy and harms of testing). In addition to the quality of evidence, the panel considered values and preferences expressed in a clinical setting (patient-physician dyad) rather than having a public health perspective. Guideline statements were organized by age group in years (age <40; 40 to 54; 55 to 69; ≥ 70).

    RESULTS:

    Except prostate specific antigen-based prostate cancer screening, there was minimal evidence to assess the outcomes of interest for other tests. The quality of evidence for the benefits of screening was moderate, and evidence for harm was high for men age 55 to 69 years. For men outside this age range, evidence was lacking for benefit, but the harms of screening, including over diagnosis and overtreatment, remained. Modeled data suggested that a screening interval of two years or more may be preferred to reduce the harms of screening.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The Panel recommended shared decision-making for men age 55 to 69 years considering PSA-based screening, a target age group for whom benefits may outweigh harms. Outside this age range, PSA-based screening as a routine could not be recommended based on the available evidence.

  • 38.
    Catto, James W. F.
    et al.
    Univ Sheffield, Acad Urol Unit, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    Blazeby, Jane M.
    Univ Bristol, Bristol Ctr Surg Res, Bristol, Avon, England..
    Holmberg, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery. Kings Coll London, Fac Life Sci & Med, London, England..
    Hamdy, Freddie C.
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Surg Sci, Oxford, England..
    Brown, Julia
    Univ Leeds, Leeds Inst Clin Trials Res, Leeds, W Yorkshire, England..
    In Defense of Randomized Clinical Trials in Surgery: Let Us Not Forget Archie Cochrane's Legacy2017In: European Urology, ISSN 0302-2838, E-ISSN 1873-7560, Vol. 71, no 5, p. 820-821Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Cederblad, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Sarkadi, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Engvall, Gunn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Nevéus, Tryggve
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Infrequent enuresis, the uninvestigated majority: comparisons between children with enuresis of varying severity.2015In: Journal of Pediatric Urology, ISSN 1477-5131, E-ISSN 1873-4898, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 24.e1-24.e6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The main objective was to compare children with frequent enuresis (FE) and children with infrequent enuresis (IE) using anamnestic data and variables related to bladder and kidney function. A secondary aim was to look at the group of children who wet their beds every single night, a phenomenon we chose to call constant enuresis (CE).

    SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The parents recorded the number of wet and dry nights for a period of 14 days, and measured the voided volumes as well as nocturnal urine production for 48 h. History data relevant to bladder and bowel function was also recorded.

    RESULTS: The children could be grouped as follows: IE, n = 14; FE, n = 18; and CE, n = 22. The children with IE were slightly older than the other groups, IE mean 7.57; FE mean 6.22; CE, mean 6.56 (p = 0.004). When comparing the groups in terms of the measured parameters, only one significant difference was found: the FE group had larger average daytime voided volumes, but only when the first morning void was included. The only significantly differing anamnestic variable was previous daytime incontinence, which was more common among the children in the IE group.

    CONCLUSIONS: When comparing children with varying enuresis severity, no major differences regarding bladder function and urine production were found. Furthermore, children with infrequent enuresis tend to be slightly older when they seek medical help.

  • 40. Chua, Horng-Ruey
    et al.
    Schneider, Antoine G.
    Sherry, Norelle L.
    Lotfy, Nadiah
    Chan, Matthew J.
    Galtieri, Jonathan
    Wong, Geoffrey R.
    Lipcsey, Miklós
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Matte, Caue de Araujo
    Collins, Allison
    Garcia-Alvarez, Mercedes
    Bellomo, Rinaldo
    Initial and Extended Use of Femoral Versus Nonfemoral Double-Lumen Vascular Catheters and Catheter-Related Infection During Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy2014In: American Journal of Kidney Diseases, ISSN 0272-6386, E-ISSN 1523-6838, Vol. 64, no 6, p. 909-917Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The risk of catheter-related infection or bacteremia, with initial and extended use of femoral versus nonfemoral sites for double-lumen vascular catheters (DLVCs) during continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT), is unclear. Study Design: Retrospective observational cohort study. Setting & Participants: Critically ill patients on CRRT in a combined intensive care unit of a tertiary institution. Factor: Femoral versus nonfemoral venous DLVC placement. Outcomes: Catheter-related colonization (CRCOL) and bloodstream infection (CRBSI). Measurements: CRCOL/CRBSI rates expressed per 1,000 catheter-days. Results: We studied 458 patients (median age, 65 years; 60% males) and 647 DLVCs. Of 405 single-site only DLVC users, 82% versus 18% received exclusively 419 femoral versus 82 jugular or subclavian DLVCs, respectively. The corresponding DLVC indwelling duration was 6 +/- 4 versus 7 +/- 5 days (P = 0.03). Corresponding CRCOL and CRBSI rates (per 1,000 catheter-days) were 9.7 versus 8.8 events (P = 0.8) and 1.2 versus 3.5 events (P = 0.3), respectively. Overall, 96 patients with extended CRRT received femoral-site insertion first with subsequent site change, including 53 femoral guidewire exchanges, 53 new femoral venipunctures, and 47 new jugular/subclavian sites. CRCOL and CRBSI rates were similar for all such approaches (P = 0.7 and P = 0.9, respectively). On multivariate analysis, CRCOL risk was higher in patients older than 65 years and weighing >90 kg (ORs of 2.1 and 2.2, respectively; P < 0.05). This association between higher weight and greater CRCOL risk was significant for femoral DLVCs, but not for nonfemoral sites. Other covariates, including initial or specific DLVC site, guidewire exchange versus new venipuncture, and primary versus secondary DLVC placement, did not significantly affect CRCOL rates. Limitations: Nonrandomized retrospective design and single-center evaluation. Conclusions: CRCOL and CRBSI rates in patients on CRRT are low and not influenced significantly by initial or serial femoral catheterizations with guidewire exchange or new venipuncture. CRCOL risk is higher in older and heavier patients, the latter especially so with femoral sites.

  • 41.
    Coppo, Rosanna
    et al.
    Regina Margherita Hosp, Fdn Ric Molinette Nephrol Dialysis & Transplantat, Turin, Italy..
    Lofaro, Danilo
    Annunziata Hosp, Cosenza, Italy..
    Camilla, Roberta R.
    Regina Margherita Hosp, Fdn Ric Molinette Nephrol Dialysis & Transplantat, Turin, Italy..
    Bellur, Shubha
    Oxford Univ Hosp, Oxford, England..
    Cattran, Daniel
    Toronto Gen Hosp, Univ Hlth Network, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Cook, H. Terence
    Imperial Coll, Hammersmith Hosp, London, England..
    Roberts, Ian S. D.
    Oxford Univ Hosp, Oxford, England..
    Peruzzi, Licia
    Regina Margherita Hosp, Fdn Ric Molinette Nephrol Dialysis & Transplantat, Turin, Italy..
    Amore, Alessandro
    Regina Margherita Hosp, Fdn Ric Molinette Nephrol Dialysis & Transplantat, Turin, Italy..
    Emma, Francesco
    Bambino Gesu Pediat Hosp, Rome, Italy..
    Fuiano, Laura
    Bambino Gesu Pediat Hosp, Rome, Italy..
    Berg, Ulla
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Topaloglu, Rezan
    Hacettepe Univ, Ankara, Turkey..
    Bilginer, Yelda.
    Hacettepe Univ, Ankara, Turkey..
    Gesualdo, Loreto
    Univ Bari & Foggia, Bari, Italy..
    Polci, Rosaria
    Belcolle Hosp, Viterbo, Italy..
    Mizerska-Wasiak, Malgorzata
    Univ Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland..
    Caliskan, Yasar
    Istanbul Univ, Istanbul, Turkey..
    Lundberg, Sigrid
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Cancarini, Giovanni
    Spedali Civili Univ Hosp, Brescia, Italy..
    Geddes, Colin
    Western Infirm Glasgow, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland..
    Wetzels, Jack
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Wiecek, Andrzej
    Silesian Univ, Katowice, Poland..
    Durlik, Magdalena
    Med Univ Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland..
    Cusinato, Stefano
    Borgomanero Hosp, Borgomanero, Italy..
    Rollino, Cristiana
    San Giovanni Bosco Hosp, Turin, Italy..
    Maggio, Milena
    Hosp Maggiore Lodi, Lodi, Italy..
    Praga, Manuel
    Hosp 12 Octubre, Madrid, Spain..
    Smerud, Hilde Kloster
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Tesar, Vladimir
    Gen Univ Hosp, Prague, Czech Republic..
    Maixnerova, Dita
    Gen Univ Hosp, Prague, Czech Republic..
    Barratt, Jonathan
    Leicester Gen Hosp, Leicester, Leics, England..
    Papalia, Teresa
    Annunziata Hosp, Cosenza, Italy..
    Bonofiglio, Renzo
    Annunziata Hosp, Cosenza, Italy..
    Mazzucco, Gianna
    Univ Turin, Turin, Italy..
    Giannakakis, Costantinos
    Univ Rome, Rome, Italy..
    Söderberg, Magnus
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Orhan, Diclehan
    Hacettepe Univ, Ankara, Turkey..
    Di Palma, Anna Maria
    Univ Bari & Foggia, Bari, Italy..
    Maldyk, Jadwiga
    Univ Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland..
    Ozluk, Yasemin
    Istanbul Univ, Istanbul, Turkey..
    Sudelin, Birgitta
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Tardanico, Regina
    Spedali Civili Univ Hosp, Brescia, Italy..
    Kipgen, David
    Western Infirm Glasgow, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland..
    Steenbergen, Eric
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Karkoszka, Henryk
    Silesian Univ, Katowice, Poland..
    Perkowska-Ptasinska, Agnieszka
    Med Univ Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland..
    Ferrario, Franco
    Monza Hosp, Monza, Italy..
    Gutierrez, Eduardo
    Hosp 12 Octubre, Madrid, Spain..
    Honsova, Eva
    Gen Univ Hosp, Prague, Czech Republic..
    Risk factors for progression in children and young adults with IgA nephropathy: an analysis of 261 cases from the VALIGA European cohort2017In: Pediatric nephrology (Berlin, West), ISSN 0931-041X, E-ISSN 1432-198X, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 139-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a need for early identification of children with immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) at risk of progression of kidney disease. Data on 261 young patients [age < 23 years; mean follow-up of 4.9 (range 2.5-8.1) years] enrolled in VALIGA, a study designed to validate the Oxford Classification of IgAN, were assessed. Renal biopsies were scored for the presence of mesangial hypercellularity (M1), endocapillary hypercellularity (E1), segmental glomerulosclerosis (S1), tubular atrophy/interstitial fibrosis (T1-2) (MEST score) and crescents (C1). Progression was assessed as end stage renal disease and/or a 50 % loss of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (combined endpoint) as well as the rate of renal function decline (slope of eGFR). Cox regression and tree classification binary models were used and compared. In this cohort of 261 subjects aged < 23 years, Cox analysis validated the MEST M, S and T scores for predicting survival to the combined endpoint but failed to prove that these scores had predictive value in the sub-group of 174 children aged < 18 years. The regression tree classification indicated that patients with M1 were at risk of developing higher time-averaged proteinuria (p < 0.0001) and the combined endpoint (p < 0.001). An initial proteinuria of ae<yen>0.4 g/day/1.73 m(2) and an eGFR of < 90 ml/min/1.73 m(2) were determined to be risk factors in subjects with M0. Children aged < 16 years with M0 and well-preserved eGFR (> 90 ml/min/1.73 m(2)) at presentation had a significantly high probability of proteinuria remission during follow-up and a higher remission rate following treatment with corticosteroid and/or immunosuppressive therapy. This new statistical approach has identified clinical and histological risk factors associated with outcome in children and young adults with IgAN.

  • 42. Dahle, Dag Olav
    et al.
    Jenssen, Trond
    Holdaas, Hallvard
    Åsberg, Anders
    Soveri, Inga
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Renal Medicine.
    Holme, Ingar
    Mjøen, Geir
    Eide, Ivar A
    Pihlstrøm, Hege
    Dörje, Christina
    Halden, Thea A S
    Hartmann, Anders
    Uric acid and clinical correlates of endothelial function in kidney transplant recipients2014In: Clinical Transplantation, ISSN 0902-0063, E-ISSN 1399-0012, Vol. 28, no 10, p. 1167-1176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Uric acid is associated with increased mortality in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs), but it is uncertain if this involves endothelial dysfunction. We hypothesized, first, that there was an association between uric acid and endothelial function, and second, that there were associations between endothelial function and cardiac and mortality risk scores.

    METHODS: One hundred and fifty-two patients were examined 10 wk after kidney transplantation by two measures of endothelial function, the brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) expressed as percent dilatation (FMD%), and fingertip peripheral arterial tone (PAT) expressed as log-reactive hyperemia index (LnRHI). Risk scores were calculated from a recently validated formula. Other clinical correlates of endothelial function were described in stepwise linear regression models.

    RESULTS: Uric acid was associated negatively with FMD% in an age- and gender-adjusted model, while not in the multivariable model. No association was shown between uric acid and LnRHI. FMD% was associated negatively with risk scores in both crude and age- and gender-adjusted models (p < 0.01). LnRHI was associated negatively with risk scores in the latter model only (p < 0.05).

    CONCLUSIONS: Uric acid was neither associated with FMD% nor LnRHI in KTRs. There were significant associations between endothelial function indices and cardiac and mortality risk scores.

  • 43.
    Danneman, Daniela
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Oncol Pathol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Drevin, Linda
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Reg Canc Ctr, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Delahunt, Brett
    Univ Otago, Wellington Sch Med & Hlth Sci, Wellington, New Zealand..
    Samaratunga, Hemamali
    Aquesta Pathol, Brisbane, Qld, Australia.;Univ Queensland, Sch Med, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Robinson, David
    Ryhov Cty Hosp, Dept Urol, Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Bratt, Ola
    Cambridge Univ Hosp, Dept Urol, Cambridge, England.;Lund Univ, Dept Translat Med, Lund, Sweden..
    Loeb, Stacy
    NYU, Dept Urol & Populat Hlth, New York, NY USA.;Manhattan Vet Affairs Med Ctr, New York, NY USA..
    Stattin, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology. Umea Univ, Dept Surg & Perioperat Sci, Urol & Androl, Umea, Sweden..
    Egevad, Lars
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Oncol Pathol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Pathol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Accuracy of prostate biopsies for predicting Gleason score in radical prostatectomy specimens: nationwide trends 2000-20122017In: BJU International, ISSN 1464-4096, E-ISSN 1464-410X, Vol. 119, no 1, p. 50-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To investigate how well the Gleason score in diagnostic needle biopsies predicted the Gleason score in a subsequent radical prostatectomy (RP) specimen before and after the 2005 International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) revision of Gleason grading, and if the recently proposed ISUP grades 1-5 (corresponding to Gleason scores 6, 3 + 4, 4 + 3, 8 and 9-10) better predict the RP grade. Patients and Methods All prostate cancers diagnosed in Sweden are reported to the National Prostate Cancer Register (NPCR). We analysed the Gleason scores and ISUP grades from the diagnostic biopsies and the RP specimens in 15 598 men in the NPCR who: were diagnosed between 2000 and 2012 with clinical stage T1-2 M0/X prostate cancer on needle biopsy; were aged <= 70 years; had serum PSA concentration of < 20 ng/mL; and underwent a RP < 6 months after diagnosis as their primary treatment. Results Prediction of RP Gleason score increased from 55 to 68% between 2000 and 2012. Most of the increase occurred before 2005 (nine percentage points; P < 0.001); however, when adjusting for Gleason score and year of diagnosis in a multivariable analysis, the prediction of RP Gleason score decreased over time (odds ratio [OR] 0.98; P < 0.002). A change in the ISUP grades would have led to a decreasing agreement between biopsy and RP grades over time, from 68% in 2000 to 57% in 2012, with an OR of 0.95 in multivariable analysis (P < 0.001). Conclusion Agreement between biopsy and RP Gleason score improved from 2000 to 2012, with most of the improvement occurring before the 2005 ISUP grading revision. Had ISUP grades been used instead of Gleason score, the agreement between biopsy and RP grade would have decreased, probably because of its separation of Gleason score 7 into ISUP grades 2 and 3 (Gleason score 3 + 4 vs 4 + 3).

  • 44. Daouacher, Georgios
    et al.
    von Below, Catrin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Gestblom, Charlotta
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Grzegorek, Rafael
    Wassberg, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Sörensen, Jens
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Waldén, Mauritz
    Laparoscopic extended pelvic lymph node (LN) dissection as validation of the performance of [(11) C]-acetate positron emission tomography/computer tomography in the detection of LN metastasis in intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer2016In: BJU International, ISSN 1464-4096, E-ISSN 1464-410X, Vol. 118, no 1, p. 77-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the accuracy of the radiopharmaceutical [(11) C]-acetate combined with positron emission tomography/computer tomography (acetate-PET/CT) in lymph node (LN) staging in newly diagnosed prostate cancer cases. A second aim was to evaluate the potential discriminative properties of acetate-PET/CT in clinical routine.

    PATIENTS AND METHODS: In a prospective comparative study, from July 2010 to June 2013, 53 men with newly histologically diagnosed intermediate- or high-risk prostate cancer underwent acetate-PET/CT investigation at one regional centre before laparoscopic extended pelvic LN dissection (ePLND) at one referral centre. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of acetate-PET/CT were calculated. Comparisons were made between true-positive and false-negative PET/CT cases to identify differences in the clinical parameters: PSA level, Gleason status, lymph metastasis burden and size, calculated risk of LN involvement, and curative treatment decisions.

    RESULTS: In all, 26 patients had surgically/histologically confirmed LN metastasis (LN+). Acetate-PET/CT was true positive in 10 patients, false positive in one, false negative in 16, and true negative in 26. The individual sensitivity was 38%, specificity 96%, and accuracy 68%. The acetate-PET/CT positive cases had significantly more involved LNs (mean 7.9 vs 2.4, P < 0.001) with larger cancer diameters (14.1 vs 4.9 mm, P = 0.001) and fewer eventually had treatment with curative intent (40% vs 94%, P <0.005), although we lack long-term outcome data.

    CONCLUSION: Acetate-PET/CT has too low a sensitivity for routine LN staging but the specificity is high. The acetate-PET/CT positive cases have a very high burden of LN spread.

  • 45. Delanaye, Pierre
    et al.
    Ebert, Natalie
    Melsom, Toralf
    Gaspari, Flavio
    Mariat, Christophe
    Cavalier, Etienne
    Björk, Jonas
    Christensson, Anders
    Nyman, Ulf
    Porrini, Esteban
    Remuzzi, Giuseppe
    Ruggenenti, Piero
    Schaeffner, Elke
    Soveri, Inga
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Renal Medicine.
    Sterner, Gunnar
    Eriksen, Bjørn Odvar
    Bäck, Sten-Erik
    Iohexol plasma clearance for measuring glomerular filtration rate in clinical practice and research: a review. Part 1 How to measure glomerular filtration rate with iohexol?2016In: Clinical Kidney Journal, ISSN 2048-8505, E-ISSN 2048-8513, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 682-699Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While there is general agreement on the necessity to measure glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in many clinical situations, there is less agreement on the best method to achieve this purpose. As the gold standard method for GFR determination, urinary (or renal) clearance of inulin, fades into the background due to inconvenience and high cost, a diversity of filtration markers and protocols compete to replace it. In this review, we suggest that iohexol, a non-ionic contrast agent, is most suited to replace inulin as the marker of choice for GFR determination. Iohexol comes very close to fulfilling all requirements for an ideal GFR marker in terms of low extra-renal excretion, low protein binding and in being neither secreted nor reabsorbed by the kidney. In addition, iohexol is virtually non-toxic and carries a low cost. As iohexol is stable in plasma, administration and sample analysis can be separated in both space and time, allowing access to GFR determination across different settings. An external proficiency programme operated by Equalis AB, Sweden, exists for iohexol, facilitating interlaboratory comparison of results. Plasma clearance measurement is the protocol of choice as it combines a reliable GFR determination with convenience for the patient. Single-sample protocols dominate, but multiple-sample protocols may be more accurate in specific situations. In low GFRs one or more late samples should be included to improve accuracy. In patients with large oedema or ascites, urinary clearance protocols should be employed. In conclusion, plasma clearance of iohexol may well be the best candidate for a common GFR determination method.

  • 46. Delanaye, Pierre
    et al.
    Melsom, Toralf
    Ebert, Natalie
    Bäck, Sten-Erik
    Mariat, Christophe
    Cavalier, Etienne
    Björk, Jonas
    Christensson, Anders
    Nyman, Ulf
    Porrini, Esteban
    Remuzzi, Giuseppe
    Ruggenenti, Piero
    Schaeffner, Elke
    Soveri, Inga
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Renal Medicine.
    Sterner, Gunnar
    Eriksen, Bjørn Odvar
    Gaspari, Flavio
    Iohexol plasma clearance for measuring glomerular filtration rate in clinical practice and research: a review. Part 2 Why to measure glomerular filtration rate with iohexol?2016In: Clinical Kidney Journal, ISSN 2048-8505, E-ISSN 2048-8513, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 700-704Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A reliable assessment of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is of paramount importance in clinical practice as well as epidemiological and clinical research settings. It is recommended by Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines in specific populations (anorectic, cirrhotic, obese, renal and non-renal transplant patients) where estimation equations are unreliable. Measured GFR is the only valuable test to confirm or confute the status of chronic kidney disease (CKD), to evaluate the slope of renal function decay over time, to assess the suitability of living kidney donors and for dosing of potentially toxic medication with a narrow therapeutic index. Abnormally elevated GFR or hyperfiltration in patients with diabetes or obesity can be correctly diagnosed only by measuring GFR. GFR measurement contributes to assessing the true CKD prevalence rate, avoiding discrepancies due to GFR estimation with different equations. Using measured GFR, successfully accomplished in large epidemiological studies, is the only way to study the potential link between decreased renal function and cardiovascular or total mortality, being sure that this association is not due to confounders, i.e. non-GFR determinants of biomarkers. In clinical research, it has been shown that measured GFR (or measured GFR slope) as a secondary endpoint as compared with estimated GFR detected subtle treatment effects and obtained these results with a comparatively smaller sample size than trials choosing estimated GFR. Measuring GFR by iohexol has several advantages: simplicity, low cost, stability and low interlaboratory variation. Iohexol plasma clearance represents the best chance for implementing a standardized GFR measurement protocol applicable worldwide both in clinical practice and in research.

  • 47. Dellagrammaticas, D
    et al.
    Bryden, A A
    Collins, G N
    Regression of metastatic transitional cell carcinoma in response to tamoxifen.2001In: Journal of Urology, ISSN 0022-5347, E-ISSN 1527-3792, Vol. 165, no 5, article id 1631Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Draaken, Markus
    et al.
    Institute of Human Genetics, University of Bonn, Germany.
    Baudisch, Friederike
    Timmermann, Bernd
    Kuhl, Heiner
    Kerick, Martin
    Proske, Judith
    Wittler, Lars
    Pennimpede, Tracie
    Ebert, Anne-Karoline
    Rösch, Wolfgang
    Stein, Raimund
    Bartels, Enrika
    von Lowtzow, Catharina
    Boemers, Thomas M
    Herms, Stefan
    Gearhart, John P
    Lakshmanan, Yegappan
    Kockum, Christina Clementsson
    Holmdahl, Gundela
    Läckgren, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Nordenskjöld, Agnetha
    Boyadjiev, Simeon A
    Herrmann, Bernhard G
    Nöthen, Markus M
    Ludwig, Michael
    Reutter, Heiko
    Institute of Human Genetics, University of Bonn, Germany.
    Classic bladder exstrophy: Frequent 22q11.21 duplications and definition of a 414 kb phenocritical region2014In: Birth defects research. Clinical and molecular teratology, ISSN 1542-0752, E-ISSN 1542-0760, Vol. 100, no 6, p. 512-517Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Classic bladder exstrophy (CBE) is the most common form of the bladder exstrophy and epispadias complex. Previously, we and others have identified four patients with a duplication of 22q11.21 among a total of 96 unrelated CBE patients.

    METHODS: Here, we investigated whether this chromosomal aberration was commonly associated with CBE/bladder exstrophy and epispadias complex in an extended case-control sample. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and microarray-based analysis were used to identify 22q11.21 duplications in 244 unrelated bladder exstrophy and epispadias complex patients (including 217 CBE patients) and 665 healthy controls.

    RESULTS: New duplications of variable size were identified in four CBE patients and one control. Pooling of our previous and present data (eight duplications in 313 CBE patients) yielded a combined odds ratio of 31.86 (95% confidence interval, 4.24-1407.97). Array-based sequence capture and high-throughput targeted re-sequencing established that all breakpoints resided within the low-copy repeats 22A to 22D. Comparison of the eight duplications revealed a 414 kb phenocritical region harboring 12 validated RefSeq genes. Characterization of these 12 candidate genes through whole-mount in situ hybridization of mouse embryos at embryonic day 9.5 suggested that CRKL, THAP7, and LZTR1 are CBE candidate genes.

    CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that duplication of 22q11.21 increases CBE risk and implicate a phenocritical region in disease formation.

  • 49. Drechsler, Christiane
    et al.
    Philstrom, Hege
    Meinitzer, Andreas
    Pilz, Stefan
    Tomaschitz, Andreas
    Abedini, Sadollah
    Fellström, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Renal Medicine.
    Jardine, Alan
    Wanner, Christoph
    Maerz, Winfried
    Holdaas, Hallvard
    Homoarginine and Clinical Outcomes in Renal Transplant Recipients: Results from the Alert Study2014In: Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation, ISSN 0931-0509, E-ISSN 1460-2385, Vol. 29, p. 539-539Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 50. Drechsler, Christiane
    et al.
    Pihlström, Hege
    Meinitzer, Andreas
    Pilz, Stefan
    Tomaschitz, Andreas
    Abedini, Sadollah
    Fellström, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Renal Medicine.
    Jardine, Alan G
    Wanner, Christoph
    März, Winifred
    Holdaas, Hallvard
    Homoarginine and Clinical Outcomes in Renal Transplant Recipients: Results From the Assessment of Lescol in Renal Transplantation Study2015In: Transplantation, ISSN 0041-1337, E-ISSN 1534-6080, Vol. 99, no 7, p. 1470-1476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Despite improvements in kidney transplantation, complications, including cardiovascular morbidity and graft loss, contribute to reduced graft and patient survival. The amino acid homoarginine exerts a variety of beneficial effects that may be relevant for cardiovascular and graft outcomes, which is investigated in the present study.

    Methods: Homoarginine was measured in 829 renal transplant recipients participating in the placebo group of the Assessment of Lescol in Renal Transplantation study. Mean follow-up was 6.7 years. By Cox regression analyses, we determined hazard ratios (HRs) to reach prespecified, adjudicated endpoints according to baseline homoarginine levels: major adverse cardiovascular events (n = 103), cerebrovascular events (n = 53), graft failure or doubling of serum creatinine (n = 140), noncardiovascular mortality (n = 51), and all-cause mortality (n = 107).

    Results: Patients mean age was 50 ± 11 years, homoarginine concentration was 1.96 ± 0.76 µmol/L, and 65% were men. Patients in the lowest homoarginine quartile (<1.40 µmol/L) had an adjusted 2.6-fold higher risk of cerebrovascular events compared to those in the highest quartile (>2.34 µmol/L) (HR, 2.56; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.13–5.82). Similarly, the renal endpoint occurred at a significantly increased rate in the lowest homoarginine quartile (HR, 2.34; 95% CI, 1.36–4.02). For noncardiovascular and all-cause mortality, there was also increased risk associated with the lowest levels of homoarginine, with HRs of 4.34 (95% CI, 1.63–10.69) and 2.50 (95% CI, 1.38–4.55), respectively.

    Conclusions: Low homoarginine is strongly associated with cerebrovascular events, graft loss and progression of kidney failure and mortality in renal transplant recipients. Whether interventions with homoarginine supplementation improve clinical outcomes requires further evaluation.

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