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  • 1.
    Anderson, Cheryl B
    et al.
    epartment of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA.
    Hagströmer, Maria
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences at Novum, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences at Novum, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Validation of the PDPAR as an adolescent diary: effect of accelerometer cut points2005In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, E-ISSN 1530-0315, Vol. 37, no 7, p. 1224-1230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the validity of the Previous Day Physical Activity Recall (PDPAR) as a physical activity diary in adolescents using two accelerometer intensity classifications.

    METHODS: One hundred eighth graders (47 boys, 53 girls) used the PDPAR as a daily diary and wore MTI accelerometers for four consecutive days. Measured time spent in moderate (> or = 3 METs) and vigorous (> or = 6 METs) activity was based on two published MTI cut-point limits (that of Freedson et al./Trost et al. and that of Puyau et al.). Spearman rank order correlations and Bland-Altman plots were used to examine agreement between MTI and PDPAR diary estimates of activity.

    RESULTS: MTI estimates of mean minutes per day of total moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) were 65.2 (+/-43.2) using the Freedson et al./Trost et al. cutoffs and 17.5 (+/-18.5) using those of Puyau et al., while students self-reported 105.1 (+/-80.1) min.d(-1). Significant relationships were observed between the diary and MTI for total MVPA using either the Freedson et al./Trost et al. (r = 0.42) or Puyau et al. (r = 0.41) cutoff as well as raw counts (r = 0.44). Plots showed reasonable agreement between the diary and Freedson et al./Trost et al. MTI estimates of MVPA for daily totals of < or = 60 min, but the Puyau et al. estimates were consistently lower. Diaries overestimated activity as time increased when compared to either MTI cut point, especially on vigorous activity.

    CONCLUSIONS: Time estimates of MVPA differed by assessment tool, but diary estimates showed adequate association with the MTI. Diaries reflected intensity-specific activity, corresponding most closely with the Freedson et al./Trost et al. classification of moderate, but substantially overestimated vigorous activity regardless of cut-point method. This is likely due to the measurement characteristics of the PDPAR, which classifies activities in 30-min blocks, as well as the nature of common activities in which high levels of intensity are not sustained.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Glykemiskt index: ett osäkert verktyg för idrottaren2009In: Nordisk nutrition, ISSN 1654-8337, no 4, p. 21-23Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Idrottsnutrition2006In: Näringslära för högskolan, Liber AB, Stockholm , 2006, p. 394-423Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Andersson, Agneta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Bakkman, Linda
    Berglund, Bo
    Reinebo, Peter
    Saltin, Bengt
    Kostrekommendationer för elitidrottare.: SOK:s kostpolicy för elitidrottare.2009Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Anens, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiotherapy.
    Emtner, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiotherapy. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Hellström, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiotherapy.
    Exploratory Study of Physical Activity in Persons With Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease2015In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0003-9993, E-ISSN 1532-821X, Vol. 96, no 2, p. 260-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To explore and describe the perceived facilitators and barriers to physical activity, and to examine the physical activity correlates in people with Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. Design: Cross-sectional survey study. Setting: Community-living subjects. Participants: Swedish people with CMT disease (N=44; men, 54.5%; median age, 59.5y [interquartile range, 45.3-64.8y]). Interventions: Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures: The survey included open-ended questions and standardized self-reported scales measuring physical activity, fatigue, activity limitation, self-efficacy for physical activity, fall-related self-efficacy, social support, and enjoyment of physical activity. Physical activity was measured by the Physical Activity Disability Survey-Revised. Results: Qualitative content analysis revealed that personal factors such as fatigue, poor balance, muscle weakness, and pain were important barriers for physical activity behavior. Facilitators of physical activity were self-efficacy for physical activity, activity-related factors, and assistive devices. Multiple regression analysis showed that self-efficacy for physical activity (beta=.41) and fatigue (beta=-.30) explained 31.8% of the variation in physical activity (F-2,F-40=10.78, P=.000). Conclusions: Despite the well-known benefits of physical activity, physical activity in people with CMT disease is very sparsely studied. These new results contribute to the understanding of factors important for physical activity behavior in people with CMT disease and can guide health professionals to facilitate physical activity behavior in this group of patients. (C) 2015 by the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine

  • 6. Ardern, Clare L.
    et al.
    Österberg, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Tagesson, Sofi
    Gauffin, Hakan
    Webster, Kate E.
    Kvist, Joanna
    The impact of psychological readiness to return to sport and recreational activities after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction2014In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 48, no 22, p. 1613-U50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background This cross-sectional study aimed to examine whether appraisal of knee function, psychological and demographic factors were related to returning to the preinjury sport and recreational activity following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Method 164 participants completed a questionnaire battery at 1-7 years after primary ACL reconstruction. The battery included questionnaires evaluating knee self-efficacy, health locus of control, psychological readiness to return to sport and recreational activity, and fear of reinjury; and self-reported knee function in sport-specific tasks, knee-related quality of life and satisfaction with knee function. The primary outcome was returning to the preinjury sport or recreational activity. Results At follow-up, 40% (66/164) had returned to their preinjury activity. Those who returned had more positive psychological responses, reported better knee function in sport and recreational activities, perceived a higher knee-related quality of life and were more satisfied with their current knee function. The main reasons for not returning were not trusting the knee (28%), fear of a new injury (24%) and poor knee function (22%). Psychological readiness to return to sport and recreational activity, measured with the ACL-Return to Sport after Injury scale (was most strongly associated with returning to the preinjury activity). Age, sex and preinjury activity level were not related. Conclusions Less than 50% returned to their preinjury sport or recreational activity after ACL reconstruction. Psychological readiness to return to sport and recreation was the factor most strongly associated with returning to the preinjury activity. Including interventions aimed at improving this in postoperative rehabilitation programmes could be warranted to improve the rate of return to sport and recreational activities.

  • 7.
    Aurivillius, Pehr Fabian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Philosophy.
    Circa exercitationes gymnicas observationes nonnullæ generaliores. Quas consensu ampliss. fac. phil. Ups. præside mag. Petro Fab. Aurivillio ... pro gradu philosophico publico examini subjicit Sveno Emanuel Thollander a sacris. Ostrogothus. In auditorio Gust. maj. d. XXIV. Maj. MDCCCVI. ... p. I.1806Dissertation (older thesis) (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Bagge, A. S. Lindqvist
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rosen, T.
    Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fahlke, C.
    Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ehrnborg, C.
    Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eriksson, B. O.
    Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Moberg, T.
    Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Thiblin, Ingemar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Forensic Medicine.
    Somatic effects of AAS abuse: A 30-years follow-up study of male former power sports athletes2017In: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, ISSN 1440-2440, E-ISSN 1878-1861, Vol. 20, no 9, p. 814-818Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between somatic health and former abuse of AAS in former elite male athletes 30 years after the end of their active sports career.

    Design

    Retrospective follow-up study.

    Methods

    N = 996 former elite male athletes were sent a questionnaire concerning sociodemographic variables, previous and past sport activity and lifetime prevalence of seeking professional help for health problems. N = 683 (68.6%) answered the questionnaire. The lifetime prevalence of AAS-abuse was 21% (n = 143), while 79% (n = 540) did not admit having ever used AAS.

    Results

    Former AAS-abuse was associated with tendon ruptures (p = 0.01), depression (p = 0.001), anxiety (p = 0.01) and lower prevalence of prostate hypertrophy (p = 0.01) and decreased libido (p = 0.01). Former advanced AAS-abusers had higher anxiety (p = 0.004) compared to the former less advanced AAS-abusers. Moreover, former advanced AAS-abusers, compared to AAS-naïves, reported more psychiatric problems (p = 0.002), depression (p = 0.003) and anxiety (p = 0.00).

    Conclusions

    A former AAS-abuse seems to be associated with some somatic and mental health problem, although a former less advanced AAS-abuse is related to lower incidence of prostate hypertrophy. The results raise the question whether some of these associations might be dose- and frequency dependent. These findings should however be seen as hypothesis generating and further studies are needed.

  • 9.
    Becirbegovic, Haris
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiotherapy.
    Svensson, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiotherapy.
    Shining a light on soccer injuries in Africa: A descriptive and comparative Cohort study on soccer injuries in Rwanda and Swaziland2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Problem definition

    There are few epidemiological studies on soccer injuries in Africa.The prevalence and variables linked to injuries needs to be recognized. Better mapping and knowledge about injury prevalence/incidence could play an important role in helping players sustain a career in soccer without major injuries. 

    Objective

    To explore prevalence, mechanism, severity of injuries and injured body parts in players from top divisions of Rwanda and Swaziland during season 2012/2013.

    Methods

    The study was of a retrospective, descriptive, comparative design with a quantitative approach on a cohort of n=738 players from Rwanda and Swaziland. Injury frequencies from data sets was analyzed. Data was analyzed using the F-MARC injury-questionnaire.

    Results

    The subpopulations had varying frequencies of injuries. Age 18-24 sustained the most injuries in both countries, n=215. There was a significant difference of injury prevalence, 71,8% of the Swaziland players sustained injuries. In Rwanda 34,8% sustained injuries. However, the severity of injuries was significantly higher in the Rwanda.

    Conclusion

    The results of the findings in this study shows that the players in Swaziland had almost a two-time higher injury prevalence. Although the reason to this can only be speculated in by the authors. Further research is encouraged to increase the mapping of injuries in Africa, and factors associated to them.

  • 10.
    Bjorke, Ann Christin Helgesen
    et al.
    Univ Agder, Dept Publ Hlth Sport & Nutr, Kristiansand, Norway.
    Sweegers, Maike G.
    Vrije Univ, Amsterdam Univ, Amsterdam Publ Hlth Inst, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat,Med Ctr, Amsterdam, Netherlands;Vrije Univ, Amsterdam Univ, Canc Ctr Amsterdam, Med Ctr, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Buffart, Laurien M.
    Vrije Univ, Amsterdam Univ, Amsterdam Publ Hlth Inst, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat,Med Ctr, Amsterdam, Netherlands;Vrije Univ, Amsterdam Univ, Canc Ctr Amsterdam, Med Ctr, Amsterdam, Netherlands;Vrije Univ, Amsterdam Univ, Dept Med Oncol, Med Ctr, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Raastad, Truls
    Norwegian Sch Sport Sci, Oslo, Norway.
    Nygren, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Berntsen, Sveinung
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Lifestyle and rehabilitation in long term illness. Univ Agder, Dept Publ Hlth Sport & Nutr, Kristiansand, Norway.
    Which exercise prescriptions optimize V̇O2max during cancer treatment?: a systematic review and meta-analysis2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 29, no 9, p. 1274-1287Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of the present systematic review and meta-analysis were to investigate the effect of exercise on maximal oxygen uptake ((V) over dot O(2)max) and to investigate whether exercise frequency, intensity, duration, and volume are associated with changes in (V) over dotO(2)max among adult patients with cancer undergoing treatment. Medline and Embase through OvidSP were searched to identify randomized controlled trials. Two reviewers extracted data and assessed the risk of bias. The overall effect size and differences in effects for different intensities and frequencies were calculated on change scores and post-intervention (V) over dot O(2)max data, and the meta-regression of exercise duration and volumes was analyzed using the Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software. Fourteen randomized controlled trials were included in the systematic review, comprising 1332 patients with various cancer types receiving (neo-) adjuvant chemo-, radio-, and/or hormone therapy. Exercise induced beneficial changes in (V) over dotO(2)max compared to usual care (effect size = 0.46, 95% Confidence Interval = 0.23-0.69). Longer session duration (P = 0.020), and weekly duration (P = 0.010), larger weekly volume (P < 0.001), and shorter intervention duration (P = 0.005) were significantly associated with more beneficial changes in (V) over dot O(2)max. No differences in effects between subgroups with respect to frequency and intensity were found. In conclusion, exercise has beneficial effects on (V) over dotO(2)max in patients with cancer undergoing (neo-) adjuvant treatment. As interventions with larger exercise volumes and longer session durations resulted in larger beneficial changes in (V) over dot O(2)max, exercise frequency, intensity, and duration should be considered carefully for sufficient exercise volume to induce changes in (V) over dot O(2)max for this patient group.

  • 11.
    Craig, Cora L
    et al.
    Canadian Fitness and Lifestyle Research Institute, Ottawa, Canada.
    Marshall, Alison L
    chool of Human Movement Studies, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Sjöström, Michael
    PrevNut at Novum, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bauman, Adrian E
    Centre for Physical Activity and Health, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of NSW, Sydney, Australia.
    Booth, Michael L
    Centre for Advancement of Adolescent Health, New Childrens Hospital, Westmead, Sydney, Australia.
    Ainsworth, Barbara E
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Department of Exercise Science, Norman J. Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA.
    Pratt, Michael
    Division of Physical Activity and Nutrition, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, GA; 8 Department of Psychology, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, USA.
    Ekelund, Ulf
    PrevNut at Novum, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Yngve, Agneta
    PrevNut at Novum, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sallis, James F
    Department of Psychology, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, USA.
    Oja, Pekka
    UKK Institute, Tampere, Finland.
    International physical activity questionnaire: 12-country reliability and validity2003In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, E-ISSN 1530-0315, Vol. 35, no 8, p. 1381-1395Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Physical inactivity is a global concern, but diverse physical activity measures in use prevent international comparisons. The International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) was developed as an instrument for cross-national monitoring of physical activity and inactivity.

    METHODS: Between 1997 and 1998, an International Consensus Group developed four long and four short forms of the IPAQ instruments (administered by telephone interview or self-administration, with two alternate reference periods, either the "last 7 d" or a "usual week" of recalled physical activity). During 2000, 14 centers from 12 countries collected reliability and/or validity data on at least two of the eight IPAQ instruments. Test-retest repeatability was assessed within the same week. Concurrent (inter-method) validity was assessed at the same administration, and criterion IPAQ validity was assessed against the CSA (now MTI) accelerometer. Spearman's correlation coefficients are reported, based on the total reported physical activity.

    RESULTS: Overall, the IPAQ questionnaires produced repeatable data (Spearman's rho clustered around 0.8), with comparable data from short and long forms. Criterion validity had a median rho of about 0.30, which was comparable to most other self-report validation studies. The "usual week" and "last 7 d" reference periods performed similarly, and the reliability of telephone administration was similar to the self-administered mode.

    CONCLUSIONS: The IPAQ instruments have acceptable measurement properties, at least as good as other established self-reports. Considering the diverse samples in this study, IPAQ has reasonable measurement properties for monitoring population levels of physical activity among 18- to 65-yr-old adults in diverse settings. The short IPAQ form "last 7 d recall" is recommended for national monitoring and the long form for research requiring more detailed assessment.

  • 12.
    Cunningham, Gregory
    et al.
    Univ Hosp Geneva, Dept Surg, Div Orthoped & Trauma Surg, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Zanchi, Davide
    Univ Hosp Geneva, Dept Imaging & Med Informat, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Emmert, Kirsten
    Univ Hosp Geneva, Dept Imaging & Med Informat, Geneva, Switzerland.;Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Inst Bioengn, Lausanne, Switzerland..
    Kopel, Rotem
    Univ Hosp Geneva, Dept Imaging & Med Informat, Geneva, Switzerland.;Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Inst Bioengn, Lausanne, Switzerland..
    Van De Ville, Dimitri
    Univ Hosp Geneva, Dept Imaging & Med Informat, Geneva, Switzerland.;Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Inst Bioengn, Lausanne, Switzerland..
    Laedermann, Alexandre
    Univ Hosp Geneva, Dept Surg, Div Orthoped & Trauma Surg, Geneva, Switzerland.;Univ Geneva, Fac Med, CH-1227 Geneva, Switzerland..
    Haller, Sven
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. Univ Geneva, Fac Med, CH-1227 Geneva, Switzerland.;Univ Hosp Freiburg, Dept Neuroradiol, Freiburg, Germany.;Ctr Diagnost Radiol Carouge, Affidea, Carouge, Switzerland..
    Hoffmeyer, Pierre
    Univ Hosp Geneva, Dept Surg, Div Orthoped & Trauma Surg, Geneva, Switzerland.;Univ Geneva, Fac Med, CH-1227 Geneva, Switzerland..
    Neural Correlates of Clinical Scores in Patients with Anterior Shoulder Apprehension2015In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, E-ISSN 1530-0315, Vol. 47, no 12, p. 2612-2620Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Anterior shoulder apprehension is a commonly reported complaint in anterior shoulder instability, which may lead to patient morbidity and impede shoulder function. It is the result of a cognitively complex mechanism, which includes anxiety, salience, fear, and anticipation. Purpose The aim of this prospective case-control study was to correlate five clinically established scores using functional magnetic resonance imaging to assess brain activation patterns in patients with apprehension related to anterior shoulder instability. Methods This study includes 28 consecutive male right-handed patients ( mean +/- SEM, 26.8 +/- 1.2 yr) with positive shoulder apprehension test and 10 healthy matched control participants without apprehension or a history of instability. Task- related and functional connectivity functional magnetic resonance imaging activation patterns occurring during apprehension video cue stimulation were correlated with five clinical tests and scores: Visual Analog Scale ( VAS), Rowe score for instability, Simple Shoulder Test, Subjective Shoulder Value ( SSV), and Western Ontario Shoulder Instability ( WOSI). Results Rowe, pain VAS, and WOSI scores correlated with prefrontal cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, somatosensory area, and parieto-occipital and temporal areas (default mode network). Rowe score additionally correlated with frontal pole, anterior midcingulate cortex, and visual areas. Moreover, SSV correlated with task-related brain activity in the bilateral precentral gyrus, bilateral postcentral gyrus, and bilateral superior parietal lobe. Conclusions Overall, Rowe score provides the strongest link between shoulder apprehension and brain level alterations as it correlates with the highest number of independent components involving areas responsible for both motor and cognitive functions, whereas pain VAS and WOSI occupy an intermediately strong link recruiting less brain networks. Finally, Simple Shoulder Test and SSV have the weakest link at the brain level.

  • 13.
    Dahlman, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Philosophy.
    Dissertatio gradualis, de exercitiis corporis, quam, suffragio ampliss. facult. philosoph. in regia academia Upsaliensi, sub præsidio ... Laurentii Dahlman ... publico examini modeste defert, alumnus Thunianus, Olavus Willmark, Smolandus. In aud. Carol. maj. d. XXVI. April. anni MDCCLXIV. H. a. m. s.1764Dissertation (older thesis) (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Derman, Wayne
    et al.
    Stellenbosch Univ, Inst Sport & Exercise Med, Dept Surg, Div Orthopaed, Cape Town, South Africa; IOC Res Ctr South Africa, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Runciman, Phoebe
    Stellenbosch Univ, Inst Sport & Exercise Med, Dept Surg, Div Orthopaed, Cape Town, South Africa; IOC Res Ctr South Africa, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Jordaan, Esme
    MRC, Biostat Unit, Cape Town, South Africa; Univ Western Cape, Stat & Populat Studies Dept, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Schwellnus, Martin
    IOC Res Ctr South Africa, Cape Town, South Africa; Univ Pretoria, Fac Hlth Sci, Sport Exercise Med & Lifestyle Inst, Pretoria, South Africa.
    Blauwet, Cheri
    Harvard Med Sch, Dept Phys Med & Rehabil, Spaulding Rehabil Hosp, Boston, MA USA; Harvard Med Sch, Womens Hosp, Boston, MA USA.
    Webborn, Nick
    Univ Brighton, Ctr Sport & Exercise Sci & Med, Eastbourne, England.
    Lexell, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Lexell: Rehabilitation Medicine.
    van de Vliet, Peter
    Int Paralymp Comm, Med & Sci Dept, Bonn, Germany.
    Kissick, James
    Univ Ottawa, Carleton Univ Sport Med Clin, Dept Family Med, Ottawa, ON, Canada.
    Stomphorst, Jaap
    Isala Klin, Dept Sports Med, Zwolle, Netherlands.
    Lee, Young-Hee
    Yonsei Univ, Wonju Coll Med, Rehabil Med, Wonju, South Korea.
    Kim, Keun-Suh
    Yonsei Univ, Yonsei Inst Sports Sci & Exercise Med, Seoul, South Korea.
    Incidence rate and burden of illness at the Pyeongchang 2018 Paralympic Winter Games2019In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 53, no 17, p. 1099-1104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To describe the incidence rate (IR) and illness burden (IB) at the Pyeongchang 2018 Paralympic Winter Games.

    Methods A total of 567 athletes from 49 countries were monitored for 12 days over the Pyeongchang 2018 Games (6804 athlete days). Illness data were obtained daily from teams with (41 teams, 557 athletes) and teams without (8 teams, 10 athletes) their own medical support, through electronic data capturing systems.

    Results There were 87 illnesses reported, with an illness IR of 12.8 illnesses per 1000 athlete days (95% CI 10.2 to 16.0) and IB of 6.8 days lost per 1000 athlete days (95% CI 3.4 to 13.5). The highest IR was reported for Para snowboard (IR of 19.7 [95% CI 12.0 to 32.2]). Illnesses in the respiratory system (IR of 4.1 [95% CI 2.9 to 5.9]; IB of 1.4 [95% CI 0.6 to 3.0]), skin and subcutaneous system (IR of 2.5 [95% CI 1.5 to 4.1]; IB of 0.6 [95% CI 0.1 to 2.9]), and eye and ocular adnexa (IR of 1.6 [95% CI 0.9 to 3.1]; IB of 0.5 [95% CI 0.1 to 3.3]) were the most common.

    Conclusion This is the first study to report both the IR and IB in this setting. There was a high IR of illness in the new sport of Para snowboard. The respiratory system had both the highest IR and IB.

     

  • 15.
    Ekelund, Ulf
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Poortvliet, Eric
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Medical Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Andreas
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Medical Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Anders
    Department of Statistics, Örebro University, 701 82 Örebro, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Michael
    Department of Physical Education and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Medical Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Physical activity in relation to aerobic fitness and body fat in 14- to 15-year-old boys and girls2001In: European Journal of Applied Physiology, ISSN 1439-6319, E-ISSN 1439-6327, Vol. 85, no 3-4, p. 195-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to examine the strength of the relationship between different variables of physical activity and aerobic fitness and body fat in adolescent boys and girls. Activity energy expenditure (AEE), time spent in a sedentary state, and time spent engaged in moderate and vigorous physical activity (MVPA, > or = 50% peak oxygen uptake, VO2peak) were assessed by the minute-by-minute heart rate monitoring method in 82 randomly selected 14- to 15-year olds (42 boys, 40 girls). Body fat was determined by measuring skinfold thicknesses. VO2peak was measured by indirect calorimetry. Somatic maturity level was determined by percentages of adult (i.e. 18 years) height attained at examination. AEE was related to aerobic fitness for both genders (boys, r = 0.30, P = 0.056; girls, r = 0.45, P = 0.003). For boys, there was a significant relationship between maturity level and VO2peak (r = 0.48, P < 0.001). For both genders, body fat was significantly and negatively related to VO2peak (r = -0.48 and r = -0.43, P < 0.01). Body fat and maturity explained 47% of the variation in VO2peak in boys, whereas AEE and body fat explained 22% of the variation in VO2peak in girls. No significant associations between physical activity variables and the data on body fat were observed. The total amount of physical activity (AEE) was related to VO2peak, at least in adolescent girls. Although VO2peak seems to be influenced by the maturity level in adolescent boys, the data support the promotion of a daily active lifestyle among young people.

  • 16.
    Ekelund, Ulf
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Hälsovetenskapliga institutionen.
    Poortvliet, Eric
    Yngve, Agneta
    Hurtig-Wennlöf, Anita
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för klinisk medicin.
    Nilsson, Andreas
    Örebro universitet, Hälsovetenskapliga institutionen.
    Sjöström, Michael
    Heart rate as an indicator of the intensity of physical activity in human adolescents2001In: European Journal of Applied Physiology, ISSN 1439-6319, E-ISSN 1439-6327, Vol. 85, no 3-4, p. 244-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this study were, in a group of adolescents, firstly to identify the absolute heart rates (HR) and the percentages of maximal heart rates (HRmax) corresponding to 40%, 60% and 80% of peak oxygen uptake (PVO2), secondly to identify absolute and relative (%PVO2) oxygen uptakes (VO2) corresponding to HR of 120, 140 and 160 beats.min-1, and thirdly to examine a possible effect of fatness and fitness on the relationship between HR and VO2. The subjects were 127 (60 boys, 67 girls) adolescents with a mean age of 14.8 (SD 0.3) years. The HR and VO2 were measured by means of an incremental exercise test to exhaustion. Linear regressions were performed for the HR-VO2 and VO2-HR relationships using absolute and relative (%HRmax, %PVO2) data for each individual. From these regressions, target HR and VO2 were computed. Average target HR corresponding to 40%, 60% and 80% of PVO2 were: 119 (SD 9), 145 (SD 9), 171 (SD 8), and 120 (SD 10), 146 (SD 8), 172 (SD 8) beats.min-1 for boys and girls, respectively. Average VO2 corresponding to HR of 120, 140 and 160 beats.min-1 were: 22 (SD 5), 30 (SD 5), 38 (SD 6) and 18 (SD 4), 24 (SD 4), 31 (SD 4) mlO2.kg-1.min-1 for boys and girls, respectively. An analysis of covariance showed a significant fitness effect (P < 0.001) for predicted VO2 at all HR studied. The results suggest that the use of absolute HR to define exercise intensity levels when assessing young people's physical activity using HR monitoring detracts from the validity of the interpretation of the data.

  • 17.
    Ekelund, Ulf
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Sjöström, Michael
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Medical Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden;.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Medical Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden;.
    Nilsson, Andreas
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Total daily energy expenditure and pattern of physical activity measured by minute-by-minute heart rate monitoring in 14-15 year old Swedish adolescents2000In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0954-3007, E-ISSN 1476-5640, Vol. 54, no 3, p. 195-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To assess total daily energy expenditure (TDEE) and patterns of physical activity among Swedish male and female adolescents and to relate the amount and intensity of physical activity to existing recommendations (energy expenditure equal to or above 12.4 kJ/kg/day or accumulation of 30 min/day in moderate physical activity equal to 4.5 times sedentary energy expenditure or more).

    DESIGN: TDEE, physical activity level (PAL=TDEE/BMR), energy expenditure (EE) and time spent in different intensities of physical activity were assessed by using minute-by-minute heart rate monitoring in combination with laboratory measured sedentary energy expenditure (SEE) and peak oxygen uptake.

    SETTING: Department of Physical Education and Health, Orebro University, and Department of Clinical Physiology, Orebro Medical Centre Hospital, Sweden.

    SUBJECTS: Eighty-two 14-15 y old adolescents (42 boys, 40 girls) from the city of Orebro, randomly selected through a two-stage sampling procedure.

    RESULTS: TDEE was 12.8 MJ/day and 10.0 MJ/day for boys and girls respectively (P<0.001) and PAL was 1.74 and 1.67 (NS). Forty-four percent and 47%, respectively, of TDEE referred to EE in physical activity, of which 70% for both genders referred to light physical activity (corresponding to <4.5 times SEE). Eleven boys and 14 girls had an EE lower than 12.4 kJ/kg/day and/or did not accumulate 30 min/day in physical activity >/=4.5 SEE. Those (n=20) with the highest PAL values (>2.01 and 1.81, respectively) spent 149 min/day at a >/=4.5 SEE intensity level compared to 40 min/day for those (n=30) with the lowest PAL values (<1.55 and 1.45, respectively).

    CONCLUSIONS: Swedish adolescent boys and girls are similarly physically active. The major amount of time devoted to physical activity refers to light physical activity. At least thirty percent of adolescents seem not to achieve appropriate levels of physical activity considered to be beneficial for health.

  • 18.
    Ekelund, Ulf
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Sjöström, Michael
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Medical Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Medical Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Poortvliet, Eric
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Medical Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Andreas
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Fröberg, Karsten
    Institute of Sport Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Wedderkopp, Niels
    Institute of Sport Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Westerterp, Klaas
    Department of Human Biology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
    Physical activity assessed by activity monitor and doubly labeled water in children2001In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, E-ISSN 1530-0315, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 275-281Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To validate the Computer Science and Application's (CSA) activity monitor for assessment of the total amount of physical activity during two school-weeks in 9-yr-old children and to develop equations to predict total energy expenditure (TEE) and activity energy expenditure (AEE) from activity counts and anthropometric variables.

    METHODS: A total of 26 children (15 boys and 11 girls, mean age 9.1 +/- 0.3 yr) were monitored for 14 consecutive days. TEE was simultaneously measured by the doubly labeled water method. Averaged activity counts (counts.min(-1)) were compared with data on: 1) TEE, 2) AEE = TEE minus basal metabolic rate (BMR; estimated from predictive equations), and 3) daily physical activity level (PAL = TEE/BMR).

    RESULTS: Physical activity determined by activity counts was significantly related to the data on energy expenditures: TEE (r = 0.39; P < 0.05), AEE (r = 0.54; P < 0.01), and PAL (r = 0.58; P < 0.01). Multiple stepwise regression analysis showed that TEE was significantly influenced by gender, body composition (body weight or fat free mass), and activity counts (R(2) = 0.54--0.60). AEE was significantly influenced by activity counts and gender (R(2) = 0.45). There were no significant differences between activity counts and PAL in discriminating among activity levels with "low" (PAL < 1.56), "moderate" (1.57 < or = PAL > or = 1.81), and "high" (PAL > 1.81) intensity.

    CONCLUSION: Activity counts from the CSA activity monitor seems to be a useful measure of the total amount of physical activity in 9-yr-old children. Activity counts contributed significantly to the explained variation in TEE and was the best predictor of AEE.

  • 19.
    Ekelund, Ulf
    et al.
    MRC Epidemiology Unit, Cambridge, United Kingdom; Department of Physical Education and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; MRC Epidemiology Unit, Strangeways Research Laboratory, Worts Causeway, Cambridge, United Kingdom .
    Yngve, Agneta
    PREVNUT at Novum, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Brage, Sören
    Department of Physical Education and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Institute of Sport Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark .
    Westerterp, Klaas
    Department of Human Biology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, Netherlands .
    Sjöström, Michael
    PREVNUT at Novum, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Body movement and physical activity energy expenditure in children and adolescents: how to adjust for differences in body size and age2004In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 79, no 5, p. 851-856Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Physical activity data in children and adolescents who differ in body size and age are influenced by whether physical activity is expressed in terms of body movement or energy expenditure.

    OBJECTIVE: We examined whether physical activity expressed as body movement (ie, accelerometer counts) differs from physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) as a function of body size and age.

    DESIGN: This was a cross-sectional study in children [n = 26; (+/-SD) age: 9.6 +/- 0.3 y] and adolescents (n = 25; age: 17.6 +/- 1.5 y) in which body movement and total energy expenditure (TEE) were simultaneously measured with the use of accelerometry and the doubly labeled water method, respectively. PAEE was expressed as 1) unadjusted PAEE [TEE minus resting energy expenditure (REE); in MJ/d], 2) PAEE adjusted for body weight (BW) (PAEE. kg(-1). d(-1)), 3) PAEE adjusted for fat-free mass (FFM) (PAEE. kg FFM(-1). d(-1)), and 4) the physical activity level (PAL = TEE/REE).

    RESULTS: Body movement was significantly higher (P = 0.03) in children than in adolescents. Similarly, when PAEE was normalized for differences in BW or FFM, it was significantly higher in children than in adolescents (P = 0.03). In contrast, unadjusted PAEE and PAL were significantly higher in adolescents (P < 0.01).

    CONCLUSIONS: PAEE should be normalized for BW or FFM for comparison of physical activity between children and adolescents who differ in body size and age. Adjusting PAEE for FFM removes the confounding effect of sex, and therefore FFM may be the most appropriate body-composition variable for normalization of PAEE. Unadjusted PAEE and PAL depend on body size.

  • 20.
    Ekelund, Ulf
    et al.
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Medical Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm; Department of Physical Education and Health, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Medical Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Sjöström, Michael
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Medical Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm; Department of Physical Education and Health, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Total daily energy expenditure and patterns of physical activity in adolescents assessed by two different methods1999In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 257-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Minute-by-minute heart rate monitoring and an activity diary were used simultaneously during three days in 30 randomly selected adolescents (16 boys, 14 girls; mean age 15.0+/-1.0). Total daily energy expenditure (TDEE) and its components (energy expenditure during sleep, during rest and in physical activity) and times spent at different intensity levels (sedentary, light, moderate physical activity and vigorous physical activity) were compared. TDEE from heart rate monitoring averaged 10.9+/-2.7 MJ x d(-1) compared to 11.3+/-2.3 MJ x d(-1) from the activity diary (NS). The limits of agreement (mean+/-2 SD) were -3.54 MJ x d(-1) and 2.74 MJ x d(-1). There was no significant difference for any of the TDEE components between the methods (MANOVA). A significant method effect (P<0.001) was observed for time spent in sedentary and light physical activity (MANOVA). No significant difference was observed for time spent in moderate and vigorous physical activity. According to this, heart rate monitoring and activity diary are comparable for group assessment of TDEE and its components, and for estimating time spent in moderate and vigorous physical activity. The activity diary underestimated time spent in moderate and vigorous physical activity for inactive subjects and consequently overestimated highly active subjects.

  • 21.
    Ekelund, Ulf
    et al.
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Medical Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Physical Education and Health, Örebro of University, Örebro, Sweden .
    Yngve, Agneta
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Medical Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Sjöström, Michael
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Medical Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Physical Education and Health, Örebro of University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Westerterp, Klaas
    Department of Human Biology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, Netherlands .
    Field evaluation of the Computer Science and Application's Inc. Activity monitor during running and skating training in adolescent athletes2000In: International Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0172-4622, E-ISSN 1439-3964, Vol. 21, no 8, p. 586-592Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the validity of the CSA activity monitor for assessment of the total amount of physical activity in adolescent athletes. Activity data were compared to data on daily energy expenditure and its derivatives measured by the doubly labeled water method. Seven athletes (speed skaters) with a mean age of 18.2+/-1.1 y were monitored twice (off-season and pre-season) by the activity monitor for eight consecutive days. The primary training during the off-season period was running whereas the pre-season period mainly involved skate training (i.e. inline skating, slideboard training, and skating imitations). Activity counts were significantly correlated to all energy estimates during the off-season period (r=0.93-0.96; P<0.01) whereas not during the pre-season period (r=0.32-0.57). A two-way multivariate analysis of variance showed a significant period effect for activity counts (668+/-163 vs. 548+/-91; P=0.026) whereas not for total daily energy expenditure (15.7+/-2.1 MJ x d(-1) vs. 16.0+/-1.0 MJ x d(-1); P=0.71). The relationship between activity counts and total daily energy expenditure seems to be affected by different training conditions. Therefore these circumstances have to be carefully considered in the interpretation of activity monitor data.

  • 22.
    Ekelund, Ulf
    et al.
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition at Novum, Department of Medical Nutrition/Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Physical Education and Health, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition at Novum, Department of Medical Nutrition/Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Westerterp, Klaas
    Department of Human Biology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
    Sjöström, Michael
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition at Novum, Department of Medical Nutrition/Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Energy expenditure assessed by heart rate and doubly labeled water in young athletes2002In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, E-ISSN 1530-0315, Vol. 34, no 8, p. 1360-1366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To compare total energy expenditure (TEE) estimated by the FLEX heart rate (HR) method with that measured by the doubly labeled water (DLW) technique in young speed skaters. We hypothesized that the accuracy of FLEX HR-estimated TEE would be affected by a) the definition of the FLEX HR and b) the type of training regimen.

    METHODS: Eight young athletes (mean age 18.2 +/- 1.3 yr) underwent measurements during two 10-d training periods: an off-season period with voluntary training (predominantly running) and a preseason period mainly focused on skating technique training. TEE was measured simultaneously by the DLW and FLEX HR methods. FLEX HR1 was defined as the mean of the HRs during all resting calibration activities and the lowest HR during exercising calibration activities. FLEX HR2 was defined as the mean of the highest HR during resting activities and the lowest HR during exercising.

    RESULTS: ANOVA showed that FLEX HR1 was significantly lower than FLEX HR2 (mean of both periods; 77 +/- 5 vs 84 +/- 6 beats.min(-1); P = 0.004). TEE values obtained by DLW were 16.8 +/- 3.8 and 16.9 +/- 2.9 MJ.d(-1) in the two periods, respectively. TEE values calculated from FLEX HR1 were 17.8 +/- 3.6 and 17.4 +/- 2.6 MJ.d(-1), and those from FLEX HR2 17.1 +/- 3.1 and 17.0 +/- 2.7 MJ.d-1, respectively. No significant period (P = 0.83) or method (P = 0.44) effect on TEE was observed.

    CONCLUSION: FLEX HR-estimated TEE was not affected by the definition of the FLEX HR or by the type of training regimen as compared with TEE measured by the DLW method in young athletes.

  • 23.
    Ekelund, Ulf
    et al.
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Medical Nutrition/Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Physical Education and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; .
    Åman, Jan
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Medical Nutrition/Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Renman, Cecilia
    Department of Pediatrics, Örebro Medical Center, Örebro, Sweden .
    Westerterp, Klaas
    Department of Human Biology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, Netherlands.
    Sjöström, Michael
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Medical Nutrition/Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Physical activity but not energy expenditure is reduced in obese adolescents: a case-control study2002In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 76, no 5, p. 935-941Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The influence of physical activity on body weight in children and adolescents is controversial.

    OBJECTIVE: The objective was to test the hypothesis that the intensity and duration of physical activity differ between obese and normal-weight adolescents, with no difference in estimated energy expenditure.

    DESIGN: We compared physical activity in 18 (8 males, 10 females) obese [body mass index (in kg/m(2)) > 30] adolescents (14-19 y) with that in a matched, normal-weight (BMI < 27) control group. Total energy expenditure (TEE) was measured with the doubly labeled water method, and physical activity was measured simultaneously by accelerometry. The physical activity level was determined as the ratio of TEE to the resting metabolic rate (RMR) and activity energy expenditure as 0.9 TEE minus RMR. Accelerometry data included total physical activity (counts x min(-1) x d(-1)), accumulated and continuous duration of activity, and continuous 10-min periods of physical activity of moderate intensity.

    RESULTS: There was no significant difference in adjusted (analysis of covariance) TEE, RMR, or AEE between groups. The physical activity level was significantly lower (P < 0.05) in the obese group. No sex x group interaction was observed. Differences in total physical activity (P < 0.001), accumulated time (P < 0.05), continuous time (P < 0.01), and continuous 10-min periods of physical activity of moderate intensity (P < 0.01) were observed between groups.

    CONCLUSIONS: Obese adolescents are less physically active than are normal-weight adolescents, but physical activity-related energy expenditure is not significantly different between groups. The data suggest that physical activity is not necessarily equivalent to the energy costs of activity.

  • 24.
    Enwald, Heidi
    et al.
    University of Oulu.
    Kangas, Maarit
    University of Oulu.
    Keränen, Niina
    University of Oulu.
    Korpelainen, Raija
    University of Oulu and Oulu Deaconess Institute.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Jämsä, Timo
    University of Oulu.
    Opinions and use of mobile information technology among older people in Northern Finland: Preliminary results of a population based study2016In: Proceedings of the 2016 ASIS&T Annual Meeting, Oct 14-18, Copenhagen / [ed] Andrew Grove and Diane H. Sonnenwald and Lauren Harrison and Catherine Blake and Christian Schlögl and Isabella Peters and Barbara Endler-Jobst and Colleen Cool and Yin-Leng Theng, Silver Springs, MD: ASIS&T , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Older peoples usage of mobile devices is increasing. This study is part of the GASEL project and seeks to increase the understanding of the use of mobile information technology and opinions towards it. Opinions are compared between genders and age groups. The population based data were collected by conducting a questionnaire survey. A random sample of 1,500 adults 65 years of age or older was obtained from the Finnish Population Register Centre. The number of respondents was 918 with a response rate of 61.2 %. About one fifth (n=169) had used a tablet computer and approximately one third (n=226) had used a mobile phone with a touch screen in the past 12 months without encountering major difficulties. The respondents had mostly thought that using the devices would not be easy. They had also thought that the usage would not be too expensive for them. Men and younger old people held more positive opinions towards these new technologies. Older people are slower in adapting and accepting new technologies and this should be taken into account when designing services, applications and content, as these technologies have the potential to enrichen the lives of this specific population group.

  • 25.
    Eriksson Crommert, Martin
    et al.
    Univ Orebro, Fac Med & Hlth, SE-70182 Orebro, Sweden.;Swedish Sch Sport & Hlth Sci GIH, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Halvorsen, Kjartan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Systems and Control. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Automatic control. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Technol & Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ekblom, Maria M.
    Swedish Sch Sport & Hlth Sci GIH, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Trunk Muscle Activation at the Initiation and Braking of Bilateral Shoulder Flexion Movements of Different Amplitudes2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 11, article id e0141777Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate if trunk muscle activation patterns during rapid bilateral shoulder flexions are affected by movement amplitude. Eleven healthy males performed shoulder flexion movements starting from a position with arms along sides (0 degrees) to either 45 degrees, 90 degrees or 180 degrees. EMG was measured bilaterally from transversus abdominis (TrA), obliquus internus (OI) with intra-muscular electrodes, and from rectus abdominis (RA), erector spinae (ES) and deltoideus with surface electrodes. 3D kinematics was recorded and inverse dynamics was used to calculate the reactive linear forces and torque about the shoulders and the linear and angular impulses. The sequencing of trunk muscle onsets at the initiation of arm movements was the same across movement amplitudes with ES as the first muscle activated, followed by TrA, RA and OI. All arm movements induced a flexion angular impulse about the shoulders during acceleration that was reversed during deceleration. Increased movement amplitude led to shortened onset latencies of the abdominal muscles and increased level of activation in TrA and ES. The activation magnitude of TrA was similar in acceleration and deceleration where the other muscles were specific to acceleration or deceleration. The findings show that arm movements need to be standardized when used as a method to evaluate trunk muscle activation patterns and that inclusion of the deceleration of the arms in the analysis allow the study of the relationship between trunk muscle activation and direction of perturbing torque during one and the same arm movement.

  • 26.
    Gilenstam, Kajsa
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Idrottsmedicin.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin.
    Henriksson-Larsén, Karin
    Umeå universitet, Idrottsmedicin.
    Gendered expectations and structural conditions in ice hockeyIn: Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, ISSN 0270-1367, E-ISSN 2168-3824Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using player questionnaires (72 women, 42 men) and club staff interviews, this paper provides an analysis of the effect of structural conditions on expectations of support and hindrance. In spite of large structural conditions women and men rated similar levels of support and hindrance. Yet, both women and men believed that the situation in sport was better for men. The adult women’s lower expectations may be an indication of their awareness of their lower status within their sport. When comparisons are made between women and men in sport it is important to consider that gender operates at different levels and may affect conditions as well as expectations

  • 27.
    Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L.
    et al.
    Loughborough Univ Technol, Sch Sport Exercise & Hlth Sci, Peter Harrison Ctr Disabil Sport, Loughborough, Leics, England;Loughborough Univ Technol, Sch Sport Exercise & Hlth Sci, Natl Ctr Sport & Exercise Med, Loughborough, Leics, England.
    van der Scheer, Jan W.
    Loughborough Univ Technol, Sch Sport Exercise & Hlth Sci, Peter Harrison Ctr Disabil Sport, Loughborough, Leics, England;Loughborough Univ Technol, Sch Sport Exercise & Hlth Sci, Natl Ctr Sport & Exercise Med, Loughborough, Leics, England.
    Lexell, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Clements, Kristen
    Loughborough Univ Technol, Sch Sport Exercise & Hlth Sci, Natl Ctr Sport & Exercise Med, Loughborough, Leics, England.
    Ginis, Kathleen A. Martin
    Univ British Columbia, ICORD, Sch Hlth & Exercise Sci, Dept Med,Fac Med, Kelowna, BC, Canada.
    Development of scientific exercise guidelines for adults with spinal cord injury2018In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 52, no 18, p. 1166-1167Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    Niia, Anna
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    School of Education and Communication, Jönköping University.
    Simeonsson, Rune
    Maxwell, Gregory
    School of Education and Communication, Jönköping University.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    School of Education and Communication, Jönköping University.
    Eriksson-Augustine, Lilly
    Pless, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Differentiating activity and participation of children and youth with disability in Sweden: a third qualifier in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health for Children and Youth?2012In: American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, ISSN 0894-9115, E-ISSN 1537-7385, Vol. 91, no 13:S1, p. S84-S96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    This article discusses the use of a third qualifier, subjective experience of involvement, as a supplement to the qualifiers of capacity and performance, to anchor activity and participation as separate endpoints on a continuum of actions.

    DESIGN:

    Empirical data from correlational studies were used for secondary analyses. The analyses were focused on the conceptual roots of the participation construct as indicated by the focus of policy documents, the support for a third qualifier as indicated by correlational data, differences between self-ratings and ratings by others in measuring subjective experience of involvement, and the empirical support for a split between activity and participation in different domains of the activity and participation component.

    RESULTS:

    Participation seems to have two conceptual roots, one sociologic and one psychologic. The correlational pattern between the qualifiers of capacity, performance, and subjective experience of involvement indicates a possible split between activity and participation. Self-ratings of participation provide information not obtained through ratings by others, and later domains in the activities and participation component fit better with measures of experienced involvement than earlier domains did.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The results from secondary analyses provide preliminary support for the use of a third qualifier measuring subjective experience of involvement to facilitate the split between activity and participation in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth version, activity and participation domain.

  • 29. Guidetti, Susanne
    et al.
    Ytterberg, Charlotte
    Ekstam, Lisa
    Johansson, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Changes in the impact of stroke between 3 and 12 months post-stroke, assessed with the Stroke Impact Scale2014In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 46, no 10, p. 963-968Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To examine data collected using the Stroke Impact Scale 3.0 (SIS) at 3 and 12 months post-stroke, and to explore any clinically meaningful changes in everyday life in relation to age, gender and stroke severity. Design: Prospective longitudinal study. Methods: A total of 204 persons were assessed using the SIS at 3 and 12 months after onset of stroke. Changes in domain scores were calculated over time and in relation to age, gender and stroke severity. Results: The Strength, Hand Function and Participation domains had the highest perceived impact at 3 and 12 months, indicating problems in everyday life. Stroke recovery was perceived to be significantly higher at 12 than at 3 months irrespective of stroke severity, age or gender. The impact on the Strength and Emotion domains was significantly lower at 12 months than at 3 months. Most clinically meaningful changes, both positive and negative ( 15 points), were seen in the Participation domain and in Stroke recovery. Few changes were associated with age, gender or stroke severity. Conclusion: Both positive and negative clinically meaningful changes related to impact of stroke were found between 3 and 12 months post-stroke. Therefore it is important to pay close attention to patients' perceptions of their everyday life situation during rehabilitation and at discharge.

  • 30. Guidetti, Susanne
    et al.
    Ytterberg, Charlotte
    Ekstam, Lisa
    Johansson, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Changes in the impact of stroke between 3 and 12 months post-stroke, assessed with the Stroke Impact Scale2014In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 46, no 10, p. 963-968Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To examine data collected using the Stroke Impact Scale 3.0 (SIS) at 3 and 12 months post-stroke, and to explore any clinically meaningful changes in everyday life in relation to age, gender and stroke severity. Design: Prospective longitudinal study. Methods: A total of 204 persons were assessed using the SIS at 3 and 12 months after onset of stroke. Changes in domain scores were calculated over time and in relation to age, gender and stroke severity. Results: The Strength, Hand Function and Participation domains had the highest perceived impact at 3 and 12 months, indicating problems in everyday life. Stroke recovery was perceived to be significantly higher at 12 than at 3 months irrespective of stroke severity, age or gender. The impact on the Strength and Emotion domains was significantly lower at 12 months than at 3 months. Most clinically meaningful changes, both positive and negative ( 15 points), were seen in the Participation domain and in Stroke recovery. Few changes were associated with age, gender or stroke severity. Conclusion: Both positive and negative clinically meaningful changes related to impact of stroke were found between 3 and 12 months post-stroke. Therefore it is important to pay close attention to patients' perceptions of their everyday life situation during rehabilitation and at discharge.

  • 31.
    Halvorsen, Kjartan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Systems and Control. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Automatic control.
    Eriksson, Martin
    Gullstrand, Lennart
    Acute Effects of Reducing Vertical Displacement and Step Frequency on Running Economy2012In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, ISSN 1064-8011, E-ISSN 1533-4287, Vol. 26, no 8, p. 2065-2070Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work studies the immediate effects of altering the vertical displacement of the center of mass (VD) and step frequency (SF) on the metabolic cost of level treadmill running at 16 km.h(-1) on 16 male runners. Alterations of VD, SF, and the product VD x SF was induced using a novel feedback system, which presents target and current values to the runner by visual or auditory display. Target values were set to 5 and 10% reductions from individual baseline values. The results were expressed as relative changes from baseline values. Alterations led to an increase in metabolic cost in most cases, measured as (V) over dotO(2) uptake per minute and kilogram of body mass. Correlations were weak. Still, linear multiple regression revealed a positive coefficient (0.28) for the relationship between VD x SF and (V) over dotO(2). Separate rank correlation tests showed negative correlation (tau = -0.19) between SF and (V) over dotO(2) and positive correlation (tau = 0.16) between VD and (V) over dotO(2). There is a coupling between VD and SF caused by the mechanics of running; hence, isolated reduction of either factor was hard to achieve. The linear model also showed a negative coefficient for the relationship between the height of the center of mass above the ground (CoMh) and (V) over dotO(2). The effect size was small (multiple R-2 0.07 and 0.12). Still the results indicate that reducing VD x SF by reducing the vertical displacement can have a positive effect on running economy, but a concurrent reduction in CoMh may diminish the positive effect. Midterm and long-term effects of altering the technique should also be studied.

  • 32.
    Halvorsen, Kjartan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Systems and Control. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Automatic control.
    Tinmark, Fredrik
    Arndt, Anton
    The concept of mobility in single- and double handed manipulation2014In: Journal of Biomechanics, ISSN 0021-9290, E-ISSN 1873-2380, Vol. 47, no 14, p. 3569-3573Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of mobility describes an important property of the human body when performing manipulation tasks. It describes, in a sense, how easy it is to accelerate a link or a point on the manipulator. Most often it is calculated for the end-link or end-point of the manipulator, since these are important for the control objective of the manipulator. Mobility is the inverse of the inertia experienced by a force acting on the end-point, or a combined force and torque acting on the end-link. The concept has been used in studies of reaching tasks with one arm, but thus far not for bi-manual manipulation. We present here the concept for both single-handed and double-handed manipulation, in a general manner which includes any type of grip of the hands on the object. The use of the concept is illustrated with data on the left and right arm in a golf swing.

  • 33.
    Hedenborg White, Manon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, History of Religions.
    Hedenborg, Susanna
    Changes and variations in patterns of gender relations in equestrian sports during the second half of the twentieth century2012In: Sport in Society: Cultures, Media, Politics, Commerce, ISSN 1743-0437, E-ISSN 1743-0445, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 302-319Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Hedenborg White, Manon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, History of Religions.
    Hedenborg, Susanna
    Malmö högskola.
    From glamour to drudgery. Changing patterns in the equine sector: A comparative study of Sweden and Great Britain in the 20th century.2013In: Gender and equestrian sport: Riding around the world / [ed] Miriam Adelman & Jorge Knijnik, Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, 2013, p. 15-36Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Hurtig-Wennlöf, Anita
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för klinisk medicin.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Sjöström, Michael
    Changes in aerobic fitness in Swedish children and adolescents2006In: Journal of Physical Activity and Health, ISSN 1543-3080, E-ISSN 1543-5474, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 79-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Steadily declining physical activity, especially among children, and the possible adverse health outcomes such behavior could precede, is a general concern. We evaluated whether a presumed decrease in physical activity has been accompanied with a decrease in aerobic fitness of Swedish children. Methods: A maximum cycle ergometer test  was performed in 935 children age 9 and 15 y, and the results were compared with previously reported data. Results: Estimated peak oxygen uptake (mL · kg-1 · min-1) in 9-y-old subjects was 37.3 in girls and 42.8 in boys; and in 15-y-olds, 40.4 in girls and 51.5 in boys. In the 9-y-olds, aerobic fitness remained lower in the current study compared to earlier data, but in the 15-y-olds the result did not differ from the 1952 data after adjustment for methodological differences. Conclusion: Our results suggest a change towards decreased aerobic fitness in 9-y-old, but not in 15-y-old, Swedish children during a 50-y time span.

  • 36.
    Hurtig-Wennlöf, Anita
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för klinisk medicin.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Sjöström, Michael
    Changes in aerobic fitness in Swedish children and adolescents2006In: Journal of Physical Activity and Health, ISSN 1543-3080, E-ISSN 1543-5474, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 79-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Steadily declining physical activity, especially among children, and the possible adverse health outcomes such behavior could precede, is a general concern. We evaluated whether a presumed decrease in physical activity has been accompanied with a decrease in aerobic fitness of Swedish children. Methods: A maximum cycle ergometer test  was performed in 935 children age 9 and 15 y, and the results were compared with previously reported data. Results: Estimated peak oxygen uptake (mL · kg-1 · min-1) in 9-y-old subjects was 37.3 in girls and 42.8 in boys; and in 15-y-olds, 40.4 in girls and 51.5 in boys. In the 9-y-olds, aerobic fitness remained lower in the current study compared to earlier data, but in the 15-y-olds the result did not differ from the 1952 data after adjustment for methodological differences. Conclusion: Our results suggest a change towards decreased aerobic fitness in 9-y-old, but not in 15-y-old, Swedish children during a 50-y time span.

  • 37.
    Lightfoot, J. Timothy
    et al.
    Texas A&M Univ, Dept Hlth & Kinesiol, College Stn, TX USA;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Genet & Biol Determinants Phys Act Consortium Gen, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    De Geus, Eco J. C.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Genet & Biol Determinants Phys Act Consortium Gen, Amsterdam, Netherlands;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Dept Biol Psychol, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Booth, Frank W.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Genet & Biol Determinants Phys Act Consortium Gen, Amsterdam, Netherlands;Univ Missouri, Dept Nutr & Exercise Physiol, Columbia, MO USA;Univ Missouri, Dept Biomed Sci, Columbia, MO USA.
    Bray, Molly S.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Genet & Biol Determinants Phys Act Consortium Gen, Amsterdam, Netherlands;Univ Texas Austin, Dept Nutr Sci, Austin, TX USA.
    den Hoed, Marcel
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Genet & Biol Determinants Phys Act Consortium Gen, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Kaprio, Jaakko
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Genet & Biol Determinants Phys Act Consortium Gen, Amsterdam, Netherlands;Univ Helsinki, Dept Publ Hlth, Helsinki, Finland;Univ Helsinki, Inst Mol Med FIMM, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kelly, Scott A.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Genet & Biol Determinants Phys Act Consortium Gen, Amsterdam, Netherlands;Ohio Wesleyan Univ, Dept Zool, Delaware, OH 43015 USA.
    Pomp, Daniel
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Genet & Biol Determinants Phys Act Consortium Gen, Amsterdam, Netherlands;Univ N Carolina, Dept Genet, Chapel Hill, NC USA.
    Saul, Michael C.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Genet & Biol Determinants Phys Act Consortium Gen, Amsterdam, Netherlands;Univ Illinois, Carl R Woese Inst Genom Biol, Urbana, IL USA.
    Thomis, Martine A.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Genet & Biol Determinants Phys Act Consortium Gen, Amsterdam, Netherlands;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Dept Movement Sci, Fac Kinesiol & Rehabil Sci, Leuven, Belgium.
    Garland, Theodore, Jr.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Genet & Biol Determinants Phys Act Consortium Gen, Amsterdam, Netherlands;Univ Calif Riverside, Dept Evolut Ecol & Organismal Biol, Riverside, CA 92521 USA.
    Bouchard, Claude
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Genet & Biol Determinants Phys Act Consortium Gen, Amsterdam, Netherlands;Pennington Biomed Res Ctr, Human Genom Lab, 6400 Perkins Rd, Baton Rouge, LA 70808 USA.
    Biological/Genetic Regulation of Physical Activity Level: Consensus From Genbiopac2018In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, E-ISSN 1530-0315, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 863-873Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Physical activity unquestionably maintains and improves health; however, physical activity levels globally are low and not rising despite all the resources devoted to this goal. Attention in both the research literature and the public policy domain has focused on social-behavioral factors; however, a growing body of literature suggests that biological determinants play a significant role in regulating physical activity levels. For instance, physical activity level, measured in various manners, has a genetic component in both humans and nonhuman animal models. This consensus article, developed as a result of an American College of Sports Medicine-sponsored round table, provides a brief review of the theoretical concepts and existing literature that supports a significant role of genetic and other biological factors in the regulation of physical activity.

    Conclusions: Future research on physical activity regulation should incorporate genetics and other biological determinants of physical activity instead of a sole reliance on social and other environmental determinants.

  • 38.
    Lindelöf, Karin S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research. Norges idrettshøgskole.
    Män i lycra och kvinnor i skägg: En feministisk betraktelse över villkor för motionsloppsdeltagande (Blogginlägg, kortversion)2015Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 39.
    Neander, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Philosophy.
    Dissertatio academica, de origine ludorum aleatoriorum, eorumque usu in interpretandis auctoribus, quam ... præses Andreas Neander, ... et respondens Nicolaus Petrus Isenberg, Smolandi, publice examinandam proponunt, in audit Caroli. maj. d. XIX. Novembr. anni MDCCLVII. H. A. M. S.1757Dissertation (older thesis) (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Nilsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Ekelund, Ulf
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Sjöström, Michael
    Assessing physical activity among children with accelerometers using different time sampling intervals and placements2002In: Pediatric Exercise Science, ISSN 0899-8493, E-ISSN 1543-2920, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 87-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to investigate (a) the effect of five different time sampling intervals (epoch settings) on different intensity levels when assessing physical activity with an accelerometer (CSA, WAM 7164), and (b) whether the placement of the monitor (on the hip and back) would affect the outcome. Sixteen children (aged 7 yrs) were monitored for four consecutive days. A significant main epoch effect was found for time spent at very high (p < 01) and high (p < 01) intensity activities. No significant difference between the two placements regarding total amount of physical activity (cnts times mm super (-1)) or different intensity levels was observed. In conclusion, different time sampling intervals, but not placement, should be carefully considered when assessing physical activity.

  • 41.
    Nilsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Ekelund, Ulf
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Sjöström, Michael
    Assessing physical activity among children with accelerometers using different time sampling intervals and placements2002In: Pediatric Exercise Science, ISSN 0899-8493, E-ISSN 1543-2920, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 87-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to investigate (a) the effect of five different time sampling intervals (epoch settings) on different intensity levels when assessing physical activity with an accelerometer (CSA, WAM 7164), and (b) whether the placement of the monitor (on the hip and back) would affect the outcome. Sixteen children (aged 7 yrs) were monitored for four consecutive days. A significant main epoch effect was found for time spent at very high (p < 01) and high (p < 01) intensity activities. No significant difference between the two placements regarding total amount of physical activity (cnts times mm super (-1)) or different intensity levels was observed. In conclusion, different time sampling intervals, but not placement, should be carefully considered when assessing physical activity.

  • 42. Nilsson, Johnny
    et al.
    Tinmark, Fredrik
    Halvorsen, Kjartan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Systems and Control. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Automatic control.
    Arndt, Anton
    Kinematic, kinetic and electromyographic adaptation to speed and resistance in double poling cross country skiing2013In: European Journal of Applied Physiology, ISSN 1439-6319, E-ISSN 1439-6327, Vol. 113, no 6, p. 1385-1394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study incorporated variations in speed and the horizontal resistance acting upon elite female skiers during double poling (DP) on a treadmill and specifically analyzed biomechanical adaptations to these variations. Whole body kinematics and pole force data were recorded and used to calculate the moment of force acting on the shoulder and elbow joints. Data were obtained with a 3D optoelectronic system using reflective markers at given anatomical landmarks. Forces along the long axis of the right pole were measured with a piezoelectric force transducer. Surface electrodes were used to record EMG activity in the rectus femoris, rectus abdominis, latissimus dorsi and triceps brachii muscles. In a first set of recordings, the participants double poled with zero elevation at five different speeds from 8 to 17 km h(-1). In a second set of recordings, horizontal resistance was added by weights (0.4-1.9 kg) attached to a pulley system pulling the skier posteriorly during DP at 14 km h(-1). Results showed increasing relative duration of the thrust phase with increasing resistance, but not with speed. Significant kinematic differences occurred with increase in both speed and resistance. The mean (+/- SD) horizontal force components ranged between 1.7 (+/- 1.3) and 2.8 (+/- 1.1) percent (%) bodyweight (BW) in the speed adaptation and 3.1 (+/- 0.6) and 4.0 (+/- 1.3) % BW in the adaptation to horizontal resistance. Peak muscle activity showed a central to peripheral (proximo-distal) activation sequence. The temporal cycle phase pattern in the adaptation to speed and horizontal resistance differed.

  • 43.
    Ring-Dimitriou, Susanne
    et al.
    Paris Lodron Univ, Dept Sport Sci & Kinesiol, A-5020 Salzburg, Austria;ECOG, B-1000 Brussels, Belgium.
    Krustrup, Peter
    Univ Southern Denmark, Dept Sports Sci & Clin Biomech, SDU Sport & Hlth Sci Cluster SHSC, DK-5000 Odense, Denmark.
    Coelho-E-Silva, Manuel J.
    Univ Coimbra, Fac Sport Sci & Phys Educ, P-3000 Coimbra, Portugal.
    Mota, Jorge
    Univ Porto, Fac Sport, Res Ctr Phys Act Hlth & Leisure CIAFEL, P-4000 Porto, Portugal.
    Seabra, Andera
    Univ Porto, Fac Sport, Res Ctr Phys Act Hlth & Leisure CIAFEL, P-4000 Porto, Portugal.
    Rego, Carla
    Univ Porto, Fac Med, Ctr Res Hlth Technol & Informat Syst CINTESIS, P-4000 Porto, Portugal.
    Mazur, Artur
    ECOG, B-1000 Brussels, Belgium;Univ Rzeszow, Dept Pediat, Clin Prov Hosp 2 Rzeszow, Fac Med, PL-35301 Rzeszow, Poland.
    Vlachopapadopoulou, Elpis
    ECOG, B-1000 Brussels, Belgium;Childrens Hosp P&A Kyriakou, Dept Endocrinol, Athens 10431, Greece.
    Caroli, Margerita
    ECOG, B-1000 Brussels, Belgium.
    Frelut, Marie-Laure
    ECOG, B-1000 Brussels, Belgium;Brindisi Hosp, Dept Paediat, I-72100 Brindisi, Italy.
    Erhardt, Eva
    ECOG, B-1000 Brussels, Belgium;Univ Pecs, Dept Paediat, H-7600 Pecs, Hungary.
    Forslund, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. ECOG, B-1000 Brussels, Belgium.
    Boyland, Ema
    ECOG, B-1000 Brussels, Belgium;Univ Liverpool, Appetite & Obes Res Grp, Dept Psychol Sci, Liverpool L69 7ZA, Merseyside, England.
    Weghuber, Daniel
    ECOG, B-1000 Brussels, Belgium;Paracelsus Med Univ, Dept Pediat, Obes Res Unit, A-5020 Salzburg, Austria.
    Thivel, David
    ECOG, B-1000 Brussels, Belgium;Clermont Auvergne Univ, Lab Metab Adaptat Exercise Physiol & Pathol Condi, Auvergne Reg Ctr Human Nutr, F-63000 Clermont Ferrand, France.
    Could sport be part of pediatric obesity prevention and treatment?: Expert conclusions from the 28th European Childhood Obesity Group Congress2019In: Journal of Sport and Health Science, ISSN 2095-2546, E-ISSN 2213-2961, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 350-352Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Robinson, Yohan
    et al.
    Charité – Campus Benjamin Franklin, Institute of Sports Medicine, Berlin, Germany.
    Cristancho, Edgar
    Böning, Dieter
    An optimized method for the assay of the red blood cell-age-related enzyme aspartate aminotransferase2004In: Laboratory Hematology, ISSN 1080-2924, E-ISSN 1523-6528, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 144-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three methods of preparation of red blood cell concentrate for erythrocyte aspartate aminotransferase measurement were compared: (1) filtration of whole blood through a cellulose column (n = 36); (2) washing of whole blood and aspiration of buffy coat after centrifugation (n = 48); (3) optimized method with washing without aspiration of buffy coat (n = 229).

  • 45.
    Robinson, Yohan
    et al.
    Charité – Campus Benjamin Franklin, Centre of Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery, Berlin, Germany.
    Cristancho, Edgar
    Böning, Dieter
    Erythrocyte aspartate aminotransferase activity as a possible indirect marker for stimulated erythropoiesis in male and female athletes2007In: Laboratory Hematology, ISSN 1080-2924, E-ISSN 1523-6528, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 49-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A reliable and cost-effective screening test for erythropoietin (EPO) doping is still unavailable. Thus a new approach by estimating mean red blood cell (RBC) age by means of erythrocyte aspartate aminotransferase activity (eAST) was developed. We investigated 201 women and 169 men residing at low altitude for peak oxygen uptake, EPO, and eAST. Additionally, we investigated 63 women and 42 men residing at 2600 m above sea level for EPO and eAST. Furthermore, 22 female and 28 male patients with renal failure receiving recombinant human EPO (rhEPO) were investigated for eAST levels. There was no difference in eAST between trained (women, 2.9+/-0.7 U x gHb(-1); men, 2.5+/-0.4 U x gHb(-1)), moderately trained (women, 2.8+/-0.6 U x gHb(-1); men, 2.4+/-0.4 U x gHb(-1)), and untrained subjects (women, 3.0+/-0.5 U x gHb(-1); men, 2.5+/-0.4 U.gHb-1) at low altitude. Participants receiving rhEPO had a dose-dependent increase in eAST (r=0.25; P< .05). Trained high-altitude residents (women, 2.8+/-0.8 U x gHb(-1); men, 3.0+/-1.1 U x gHb(-1)) had higher eAST than untrained high-altitude residents (women, 2.5+/-0.6 U.gHb-1; men, 2.4+/-0.4 U x gHb(-1); P< .05). Since eAST was sensitive to RBC rejuvenation, eAST elevation could indicate EPO use in lowlanders. eAST values above the 95% confidence interval (>3.3 U x gHb(-1) for men; >4.1 U x gHb(-1) for women) are suspected of EPO use.

  • 46.
    Robinson, Yohan
    et al.
    Charite´–Campus Benjamin Franklin, Institute for Sports Medicine, Berlin, Germany.
    Cristancho, Edgar
    Böning, Dieter
    Intravascular hemolysis and mean red blood cell age in athletes2006In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, E-ISSN 1530-0315, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 480-483Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Since the observation that mechanical stress causes red blood cell (RBC) destruction, foot-strike hemolysis has been used to explain sports anemia and RBC rejuvenation in athletes. Recently gained knowledge questions the importance of mechanical RBC trauma on RBC hemolysis in athletes.

    METHODS: Male athletes (N = 90) and untrained male controls (N = 58) were investigated for aerobic performance, hematological parameters, serum erythropoietin concentration (EPO), soluble transferrin receptor concentration (sTFR), and erythrocyte aspartate aminotransferase activity (eAST).

    RESULTS: On hard floor running disciplines (HFR, N = 26, short- and long-distance runners, triathletes) showed a lower eAST (P < 0.001) and thus no younger RBC population than not on hard floor running athletes (NHFR, N = 64, cyclists, soccer players, others) or the untrained control group (N = 58). HFR had higher but still normal EPO (P < 0.01) and no higher sTFR.

    CONCLUSION: Because intravascular hemolysis occurs in swimmers, cyclists, and runners, and mean RBC age is not reduced in runners, mechanisms other than foot-strike hemolysis have to be considered as well. Possible reasons are intramuscular destruction, osmotic stress, and membrane lipid peroxidation caused by free radicals released by activated leukocytes. Intravascular hemolysis can even be regarded as physiological means to provide heme and proteins for muscle growth.

  • 47.
    Schoffelen, Paul F. M.
    et al.
    Maastricht Univ, Med Ctr, NUTRIM Sch Nutr Toxicol & Metab, Dept Human Biol, Maastricht, Netherlands;Maastricht Univ, Med Ctr, NUTRIM Sch Nutr Toxicol & Metab, Dept Nutr & Movement Sci, Maastricht, Netherlands.
    den Hoed, Marcel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    van Breda, Eric
    Univ Antwerp, Dept Rehabil Sci & Physiotherapy, MOVANT, Fac Med & Hlth Sci, Antwerp, Belgium.
    Plasqui, Guy
    Maastricht Univ, Med Ctr, NUTRIM Sch Nutr Toxicol & Metab, Dept Nutr & Movement Sci, Maastricht, Netherlands.
    Test-retest variability of VO2max using total-capture indirect calorimetry reveals linear relationship of VO2 and Power2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 213-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to analyze the intra-individual variation in VO2max of human subjects using total-capture and free-flow indirect calorimetry. Twenty-seven men (27 ± 5 year; VO2max 49-79 mL•kg-1 •min-1) performed two maximal exertion tests (CPETs) on a cycle ergometer, separated by a 7 ± 2 day interval. VO2 and VCO2 were assessed using an indirect calorimeter (Omnical) with total capture of exhalation in a free-flow airstream. Thirteen subjects performed a third maximal exertion test using a breath-by-breath calorimeter (Oxycon Pro). On-site validation was deemed a requirement. For the Omnical, the mean within-subject CV for VO2max was 1.2 ± 0.9% (0.0%-4.4%) and for ergometer workload P max 1.3 ± 1.3% (0%-4.6%). VO2max values with the Oxycon Pro were significantly lower in comparison with Omnical (P< t 0.001; t test) with mean 3570 vs 4061 and difference SD 361 mL • min-1. Validation results for the Omnical with methanol combustion were -0.05 ± 0.70% (mean ± SD; n = 31) at the 225 mL • min-1 VO2 level and -0.23 ± 0.80% (n = 31) at the 150 mL • min-1 VCO2 level. Results using gas infusion were 0.04 ± 0.75% (n = 34) and -0.99 ± 1.05% (n = 24) over the respective 500-6000 mL • min-1 VO2 and VCO2 ranges. Validation results for the Oxycon Pro in breath-by-breath mode were - 2.2 ± 1.6% (n = 12) for VO2 and 5.7 ± 3.3% (n = 12) for VCO2 over the 1000-4000 mL •min-1 range. On a Visual analog scale, participants reported improved breathing using the free-flow indirect calorimetry (score 7.6 ± 1.2 vs 5.1 ± 2.7, P = 0.008). We conclude that total capturing free-flow indirect calorimetry is suitable for measuring VO2 even with the highest range. VO2max was linear with the incline in P max over the full range.

  • 48.
    Sjögren, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Fisher, Rachel
    Kallings, Lena
    Svenson, Ulrika
    Roos, Goran
    Hellenius, Mai-Lis
    Stand up for health-avoiding sedentary behaviour might lengthen your telomeres: secondary outcomes from a physical activity RCT in older people2014In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 48, no 19, p. 1407-1409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Telomere length has been associated with a healthy lifestyle and longevity. However, the effect of increased physical activity on telomere length is still unknown. Therefore, the aim was to study the relationship between changes in physical activity level and sedentary behaviour and changes in telomere length. Methods Telomere length was measured in blood cells 6 months apart in 49, 68-year-old, sedentary, overweight individuals taking part in a randomised controlled physical activity intervention trial. The intervention group received individualised physical activity on prescription. Physical activity was measured with a 7-day diary, questionnaires and a pedometer. Sitting time was measured with the short version of The International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Results Time spent exercising as well as steps per day increased significantly in the intervention group. Reported sitting time decreased in both groups. No significant associations between changes in steps per day and changes in telomere length were noted. In the intervention group, there was a negative correlation between changes in time spent exercising and changes in telomere length (rho=-0.39, p=0.07). On the other hand, in the intervention group, telomere lengthening was significantly associated with reduced sitting time (rho=-0.68, p=0.02). Conclusions Reduced sitting time was associated with telomere lengthening in blood cells in sedentary, overweight 68-year-old individuals participating in a 6-month physical activity intervention trial.

  • 49. Sjöström, Michael
    et al.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Poortvliet, Eric
    Ekelund, Ulf
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Hurtig-Wennlöf, Anita
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för klinisk medicin.
    Nilsson, Andreas
    RISPA.
    Hagströmer, Maria
    Adolescent nutrition: a multidimensional challenge2003In: Modern aspects of nutrition: present knowledge and future perspectives / [ed] I. Elmadfa, E. Anklam, J. König, 2003, p. 253-254Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50. Sollie, Ove
    et al.
    Jeppesen, Per Bendix
    Tangen, Daniel Steensen
    Jernerén, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences. University of Oxford, Department of Pharmacology.
    Nellemann, Birgitte
    Valsdottir, Ditta
    Madsen, Klavs
    Turner, Cheryl
    Refsum, Helga
    Skålhegg, Bjørn Steen
    Ivy, John L
    Jensen, Jørgen
    Protein intake in the early recovery period after exhaustive exercise improves performance the following day.2018In: Journal of applied physiology, ISSN 8750-7587, E-ISSN 1522-1601Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of protein and carbohydrate ingestion during early recovery from exhaustive exercise on performance after 18 h recovery. Eight elite cyclists (VO2max 74.0±1.6 ml∙kg-1∙min-1) completed two exercise and diet interventions in a double-blinded, randomized, crossover design. Participants cycled first at 73% of VO2max (W73%) followed by one-min intervals at 90% of VO2max until exhaustion. During the first two hours of recovery, participants ingested either 1.2 g carbohydrate∙kg-1∙h-1 (CHO) or 0.8 g carbohydrate + 0.4 g protein∙kg-1∙h-1 (CHO+PROT). The diet during the remaining recovery period was similar for both interventions and adjusted to body weight. After an 18 h recovery, cycling performance was assessed with a 10 s sprint test, 30 min of cycling at W73%, and a cycling time trial (TT). The TT was 8.5% faster (41:53±1:51 min vs 45:26±1:32 min; p&lt;0.03) after CHO+PROT compared to CHO. Mean power output during the sprints was 3.7% higher in CHO-PROT compared to CHO (1063±54 W vs 1026±53 W; p&lt;0.01). Nitrogen balance in the recovery period was negative in CHO and neutral in CHO+PROT (-82.4±11.5 vs 7.0±15.4 mg∙kg-1; p&lt;0.01).

    IN CONCLUSION: TT and sprint performances were improved 18 h after exhaustive cycling by CHO-PROT supplementation during the first two hours of recovery compared with isoenergetic CHO supplementation. Our results indicate that intake of carbohydrate plus protein after exhaustive endurance exercise more rapidly converts the body from a catabolic to an anabolic state than carbohydrate alone, thus speeding recovery and improving subsequent cycling performance.

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