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  • 1.
    Aarts, Clara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Holm, Marta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Barnhälsoteam: ett exempel på framgångsfaktorer för god samverkan kring förebyggande arbete för barn2010In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 87, no 4, p. 274-281Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Adolfsson, Päivi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Disability Research.
    Food security and people with intellectual disabilities living in community residences in Sweden2012In: Journal of Intellectual Disability Research 56; 7/8, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Adolfsson, Päivi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Centre for Disability Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Janeslätt, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. SUF Resource Centre, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lindstedt, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Jöreskog, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Centre for Disability Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Mothers with cognitive limitations who have children in placement benefit from intervention2021In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 79-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mothers with cognitive limitations who have children in placement need to be listened to and to receive help in understanding and dealing with their situation. A support programme for this group was developed in Australia and then adapted for use in a Swedish context and named 'Mamma Trots Allt' (MTA). The aim was to examine the experiences of these mothers regarding their mothering role after participation in MTA. An explorative and qualitative design was used. Inclusion criteria were mothers with cognitive limitations, a child in placement and participation in MTA. Nine mothers, eight of them from a previous study, gave their informed consent to participate. A study-specific interview guide was adapted to people with cognitive limitations. The interviews took place after the final MTA session. The qualitative analyses resulted in a description of the mothers' experiences and how they changed after MTA, resulting in an overall theme, two subthemes, four categories and 11 subcategories. MTA facilitated the mothers' maturation and broadened their earlier, stereotypic life expectations. Offering a support programme benefits not only the mother but most likely the child as well.

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  • 4.
    Adolfsson, Päivi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. Centrum för forskning om funktionshinder, Centre for Disability research.
    Lindstedt, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Janeslätt, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Jöreskog, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. Centrum för forskning om funktionshinder, Centre for Disability research.
    Evaluation of “Mothers in spite of all”, a group intervention for mothers with cognitive limitations who have children in placement2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5. Aeinehband, Shahin
    et al.
    Lindblom, Rickard P F
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Thoracic Surgery.
    Al Nimer, Faiez
    Vijayaraghavan, Swetha
    Sandholm, Kerstin
    Khademi, Mohsen
    Olsson, Tomas
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Nilsson, Kristina Ekdahl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Darreh-Shori, Taher
    Piehl, Fredrik
    Complement Component C3 and Butyrylcholinesterase Activity Are Associated with Neurodegeneration and Clinical Disability in Multiple Sclerosis2015In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dysregulation of the complement system is evident in many CNS diseases but mechanisms regulating complement activation in the CNS remain unclear. In a recent large rat genomewide expression profiling and linkage analysis we found co-regulation of complement C3 immediately downstream of butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE), an enzyme hydrolyzing acetylcholine (ACh), a classical neurotransmitter with immunoregulatory effects. We here determined levels of neurofilament-light (NFL), a marker for ongoing nerve injury, C3 and activity of the two main ACh hydrolyzing enzymes, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and BuChE, in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with MS (n = 48) and non-inflammatory controls (n = 18). C3 levels were elevated in MS patients compared to controls and correlated both to disability and NFL. C3 levels were not induced by relapses, but were increased in patients with >= 9 cerebral lesions on magnetic resonance imaging and in patients with progressive disease. BuChE activity did not differ at the group level, but was correlated to both C3 and NFL levels in individual samples. In conclusion, we show that CSF C3 correlates both to a marker for ongoing nerve injury and degree of disease disability. Moreover, our results also suggest a potential link between intrathecal cholinergic activity and complement activation. These results motivate further efforts directed at elucidating the regulation and effector functions of the complement system in MS, and its relation to cholinergic tone.

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  • 6.
    Agréus, L
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Svärdsudd, Kurt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Talley, NJ
    Jones, MP
    Tibblin, G
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Natural History of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Functional Abdominal Disorders: A Population-Based Study2017In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0002-9270, E-ISSN 1572-0241, no 7, p. 1207-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), dyspepsia, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are generally considered to be chronic conditions, but community-based studies are sparse, and long-term natural history data are unavailable. We aimed to determine the natural history of these conditions.

    Methods: A representative Swedish sample (20-79 yr) completed a validated questionnaire over the preceding 3 months. The survey was repeated after 1 and 7 yr in the same target group (n = 1290, 1260, and 1065; response rates 90%, 87%, and 82%, respectively; 79% responded to all three mailings).

    Results: The prevalence of GERD symptoms remained stable, whereas the prevalence of IBS increased over time, independent of aging. Dyspepsia decreased with advancing age. Although more than half of those with IBS reported the same symptom profile after 1 and 7 yr, there was a substantial symptom fluctuation and symptom profile flux between those reporting dyspepsia, IBS, or minor symptoms. Only a minority with GERD (<10%) changed to dyspepsia and/or IBS, or vice versa. The symptom-free patients remained symptom-free or reported only minor symptoms in > or = 90% of cases.

    Conclusion: There seem to be two distinct populations of symptom reporters, those with dyspepsia or IBS, and those with GERD.

  • 7.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Being Born Large for Gestational Age: Metabolic and Epidemiological Studies2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Obesity is a major health problem in the Western world. Mean birth weight has increased during the last 25 years. One explanation is that the proportion of large for gestational age (LGA) infants has increased. Such infants risk developing obesity, cardiovascular disease and diabetes later in life. Despite the risk of neonatal hypoglycemia, their postnatal metabolic adaptation has not been investigated. Our data, obtained with stable isotope labeled compounds, demonstrate that newborn LGA infants have increased lipolysis and decreased insulin sensitivity. After administration of glucagon, the plasma levels of glucose and the rate of glucose production increased. The simultaneous increase in insulin correlated with the decrease in lipolysis, indicating an antilipolytic effect of insulin in these infants.

    We also demonstrated an intergenerational effect of being born LGA, since women born LGA, were at higher risk of giving birth to LGA infants than women not born LGA. Further, the LGA infants formed three subgroups: born long only, born heavy only, and born both long and heavy. Infants born LGA of women with high birth weight or adult obesity were at higher risk of being LGA concerning weight alone, predisposing to overweight and obesity at childbearing age. In addition we found that pregnant women with gestational diabetes were at increased risk of giving birth to infants that were heavy alone. This could explain the risk of both perinatal complications and later metabolic disease in infants of this group of women.

    To identify determinants of fetal growth, 20 pregnant women with a wide range of fetal weights were investigated at 36 weeks of gestation. Maternal fat mass was strongly associated with insulin resistance. Insulin resistance was related to glucose production, which correlated positively with fetal size. The variation in resting energy expenditure, which was closely related to fetal weight, was largely explained by BMI, insulin resistance, and glucose production. Lipolysis was not rate limiting for fetal growth in this group of women. Consequently, high maternal glucose production due to a high fat mass may result in excessive fetal growth.

    List of papers
    1. Lipolysis and Insulin Sensitivity at Birth in Infants Who Are Large for Gestational Age
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lipolysis and Insulin Sensitivity at Birth in Infants Who Are Large for Gestational Age
    2007 (English)In: Pediatrics, ISSN 0031-4005, E-ISSN 1098-4275, Vol. 120, no 5, p. 958-965Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE. In addition to neonatal hypoglycemia, infants who are born large for gestational age are at risk for developing obesity, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes later in life. The aim of this study was to investigate glucose production, lipolysis, and insulin sensitivity in infants who were born large for gestational age to mothers without diabetes. The effect of glucagon administration on production of energy substrates was also investigated.

    METHODS. Ten healthy term infants who were born large for gestational age to mothers without diabetes were studied 16 ± 8 hours postnatally after a 3-hour fast. Rates of glucose production and lipolysis were analyzed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry following constant rate infusion of [6,6-2H2]glucose and [2-13C]glycerol. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by the Homeostasis Assessment Model. In 8 of the infants, the effect of an intravenous injection of 0.2 mg/kg glucagon was also analyzed.

    RESULTS. Plasma glucose and glycerol averaged 3.8 ± 0.5 mmol/L and 384 ± 183 µmol/L, respectively. The glycerol production rate, reflecting lipolysis, was 12.7 ± 2.9 µmol/kg per min. Mean rate of glucose production was 30.2 ± 4.6 µmol/kg per min. Homeostasis Assessment Model insulin sensitivity corresponded to 82% ± 19%, β-cell function to 221% ± 73%, and insulin resistance to 1.3 ± 0.3. After glucagon administration, rate of glucose production increased by 13.3 ± 8.3 µmol/kg per min and blood glucose by 1.4 ± 0.5 mmol/L. Glycerol production decreased from 12.8 ± 3.0 to 10.7 ± 2.9 µmol/kg per min. Mean insulin concentration increased from 10.9 ± 3.0 to 30.9 ± 10.3 mU/L. There was a strong inverse correlation between the decrease in lipolysis and increase in insulin after glucagon administration.

    CONCLUSIONS. Infants who are born large for gestational age show increased lipolysis and a propensity for decreased insulin sensitivity already at birth. The simultaneous increase in plasma insulin correlated strongly with the noted decrease in lipolysis, indicating an antilipolytic effect of insulin in these infants.

    Keywords
    LGA, glucose production, lipolysis, newborn infant, insulin sensitivity
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-97381 (URN)10.1542/peds.2007-0165 (DOI)000250618900004 ()17974732 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2008-08-18 Created: 2008-08-18 Last updated: 2022-01-28Bibliographically approved
    2. Females born large for gestational age have a doubled risk of giving birth to large for gestational age infants
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Females born large for gestational age have a doubled risk of giving birth to large for gestational age infants
    2007 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 96, no 3, p. 358-362Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To analyse if females born large for gestational age (LGA) have an increased risk to give birth to LGA infants and to study anthropometric characteristics in macrosomic infants of females born LGA.Methods: The investigation was performed as an intergenerational retrospective study of women born between 1973 and 1983, who delivered their first infant between 1989 and 1999. Birth characteristics of 47 783 females, included in the Swedish Birth Register both as newborns and mothers were analysed. LGA was defined as >2 SD in either birth weight or length for gestational age. The infants were divided into three subgroups: born tall only, born heavy only and born both tall and heavy for gestational age. Multiple logistic and linear regression analyses were performed.Results: Females, born LGA with regard to length or weight, had a two-fold (adjusted OR 1.96, 95% Cl 1.54-2.48) increased risk to give birth to an LGA infant. Females, born LGA concerning weight only, had a 2.6 (adjusted OR 2.63, 95%, 1.85-3.75) fold increased risk of having an LGA offspring heavy only and no elevated risk of giving birth to an offspring that was tall only, compared to females born not LGA. In addition, maternal obesity was associated with a 2.5 (adjusted OR 2.56, 95%, 2.20-2.98) fold increased risk of having an LGA newborn, compared to mothers with normal weight.Conclusion: Females, born LGA, have an increased risk to give birth to LGA infants, compared to mothers born not LGA. Maternal overweight increases this risk even further.

    Keywords
    Females born LGA, Intergenerational study, LGA, Newborn infants
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-97382 (URN)10.1111/j.1651-2227.2006.00141.x (DOI)000244716300009 ()17407456 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2008-08-18 Created: 2008-08-18 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    3. Gestational diabetes and offspring body disproportion
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gestational diabetes and offspring body disproportion
    Show others...
    2010 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 99, no 1, p. 89-93Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:   It has been demonstrated that females born large for gestational age   (LGA) in weight but not length are at increased risk of being obese at   childbearing age. We addressed the question whether women with   gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are at increased risk of giving   birth to such infants.   Methods:   Birth characteristics of 884 267 infants of non-diabetic mothers and   7817 of mothers with GDM were analysed. LGA was defined as birth weight   or birth length > 2 standard deviation scores for gestational age.   Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed.   Results:   The odds ratio (OR) for a woman with GDM to give birth to an LGA infant   that was heavy alone was four times increased (OR: 3.71, 95% CI:   3.41-4.04). Furthermore, in the population of mothers giving birth to   LGA infants, the proportion heavy alone was 68% in the group of women   with GDM compared with 64.4% in the group of non-diabetic women. The   risks were independent of gender of the foetus.   Conclusion:   Women with GDM have an almost four times higher risk of delivering an   LGA infant that is heavy alone. The noted disproportion between weight   and length in infants of such mothers may have an impact on the risk of   later obesity.

    Keywords
    Body disproportion, Gestational diabetes, Large for gestational age, Newborn and obesity
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-97383 (URN)10.1111/j.1651-2227.2009.01532.x (DOI)000272565800025 ()19814749 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2008-08-18 Created: 2008-08-18 Last updated: 2022-01-28Bibliographically approved
    4. Maternal glucose production and resting energy expenditure determine fetal size
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Maternal glucose production and resting energy expenditure determine fetal size
    Show others...
    Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-97384 (URN)
    Available from: 2008-08-18 Created: 2008-08-18 Last updated: 2010-01-13Bibliographically approved
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  • 8.
    Ahlström, Gerd
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University.
    Wadensten, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Enjoying work or Burdened by it?: How personal Assistants Experience and Handle Stress at Work2012In: Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation, ISSN 1536-710X, E-ISSN 1536-7118, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 112-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A personal assistant has to promote equality in living conditions for persons with severe disabilities. The aim of this study was to explore how personal assistants experience their work and what strategies they employ to alleviate work-related stress. Thirty personal assistants were interviewed and latent content analysis was performed. The findings regarding the experiences of work-related stress could be brought together under the theme of “difficulties of being in a subordinate position,” and those regarding management strategies could be brought together under the theme of “coming to terms with the work situation.” There is a need to empower personal assistants through training programs including tailored education, working communities, and coaching.

  • 9.
    Ahlström, Stina
    et al.
    Natl Board Forens Med, Dept Forens Med, Uppsala, Sweden; Linköping Univ, Fac Med & Hlth Sci, Dept Biomed & Clin Sci, Div Drug Res, Linköping, Sweden.
    Thiblin, Ingemar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Forensic Medicine. Natl Board Forens Med, Dept Forens Med, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Anna K.
    Linköping Univ, Fac Med & Hlth Sci, Dept Biomed & Clin Sci, Div Drug Res, Linköping, Sweden; Natl Board Forens Med, Dept Forens Genet & Forens Toxicol, Linköping, Sweden.
    Green, Henrik
    Linköping Univ, Fac Med & Hlth Sci, Dept Biomed & Clin Sci, Div Drug Res, Linköping, Sweden; Natl Board Forens Med, Dept Forens Genet & Forens Toxicol, Linköping, Sweden.
    Characteristics of post-mortem beta-hydroxybutyrate-positivet cases: A retrospective study on age, sex and BMI in 1407 forensic autopsies2021In: Forensic Science International, ISSN 0379-0738, E-ISSN 1872-6283, Vol. 325, article id 110878Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Post-mortem biochemistry, including the analysis of beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), is increasingly employed in forensic medicine, especially in conditions such as diabetes and chronic alcoholism. However, not much is known about the associations between age, body mass index (BMI), and sex and BHB concentrations in ketoacidotic conditions.

    Aim

    To retrospectively study the association between age, BMI and sex in several conditions, such as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), alcoholic ketoacidosis (AKA), and elevated post-mortem BHB concentrations.

    Methods

    1407 forensic autopsy cases analysed for BHB were grouped by diagnosis: DKA, AKA, HHS [hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state], acidosis NOS [not otherwise specified], or hypothermia. Age, sex, BMI and the concentrations of blood alcohol, vitreous glucose and blood BHB were recorded.

    Results

    Cases of AKA and DKA were most numerous (184 and 156, respectively). In DKA and in its male subgroup, cases with severe ketosis (BHB>1000 µg/g) were younger and had a lower BMI than those with moderate ketosis (BHB 250–1000 µg/g) and controls (P<0.001). In DKA and in its female subgroup, cases with moderate ketosis cases were older (P = 0.0218 and P = 0.0083) than controls. In AKA and in its male subgroup, cases with severe ketosis had a lower BMI than those with moderate ketosis (P = 0.0391 and P = 0.0469) and controls (P<0.001). Cases with moderate ketosis had a lower BMI than controls (P<0.001).

    Conclusions

    BHB concentration is associated with BMI in DKA and AKA, and with both BMI and age in DKA. Constitutional factors should, therefore, be considered in potential AKA and DKA cases.

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  • 10.
    Ahlström Wallin, Sara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. School of Health, Care and Social Welfare (HVV) Mälardalen University Västerås Sweden;Habilitation Center in Falun Dalarna Sweden.
    Almqvist, Lena
    School of Health, Care and Social Welfare (HVV) Mälardalen University Västerås Sweden.
    Janeslätt, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. Habilitation Center in Falun Dalarna Sweden..
    Gustavsson, Catharina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. School of Health and Welfare Dalarna University Falun Sweden..
    Harder, Maria
    School of Health, Care and Social Welfare (HVV) Mälardalen University Västerås Sweden.
    The experiences and the meaning of using MyTime in the preschool context from the perspective of children in need of special support, 5–6 years of age2023In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 49, no 6, p. 1096-1103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Children in need of special support often display delays in time processing ability, affecting everyday functioning. MyTime is an intervention programme for systematic training of time processing ability. To support preschool children's development of time processing ability and everyday functioning, it is necessary to include their perspectives of the MyTime intervention programme. A previous study shows that MyTime is feasible with children in the preschool setting and shows positive effects on time processing ability for older children in special schools. Yet, there is a lack of knowledge regarding how preschool children experience the intervention programme and how they understand its meaning. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences and the meaning of using MyTime from the perspective of children with informal needs of special support (INS) 5–6 years of age in the preschool context.

    Methods: To explore the children's perspectives, video-recorded interviews with 21 children were analysed hermeneutically. To facilitate the interview situation with the children in need of special support, the Talking Mats© was used. Both body and spoken languages were analysed.

    Results: The results reveal children as active participants, willing to share their experiences of using the MyTime intervention in the preschool context. The conceptualization of the children's experiences and expressions uncovers their meaning of using the MyTime intervention as to know and to understand time by doing.

    Conclusions: When children are given the opportunity to use concrete tools to understand and measure time, they experience themselves as active participants involved and engaged in the intervention. They reveal meaningful experiences to be able to manage time that facilitate their everyday functioning and participation in the preschool context.

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  • 11.
    Ahmad, Abdulbaghi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder among displaced Kurdish children in Iraq; victims of a man-made disaster after the Gulf war.1992In: Nordic Journal Psychiatry, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 315-319Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12. Akerstedt, T.
    et al.
    Alfredsson, L.
    Westerholm, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Fischer, H.
    Nilsson, L. -G
    Nordin, M.
    Fatigue/sleepiness and important aspects of sleep restoration improve across aging2014In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 23, p. 241-241Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 13. Akpiroro Peters, Marie Berit
    et al.
    Kassa, Eszter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Biochemistry.
    Yau, Wai-Lok
    Lindqvist, Richard
    Nilsson, Emma
    Siljedahl, Michaela
    Ivarsson, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Biochemistry.
    Lundmark, Richard
    Överby, Anna K.
    Tick-borne flaviviruses recruits the pro viral factor NUP153 to the replication siteManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala Univ Hosp, Dept Pathol, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Libard, Sylwia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neurooncology and neurodegeneration. Uppsala Univ Hosp, Dept Pathol, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Ageing-Related Neurodegeneration and Cognitive Decline2024In: International Journal of Molecular Sciences, ISSN 1661-6596, E-ISSN 1422-0067, Vol. 25, no 7, article id 4065Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neuropathological assessment was conducted on 1630 subjects, representing 5% of all the deceased that had been sent to the morgue of Uppsala University Hospital during a 15-year-long period. Among the 1630 subjects, 1610 were ≥ 41 years of age (range 41 to 102 years). Overall, hyperphosphorylated (HP) τ was observed in the brains of 98% of the 1610 subjects, and amyloid β-protein (Aβ) in the brains of 64%. The most common alteration observed was Alzheimer disease neuropathologic change (ADNC) (56%), followed by primary age-related tauopathy (PART) in 26% of the subjects. In 16% of the subjects, HPτ was limited to the locus coeruleus. In 14 subjects (<1%), no altered proteins were observed. In 3 subjects, only Aβ was observed, and in 17, HPτ was observed in a distribution other than that seen in ADNC/PART. The transactive DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP43) associated with limbic-predominant age-related TDP encephalopathy (LATE) was observed in 565 (35%) subjects and α-synuclein (αS) pathology, i.e., Lewy body disease (LBD) or multi system atrophy (MSA) was observed in the brains of 21% of the subjects. A total of 39% of subjects with ADNC, 59% of subjects with PART, and 81% of subjects with HPτ limited to the locus coeruleus lacked concomitant pathologies, i.e., LATE-NC or LBD-NC. Of the 293 (18% of the 1610 subjects) subjects with dementia, 81% exhibited a high or intermediate level of ADNC. In 84% of all individuals with dementia, various degrees of concomitant alterations were observed; i.e., MIXED-NC was a common cause of dementia. A high or intermediate level of PART was observed in 10 subjects with dementia (3%), i.e., tangle-predominant dementia. No subjects exhibited only vascular NC (VNC), but in 17 subjects, severe VNC might have contributed to cognitive decline. Age-related tau astrogliopathy (ARTAG) was observed in 37% of the 1610 subjects and in 53% of those with dementia.

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  • 15.
    Alant, Erna
    et al.
    Univ Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa; Indiana Univ, Bloomington, IN 47405 USA.
    Basil, Carmen
    Univ Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
    Jennische, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Loncke, Filip
    Univ Virginia, Charlottesville, VA USA.
    McNaughton, Shirley
    ‎Blissymbol Commun Inst, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Murray, Janice
    Manchester Metropolitan Univ, Manchester, Lancs, England.
    Renner, Gregor
    Catholic Univ Appl Sci, Freiburg, Germany.
    Smith, Martine
    Trinity Coll Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Soto, Gloria
    San Francisco State Univ, San Francisco, CA 94132 USA.
    van Balkom, Hans
    San Francisco State Univ, San Francisco, CA 94132 USA.
    von Tetzchner, Stephen
    Univ Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    At the end of the journey Lyle Lewis Lloyd (August 10 1934-February 12 2020)2020In: Augmentative and Alternative Communication, ISSN 0743-4618, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 1-3Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Alassaad, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Hammarlund-Udenaes, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Bertilsson, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Gillespie, Ulrika
    Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    A tool for prediction of risk of rehospitalisation and mortality in the hospitalised elderly: secondary analysis of clinical trial data2015In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 5, no 2, article id e007259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To construct and internally validate a risk score, the '80+ score', for revisits to hospital and mortality for older patients, incorporating aspects of pharmacotherapy. Our secondary aim was to compare the discriminatory ability of the score with that of three validated tools for measuring inappropriate prescribing: Screening Tool of Older Person's Prescriptions (STOPP), Screening Tool to Alert doctors to Right Treatment (START) and Medication Appropriateness Index (MAI). Setting: Two acute internal medicine wards at Uppsala University hospital. Patient data were used from a randomised controlled trial investigating the effects of a comprehensive clinical pharmacist intervention. Participants: Data from 368 patients, aged 80 years and older, admitted to one of the study wards. Primary outcome measure: Time to rehospitalisation or death during the year after discharge from hospital. Candidate variables were selected among a large number of clinical and drug-specific variables. After a selection process, a score for risk estimation was constructed. The 80+ score was internally validated, and the discriminatory ability of the score and of STOPP, START and MAI was assessed using C-statistics. Results: Seven variables were selected. Impaired renal function, pulmonary disease, malignant disease, living in a nursing home, being prescribed an opioid or being prescribed a drug for peptic ulcer or gastroesophageal reflux disease were associated with an increased risk, while being prescribed an antidepressant drug (tricyclic antidepressants not included) was linked to a lower risk of the outcome. These variables made up the components of the 80+ score. The C-statistics were 0.71 (80+), 0.57 (STOPP), 0.54 (START) and 0.63 (MAI). Conclusions: We developed and internally validated a score for prediction of risk of rehospitalisation and mortality in hospitalised older people. The score discriminated risk better than available tools for inappropriate prescribing. Pending external validation, this score can aid in clinical identification of high-risk patients and targeting of interventions.

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  • 17.
    Albrecht, Lisa M
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Andersson, Dan I
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Cross-Resistance to Antibiotics After Exposure to Qaternary Ammonium CompoundsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) are common antimicrobials that are used in a variety of consumer products, such as lotions, sunscreen, hair conditioners and hand sanitizers, to inhibit bacterial growth. However, it has been noted that bacteria exposed to QACs can develop resistance, and additionally, resistance to QACs has been observed to provide cross-resistance to antibiotics. In order to identify genetic adaptations for this resistance pattern, we exposed E. coli to three different QACs at sub-MIC and above-MIC concentrations, and identified genetic changes by whole genome sequencing. We found that initial adaptation, at sub-MIC levels, happened through efflux mechanisms, and that subsequent genetic changes, during above-MIC exposure, involved genes associated with the cell membranes and with transcription/translation. We also found that these genetic changes provided cross-resistance to other QACs as well as to several antibiotics.

  • 18.
    Albrecht, Lisa M
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Andersson, Dan I
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Potentiation of the Selective Effect of Antibiotics by Metal IonsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Complex mixtures of antibiotics and metals are present in many environments ranging from municipal sewage to irrigation water and manure used as agricultural fertilizer. Such mixtures of drugs and metals exert unique selection pressures on local bacterial communities and could function as hotspots for enrichment of antibiotic resistance genes. The presence of metals in the environment has previously been linked to increases in tolerance to antibiotics. In this study, we investigated metal-potentiated selection of antibiotic resistant Salmonella enterica strains. Six environmentally relevant metals were examined in combinations with three different antibiotics. By performing competitions between an antibiotic resistant mutant and the isogenic wild type in each metal-antibiotic combination, we assessed the minimal selective concentration (MSC) of the antibiotic for the resistant strain. The metals silver, cadmium and mercury all exhibited potentiating effects, reducing the MSC of the antibiotic up to 5-fold as compared to in the absence of the metal. We further show that the potentiating metals increased permeability of the cellular outer membrane. These results demonstrate that the presence of a metal can decrease the concentration of an antibiotic required to select for an antibiotic resistant strain, and they indicate that this process involves metal-facilitated uptake of the antibiotic following damage to the outer membrane.

  • 19.
    Albrecht, Lisa M
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Sandegren, Linus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Andersson, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Mutation in the Copper-Induced sil Operon Enables High-Level Silver Resistance and Silver Facilitated Co-Selection of Multidrug Resistance PlasmidManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Human activities are responsible for an accumulation of metals in health care and agricultural environments, and plasmid-encoded metal tolerance operons enable bacteria to rapidly adapt to metal exposure under such conditions. While the mechanisms of action of many metal resistance systems have been described, there is still limited understanding of their role in co-selection of antibiotic resistance in metal-containing environments. Whether plasmid-encoded metal resistance genes confer significant selective advantages is of interest as it has implications for plasmid enrichment and the spread of plasmid-borne antibiotic resistance genes. To increase our understanding of plasmid-mediated metal resistance, we studied the sil operon and its phenotypes in E. coli during growth in the absence and presence of silver and copper. We found that the sil operon provides resistance to both silver and copper. However, it is induced by copper only, and constitutive expression due to point mutations in the two-component silS gene provides high-level silver resistance. Furthermore, we showed that a high-level silver resistant mutant could be enriched in the presence of silver. This enrichment entailed co-selection of the multidrug resistance plasmid pUUH239.2. Our results show that a copper resistance operon can provide high-level silver resistance following a single point mutation, and that the silver resistance phenotype subsequently can co-select for antibiotic resistance in the presence of silver. 

  • 20.
    Ali, M
    et al.
    NMAHP Research Unit, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, UK.
    Ben Basat, A Lifshitz
    Department of Communication Disorders, Ariel University, Ariel, Israel.
    Berthier, M
    Cognitive Neurology and Aphasia Unit, Centro De Investigaciones Médico-Sanitarias, Instituto De Investigación Biomédica De Málaga (IBIMA), University of Malaga, Malaga, Spain.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Blom Johansson: Speech-Language Pathology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Breitenstein, C
    Dept. Of Neurology with Institute of Translational Neurology, University of Muenster, Germany.
    Cadilhac, D A
    Department of Medicine, School of Clinical Sciences at Monash Health, Monash University, Australia.
    Constantinidou, F
    Department of Psychology and Center for Applied Neuroscience, University of Cyprus Nicosia, Cyprus.
    Cruice, M
    City, University of London, London, UK.
    Davila, G
    Cognitive Neurology and Aphasia Unit, Centro De Investigaciones Médico-Sanitarias, Instituto De Investigación Biomédica De Málaga (IBIMA), University of Malaga, Malaga, Spain Area of Psychobiology, Faculty of Psychology and Speech Therapy, University of Malaga, Malaga, Spain.
    Gandolfi, M
    Department of Neurosciences, Biomedicine and Movement Sciences, University of Verona, Verona, Italy.
    Gil, M
    Department of Communication Disorders, Loewenstein Rehabilitation Hospital, Israel.
    Grima, R
    Department of Communication Therapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Malta Imsida, Malta.
    Godecke, E
    School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Australia; Speech Pathology Department, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Australia & Centre for Research Excellence in Aphasia Recovery and Rehabilitation, Melbourne, Australia.
    Jesus, L
    School of Health Sciences (ESSUA) and Institute of Electronics and Informatics Engineering of Aveiro (IEETA), University of Aveiro, Portugal.
    Jiminez, L Martinez
    Universidad De Talca, Talca, Chile.
    Kambanaros, M
    Allied Health and Human Performance, University of South Australia, Adelaide South, Australia.
    Kukkonen, T
    Department of ENT/Phoniatry, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.
    Laska, A
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mavis, I
    Speech and Language Therapy Department, Anadolu University, Eskişehir, Turkey.
    Mc Menamin, R
    Discipline of Speech and Language Therapy, School of Health Sciences, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland.
    Mendez-Orellana, C
    Carrera De Fonoaudiología, Departamento Ciencias De La Salud, Facultad De Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica De Chile, Santiago- Chile.
    Obrig, H
    Clinic for Cognitive Neurology, University Hospital Leipzig & MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig, Germany.
    Ostberg, P
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Robson, H
    Psychology and Language Sciences, University College London, London, UK.
    Sage, K
    Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health, Psychology and Social Care, Manchester Metropolitan University UK.
    Van De Sandt-Koenderman, M
    Dept of Rehabilitation Medicine, Rijndam Rehabilitation Centre & Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Sprecht, K
    Department of Biological and Medical Psychology, Faculty of Psychology, University of Bergen, Bergen Norway.
    Visch-Brink, E
    Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Wehling, E
    Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Wielaert, S
    Dept of Rehabilitation Medicine, Rijndam Rehabilitation Centre & Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Wallace, S J
    Queensland Aphasia Research Centre, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, the University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Williams, L J
    Usher Institute, University of Edinburgh, UK.
    Brady, M C
    NMAHP Research Unit, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, UK.
    Protocol for the development of the international population registry for aphasia after stroke (I-PRAISE)2022In: Aphasiology, ISSN 0268-7038, E-ISSN 1464-5041, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 534-554Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: We require high-quality information on the current burden, the types of therapy and resources available, methods of delivery, care pathways and long-term outcomes for people with aphasia.

    Aim: To document and inform international delivery of post-stroke aphasia treatment, to optimise recovery and reintegration of people with aphasia.

    Methods & Procedures: Multi-centre, prospective, non-randomised, open study, employing blinded outcome assessment, where appropriate, including people with post-stroke aphasia, able to attend for 30 minutes during the initial language assessment, at first contact with a speech and language therapist for assessment of aphasia at participating sites. There is no study-mandated intervention. Assessments will occur at baseline (first contact with a speech and language therapist for aphasia assessment), discharge from Speech and Language Therapy (SLT), 6 and 12-months post-stroke. Our primary outcome is changed from baseline in the Amsterdam Nijmegen Everyday Language Test (ANELT/Scenario Test for participants with severe verbal impairments) at 12-months post-stroke. Secondary outcomes at 6 and 12 months include the Therapy Outcome Measure (TOMS), Subjective Index of Physical and Social Outcome (SIPSO), Aphasia Severity Rating Scale (ASRS), Western Aphasia Battery Aphasia Quotient (WAB-AQ), stroke and aphasia quality of life scale (SAQoL-39), European Quality of Life Scale (EQ-5D), lesion description, General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), resource use, and satisfaction with therapy provision and success. We will collect demography, clinical data, and therapy content. Routine neuroimaging and medication administration records will be accessed where possible; imaging will be pseudonymised and transferred to a central reading centre. Data will be collected in a central registry. We will describe demography, stroke and aphasia profiles and therapies available. International individual participant data (IPD) meta-analyses will examine treatment responder rates based on minimal detectable change & clinically important changes from baseline for primary and secondary outcomes at 6 and 12 months. Multivariable meta-analyses will examine associations between demography, therapy, medication use and outcomes, considering service characteristics. Where feasible, costs associated with treatment will be reported. Where available, we will detail brain lesion size and site, and examine correlations with SLT and language outcome at 12 months.

    Conclusion: International differences in care, resource utilisation and outcomes will highlight avenues for further aphasia research, promote knowledge sharing and optimise aphasia rehabilitation delivery. IPD meta-analyses will enhance and expand understanding, identifying cost-effective and promising approaches to optimise rehabilitation to benefit people with aphasia.

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  • 21.
    Allansson, Elina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi.
    Holm, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi.
    Förekommer orofaryngeal dysfagi hos patienter med akut hjärtproblematik2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether swallowing difficulties occur in patients who are hospitalized for acute heart disease and if any association with other known risk factors could be seen in the event of dysphagia. In the study, objective swallowing assessments were carried out in combination with estimation of the participants' subjective experience of their swallowing ability and a detailed medical history to get an as comprehensive picture of the participants as possible. The results showed that objective dysphagia occurred in 30% of the participants and subjective dysphagia occurred in 20% (a total of 40% in the overall assessment) and that there was an increased risk in the presence of dyspnea. This study therefore concludes that dysphagia occurs in this patient group and that dyspnoea is a risk factor for suffering from it.

     

    The present thesis is part of an ongoing research study on swallowing difficulties in emergency care patients and is a sub-project in Margareta Gonzalez Lindh's PhD work. The study is approved by the Ethical Review Board in Uppsala, Dnr 2014/405, and will be published in an international journal.

  • 22.
    Allen, Marie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Divne, Anna-Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Universal tag arrays in forensic SNP analysis.2005In: Methods in Molecular Biology, ISSN 1064-3745, E-ISSN 1940-6029, Vol. 297, p. 141-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microarray-based single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping enables simultaneous and rapid detection of a large number of markers and is thus an attractive method for forensic individual acid identification. This assay relies on a one-color detection system and minisequencing in solution before hybridization to universal tag arrays. The minisequencing reaction is based on incorporation of a fluorescent dideoxynucleotide to a primer containing a tag-sequence flanking the position to be interrogated. This one-color system detects C and T polymorphisms in separate reactions on multiple polymerase chain reaction targets with the fluorophore TAMRA coupled to the respective dideoxynucleotide. After incorporation, tagged primer sequences are hybridized through their complementary sequence on the array, and positive signals are detected by a confocal laser-scanner.

  • 23.
    Alm, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Blom Johansson: Speech-Language Pathology.
    Streptococcal infection as a major historical cause of stuttering: data, mechanisms, and current importance2020In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, E-ISSN 1662-5161, Vol. 14, article id 569519Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stuttering is one of the most well-known speech disorders, but the underlying neurological mechanisms are debated. In addition to genetic factors, there are also major non-genetic contributions. It is here proposed that infection with group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus (GAS) was a major underlying cause of stuttering until the mid-1900s when penicillin was introduced in 1943. The main mechanism proposed is an autoimmune reaction from tonsillitis, targeting specific molecules, for example within the basal ganglia. It is here also proposed that GAS infections may have continued to cause stuttering to some extent, to the present date, though more rarely. If so, early diagnosis of such cases would be of importance. Childhood cases with sudden onset of stuttering after throat infection may be particularly important to assess for possible GAS infection. The support for this hypothesis primarily comes from three lines of argument. First, medical record data from the 1930s strongly indicates that there was one type of medical event in particular that preceded the onset of childhood stuttering with unexpected frequency: diseases related to GAS throat infections. In particular, this included tonsillitis and scarlet fever, but also rheumatic fever. Rheumatic fever is a childhood autoimmune sequela of GAS infection, which was a relatively widespread medical problem until the early 1960s. Second, available reports of changes of the childhood prevalence of stuttering indicate striking parallels between stuttering and the incidence of rheumatic fever, with: (1) decline from the early 1900s; (2) marked decline from the introduction of penicillin in the mid 1940s; and (3) reaching a more stable level in the 1960s. The correlations between the data for stuttering and rheumatic fever after the introduction of penicillin are very high, at about 0.95. Third, there are established biological mechanisms linking GAS tonsillitis to immunological effects on the brain. Also, a small number of more recent case reports have provided further support for the hypothesis linking stuttering to GAS infection. Overall, it is proposed that the available data provides strong evidence for the hypothesis that GAS infection was a major cause of stuttering until the mid-1900s, interacting with genetic predisposition.

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  • 24.
    Al-Nuaimi, Ateka
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Patienternas inställning till användningen av en patientaktiverande frågelista i farmaceutmötet på svenska apotek - en enkätstudie2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Mål: Syftet med studien är att beskriva patienternas inställningar till användningen av en QPL, huruvida det är ett möjligt redskap att använda under farmaceutmötet på svenska öppenvårdsapotek. Dessutom att undersöka den rapporterade skillnaden i kunskapsnivå efter användningen av QPL mellan patienterna som valde att använda QPL:en under farmaceutmötet och patienterna som valde att inte göra det. Samt att undersöka om olika bakgrundsfaktorer påverkar användningen av QPL.

        

    Metod: En kvantitativ analys av redan besvarade enkäter genomfördes för att besvara syftet och frågeställningen. Enkäterna analyserades deskriptivt med hjälp av beskrivande mått och genom inferentiell statistik i Microsoft Excel. Delstudien bestod av 179 enkäter. 

     

    Resultat: Totalt kodades 179 enkäter utifrån inklusionskriterierna. Patienterna rapporterade att QPL introducerades i 96% (n=172) och användes i 46% (n=83) av farmaceutmöten. Majoriteten av patienterna (n=101) upplevde att QPL inte tog mycket tid att läsa och (n=121) tyckte att frågorna var enkla att förstå. Å andra sidan rapporterade patienterna som hämtade minst ett nytt läkemedel och patienterna som hade svenska som modersmål att de använde QPL mer än andra. Samtidigt upplevde patienterna som använde QPL:en under farmaceutmötet en ökad kunskapsnivå om läkemedel jämfört med patienterna som inte använde QPL:en under mötet.

     

    Slutsats: Patienterna upplevde att QPL:en var ett funktionellt verktyg som fick de att ställa fler frågor och förstå sitt sjukdomstillstånd bättre. QPL:en kan effektiviseras ytterligare genom att förkortas ned och finnas i fler språk. Samtidigt bör farmaceut-patientkommunikation på öppenvårdsapotek effektiviseras ytterligare.

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  • 25.
    Alsehli, Ahmed M.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Schiöth: Functional Pharmacology. King Abdulaziz Univ, Dept Physiol, Fac Med, Al Ehtifalat St, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia..
    Olivo, Gaia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Schiöth: Functional Pharmacology.
    Clemensson, Laura Emily
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Schiöth: Functional Pharmacology.
    Williams, Michael J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Schiöth: Functional Pharmacology.
    Schiöth, Helgi B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Schiöth: Functional Pharmacology. Sechenov First Moscow State Med Univ, Inst Translat Med & Biotechnol, Sechenov Biomed Sci & Technol Pk,Trubetskay Str 8, Moscow 119991, Russia..
    The Cognitive Effects of Statins are Modified by Age2020In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 6187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To reveal new insights into statin cognitive effects, we performed an observational study on a population-based sample of 245,731 control and 55,114 statin-taking individuals from the UK Biobank. Cognitive performance in terms of reaction time, working memory and fluid intelligence was analysed at baseline and two follow-ups (within 5-10 years). Subjects were classified depending on age (up to 65 and over 65 years) and treatment duration (1-4 years, 5-10 years and over 10 years). Data were adjusted for health- and cognition-related covariates. Subjects generally improved in test performance with repeated assessment and middle-aged persons performed better than older persons. The effect of statin use differed considerably between the two age groups, with a beneficial effect on reaction time in older persons and fluid intelligence in both age groups, and a negative effect on working memory in younger subjects. Our analysis suggests a modulatory impact of age on the cognitive side effects of statins, revealing a possible reason for profoundly inconsistent findings on statin-related cognitive effects in the literature. The study highlights the importance of characterising modifiers of statin effects to improve knowledge and shape guidelines for clinicians when prescribing statins and evaluating their side effects in patients.

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  • 26.
    Al-Tamimi, Mohammed
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Läkemedelsbehandling vid kronisk hjärtsvikt_ en tvärsnittsstudie baserad på Vårdanalysdatabasen i Stockholms läns landsting2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Introduktion: Kronisk hjärtsvikt (CHF) utvecklas ofta gradvis under en längre tid. Det drabbar vanligen äldre, som ofta har andra sjukdomar som hypertoni och ischemisk hjärtsjukdom. Enligt läkemedelsrekommendationer och riktlinjer ska patienter med CHF behandlas med kombinationer av angiotensinkonverterande enzymblockare (ACEI) eller angiotensinreceptorblockerare (ARB) och betablockerande läkemedel (BB) och vid NYHA funktionsklass III och IV ska patienter behandlas ytterligare med mineralkortikoidantagonister (MRA). Syfte: Syftet med studien är att analysera läkemedelsbehandlingen vid CHF, som ett underlag för att förbättra vården och till nytta för patienter med CHF och vårdgivare. Material och metoder: Denna studie var en deskriptiv tvärsnittsstudie ur den individbaserade, administrativa Vårdanalysdatabasen (VAL) vid Stockholms läns landsting (SLL). Studien inkluderade alla patienter som var ≥40 år och levde i SLL någon gång mellan juli-augusti 2012. Resultat: VAL-databasen innehöll totalt 32754 patienter med CHF. Andel patienter med CHF som behandlades med ACEI/ARB var 64 % och BB var 69 % samt MRA var 18 %. Andel patienter med CHF som behandlades med kombinationer av ACEI/ARB och BB var 40 % och med kombinationer av ACEI/ARB och BB samt MRA var 11 %. Andel män som behandlades med dessa läkemedel var högre än andel kvinnor, förutom behandling med MRA som var lika hos män och kvinnor. Behandling med dessa läkemedel minskade med stigande ålder. Konklusion: Tydliga ålders- och könsskillnader i behandling vid CHF observerades. Endast 40 % av patienter med CHF behandlades med rekommenderade kombinationer av ACEI/ARB och BB. Den rekommenderade läkemedelsbehandlingen hos patienter med CHF kan förbättras. 

  • 27.
    Amini, Qasim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Iosipova, Olga
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Patientens upplevelse av den perioperativa vården2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patients who waiting for a surgery can feel fear, which increases the risk of more concern and anxiety. Patients need a clear information and communication that includes openness and hope in the preoperative care. Aim: The aims of this study are to investigate patients' experiences of the perioperative care in connection with an operation and with questions about the patients experience regarding information, communication, satisfaction and anxiety. Method: A quantitative descriptive study in the form of questionnaires conducted. The study participants were all patients who had undergone elective surgery at a hospital in central Sweden during week 10-11 in 2015. It was attended 50 patients, 30 men and 20 women between 20-86 years from five different surgical divisions. Results: The patient has high confidence of nurses and doctors professional competence, however more than half of the patients reported that the experienced anxiety before surgery. The preoperative meeting with the anesthesiologist experienced positive without reducing their anxiety. Patients felt that communication with a nurse anesthetist is easier compared to an anesthesia doctor, according to descriptive data. The majority of patients that the experienced unexpected situations in the operating room, and 28% wanted more information on how the surgery would go to. Conclusion; Lack of information is extensive in the preoperative care of patients who waiting for an operation. Most patients felt unexpected situations during the hospital stay, spite that the 100% of patients had high confidence in the nurse anesthesia and anesthesia doctor’s professional competence.

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  • 28.
    Anaker, Anna
    et al.
    Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden..
    von Koch, Lena
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Neurovasc Dis, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation. Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sjostrand, Christina
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Neurovasc Dis, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Elf, Marie
    Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Stockholm, Sweden.;Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Architecture & Civil Engn, Sch Architecture, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    The physical environment and multi-professional teamwork in three newly built stroke units2022In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 44, no 7, p. 1098-1106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose To explore multi-professional teamwork in relation to the physical environment in three newly built or renovated stroke units. Materials and methods An observational study was undertaken. The participants were all staff members of a multi-professional team working in the reviewed stroke units. The data were collected using behavioural mapping and semi-structured observations, and they were analysed by content analysis and descriptive statistics. Results Out of all the observations in the behavioural mapping, very few were of two or more members from the team together with a patient. None of the included stroke units had a co-location for all the members of the multi-professional team. Three main categories emerged from the analysis of the interviews: (i) the hub of the unit; (ii) the division of places; and (iii) power imbalance. All the categories reflected the teamwork in relation to parts of the physical environment. Conclusion The design of the physical environment is important for multi-professional teamwork. Emphasis must be placed on better understanding the impact of the physical environment and on incorporating the evidence related to multi-professional teamwork during the design of stroke units.

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  • 29.
    Andersson, Agneta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Sjöberg, Marina
    Att bättre förstå ätstörningar och förmedla en sund kostmedvetenhet inom idrotten: Paradoxen och den svåra balansgången2011In: Dietistaktuellt, ISSN 1102-9285, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 14-16Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Majoriteten av idrottare drabbas aldrig av ätstörningar trots hård träning, prestationsinriktning och en mer eller mindre noggrann kosthållning och viktreglering . Det finns dock idrottare som under lång tid kämpar med en ätstörningsproblemtik där ett komplicerat förhållande till mat och träning uppstått. Vissa studier talar vidare för att idrotten skulle kunna skydda individen för ätstörningar medan flera studier visar en högre förekomst av ätstör-ningar och stört ätbeteende inom än utanför idrottsvärlden, i synnerhet inom estetiska och viktrelaterade idrotter . Maten och träningen är båda komplexa fenomen och en djupare insikt och öppenhet kring hur man hanterar denna form av ”idrottsskada” är värdefullt såväl inom idrottsvärlden som inom hälso- och sjukvården. Dietisten med fördjupad kunskap inom idrott och ätstörningar förefaller vara en värdefull person i detta arbete.

  • 30. Andersson, Arne
    et al.
    Lau Börjesson, Joey
    Scholarly publishing threatened?2016In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 121, no 4, p. 205-206Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Andersson, Arne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Ronquist, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    A substantial increase of the impact factor2012In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 117, no 4, p. 353-354Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Andersson, Camilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Röing, Marta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research.
    Ehrsson, Ylva Tiblom
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Johansson, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Lifestyle and rehabilitation in long term illness. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Psychology in Healthcare.
    It's a question of endurance: patients with head and neck cancer experiences of 18F-FDG PET/CT in a fixation mask2017In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 29, p. 85-90, article id S1462-3889(17)30082-0Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: This study aimed to explore how patients with head and neck cancer experienced undergoing an (18)F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose positrons emissions tomography/computed tomography ((18)F-FDG PET/CT) examination in a fixation mask.

    METHOD: Interviews were conducted with nine patients with known or suspected head and neck cancer who were scheduled for the examination for the first time. The phenomenological method according to van Manen and his four lifeworld existentials; lived space, lived body, lived time, and lived relation was used to analyse the interviews.

    RESULTS: The thoughts and feelings of the patients during the PET/CT examination varied, some found it very difficult, while others did not. However, for all the patients, it was an experience that required some form of coping to maintain composure for example distraction.

    CONCLUSIONS: PET/CT examnation in a fixation mask may be strenuous for some patients. Patients need more detailed information, including suggestions for coping behaviours, prior to the examination, as well as higher level of support during and after the examination. The results of this study may be used to improve patient care and optimize the procedure of PET/CT examination in a fixation mask.

  • 33.
    Andersson, Linus
    et al.
    Swedish Institute for Social Research Stockholm University Stockholm Sweden.
    Chudnovskaya, Margarita
    Swedish Institute for Social Research Stockholm University Stockholm Sweden.
    Shahbazian, Roujman
    Swedish Institute for Social Research Stockholm University Stockholm Sweden.
    Ghaznavi, Cyrus
    Medical Education Program Washington University School of Medicine St. Louis Missouri USA.
    Ueda, Peter
    Clinical Epidemiology Division Department of Medicine Karolinska Institutet Solna Stockholm Sweden.
    Nationwide study of trends in physician partner choice for childbearing unions2022In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 292, no 1, p. 165-167Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 34.
    Andersson, M. Gunnar
    et al.
    Natl Vet Inst, Dept Chem Environm & Feed Hyg, SE-75189 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ceciliason, Ann-Sofie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Forensic Medicine. Natl Board Forens Med, Dept Forens Med, Box 1024, SE-75140 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sandler, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Forensic Medicine. Natl Board Forens Med, Dept Forens Med, Box 1024, SE-75140 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Mostad, Petter
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Math Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden;Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Application of the Bayesian framework for forensic interpretation to casework involving postmortem interval estimates of decomposed human remains2019In: Forensic Science International, ISSN 0379-0738, E-ISSN 1872-6283, Vol. 301, p. 402-414Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We demonstrate how the Bayesian framework for forensic interpretation can be adapted for casework involving postmortem intervals (PMI) utilizing taphonomic data as well as how to overcome some of the limitations of current approaches for estimating and communicating uncertainty. A model is implemented for indoor cases based on partial body scores from three different anatomical regions as correlated functions of accumulated temperature (AT). The multivariate model enables estimation of PMI for human remains also when one or two local body scores are missing or undetermined, e.g. as a result of burns, scars or covered body parts. The model was trained using the expectation maximization algorithm, enabling us to account for uncertainty of PMI and/or ambient temperature in the training data. Alternative approaches reporting the results are presented, including the likelihood curve, likelihood ratios for competing hypotheses and posterior probability distributions and credibility intervals for PMI. The applicability or the approaches in different forensic scenarios is discussed.

  • 35.
    Andersson, Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Egentlig depression och utmattningssyndrom -diagnostik, farmakologisk behandling och biologiska skillnader2013Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Psykisk ohälsa är en av de största orsakerna till långtidssjukskrivning i Sverige idag. Depression är vanligast men även utmattningssyndrom är en bidragande orsak.

    Diagnostiken utförs med hjälp av kriterier för de båda sjukdomarna. Depression eller andra differentialdiagnoser ska uteslutas innan diagnosen utmattningssyndrom kan ställas. Det som kan försvåra diagnostiken är att sjukdomarna har många symtom som överlappar varandra t.ex. koncentrationssvårigheter, trötthet och minnesproblem. Det som skiljer dem åt är framförallt att de med depression har mer psykiska symtom som skuldkänslor och dålig självkänsla medan de med utmattningssyndrom har mer somatiska symtom som muskelproblem, ökad smärtkänslighet och sömnproblem.

    Depression behandlas farmakologiskt med antidepressiva läkemedel som höjer nivån av signalsubstanserna serotonin och noradrenalin på olika sätt. Vid utmattningssyndrom finns det inte idag någon rekommenderad farmakologisk behandling. Antidepressiva-, sömn- och ångestdämpade läkemedel kan användas vid behov för att lindra vissa symtom.

    Den tydligaste biologiska skillnaden mellan egentlig depression och utmattningssyndrom gäller det endokrina systemet. HPA-axeln (hypotalamus-hypofys-binjurebark-axeln) hos de med depression är hyperaktiv vilket gör att de får en hög kortisolnivå. Däremot är HPA-axeln tvärtom hypoaktiv hos de med utmattningssyndrom och de får då en låg nivå av kortisol. 

  • 36.
    Andersson, Sandra
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Nilsson, Kenneth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Fagerberg, Linn
    Hallstrom, Bjorn M.
    Sundström, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Danielsson, Angelika
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Edlund, Karolina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Uhlen, Mathias
    Asplund, Anna
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    The Transcriptomic and Proteomic Landscapes of Bone Marrow and Secondary Lymphoid Tissues2014In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 12, p. e115911-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The sequencing of the human genome has opened doors for global gene expression profiling, and the immense amount of data will lay an important ground for future studies of normal and diseased tissues. The Human Protein Atlas project aims to systematically map the human gene and protein expression landscape in a multitude of normal healthy tissues as well as cancers, enabling the characterization of both housekeeping genes and genes that display a tissue-specific expression pattern. This article focuses on identifying and describing genes with an elevated expression in four lymphohematopoietic tissue types (bone marrow, lymph node, spleen and appendix), based on the Human Protein Atlas-strategy that combines high throughput transcriptomics with affinity-based proteomics. Results: An enriched or enhanced expression in one or more of the lymphohematopoietic tissues, compared to other tissue-types, was seen for 693 out of 20,050 genes, and the highest levels of expression were found in bone marrow for neutrophilic and erythrocytic genes. A majority of these genes were found to constitute well-characterized genes with known functions in lymphatic or hematopoietic cells, while others are not previously studied, as exemplified by C19ORF59. Conclusions: In this paper we present a strategy of combining next generation RNA-sequencing with in situ affinity-based proteomics in order to identify and describe new gene targets for further research on lymphatic or hematopoietic cells and tissues. The results constitute lists of genes with enriched or enhanced expression in the four lymphohematopoietic tissues, exemplified also on protein level with immunohistochemical images.

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  • 37.
    Andrade Lima Nerell, Rosemary
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Media and Communication Studies.
    “Excuse me, I am still here”: Designing for the Wellbeing of People With Dementia2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    A growing number of studies have been addressing the use of technology in dementia care. As traditional views of society focus mostly on the symptomatic aspects of dementia, the use of technology is limited to people’s impairments. However, critical dementia aligned with the third wave of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) adopted a more holistic approach that goes beyond individual cognitive functions. In this paper, I will (1) present findings about the experience of practitioners and family members of people with dementia (PwD) in a long-term care residence in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; (2) Present and discuss digital design solutions for the well-being of PwD in the field of art therapy, Internet of Things (IoT), augmented technology and multisensory environment, and (3) Propose interaction qualities to solidify the epistemological shifts of HCI in the context of dementia care. The overall aim of this paper is to understand the psychological and social needs of PwD in the context of a long-term care institution and suggest a design approach that leads to digital artifacts that enhance engagement and social connectedness for the wellbeing of PwD. 

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  • 38. Annerbäck, E-M
    et al.
    Lindell, C
    Svedin, C G
    Gustafsson, P A
    Severe child abuse: a study of cases reported to the police, Acta Paediatr. 2007:96(12):1760-4.2007In: Acta Paediatrica, Vol. 96, no 12, p. 1760-4Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39. Annerbäck, Eva-Maria
    et al.
    Svedin, Carl-Göran
    Gustafsson, Per A
    Characteristic Features of Severe Child Physical Abuse - A Multi-informant Approach.2010In: Journal of Family Violence, Vol. 25, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40. Annoni, Marco
    et al.
    Blease, Charlotte
    Program in Placebo Studies and the Therapeutic Encounter, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Harvard, USA;School of Psychology, University College Dublin, Ireland.
    A critical (and cautiously optimistic) appraisal of moerman’s" meaning response"2018In: Perspectives in biology and medicine, ISSN 0031-5982, E-ISSN 1529-8795, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 379-387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we propose a critical reassessment of Daniel Moerman's "meaning response." First, we reconstruct and criticize Moerman's original proposal of introducing the "meaning response" as a way of clarifying some terminological and conceptual issues in the placebo debate. Next we evaluate the criticisms that Moerman's proposal is epistemically moot since other existing and more empirically grounded models already account for all the phenomena that fall under the concept of the "meaning response." We conclude that Moerman's original proposal is inherently problematic and that, in order to be instrumentally useful in the future, the meaning response must be reconceived so that it may finally support, rather than oppose, other theoretical and empirical lines of research currently ongoing in the field of placebo studies.

  • 41.
    Anvari, Ebrahim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wang, Xuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sandler, Stellan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Welsh, Nils
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    The H1-receptor antagonist cetirizine ameliorates high-fat diet-induced glucose intolerance in male C57BL/6 mice, but not diabetes outcome in female non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice2015In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 120, no 1, p. 40-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. It has been proposed that the histamine 1-receptor (H1-receptor) not only promotes allergic reactions, but also modulates innate immunity and autoimmune reactions. In line with this, we have recently reported that the H1-receptor antagonist cetirizine partially counteracts cytokine-induced beta-cell signaling and destruction. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether cetirizine affects diabetes in NOD mice, a model for human type 1 diabetes, and glucose intolerance in high-fat diet C57BL/6 mice, a model for human glucose intolerance. Methods. Female NOD mice were treated with cetirizine in the drinking water (25 mg/kg body weight) from 9 until 30 weeks of age during which precipitation of diabetes was followed. Male C57BL/6 mice were given a high-fat diet from 5 weeks of age. When the mice were 12 weeks of age cetirizine was given for 2 weeks in the drinking water. The effects of cetirizine were analyzed by blood glucose determinations, glucose tolerance tests, and insulin sensitivity tests. Results. Cetirizine did not affect diabetes development in NOD mice. On the other hand, cetirizine treatment for 1 week protected against high-fat diet-induced hyperglycemia. The glucose tolerance after 2 weeks of cetirizine treatment was improved in high-fat diet mice. We observed no effect of cetirizine on the insulin sensitivity of high-fat diet mice. Conclusion. Our results suggest a protective effect of cetirizine against high-fat diet-induced beta-cell dysfunction, but not against autoimmune beta-cell destruction.

  • 42. Aradhya, Siddartha
    et al.
    Tegunimataka, Anna
    Kravdal, Øystein
    Martikainen, Pekka
    Myrskylä, Mikko
    Barclay, Kieron
    Uppsala University, Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study (SCAS).
    Goisis, Alice
    Maternal age and the risk of low birthweight and pre-term delivery: a pan-Nordic comparison2023In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, 1464-3685, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 156-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Advanced maternal age at birth is considered a risk factor for adverse birth outcomes. A recent study applying a sibling design has shown, however, that the association might be confounded by unobserved maternal characteristics.

    Methods: Using total population register data on all live singleton births during the period 1999–2012 in Denmark (N = 580 133; 90% population coverage), Norway (N = 540 890) and Sweden (N = 941 403) and from 2001–2014 in Finland (N = 568 026), we test whether advanced maternal age at birth independently increases the risk of low birthweight (LBW) (<2500 g) and pre-term birth (<37 weeks gestation). We estimated within-family models to reduce confounding by unobserved maternal characteristics shared by siblings using three model specifications: Model 0 examines the bivariate association; Model 1 adjusts for parity and sex; Model 2 for parity, sex and birth year.

    Results: The main results (Model 1) show an increased risk in LBW and pre-term delivery with increasing maternal ages. For example, compared with maternal ages of 26–27 years, maternal ages of 38–39 years display a 2.2, 0.9, 2.1 and 2.4 percentage point increase in the risk of LBW in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden, respectively. The same patterns hold for pre-term delivery.

    Conclusions: Advanced maternal age is independently associated with higher risk of poor perinatal health outcomes even after adjusting for all observed and unobserved factors shared between siblings.

  • 43.
    Arkkukangas, Marina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Centre for Clinical Research Sörmland. Department of Medicine, Sport and Fitness Science, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden;Department of Physiotherapy, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Involvement of Older Adults, the Golden Resources, as a Primary Measure for Fall Prevention2023In: Clinical Interventions in Aging, ISSN 1176-9092, E-ISSN 1178-1998, Vol. 18, p. 2165-2170Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Falls remain the second leading cause of injury-related deaths worldwide; therefore, longstanding practical fall-prevention efforts are needed. Falls can also lead to a reduction in independence and quality of life among older adults. Fall-prevention research has found that early prevention promotes a prolonged independence. However, it remains unknown which intervention is most beneficial for early prevention and how these interventions should be implemented for long-term effects. In addition, the present and future burden on social and healthcare services contributes to a gap in needs and requires an evidence-based fall prevention. Research suggests that strength, balance, and functional training are effective in reducing falls and fall-related injuries. Such training could greatly impacting independence. Fear of falling and strategies for managing falls are the suggested components to be included when evaluating fall-prevention programs. Thus, the preservation of physical functions is highly relevant for both independence and quality of life. It also contributes to psychological and social well-being, which are important factors for enabling individuals to stay at home for as long as possible. To meet future challenges associated with the expected increase in the older population, older adults should be viewed as a golden resource. With assistance from professionals and researchers, they can learn and gain the ability to institute fall-prevention programs in their own environments. These environments are primarily beyond the responsibilities of the healthcare sector. Therefore, programs comprising current knowledge about fall prevention should be developed, evaluated, and implemented with older adults by using a "train-The-trainer" approach, where a natural collaboration is established between civil society and/or volunteers, healthcare professionals, and researchers. For sustainable and effective fall-prevention programs, a co-design and early collaborative approach should be used in the natural environment, before social and healthcare services are required.

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  • 44.
    Arnqvist, Nathalie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Association between mothers´education level and  incidence of rapid breathing as a sign of pneumonia in children under 5 in Kenya: A cross sectional study from 2014 in Kenya2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Pneumonia is a major threat to global health. It is one of the biggest causes of death in children under 5 and kills approximately 1.4 million children, yearly. In Kenya, pneumonia is accountable for 16% of all deaths in children under 5 but could be prevented with simple interventions. To decrease the mortality rate, increasing the knowledge on the symptoms of pneumonia is of major importance. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between level of maternal education and the incidence of rapid breathing as a sign of pneumonia in children under 5 in Kenya.

    Methods

    This study was a cross sectional study analysing data from DHS collected in Kenya 2014. The study population were a sample of 5,391 mothers and their first-born children under 5. Logistic regression analyses were made to see the association to maternal education.

    Results

    The results in this study showed that there was no association between the level of maternal education and incidence of rapid breathing as a sign of pneumonia (CI 0.65-1.08, p-value 0.18). If the child was a boy showed increased odds for rapid breathing (CI 0.77-0.99, p-value 0.01), and living in the regions Nyanza (CI 1.08-1.77, p-value 0.01), Western (2.25-3.75, p-value 0.00) and Coast (CI 1.00-1.66, p-value 0.05) showed an increased odd.

    Conclusion

    This study found that there was no significant association between the level of maternal education and incidence of rapid breathing as a sign of pneumonia for children under 5 in Kenya.

  • 45.
    Artzi-Medvedik, Rada
    et al.
    Ben Gurion Univ Negev, Recanati Sch Community Hlth Profess, Fac Hlth Sci, Dept Nursing, Beer Sheva, Israel.;Ben Gurion Univ Negev, Recanati Sch Community Hlth Profess, Fac Hlth Sci, Dept Phys Therapy, Beer Sheva, Israel..
    Kob, Robert
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg, Dept Internal Med Geriatr, Inst Biomed Aging, Krankenhaus Barmherzige Bruder, Koberger Str 60, D-90408 Nurnberg, Germany..
    Fabbietti, Paolo
    Italian Natl Res Ctr Aging IRCCS INRCA, Ancona, Italy.;Italian Natl Res Ctr Aging IRCCS INRCA, Fermo, Italy.;Italian Natl Res Ctr Aging IRCCS INRCA, Cosenza, Italy.;IRCCS INRCA, Lab Geriatr Pharmacoepidemiol & Biostat, Via S Margherita 5, I-60124 Ancona, Italy..
    Lattanzio, Fabrizia
    Italian Natl Res Ctr Aging IRCCS INRCA, Ancona, Italy.;Italian Natl Res Ctr Aging IRCCS INRCA, Fermo, Italy.;Italian Natl Res Ctr Aging IRCCS INRCA, Cosenza, Italy..
    Corsonello, Andrea
    Italian Natl Res Ctr Aging IRCCS INRCA, Ancona, Italy.;Italian Natl Res Ctr Aging IRCCS INRCA, Fermo, Italy.;Italian Natl Res Ctr Aging IRCCS INRCA, Cosenza, Italy..
    Melzer, Yehudit
    Ben Gurion Univ Negev, Recanati Sch Community Hlth Profess, Fac Hlth Sci, Dept Phys Therapy, Beer Sheva, Israel.;Maccabi Hlth Org, Tel Aviv, Israel..
    Roller-Wirnsberger, Regina
    Med Univ Graz, Dept Internal Med, Graz, Austria..
    Wirnsberger, Gerhard
    Med Univ Graz, Div Nephrol, Dept Internal Med, Graz, Austria..
    Mattace-Raso, Francesco
    Erasmus MC, Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Geriatr Med Sect, Dept Internal Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Tap, Lisanne
    Erasmus MC, Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Geriatr Med Sect, Dept Internal Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Gil, Pedro
    Hosp Clin San Carlos, Dept Geriatr Med, Madrid, Spain..
    Martinez, Sara Lainez
    Hosp Clin San Carlos, Dept Geriatr Med, Madrid, Spain..
    Formiga, Francesc
    Bellvitge Univ Hosp, IDIBELL, Dept Internal Med, Geriatr Unit, Barcelona, Spain..
    Moreno-Gonzalez, Rafael
    Bellvitge Univ Hosp, IDIBELL, Dept Internal Med, Geriatr Unit, Barcelona, Spain..
    Kostka, Tomasz
    Med Univ Lodz, Hlth Ageing Res Ctr, Dept Geriatr, Lodz, Poland..
    Guligowska, Agnieszka
    Med Univ Lodz, Hlth Ageing Res Ctr, Dept Geriatr, Lodz, Poland..
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Dalarna Univ, Sch Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Family Med, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Carlsson, Axel C
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Dalarna Univ, Sch Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Family Med, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Freiberger, Ellen
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg, Dept Internal Med Geriatr, Inst Biomed Aging, Krankenhaus Barmherzige Bruder, Koberger Str 60, D-90408 Nurnberg, Germany..
    Melzer, Itshak
    Ben Gurion Univ Negev, Recanati Sch Community Hlth Profess, Fac Hlth Sci, Dept Phys Therapy, Beer Sheva, Israel..
    Impaired kidney function is associated with lower quality of life among community-dwelling older adults The screening for CKD among older people across Europe (SCOPE) study2020In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 20, article id 340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Quality of life (QoL) refers to the physical, psychological, social and medical aspects of life that are influenced by health status and function. The purpose of this study was to measure the self-perceived health status among the elderly population across Europe in different stages of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD). Methods Our series consisted of 2255 community-dwelling older adults enrolled in the Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) among Older People across Europe (SCOPE) study. All patients underwent a comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA), including included demographics, clinical and physical assessment, number of medications taken, family arrangement, Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), Cumulative Illness Rating Scale, History of falls, Lower urinary tract symptoms, and Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB). Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated by Berlin Initiative Study (BIS) equation. Quality of life was assessed by Euro Qol questionnaire (Euro-Qol 5D) and EQ-Visual Analogue Scale (EQ-VAS). The association between CKD (eGFR < 60, < 45 ml or < 30 ml/min/1.73m(2)) and low EQoL-VAS was investigated by multivariable logistic regression models. Results CKD was found to be significantly associated with low EQoL-VAS in crude analysis (OR = 1.47, 95%CI = 1.16-1.85 for eGFR< 60; OR = 1.38, 95%CI = 1.08-1.77 for eGFR< 45; OR = 1.57, 95%CI = 1.01-2.44). Such association was no longer significant only when adjusting for SPPB (OR = 1.20, 95%CI = 0.93-1.56 for eGFR< 60; OR = 0.87, 95%CI = 0.64-1.18 for eGFR< 45; OR = 0.84, 95%CI = 0.50-1.42), CIRS and polypharmacy (OR = 1.16, 95%CI = 0.90-1.50 for eGFR< 60; OR = 0.86, 95%CI = 0.64-1.16 for eGFR< 45; OR = 1.11, 95%CI = 0.69-1.80) or diabetes, hypertension and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (OR = 1.28, 95%CI = 0.99-1.64 for eGFR< 60; OR = 1.16, 95%CI = 0.88-1.52 for eGFR< 45; OR = 1.47, 95%CI = 0.92-2.34). The association between CKD and low EQoL-VAS was confirmed in all remaining multivariable models. Conclusions CKD may significantly affect QoL in community-dwelling older adults. Physical performance, polypharmacy, diabetes, hypertension and COPD may affect such association, which suggests that the impact of CKD on QoL is likely multifactorial and partly mediated by co-occurrent conditions/risk factors.

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  • 46.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division Vi3. Ruhr Universität Bohum, Germany.
    Nakada, Makoto
    University of Tsukuba, Japan.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division Vi3.
    Care Robots and Humanity: How Can We Cope with The Indeterminacy and Ambiguity of Robot-Human Relationships?2023In: Tethics 2023: Proceedings of the Conference on Technology Ethics 2023 / [ed] Minna M. Rantanen, Salla Westerstrand, Otto Sahlgren and Jani Koskinen, CEUR-WS.org , 2023, p. 1-10Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ageing society, labour shortages in the care sector and increasing social security costs havebecome serious social problems in many countries. Sweden and Japan are, of course, noexception in this respect. In order to alleviate this situation, both countries have implementedvarious policies in different social areas, as well as promoting digitalisation and introducingcare robots in the healthcare sector. While older people are generally considered to be reluctantto adapt to new technologies, in both Japan and Sweden, the digital integration of older peopleis higher than in other countries. In the near future, care robots or robotic care would becomemore common in the care sector in both countries. This study examines how people in bothcountries perceive robots and autonomous artefacts and how they construct relationships withthese artefacts, based on the results of two surveys, one conducted in Japan 2020, and anotherin Sweden 2019, and elucidates the relationship between humans and robots from an ethicalperspective. The research findings show that people’s orientation toward the search for theexistential meaning and their complex emotions related to ephemerality and transience canaffect the relationship between humans and robots. Furthermore, this study is a new attempt toincorporate a 'care' perspective into technology ethics.

  • 47. Awortwe, Victoria
    et al.
    Litela Asare, Jennifer
    Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.
    Logoniga Gariba, Samuel
    Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Rakibu Mbamba, Crispin
    University at Albany, New York, USA.
    Ansie, Vera
    Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.
    Witchcraft accusations and older adults: insights from family members on the struggles of well-being2023In: Journal of Religion, Spirituality & Aging, ISSN 1552-8030, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Africa, witch doctors are consulted not only for healing diseases, but also for invoking curses. There has been a paradigm shift involving the types of people often accused of using witchcraft in response to the changing political, economic, and social landscape, and the most affected group is older adults. While efforts are being made to eliminate accusations and lynching, little attention is paid to understanding the experiences of accused older adults and their families. The study collected data through face-to-face interviews from 12 family members of accused older adults who are living in their communities to identify their wellbeing challenges. The findings of this study will offer significant contributions because a lot of attention has been given to older adults confined in “witch” camps, but this paper looks at those in the communities. The study found that ostracism and marginalization, as well as emotional and psychological distress, are key wellbeing challenges experienced by older adults and their families accused of witchcraft. The findings suggest that there is a need for governmental involvement in actively enforcing existing laws that criminalize banishment of accused persons and recognizing that victims of such accusations need trauma-related support services which is currently non-existent. Specifically, a clarion call is placed on the Ministry of Gender, Children and Social Protection to spearhead reforms around trauma-related support provision.

  • 48.
    Barbora, Gustafsson
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Åsenlöf: Physiotheraphy.
    Malmberg, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Åsenlöf: Physiotheraphy.
    Ansträngningsutlösta andningssymtom bland ungdomar på ett idrottsgymnasium i Sverige: könsskillnader och samband med Body mass-index2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 49.
    Barclay, Kieron
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study (SCAS). Department of Sociology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    Smith, Ken R.
    Birth Spacing and Health and Socioeconomic Outcomes Across the Life Course: Evidence From the Utah Population Database2022In: Demography, ISSN 0070-3370, Vol. 59, no 3, p. 1117-1142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship between birth interval length and child outcomes has received increased attention in recent years, but few studies have examined offspring outcomes across the life course in North America. We use data from the Utah Population Database to examine the relationship between birth intervals and short- and long-term outcomes: preterm birth, low birth weight (LBW), infant mortality, college degree attainment, occupational status, and adult mortality. Using linear regression, linear probability models, and survival analysis, we compare results from models with and without sibling comparisons. Children born after a birth interval of 9–12 months have a higher probability of LBW, preterm birth, and infant mortality both with and without sibling comparisons; longer intervals are associated with a lower probability of these outcomes. Short intervals before the birth of the next youngest sibling are also associated with LBW, preterm birth, and infant mortality both with and without sibling comparisons. This pattern raises concerns that the sibling comparison models do not fully adjust for within-family factors predicting both spacing and perinatal outcomes. In sibling comparison analyses considering long-term outcomes, not even the very shortest birth intervals are negatively associated with educational or occupational outcomes or with long-term mortality. These findings suggest that extremely short birth intervals may increase the probability of poor perinatal outcomes but that any such disadvantages disappear over the extended life course.

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  • 50.
    Baunsgaard, Carsten Bach
    et al.
    Univ Copenhagen, Rigshosp, Clin Spinal Cord Injuries, Havnevej 25, DK-3100 Hornbaek, Denmark.
    Nissen, Ulla Vig
    Univ Copenhagen, Rigshosp, Clin Spinal Cord Injuries, Havnevej 25, DK-3100 Hornbaek, Denmark.
    Brust, Anne Katrin
    SPC, Nottwil, Switzerland.
    Frotzler, Angela
    SPC, Nottwil, Switzerland.
    Ribeill, Cornelia
    Ulm Univ, SCI Ctr Orthopaed Dept, Ulm, Germany.
    Kalke, Yorck-Bernhard
    Ulm Univ, SCI Ctr Orthopaed Dept, Ulm, Germany.
    Leon, Natacha
    FLM, Madrid, Spain.
    Gomez, Belen
    FLM, Madrid, Spain.
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Rehabil Med, Linkoping, Sweden;Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Antepohl, Wolfram
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Rehabil Med, Linkoping, Sweden;Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Holmstrom, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery. Uppsala Univ Hosp, Spinal Cord Rehabil Unit, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery. Uppsala Univ Hosp, Spinal Cord Rehabil Unit, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Glott, Thomas
    Sunnaas Rehabil Hosp, Nesoddtangen, Norway.
    Opheim, Arve
    Sunnaas Rehabil Hosp, Nesoddtangen, Norway;Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Neurosci & Physiol, Rehabil Med, Gothenburg, Sweden;Reg Vastra Gotaland, Habilitat & Hlth, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Benito Penalva, Jesus
    Neurorehabil Hosp, Inst Guttmann, Barcelona, Spain.
    Murillo, Narda
    Neurorehabil Hosp, Inst Guttmann, Barcelona, Spain.
    Nachtegaal, Janneke
    Heliomare Rehabil Ctr, Wijk Aan Zee, Netherlands.
    Faber, Willemijn
    Heliomare Rehabil Ctr, Wijk Aan Zee, Netherlands.
    Biering-Sorensen, Fin
    Univ Copenhagen, Rigshosp, Clin Spinal Cord Injuries, Havnevej 25, DK-3100 Hornbaek, Denmark.
    Exoskeleton Gait Training After Spinal Cord Injury: An Exploratory Study on Secondary Health Conditions2018In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 50, no 9, p. 806-813Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore changes in pain, spasticity, range of motion, activities of daily living, bowel and lower urinary tract function and quality of life of individuals with spinal cord injury following robotic exoskeleton gait training.

    Design: Prospective, observational, open-label multicentre study. Methods: Three training sessions per week for 8 weeks using an Ekso GT robotic exoskeleton (Ekso Bionics). Included were individuals with recent (<1 year) or chronic (>1 year) injury, paraplegia and tetraplegia, complete and incomplete injury, men and women.

    Results: Fifty-two participants completed the training protocol. Pain was reported by 52% of participants during the week prior to training and 17% during training, but no change occurred longitudinally. Spasticity decreased after a training session compared with before the training session (p< 0.001), but not longitudinally. Chronically injured participants increased Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM III) from 73 to 74 (p= 0.008) and improved life satisfaction (p= 0.036) over 8 weeks of training. Recently injured participants increased SCIM III from 62 to 70 (p<0.001), but no significant change occurred in life satisfaction. Range of motion, bowel and lower urinary function did not change over time.

    Conclusion: Training seemed not to provoke new pain. Spasticity decreased after a single training session. SCIM III and quality of life increased longitudinally for subsets of participants.

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