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  • 1.
    Adolfsson, Päivi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Lindstedt, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    Univ Örebro, Sch Hlth & Med Sci, Örebro, Sweden.
    Norling Hermansson, Liselotte
    Univ Örebro, Sch Hlth & Med Sci, Örebro, Sweden.; Örebro Cty Council, Dept Prosthet & Orthot, Örebro, Sweden.
    Janeslätt, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. Jönköping Univ, Sch Hlth Sci, CHILD, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Perception of the influence of environmental factors in the use of electronic planning devices in adults with cognitive disabilities2016In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 493-500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Adults with cognitive disabilities often have difficulties in dealing with the complexity of everyday life. With cognitive assistive technology (e.g. electronic planning devices [EPDs] and individual support), they can bring order to their often chaotic life. Assumptions are that environmental factors influence with non-use of EPDs.

    OBJECTIVE: To explore how adults with cognitive disabilities perceive the influence of environmental factors in the use of EPDs.

    METHODS: A reference group with experience of use of EPDs assisted the researchers. Twelve adults with cognitive disabilities and experience of using EPDs participated. An interview guide was implemented covering environmental factors according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Qualitative content analysis was applied in the analyses.

    RESULTS: Five categories and two themes emerged, which were integrated into a model of facilitating factors influencing the use of EPDs. Measures to prevent or eliminate negative influences of the device use are important to be taken. CONCLUSIONS: Professionals need more knowledge about EPDs, while users need individual adaption of the EPDs. EPDs need to be user-friendly, manageable and work in any seasons. Implications for Rehabilitation The users should have access to specially trained prescribers. There is a need for development of user-friendly and manageable products to function in any climate. Knowledge is lacking on how to implement the users in all stages of the prescribing process. Prescribers should increase knowledge in the use of EPDs to influence the attitudes of the social environment.

  • 2.
    Bergsten, Eva L.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Univ Gavle, Ctr Musculoskeletal Res, Dept Occupat & Publ Hlth Sci, S-80176 Gavle, Sweden.
    Mathiassen, S. E.
    Univ Gavle, Ctr Musculoskeletal Res, Dept Occupat & Publ Hlth Sci, S-80176 Gavle, Sweden..
    Vingård, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Psychosocial Work Factors and Musculoskeletal Pain: A Cross-Sectional Study among Swedish Flight Baggage Handlers2015In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, article id 798042Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Flight baggage handlers sort and load luggage to airplanes. This study aimed at investigating associations between psychosocial exposures and low back and shoulder musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among Swedish flight baggage handlers. Methods. A questionnaire addressing MSDs (Standardized Nordic Questionnaire) and psychosocial factors (Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire, COPSOQ) was answered by 525 baggage handlers in six Swedish airports. Results. Low back (LBP) and shoulder pain (SP) were reported by 70% and 60%, respectively. Pain was reported to interfere with work (PIW) by 30% (low back) and 18% (shoulders), and intense pain (PINT) occurred in 34% and 28% of the population. Quality of leadership was the most dissatisfying psychosocial factor, while the most positive was social community at work. Low ratings in the combined domain Work organization and job content were significantly associated with PIW in both low back and shoulders (Adjusted Hazard Ratios 3.65 (95% CI 1.67-7.99) and 2.68 (1.09-6.61)) while lower ratings in the domain Interpersonal relations and leadership were associated with PIWLBP (HR 2.18 (1.06-4.49)) and PINT LBP and SP (HRs 1.95 (1.05-3.65) and 2.11 (1.08-4.12)). Conclusion. Severity of pain among flight baggage handlers was associated with psychosocial factors at work, suggesting that they may be a relevant target for intervention in this occupation.

  • 3. Bertilsson, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Ranner, Maria
    von Koch, Lena
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Johansson, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Ytterberg, Charlotte
    Guidetti, Susanne
    Tham, Kerstin
    A client-centred ADL intervention: three-month follow-up of a randomized controlled trial2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 377-391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim was to study a client-centred activities of daily living (ADL) intervention (CADL) compared with the usual ADL intervention (UADL) in people with stroke regarding: independence in ADL, perceived participation, life satisfaction, use of home-help service, and satisfaction with training and, in their significant others, regarding: caregiver burden, life satisfaction, and informal care. Methods: In this multicentre study, 16 rehabilitation units were randomly assigned to deliver CADL or UADL. The occupational therapists who provided the CADL were specifically trained. Eligible for inclusion were people with stroke treated in a stroke unit 3 months after stroke, dependent in two ADL, not diagnosed with dementia, and able to understand instructions. Data were collected at inclusion and three months thereafter. To detect a significant difference between the groups in the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) domain "participation", 280 participants were required. Intention-to-treat analysis was applied. Results: At three months, there was no difference in the outcomes between the CADL group (n = 129) and the UADL group (n = 151), or their significant others (n = 87/n = 93) except in the SIS domain "emotion" in favour of CADL (p = 0.04). Conclusion: The CADL does not appear to bring about short-term differences in outcomes and longer follow-ups are required.

  • 4. Bertilsson, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Ranner, Maria
    von Koch, Lena
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Johansson, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Ytterberg, Charlotte
    Guidetti, Susanne
    Tham, Kerstin
    A client-centred ADL intervention: three-month follow-up of a randomized controlled trial2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 377-391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim was to study a client-centred activities of daily living (ADL) intervention (CADL) compared with the usual ADL intervention (UADL) in people with stroke regarding: independence in ADL, perceived participation, life satisfaction, use of home-help service, and satisfaction with training and, in their significant others, regarding: caregiver burden, life satisfaction, and informal care. Methods: In this multicentre study, 16 rehabilitation units were randomly assigned to deliver CADL or UADL. The occupational therapists who provided the CADL were specifically trained. Eligible for inclusion were people with stroke treated in a stroke unit 3 months after stroke, dependent in two ADL, not diagnosed with dementia, and able to understand instructions. Data were collected at inclusion and three months thereafter. To detect a significant difference between the groups in the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) domain "participation", 280 participants were required. Intention-to-treat analysis was applied. Results: At three months, there was no difference in the outcomes between the CADL group (n = 129) and the UADL group (n = 151), or their significant others (n = 87/n = 93) except in the SIS domain "emotion" in favour of CADL (p = 0.04). Conclusion: The CADL does not appear to bring about short-term differences in outcomes and longer follow-ups are required.

  • 5. Bertilsson, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Ranner, Maria
    von Koch, Lena
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Johansson, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Ytterberg, Charlotte
    Guidetti, Susanne
    Tham, Kerstin
    A client-centred ADL intervention: three-month follow-up of a randomized controlled trial2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 377-391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim was to study a client-centred activities of daily living (ADL) intervention (CADL) compared with the usual ADL intervention (UADL) in people with stroke regarding: independence in ADL, perceived participation, life satisfaction, use of home-help service, and satisfaction with training and, in their significant others, regarding: caregiver burden, life satisfaction, and informal care. Methods: In this multicentre study, 16 rehabilitation units were randomly assigned to deliver CADL or UADL. The occupational therapists who provided the CADL were specifically trained. Eligible for inclusion were people with stroke treated in a stroke unit 3 months after stroke, dependent in two ADL, not diagnosed with dementia, and able to understand instructions. Data were collected at inclusion and three months thereafter. To detect a significant difference between the groups in the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) domain "participation", 280 participants were required. Intention-to-treat analysis was applied. Results: At three months, there was no difference in the outcomes between the CADL group (n = 129) and the UADL group (n = 151), or their significant others (n = 87/n = 93) except in the SIS domain "emotion" in favour of CADL (p = 0.04). Conclusion: The CADL does not appear to bring about short-term differences in outcomes and longer follow-ups are required.

  • 6.
    Bertilsson, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Div Occupat Therapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, S-14183 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Von Koch, Lena
    Karolinska Inst, Div Occupat Therapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, S-14183 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Neurol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Tham, Kerstin
    Karolinska Inst, Div Occupat Therapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, S-14183 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Occupat Therapy, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Johansson, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg. Karolinska Inst, Div Occupat Therapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, S-14183 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Client-centred ADL intervention after stroke: Significant others' experiences2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 377-386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Client-centredness is a prominent contemporary concept in rehabilitation. However, there is a lack of knowledge on if and how a client-centred rehabilitation approach is incorporated in the everyday life of significant others of people who receive such rehabilitation. Objective: Explore and describe if and how a client-centred ADL intervention (CADL) was integrated in the everyday lives of significant others of people with stroke. Materials and methods: Qualitative longitudinal design, with a grounded theory approach. Seven significant others, who cohabited with persons receiving a CADL intervention, were interviewed during the first year. Findings: One core category was identified: "Taking responsibility and achieving balance with respect to self-esteem in order to get on with everyday life". The integration of the CADL was a process. A key aspect was that as the person with stroke acted upon his/her own desired activity goals the significant others were encouraged to act on their own needs. Conclusions: Enablement is important also for the significant others of people with stroke. One way of enabling significant others to maintain an active lifestyle and find respite in everyday life might be to enable people with stroke to formulate and act upon their desired activity goals.

  • 7.
    Borgestig, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. Linkoping Univ, Dept Social & Welf Studies, Linkoping, Sweden;Uppsala Univ, Folke Bernadotte Reg Habilitat Ctr, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Social & Welf Studies, Linkoping, Sweden.
    The Benefits of Gaze-Based Assistive Technology in Daily Activities for Children with Disabilities2017In: Harnessing The Power Of Technology To Improve Lives / [ed] Cudd, P DeWitte, L, IOS Press, 2017, p. 1082-1088Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports research findings on how gaze-based assistive technology contributed to performance of daily activities for a group of children with severe physical impairments and without speech.

  • 8.
    Centurion Arce, Linda
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Andersson, Catarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Med tassar mot ett mål: kan vårdhund öka välbefinnande, motivation och aktivitet vid rehabilitering?2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The use of Animal Assisted Intervention (AAI) within Swedish health care has increased and as the number of studies done in the field of rehabilitation is few, this was considered a relevant field to explore.

    Aim: To investigate whether AAI could increase wellbeing, motivation and activity of patients in comparison with conventional rehabilitation.

    Method: Single case design. Two participants were studied at seven training sessions for four weeks with video recording, VAS and interview.

    Result: Self-assessment on VAS showed no differences between the various trainings, while observations showed that the participants smiled longer, had more physical contact, more fine motor skill exercises and half the time of gross motor exercises at AAI sessions. Participants described both trainings as valuable, rewarding and fun. AAI sessions were also described as easy-going and a moment of distraction from the bad things that had happened.

    Conclusions: According to VAS both trainings were equally appreciated, while the observations and interview showed that AAI provided increased wellbeing. Wellbeing is an important factor for motivation and activity. Thus more studies in the area are of interest since the use of AAI appears to be an important asset in rehabilitation.

  • 9.
    Cruice, Madeline
    et al.
    Division of Language and Communication Science, School of Health Sciences, City University London, London, United Kingdom.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi.
    Isaksen, Jytte
    Department of Language and Communication, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Horton, Simon
    School of Health Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom.
    Reporting Interventions in Communication Partner Training: A Critical Review and Narrative Synthesis of the Literature2018In: Aphasiology, ISSN 0268-7038, E-ISSN 1464-5041, Vol. 32, no 10, p. 1135-1166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Communication partner training (CPT) is an umbrella term for a complex behavioural intervention for communications partners (CPs) of people with aphasia (PWA) and possibly PWA themselves, with many interacting components, deployed in flexible ways. Recent systematic reviews (Simmons-Mackie, Raymer, Armstrong, Holland, & Cherney, 2010; Simmons-Mackie, Raymer, & Cherney, 2016) have highlighted the effectiveness of CPT in addressing the skills of conversation partners and the communicative participation of people with aphasia but have suggested that CPT has been variably delivered, with no clear picture of what the essential elements of CPT are and how CPT is expected to achieve its results through hypothesised mechanisms of change (Coster, 2013).

    Aim: This paper aims broadly to consider specification of CPT and describes how CPT has been conducted overall and in relation to treatment recipients. Recommendations for CPT and areas for future research are considered.

    Methods & Procedures: A critical review and narrative synthesis was carried out through: (i) the systematic application of the 12-item TIDieR checklist (Hoffmann et al., 2014) to the 56 studies appraised in the Simmons-Mackie et al. (2010, 2016)) reviews, providing a quantitative overview of the completeness of CPT intervention reporting; and (ii) a qualitative synthesis of the reviewed CPT literature according to TIDieR items.

    Outcomes & Results: Half of the TIDieR checklist items were reported by 71% or more of the studies, and the rest of the items were reported by 0–63% of studies. TIDieR items relating to the treatment (goal, rationale or theory of essential elements, materials and procedures) and provision (provider, mode, timing, dose) were more frequently reported; however, the level of detail provided was often inadequate or incomplete. The interventions were insufficiently specified to enable replication for most of the studies considered. The most infrequently reported items were: name, location, intervention tailoring and modification, and planned and actual intervention adherence/fidelity.

    Conclusion: For a better understanding of an intervention, it is necessary to identify and describe potentially central elements and perhaps especially in complex interventions as CPT, where it is likely also more difficult. Whilst the reviewed CPT studies are on average reporting on slightly more than half of the TIDieR items, they are overall insufficiently detailed. Some items appear easier to report on, whereas other items have not been attended to, are too complex in nature to give a full report on, or simply have not been relevant for the individual study to include.

  • 10.
    Garrels, Veerle
    et al.
    Univ Oslo, Fac Educ Sci, Dept Special Needs Educ, Oslo, Norway.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg. Jonkoping Univ, Swedish Inst Disabil Res, CHILD, Jonkoping, Sweden;.
    Promoting self-determination for students with intellectual disability: A Vygotskian perspective2019In: Learning, Culture and Social Interaction, ISSN 2210-6561, E-ISSN 2210-657X, Vol. 22, article id 100241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite weak correlations between IQ scores and self-determination, research indicates that individuals with intellectual disability (ID) show lower levels of self-determination than their non-disabled peers, and that they experience lower effects of self-determination interventions. From a Vygotskian perspective, self-determination skills can be considered complex cognitive abilities that develop through social interaction with and adequate scaffolding by competent tutors. This approach raises the need to look into how self-determination interventions can be adapted to the cognitive profiles of individuals with ID. In this article, the Self-Determined Learning Model of Instruction was used with eight adolescents with mild ID over a three-month period. Typical challenges that were encountered are described, and suggestions for how these challenges can be addressed are discussed. Findings from this study illustrate how the development of self-determination skills may be facilitated when there is congruence between the individual's neurobiological development and the social conditions for development.

  • 11.
    Gustavsson, Martha
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Guidetti, Susanne
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, Huddinge, Sweden.
    von Koch, Lena
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, Huddinge, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Theme Neuro, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ytterberg, Charlotte
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Physiotherapy, Huddinge, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Funct Area Occupat Therapy & Physiotherapy, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Factors affecting outcome in participation one year after stroke: a secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial2019In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 51, no 3, p. 160-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective:

    To explore the importance of client characteristics (age, sex, stroke severity and participation before stroke), rehabilitation context (in-patient or client's home) and approach (enhanced client-centeredness or not) on participation in everyday life after stroke.

    Methods:

    A secondary analysis of data on 237 participants from a previous randomized controlled trial evaluating an enhanced client-centred intervention after stroke. Plausible associations between client characteristics, context and rehabilitation approach, and a positive outcome regarding participation were explored. Three different outcome measures for participation were used: Stroke Impact Scale 3.0, domain participation; Frenchay Activities Index; and Occupational Gaps Questionnaire.

    Results:

    For all participants there was a significant association between mild stroke and a positive outcome using the Frenchay Activities Index. Among participants who had not received the enhanced client-centred approach, there was a significant association between mild stroke and a positive outcome using the Stroke Impact Scale. The context of rehabilitation, i.e. receiving home rehabilitation, was also associated with a positive outcome in the Frenchay Activities Index for the control group.

    Conclusion:

    In order to increase participation in everyday life for people after stroke it appears to be important to use an enhanced client-centred approach, particularly when working within in-patient rehabilitation and with people with moderate or severe stroke.

  • 12.
    Hedman, Annicka
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc NVS, Div Occupat Therapy, Box 23 200, SE-14183 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc NVS, Div Occupat Therapy, Box 23 200, SE-14183 Huddinge, Sweden.
    von Koch, Lena
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc NVS, Div Occupat Therapy, Box 23 200, SE-14183 Huddinge, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Neuro, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Guidetti, Susanne
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc NVS, Div Occupat Therapy, Box 23 200, SE-14183 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Five-year follow-up of a cluster-randomized controlled trial of a client-centred activities of daily living intervention for people with stroke2019In: Clinical Rehabilitation, ISSN 0269-2155, E-ISSN 1477-0873, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 262-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To compare five-year outcomes and changes over time of a client-centred activities of daily living (ADL) intervention versus usual ADL interventions for people with stroke and their significant others.

    Design: Five-year follow-up of a cluster-randomized controlled trial where a client-centred ADL intervention (n = 129) or usual ADL interventions (n = 151) were delivered to people with stroke.

    Setting: Multicentre study including 16 inpatient or home-based rehabilitation units.

    Participants: People with stroke and significant others.

    Intervention: The client-centred ADL intervention aimed at enabling agency in daily activities and participation in everyday life and at reducing caregiver burden.

    Main measures: For people with stroke, perceived participation (Stroke Impact Scale), independence in ADL, life satisfaction, and use of formal/informal care were measured. For significant others, caregiver burden, life satisfaction, and mood (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) were assessed.

    Results: Five years post-intervention, data were collected from 145 people with stroke (intervention group: n = 71/control group: n = 74) and 75 significant others (intervention group: n = 36/control group: n = 39). For those with stroke, the Participation domain of the Stroke Impact Scale showed no group differences at year five (68.9 vs 75.4, P = 0.062) or in changes over time. At year five, the control group had better outcomes regarding Other help/supervision. Significant others in the control group were more likely to show signs of depression at year five (odds ratio = 22.3; P < 0.001).

    Conclusion: The client-centred ADL intervention appears to render similar long-term effects as usual ADL interventions for people with stroke, but for significant others signs of depression might be reduced.

  • 13. Hellman, Therese
    et al.
    Jonsson, Hans
    Johansson, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Tham, Kerstin
    Connecting rehabilitation and everyday life - the lived experiences among women with stress-related ill health2013In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 35, no 21, p. 1790-1797Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim was to describe and understand how connecting rehabilitation experiences and everyday life was characterised in the lived experiences during the rehabilitation in women with stress-related ill health. Method: Five women were interviewed on three occasions during a rehabilitation programme and once 3 months later. Data were analysed using the Empirical, Phenomenological and Psychological method. Results: The participants experienced connections between their rehabilitation and their previous, present and future everyday life influencing both rehabilitation and everyday life in a back-and-forth process. These connections were experienced in mind or in doing, mostly targeting the private arena in everyday life. Connecting rehabilitation experiences to their working situations was more challenging and feelings of frustration and being left alone were experienced. Conclusions: Although the participants described constructive connections between rehabilitation experiences and the private arena in everyday life, they mostly failed to experience connections that facilitated a positive return to work. Recommended support in the return to work process in rehabilitation comprises the provision of practical work-related activities during rehabilitation; being supportive in a constructive dialogue between the participant and the workplace, and continuing this support in follow-ups after the actual rehabilitation period. Implications for Rehabilitation Rehabilitation for persons with stress-related ill health needs to focus on the private arena as well as the work situation in everyday life. Creative activities may enable experiences that inspire connections in mind and connections targeting the private arena in everyday life. The work situation needs to be thoroughly discussed during rehabilitation for enabling the participants to experience a support in the return to work process. Rehabilitation including practical work-related activities, support in a constructive dialogue between the participant and the manager at the workplace, and continued support in follow-ups targeting the workplace might be beneficial for successfully return to work.

  • 14.
    Holmefur, Marie
    et al.
    Orebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Sch Hlth Sci, Orebro, Sweden.
    Lidstrom-Holmqvist, Kajsa
    Orebro Univ, Univ Hlth Care Res Ctr, Fac Med & Hlth, Orebro, Sweden.
    Roshanai, Afsaneh
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social Medicine.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    Jonkoping Univ, Swedish Inst Disabil Res, Jonkoping, Sweden;Uppsala Univ, Ctr Res & Dev, Gavle, Region Gavlebor, Sweden.
    White, Suzanne
    Suny Downstate Med Ctr, Brooklyn, NY 11203 USA.
    Janeslätt, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna.
    Pilot Study of Let's Get Organized: A Group Intervention for Improving Time Management2019In: American Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0272-9490, E-ISSN 1943-7676, Vol. 73, no 5, article id 7305205020Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Importance: There is a need for evidence-based occupational therapy interventions to enhance time management in people with time management difficulties. Objective: To pilot test the first part of the Let's Get Organized (LGO) occupational therapy intervention in a Swedish context by exploring enhancements of time management skills, aspects of executive functioning, and satisfaction with daily occupations in people with time management difficulties because of neurodevelopmental or mental disorders. Design: One-group pretest-posttest design with 3-mo follow-up. Setting: Outpatient psychiatric and habilitation settings. Participants: Fifty-five people with confirmed or suspected mental or neurodevelopmental disorder and self-reported difficulties with time management in daily life. Intervention: Swedish version of Let's Get Organized (LGO-S) Part 1, with structured training in the use of cognitive assistive techniques and strategies using trial-and-error learning strategies in 10 weekly group sessions of 1.5 hr. Outcomes and Measures: Time management, organization and planning, and emotional regulation were measured with the Swedish version of the Assessment of Time Management Skills (ATMS-S). Executive functioning was measured with the Swedish version of the Weekly Calendar Planning Activity, and satisfaction with daily occupations was assessed with the Satisfaction With Daily Occupations measure. Results: Participants displayed significantly improved time management, organization and planning skills, and emotional regulation, as well as satisfaction with daily occupations. Aspects of executive functioning were partly improved. ATMS-S results were sustained at 3-mo follow-up. Conclusion and Relevance: LGO-S Part 1 is a promising intervention for improving time management skills and satisfaction with daily occupations and should be investigated further. What This Article Adds: This study shows that LGO-S Part 1 is feasible for use in psychiatric and habilitation outpatient services. The results are promising for improved time management skills, organization and planning skills, and satisfaction with daily occupations and need to be confirmed in further studies.

  • 15.
    Holmlund, Lisa
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, Huddinge, Sweden;Rehab Stn Stockholm, Spinalis SCI Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Guidetti, Susanne
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Asaba, Eric
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, Huddinge, Sweden;Stockholms Sjukhem Fdn, Res Educ & Dev Unit, Stockholm, Sweden;Tokyo Metropolitan Univ, Grad Sch Human Hlth Sci, Dept Occupat Therapy, Tokyo, Japan.
    Return to work in the context of everyday life 7-11 years after spinal cord injury - a follow-up study2018In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 40, no 24, p. 2875-2883Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this follow-up study was to explore experiences of return to work in the context of everyday life among adults 7-11 years after spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods: This study used in-depth interviews and observations in a qualitative design with eight persons who had previously been interviewed in 2008. A narrative approach was used during data gathering and analysis. Results: Return to work was experienced as something constantly needing to be negotiated in the context of everyday life. Several years after SCI expectations for work and perceptions of possibilities for meaningful work had changed. Five main themes were identified through the analysis, (1) negotiating the possibilities of working, (2) hope for future work tempered with concern, (3) education as a possible path to employment, (4) paths toward return to work in light of unmet support, and (5) unpaid occupations grounded in interest and competence. Conclusions: Persons who have no higher education or lack viable employment to return to after SCI seem to be vulnerable in return to work. Early and timely interventions tailored to the person's interests and competencies, in which the rehabilitation team has a distinct coordinating role, are thus critical in return to work.

  • 16.
    Janeslätt, Gunnel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Lindstedt, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Adolfsson, Päivi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Daily time management and influences of environmental factors on use of electronic planning devices in adults with mental disability2015In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 10, no 5, p. 371-377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose:  To describe daily time management in adults with and without mental disability and to examine differences in the level of their daily time management; to describe the possessions and use of electronic planning devices (EPDs) in activities and how environmental factors influence the use of EPDs in adults with mental disability. Methods: In a descriptive and cross-sectional design 32 participants using EPDs and a matched comparison group of 32 healthy adults was recruited. Time-Self rating scale measuring daily time management was adapted for adults. A study specific questionnaire was applied to collect data on five ICF environmental factors. Rasch modelling, descriptive and non-parametric statistics were applied. Results: Time-S has acceptable psychometric properties for use on adults with mental disability. People with mental disability and low level of daily time management who use advanced EPDs are more influenced by environmental factors. The study group perceived that encouragement and support from professionals as well as services influence their use of EPDs. Conclusions: Time-S can safely be used for people with mental disability. EPDs do not fully compensate the needs of the target-group. Prescribers need to give considerations to this and therefore they should be provided with more knowledge about this matter.

  • 17.
    Janeslätt, Gunnel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna.
    Wallin Ahlström, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. Mälardalens Högskola.
    Granlund, Mats
    CHILD, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Intervention in time‐processing ability, daily time management and autonomy in children with intellectual disabilities aged 10–17 years: A cluster randomised trial2019In: Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, ISSN 0045-0766, E-ISSN 1440-1630, Vol. 66, no 1, p. 110-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/aim: Difficulties with management of time are frequently observed in children and youth with intellectual disabilities (IDs). The aim of this study was to evaluate a new intervention programme 'My Time' to improve time-processing ability (TPA) in children with IDs aged 10-17 years (n = 61).

    Methods: Cluster randomised and waiting-list control group design was used. Data collection included the Kit for assessment of TPA, the Time-Parent scale and a self-rating of autonomy to assess occupational performance in daily life. The method was implemented over an 8-week period. Effect size (ES) was calculated and an analysis of covariance on the individual level and a two-stage process on the cluster level.

    Results: The estimated mean improvement in the KaTid-Child score from baseline (t1) to t2 was significantly higher in the intervention group compared to the waiting-list group, ES Cohen's d = 0.64.

    Conclusion: The results present first evidence of the effectiveness of a new occupational therapy intervention programme ('My Time') to facilitate TPA in children with mild to moderate IDs. Children with IDs aged 10-17 years could improve their TPA at a measurable pace when given intervention. The method could complement interventions using time-assistive devices. Children with IDs should be identified to guide intervention. Further research is necessary to establish whether using the intervention programme can facilitate the development of TPA in younger children.

  • 18.
    Kamwesiga, Julius T.
    et al.
    Uganda Allied Hlth Examinat Board, Kampala, Uganda;Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat therapy, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat therapy, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tham, Kerstin
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat therapy, Stockholm, Sweden;Malmo Univ, Malmo, Sweden.
    Fors, Uno
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Comp & Syst Sci DSV, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ndiwalana, Ali
    Knowledge Consulting Ltd, Kampala, Uganda.
    von Koch, Lena
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Neurol, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat therapy, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Guidetti, Susanne
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat therapy, Stockholm, Sweden.
    A feasibility study of a mobile phone supported family-centred ADL intervention, F@ce (TM), after stroke in Uganda2018In: Globalization and Health, ISSN 1744-8603, E-ISSN 1744-8603, Vol. 14, article id 82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is a lack of evidence-based health services to reduce the impact of stroke in low-income countries at a personal, family or community level. The aim was to evaluate the feasibility of: i) a mobile phone supported family-centred intervention (F@ce (TM)), and ii) the study design for evaluating the effects of the intervention on the perceived impact of stroke; perceived participation in everyday life; and self-efficacy in everyday activities amongst persons with stroke and their families in Uganda. Methods: The study comprised a pre-post design with an intervention group (IG) receiving the F@ce (TM) and a control group (CG). The inclusion criteria's were: a) confirmed stroke diagnosis, b) access to and ability to use a mobile phone, c) ability to communicate in English and/or Luganda, d) > 18 years, e) residents in Kampala, and f) a Modified Rankin Scale level 2 to 4. The aimof the F@ce (TM) was to increase functioning in daily activities for persons living with the consequences of stroke, and participation in everyday life for persons with stroke and their families. The F@ce (TM) was an eight-week family-centred intervention, which entailed goal setting and problem-solving strategies, daily reminders and self-rated follow-ups of performance by short message service (SMS). Data were collected in the participants' home environment at baseline and after eight weeks. Data on acceptability of the F@ce (TM) and study procedures were collected by log-books and the responses of the SMS follow ups on the server. The primary outcomes were performance and satisfaction of valued daily activities in everyday life using the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM), self-efficacy in performance of activities in daily life. Results: The IG comprised n = 13 and the CG n = 15. There were differences between the IG and CG in changes between baseline and follow-up in the primary outcomes COPM (performance component) and self-efficacy in favour of F@ce (TM). Overall with minor modifications the intervention and the study design were feasible for all participants involved. Conclusion: The results support the need for further research to rigorously evaluate the effects of F@ceT (TM) since the intervention appears to be feasible for persons with stroke and their family members.

  • 19.
    Lidström, Helene
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Benefits of the use of ICT in school activities by students with motor, speech, visual, and hearing impairment: A literature review2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 251-266Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Information and communication technology (ICT) has the potential to enhance participation in educational activities for students with physical disabilities. Even though incorporating ICTs into teaching and learning in education has become an important issue, it is unclear what evidence research has provided. The aim of this study was to investigate types of ICT items and how ICT is being used by students with physical disabilities, and describe the benefits of ICT use in school activities. Methods: A systematic literature search, covering the period 2000-May 2012, was performed in the databases AMED, CINAHL, Eric, OTseeker, Psych Info, PubMed, and Scopus. Data analysis entailed extracting, editing, grouping, and abstracting findings. Results: A total of 32 articles were included, 16 of which were intervention studies. More than half of the studies concerned students with motor impairments. Type of ICT used differed among impairment groups, and ICT seemed to be especially beneficial for writing, spelling, and communication. Conclusions: Even though the review found heterogeneity across the studies students seemed to benefit from ICT use regardless of the type. For future research it is important to highlight intervention studies, especially for students with visual, hearing, and communication impairments.

  • 20.
    Lindstedt, Helena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Adolfsson, Päivi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Centre for Disability Research.
    Janeslätt, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Center for Clinical Research Dalarna.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    Örebro universitet.
    Norling Hermansson, Liselotte
    Örebro läns landsting.
    Omgivningens hjälp eller stjälp?: Dokumentation av personers med psykisk funktionsnedsättning erfarenheter av användning av elektroniska planeringshjälpmedel2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vuxna personer med psykisk funktionsnedsättning har ofta problem med sin kognitiva förmåga, vilket leder till problem med att hantera vardagslivets komplexitet. Med behovsanpassade kognitiva hjälpmedel och individuellt stöd från kunnig personal finns möjlighet för personen att få ordning på sitt ofta kaotiska vardagsliv. Dock finns studier och klinisk erfarenhet som påtalar att hjälpmedel inte används i den utsträckning som förväntats. Antaganden finns om att komplexa faktorer i omgivningen interagerar med hjälpmedelsanvändning.

    Syftet med studien var att dokumentera erfarenheter av underlättande och hindrande omgivningsfaktorer som personer med psykisk funktionsnedsättning har av användningen av elektroniska planeringshjälpmedel. Metod: tolv personer med psykisk funktionsnedsättning och med erfarenhet av elektroniska planeringshjälpmedel rekryterades efter informerat samtycke via förskrivare och besök vid dagliga verksamheter. En studiespecifik frågeguide med öppna frågor med ett innehåll som täcker omgivningsfaktorer enligt Klassifikation av funktionstillstånd, funktionshinder och hälsa (ICF) användes i de inspelade intervjuerna. Materialet bearbetades med kvalitativ, induktiv innehållsanalys. Resultatet utmynnade i sex kategorier och två teman formade till en modell med underlättande eller hindrande faktorer som inverkar på användning av elektroniska planeringshjälpmedel enligt deltagarna. Kategorierna benämndes: Insikt om funktionsnedsättning/behov; Medveten social omgivning; Egen kontroll och hanterbarhet av hjälpmedel; Nytta av och brister i hjälpmedlets funktion; stöd av Kunnig personal; och Tydligt och lättbegripligt myndighetsutövande. Teman benämndes: Tydlig önskan om delaktighet och Nödvändig individuell anpassnnig. Åtgärder för att förebygga eller förhindra omgivningens negativa inverkan på hjälpmedelsanvändning är angelägen.

  • 21.
    Lindstedt, Helena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Adolfsson, Päivi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Janeslätt, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    Örebro universitet.
    Norling Hermansson, Liselotte
    Örebro Läns landsting.
    Omgivningens hjälp eller stjälp?: Dokumentation av personers med psykisk funktionsnedsättning erfarenheter av användning av elektroniska planeringshjälpmedel2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Adults with mental disabilities often have problems with their cognitive ability, leading to problems in dealing with everydaylife's hindrancecomplexity. With the needs-based cognitive assistive technology and individual support from knowledgeable staff it is possible for the person to bring order to their often chaotic daily life. However, there are studies and clinical experience which indicate that assistive technology is not used to the extent expected. Assumptions are that complex environmental factors interact with use of the assistive technology.

    The purpose of this study was to document the experiences of facilitating or hindrance environmental factors that people with mental disabilities have of using electronic planning devices.

    Method: Using prescribers and at visits to community activity centres twelve adult persons with mental disabilities and own experience of useing electronic planning devices were, after informed consent, recruited. A study-specific interview guide with open questions, with a content that covers environmental factors according to International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) was used in the recorded interviews. The material was analysed by using qualitative inductive content analysis.

    Result: From the interviews six categories and two themes emerged, wich were molded to a model of facilitating or impeding factors affecting the use of electronic planning devices. The categories were named: Insight of disability/needs; Cognisant social environment; Self control and manageability of the device; Benefits and shortcomings of using the device; Assistance of skilled personnel and Clear and simple exercise of authority. The themes are named: A clear desire for participation and Necessity of individual adaption of the device. Measures to prevent or eliminate ambient negative impact of the device use is keen.

  • 22.
    Lindstedt, Helena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Grann, Martin
    Söderlund, Anne
    Mentally disordered offenders’ daily occupations after one year of forensic care2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 302-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Persons detained as mentally disordered offenders need support for transition from care to community life. Few systematic studies have been completed on the outcomes of standard forensic care. The aim was to investigate the target group's life conditions and daily occupations one year after care. In a follow-up design occupational performance (OP) and social participation (SP) were investigated at two time points. After informed consent 36 consecutively recruited participants reported OP using the Capability to Perform Daily Occupations, Self-Efficacy Scale, Importance scale, and Allen Cognitive Level Screen. SP was measured with the Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life, and Interview Schedule for Social Interaction. After one year 24 participants were still incarcerated, 11 were conditionally released, and one participant was discharged. The group were generally more satisfied and engaged in daily occupations than at admission. The study's attrition rate, 51%, is discussed. The conclusion and the clinical implications indicate that the target group need early, goal directed interventions in OP and SP for alterations in daily occupations. Furthermore, to increase the knowledge base concerning mentally disordered offenders, studies with research designs that have the potential to uncover changes in daily occupation and other measures for this target group are necessary.

  • 23.
    Lindstedt, Helena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ivarsson, Ann-Britt
    Örebro universitet.
    Goal Attainment Scaling, GAS, Måluppfyllelseskala: Manual2013Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 24.
    Lindstedt, Helena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Umb-Carlsson, Öie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Cognitive assistive technology and professional support in everyday life for adults with ADHD2013In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 402-408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    An evaluation of a model of intervention in everyday settings, consisting of cognitive assistive technology (CAT) and support provided by occupational therapists to adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The purpose was to study how professional support and CAT facilitate everyday life and promote community participation of adults with ADHD.

    Method

    The intervention was implemented in five steps and evaluated in a 15-month study (March 2006 = T1 to June 2007 = T2). One questionnaire and one protocol describe the CATs and provided support. Two questionnaires were employed at T1 and T2 for evaluation of the intervention in everyday settings.

    Results

    The participants tried 74 CATs, with weekly schedules, watches and weighted blankets being most highly valued. Carrying out a daily routine was the most frequent support. More participants were working at T2 than at T1. Frequency of performing and satisfaction with daily occupations as well as life satisfaction were stable over the one-year period.

    Conclusions

    The results indicate a higher frequency of participating in work but only a tendency of increased subjectively experienced life satisfaction. However, to be of optimal usability, CAT requires individually tailored, systematic and structured support by specially trained professionals.

  • 25.
    Lindström, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Arbetsterapi.
    Lindberg, Margareta
    Umeå universitet, Arbetsterapi.
    Sjöström, Stefan
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för socialt arbete.
    Home bittersweet home: the significance of home for occupational transformations2011In: International Journal of Social Psychiatry, ISSN 0020-7640, E-ISSN 1741-2854, Vol. 57, no 3, p. 284-299Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The study illuminated how persons with psychiatric disabilities experienced the processes of change in a residential context.

    Material: Qualitative interviews with residents living in supported housing were conducted and analyzed using constant comparative analysis.

    Discussion: Residential conditions appear to provide a complex structure that facilitates rehabilitative interactions, in which ‘progressive tensions’ arise between opposing values, such as authentic versus artificial, and independence versus dependence, both of which are important in the process of change.

    Conclusions: A client-centred approach could be taken further if clients are engaged in productive discussions about challenging these ‘progressive tensions’. Awareness of the meaning of home also emerged as central.

  • 26. Niemi, Tuuli
    et al.
    Johansson, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    The lived experience of engaging in everyday occupations in persons with mild to moderate aphasia2013In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 35, no 21, p. 1828-1834Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Impairment of language ability, aphasia, can cause barriers to communication and hence impact on participation in many life situations. This study aimed to describe and explore how persons with aphasia following stroke experience engaging in everyday occupations. Method: Six persons from Southwest Finland who had aphasia due to stroke one to four years previously were interviewed for the study. A modified form of the empirical phenomenological psychological method was used for data analysis. Results: Three main characteristics of experiences of engaging in everyday occupations were identified: (1) encountering new experiences in everyday occupations, (2) striving to handle everyday occupations and (3) going ahead with life. The participants had experienced an altering life-world. Engagement in occupations affected their perceptions of competence and identity, and experiences of belonging and well-being. It was also through engagement in everyday occupations that they had discovered and learnt to handle changes in their everyday life. Conclusion: Aphasia can have a long-term impact on engagement in everyday occupations and participation in society, but conversely, engagement in meaningful occupations can also contribute to adaptation to disability and life changes. Implications for Rehabilitation Aphasia can have a long-term impact on engagement in everyday occupations and participation in society. Health care professionals need to determine what clients with aphasia think about their occupations and life situations in spite of difficulties they may have verbalizing their thoughts. Experiences of engaging in meaningful occupations can help clients with aphasia in reconstructing their life stories, thereby contributing to adaptation to disability and life changes.

  • 27.
    Rashid, Mamunur
    et al.
    Univ Gavle, Fac Hlth & Occupat Studies, Ctr Musculoskeletal Res, Dept Occupat & Publ Hlth Sci, Gavle, Sweden..
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Univ Gavle, Fac Hlth & Occupat Studies, Dept Hlth & Caring Sci, Gavle, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Univ Gavle, Fac Hlth & Occupat Studies, Dept Hlth & Caring Sci, Gavle, Sweden..
    Heiden, Marina
    Univ Gavle, Fac Hlth & Occupat Studies, Ctr Musculoskeletal Res, Dept Occupat & Publ Hlth Sci, Gavle, Sweden..
    Factors associated with return to work among people on work absence due to long-term neck or back pain: a narrative systematic review2017In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 7, no 6, article id e014939Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The purpose of this narrative systematic review was to summarise prognostic factors for return to work (RTW) among people with long-term neck/shoulder or back pain.

    Methods: A systematic literature search was performed through three databases (Medline, CINAHL and PsycINFO) for studies published until February 2016. Only observational studies of people on work absence ((a) over cap %Y2 weeks) due to neck/shoulder or back pain were included. The methodological quality of the included studies was assessed using guidelines for assessing quality in prognostic studies on the basis of Framework of Potential Biases. Factors found in the included studies were grouped into categories based on similarities and then labelled according to the aspects covered by the factors in the category.

    Results: Nine longitudinal prospective cohort studies and one retrospective study fulfilled the inclusion criteria. From these, five categories of factors were extracted. Our findings indicate that recovery beliefs, health-related factors and work capacity are important for RTW among people with long-term neck or back pain. We did not find support for workplace factors and behaviour being predictive of RTW.

    Conclusions: Our findings suggest that recovery beliefs, perceived health and work capacity may be important targets of intervention for people with long-term neck or back pain. However, more high-quality prospective studies are needed to confirm the results and improve our understanding of what is needed to facilitate RTW in this population.

  • 28.
    Rodéhn, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Cultural heritage, Democracy and the Labour Market2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This project aims to investigate if the system of ’wage subsidy’ coupled with of Lifelong Learning can result in more democratic museums and archives. The study is based on archive studies and field studies and qualitative interviews. Interviews was conducted with people in ‘wage subsidy’ programmes and people in management positions at Jamtli and the Regional Archives in Östersund and questions centres around Lifelong Learning, learning in general and the ‘wage subsidy’ system. The ethnographic material was analysed using theories on Lifelong Learning and workplace learning. I argue in this paper that learning is situated to certain contexts, e.g., the museum and archive, to the pedagogical profile, to the social and political context. I discuss these contexts in terms of Lifelong Learning and EU and Swedish labour market and cultural policies. I come to the conclusion that heritage institution is dependent on people in ‘wage subsidy’ programmes to continue to exist and to further a democratic heritage. I argue, furthermore, that Lifelong Learning needs to better define within the heritage sector if it is to be utilised in terms of labour market measures and democratisation of heritage. If museums and archives want to use Lifelong Learning as a method for personal development among people in labour market measures they need to better define the goals with Lifelong Learning. I therefore come to the conclusion that Lifelong Learning is best used as a method to approach attitudes to the society rather than investigate learning, as learning is assumed within this theory. If museums and archives are approached from this angle, Lifelong Learning can be used as a method to evaluate the heritage production.

  • 29.
    Rodéhn, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Democracy, Lifelong Learning and Labour Market Policies2010Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Sahlstrom, T.
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Neurol, Fac Med, Lund, Sweden.
    Eklund, M.
    Lund Univ, Dept Hlth Sci Mental Hlth Act & Participat MAP, Lund, Sweden.
    Timpka, J.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Neurol, Fac Med, Lund, Sweden;Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Neurol, Lund, Sweden.
    Henriksen, T.
    Univ Hosp Bispebjerg, Movement Disorder Clin, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Nyholm, Dag
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Odin, P.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Neurol, Fac Med, Lund, Sweden;Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Neurol, Lund, Sweden;Cent Hosp, Dept Neurol, Bremerhaven, Germany.
    Workforce participation and activities in Parkinson's disease patients receiving device-aided therapy2018In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 138, no 1, p. 78-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Many countries have an aging population, and it is thus likely that Parkinson's disease (PD) will become an increasing health problem. It is important to ensure this group can use their resources in the best way possible, including remaining in the work market. This study aimed to investigate workforce participation and daily activities among patients with PD receiving device-aided therapy to provide new knowledge that may be used to inform decisions about these therapy options.

    Materials and Methods:This was a retrospective, descriptive quantitative pilot study, including 67 patients with PD from 3 centers in Sweden and Denmark. Included patients were younger than 67years at the time of introduction of device-aided therapy. Eligible patients were identified by the Swedish national Parkinson patient registry or by the treating neurologist. Quantitative interviews were made by telephone.

    Results:A majority of the patients could perform the same, or more, amount of activities approximately 5years after the introduction of device-aided therapy. A small number of patients receiving deep brain stimulation (DBS) and levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel (LCIG) were able to increase their work capacity within 1year of initiating device-aided therapy and a remarkably high share could still work at the end-point of this study, approximately 15years since the diagnosis of PD.

    Conclusions:Device-aided therapy may sustain or increase daily activities and workforce participation in patients with PD who have not yet reached retirement age. There is need for prospective studies, both quantitative and qualitative, to confirm these results.

  • 31.
    Sydsjo, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ, Div Obstet & Gynaecol, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Fac Hlth Sci, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden..
    Vikstrom, Josefin
    Linkoping Univ, Div Obstet & Gynaecol, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Fac Hlth Sci, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden..
    Bladh, Marie
    Linkoping Univ, Div Obstet & Gynaecol, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Fac Hlth Sci, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden..
    Jablonowska, Barbara
    Linkoping Univ, Div Obstet & Gynaecol, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Fac Hlth Sci, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden..
    Svanberg, Agneta Skoog
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Men report good mental health 20 to 23 years after in vitro fertilisation treatment2015In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 15, article id 1175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Infertility and infertility treatment are known to have negative short-term psychological consequences for men and women, with more long-term consequences for women. The long-term wellbeing and mental health of men who have experienced in vitro fertilisation (IVF) treatment has not been extensively described in the literature. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyse the mental health of men 20 to 23 years after IVF treatment. Method: The Symptom Checklist 90 tool was used to assess the self-perceived mental health of men who were part of a couple that underwent IVF treatment at Linkoping University Hospital, Sweden, 20 to 23 years earlier. We enrolled 292 out of the 490 men who took part in the hospital's IVF programme from 1986 to 1989 and compared them to an aged-matched control group. In addition, the men who had remained childless were compared to those who had fathered biological children and those who had adopted children. Results: The overall mental health of the men who had received IVF was good. We found that 54 % of the men had fathered their own biological children, 21 % were childless and the remainder were part of a couple that had gone on to adopt. The childless men displayed more mental health problems than the other men in the study, as did men who were unemployed, single or divorced. Conclusion: This study carried out 20 to 23 years after IVF treatment showed that the majority of the men who took part were in good mental health. Those who remained childless faced an increased risk of negative psychological symptoms and men who were single showed more symptoms of depression and anxiety disorders.

  • 32.
    Terio, Minna
    et al.
    Danderyds Univ Hosp, Dept Rehabil Med, Danderyd, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Lexell: Rehabilitation Medicine. Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, Box 23 200, S-14183 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Kamwesiga, Julius T.
    Uganda Allied Hlth Examinat Board, Kampala, Uganda.
    Guidetti, Susanne
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, Box 23 200, S-14183 Huddinge, Sweden.
    What's in it for me?: A process evaluation of the implementation of a mobile phone-supported intervention after stroke in Uganda2019In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 19, article id 562Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The prevalence of stroke in Uganda is increasing. In stroke rehabilitation, information and communication technology has been shown to have potential in improving service delivery in high-income countries but there is limited knowledge of its use and impact in low-income countries.The aim of the study was to evaluate the implementation process of a mobile phone-supported family-centred rehabilitation intervention and to gain knowledge on the mechanisms of impact as well as the contextual factors that might have affected the implementation process and its outcome.

    Method

    This was a single-case study design using the integrated Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services framework and the Medical Research Council guidance as frameworks. Quantitative process data was derived from 14 log books used by occupational therapists during the implementation. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 implementers in different professions, 12months into the implementation, in order to obtain the primary data. Secondary data was derived from six semi-structured interviews conducted directly after pre-intervention workshops and 6 months later. The framework method was used in the data analysis.

    Results

    In 11 out of 14 cases, the clients were compliant with the intervention. Yet, challenges such as technical problems were reported. The target of conducting 16 phone calls for each client was achieved to 74%. Eight categories emerged from the qualitative analysis of the interviews including: 1) perceptions on facilitation, 2) using scientific and experience-based knowledge, 3) tailoring the intervention, 4) supportive working culture, 5) barriers to the service delivery, 6) implementers' interaction with the intervention, 7) perceptions on motivations and values, and 8) improving the model and enabling sustainability. Mechanisms contributing to the implementation of the intervention included engaged facilitators and motivated participants. Challenges in the client recruitment and poor information dissemination were some of the mechanisms impeding the implementation.

    Conclusions

    The intervention was partially delivered in accordance with the logic model for the project, where the implementation process was influenced by several barriers in the context such as technical setbacks. However, there were also several mediators in the process driving the project forward, including strong facilitation and motivated participants.

  • 33.
    Tistad, Malin
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, Huddinge, Sweden;Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden;Umea Univ, Dept Rehabil & Social Med, Physiotherapy, Umea, Sweden.
    Flink, Maria
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Funct Area Social Work Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Learning Informat Management & Eth, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ytterberg, Charlotte
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Physiotherapy, Huddinge, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Funct Area Occupat Therapy & Physiotherapy, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Guidetti, Susanne
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Tham, Kerstin
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, Huddinge, Sweden;Malmo Univ, Fac Hlth & Soc, Malmo, Sweden.
    von Koch, Lena
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, Huddinge, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Theme Neuro, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Resource use of healthcare services 1 year after stroke: a secondary analysis of a cluster-randomised controlled trial of a client-centred activities of daily living intervention2018In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 8, no 8, article id e022222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The objective of the study was to compare the total use of healthcare services in the course of the first year after a stroke between participants who, after the acute care, had received occupational therapy as a client-centred activities of daily living (ADL) intervention (CADL) and participants who had received usual ADL intervention (UADL).

    Design: A secondary analysis of a multicentre cluster-randomised controlled trial (RCT).

    Setting: Primary and secondary care in Sweden.

    Participants: Participants were included if they: (1) had received CADL or UADL in the RCT, either as inpatients in geriatric rehabilitation units or in their own homes, and (2) data could be retrieved about their use of healthcare services provided by the county council from computerised registers.

    Interventions: CADL or UADL.

    Outcome measures: Inpatient and outpatient healthcare in the course of the first year after stroke.

    Results: Participants from 7 of the 16 units included in the RCT met the criteria. Participants in the CADL group (n=26) who received geriatric inpatient rehabilitation had a shorter length of hospital stay (p=0.03) than participants in the UADL group (n=46), and the CADL group with home rehabilitation (n=13) had fewer outpatient contacts (p=0.01) compared with the UADL group (n=25). Multiple regression analyses showed that in four of the models, a higher age was associated with a lower use of healthcare services. The use of healthcare services was also associated (some of the models) with dependence in ADL, stroke severity and type of rehabilitation received, CADL or UADL.

    Conclusions: The provision of client-centred occupational therapy after stroke did not appear to increase the use of healthcare services during the first year after stroke. Trial registration number NCT01417585.

  • 34.
    Wandin, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation. Swedish Natl Ctr Rett Syndrome & Related Disorde, Reg Jamtland Harjedalen, Ostersund, Sweden.
    Gaze-Based Assistive Technology: Usefulness in Clinical Assessments2017In: Harnessing the Power of Technology to Improve Lives / [ed] Peter Cudd, Luce de Witte, IOS Press, 2017, Vol. 242, p. 1113-1118Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gaze-based assistive technology was used in informal clinical assessments. Excerpts of medical journals were analyzed by directed content analysis using a model of communicative competence. The results of this pilot study indicate that gaze-based assistive technology is a useful tool in communication assessments that can generate clinically relevant information.

  • 35.
    Zander, Viktoria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Univ Hosp Solna, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Karolinska Inst, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Swedish Red Cross Univ Coll, Dept Nursing & Care, S-11428 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Christensson, Kyllike
    Karolinska Univ Hosp Solna, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Karolinska Inst, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Mullersdorf, Maria
    Malardalen Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Social Welf, S-63105 Eskilstuna, Sweden..
    Development of an Interview Guide Identifying the Rehabilitation Needs of Women from the Middle East Living with Chronic Pain2015In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 12, no 10, p. 12043-12056Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to develop an interview guide for use by primary healthcare professionals to support them in identifying the rehabilitation needs of forced resettled women from the Middle East living with chronic pain. Previous findings together with the existing literature were used as the basis for developing the interview guide in three steps: item generation, cognitive interviews, and a pilot study. The study resulted in a 16-item interview guide focusing on patients' concerns and expectations, with consideration of pre-migration, migration, and post-migration factors that might affect their health. With the help of the guide, patients were also invited to identify difficulties in their daily activities and to take part in setting goals and planning their rehabilitation. The current interview guide provides professional guidance to caretakers, taking a person-centered participative point of departure when meeting and planning care, for and together, with representatives from dispersed ethnic populations in Sweden. It can be used together with the patient by all staff members working in primary healthcare, with the aim of contributing to continuity of care and multi-professional collaboration.

  • 36.
    Åkerström, Mona-Lisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Grimby-Ekman, Anna
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Occupat & Environm Med, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Lundberg, Mari
    Karolinska Inst, Div Physiotherapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Sociol, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Work ability is influenced by kinesiophobia among patients with persistent pain2017In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 33, no 8, p. 634-643Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how kinesiophobia fluctuates in patients over a four weeks multimodal rehabilitation program and to study the relationship between work ability and kinesiophobia. The study included 112 patients (94 women, 18 men). Measurements were made before, directly after, 2months after, and 12months after the program. The level of work ability was rated by the patients on a scale from 0% to 100%, and kinesiophobia was measured by the Swedish version of the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (TSK-SV). Kinesiophobia decreased between the start of the multimodal rehabilitation program and the follow-up periods. Work ability increased over time, but not between baseline and the 2-month follow-up. Decreases in the TSK-SV score between baseline and the 2-month follow-up were related to the increased probability of improved work ability at the 12-month follow-up. In conclusion, a decrease in kinesiophobia seems to be related to increased work ability of patients participating in a 4-week multimodal rehabilitation program.

1 - 36 of 36
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