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  • 1.
    Alati, Victor Mwakha
    et al.
    Kenya Marine & Fisheries Res Inst, POB 81651-80100, Mombasa, Kenya.;Univ Roehampton, Dept Life Sci, Roehampton Lane, London SW15 5PU, England..
    Olunga, Jibril
    Kenya Marine & Fisheries Res Inst, POB 81651-80100, Mombasa, Kenya..
    Olendo, Mike
    Conservat Int, POB 1963-00502, Nairobi, Kenya..
    Daudi, Lillian Nduku
    Kenya Marine & Fisheries Res Inst, POB 81651-80100, Mombasa, Kenya..
    Osuka, Kennedy
    Coastal Oceans Res & Dev Indian Ocean CORDIO East, 9 Kibaki Flats,POB 10135-80101, Mombasa, Kenya.;Univ York, Dept Environm & Geog, York, N Yorkshire, England..
    Odoli, Cyprian
    Kenya Marine & Fisheries Res Inst, POB 81651-80100, Mombasa, Kenya..
    Tuda, Paul
    Leibniz Zentrum Marine Tropenforsch ZMT GmbH, D-628359 Bremen, Germany..
    Nordlund, Lina M.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Naturresurser och hållbar utveckling.
    Mollusc shell fisheries in coastal Kenya: Local ecological knowledge reveals overfishing2020Ingår i: Ocean and Coastal Management, ISSN 0964-5691, E-ISSN 1873-524X, Vol. 195, artikel-id 105285Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    There is limited documentation on the status and dynamics of fished marine shelled mollusc species in many countries. Some of the challenges are due to obscure documentation of species, extensive unregulated and unrecorded fishing and unawareness of drivers behind declining stocks. The lack of understanding makes it difficult to formulate effective management plans. Here, we assess the fishers' perceptions on changes in abundance of targeted marine shelled mollusc species and status of associated fished habitats. We interviewed 132 marine shelled mollusc gleaners (fishing by walking) at five sites in coastal Kenya. We established that a multispecies marine shelled mollusc fishery is present in Kenya and that this fishery is conducted by both women and men. We distinguished 158 different shelled mollusc species being targeted. The gleaners perceived a temporal decline of gleaned species. The main causes for the decline were perceived to be overfishing of shells, elevated sea-surface temperature and habitat destruction. The more experienced gleaners perceived a greater decline indicating a baseline shift in perceptions. Our findings suggest that local ecological knowledge is useful to understand historic changes in fisheries lacking long-term scientific data. Furthermore, it highlights the potential benefits of a collaboration between ecologists and gleaners to improve our understanding of the status and dynamics of fishing of marine shelled molluscs as well as other types of fishing.

  • 2.
    Alati, Victor Mwakha
    et al.
    Kenya Marine & Fisheries Res Inst, POB 81651-80100, Mombasa, Kenya.;Univ Roehampton, Dept Life Sci, Roehampton Lane, London SW15 5PU, England..
    Osuka, Kennedy
    Coastal Oceans Res & Dev Indian Ocean CORDIO East, 9 Kibaki Flats,POB 10135-80101, Mombasa, Kenya.;Univ Liverpool, Dept Earth Ocean & Ecol Sci, Liverpool, England..
    Otwoma, Levy Michael
    Kenya Marine & Fisheries Res Inst, POB 81651-80100, Mombasa, Kenya..
    Tuda, Paul
    Leibniz Ctr Trop Marine Res ZMT GmbH, Fahrenheitstr, D-628359 Bremen, Germany..
    Nordlund, Lina M.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Naturresurser och hållbar utveckling.
    Gender analysis in fisheries: The case of the shelled mollusc fisheries in Kenya2023Ingår i: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 158, artikel-id 105863Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Analysing gender in small-scale fisheries (SSF) is vital for understanding the contributions of women and men and detecting potential inequalities. In this study, the shelled mollusc fishery was examined through the gender lens using quantitative and qualitative data collected from 132 shelled mollusc fishers accross five sites in coastal Kenya. In Kenya, both women and men participate in shelled mollusc fisheries. The study incorporated in its analyses the main components that intersect with gender to investigate whether similarities and differences exist in SSF in coastal Kenya in terms of access to shelled mollusc fisheries resources and the distribution of monetary benefits from the fishery. Most women respondents (73%, n = 91) relied on shelled mollusc fishing as their primary occupation compared to men (17%, n = 41) whose primary occupation was finfish fishing (69%, n = 41). There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) between women and men fishers in terms of income per individual fisher, time spent fishing, the number of species caught per individual fisher, as well as the monetary value of shells caught. There are several similarities between women and men in this fishery, but with a very important distinction that women more often consider this fishery their primary occupation. Thus, women constitute a large and important part of this fishery in Kenya. To advance coastal and fisheries management, it is essential that women, as well as gender aspects, are included in policy and decision-making processes related to SSF.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Leif
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi. Texas A&M Univ, Dept Vet Integrat Biosci, College Stn, TX 77843 USA.
    André, Carl
    Gothenburg Univ, Dept Marine Sci Tjarno, Stromstad, Sweden.;Univ Gothenburg, Ctr Marine Evolutionary Biol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Johannesson, Kerstin
    Gothenburg Univ, Dept Marine Sci Tjarno, Stromstad, Sweden.;Univ Gothenburg, Ctr Marine Evolutionary Biol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Pettersson, Mats
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi.
    Ecological adaptation in cod and herring and possible consequences of future climate change in the Baltic Sea2023Ingår i: Frontiers in Marine Science, E-ISSN 2296-7745, Vol. 10, artikel-id 1101855Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The Atlantic herring and Atlantic cod are two marine fish species that have successfully adapted to the brackish Baltic Sea, and the former is able to spawn in near-freshwater conditions in the inner Gulf of Bothnia. Here, we review the state of current knowledge concerning ecological adaptation in the two species and make an attempt to predict how they will be able to cope with future climate change. Previous whole genome sequencing studies in Atlantic herring have revealed hundreds of genetic loci underlying ecological adaptation, including several loci that show very strong associations to variation in salinity and temperature. These results suggest the existence of standing genetic variation available for adaptation to a changing environment. However, although Atlantic herring probably has the genetic potential to adapt, its future status also depends on how climate change will affect plankton production and competing species, such as sprat and three-spined stickleback. In cod, the situation is challenging, as there is only one true Baltic population, spawning east of Bornholm and then dispersing towards the east and north. This Baltic cod population is threatened by overfishing, low oxygen levels in benthic waters and generally bad physiological condition of individual fish, in addition to being completely isolated from gene flow from nearby cod populations at the entrance of the Baltic Sea.

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  • 4.
    Andersson, Leif
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi. Texas A&M Univ, Dept Vet Integrat Biosci, College Stn, TX 77843 USA.
    Bekkevold, Dorte
    Tech Univ Denmark, Natl Inst Aquat Resources, Silkeborg, Denmark..
    Berg, Florian
    Inst Marine Res, Bergen, Norway..
    Farrell, Edward D.
    Killybegs Fishermens Org, Killybegs, County Donegal, Ireland..
    Felkel, Sabine
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi.
    Ferreira, Mafalda S.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi.
    Fuentes-Pardo, Angela P.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi.
    Goodall, Jake
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi.
    Pettersson, Mats
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi.
    How Fish Population Genomics Can Promote Sustainable Fisheries: A Road Map2024Ingår i: Annual Review of Animal Biosciences, ISSN 2165-8102, E-ISSN 2165-8110, Vol. 12, s. 1-20Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Maintenance of genetic diversity in marine fishes targeted by commercial fishing is a grand challenge for the future. Most of these species are abundant and therefore important for marine ecosystems and food security. Here, we present a road map of how population genomics can promote sustainable fisheries. In these species, the development of reference genomes and whole genome sequencing is key, because genetic differentiation at neutral loci is usually low due to large population sizes and gene flow. First, baseline allele frequencies representing genetically differentiated populations within species must be established. These can then be used to accurately determine the composition of mixed samples, forming the basis for population demographic analysis to inform sustainably set fish quotas. SNP-chip analysis is a cost-effective method for determining baseline allele frequencies and for population identification in mixed samples. Finally, we describe how genetic marker analysis can transform stock identification and management.

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  • 5.
    Appelberg, Magnus
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    7. Fish Communities2012Ingår i: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, s. 56-62Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
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    ehsa 2-7
  • 6.
    Bekkevold, Dorte
    et al.
    Tech Univ Denmark, Natl Inst Aquat Resources, DK-8600 Silkeborg, Denmark..
    Berg, Florian
    Inst Marine Res IMR, POB 1870 Nordnes, N-5018 Bergen, Norway..
    Polte, Patrick
    Thunen Inst Baltic Sea Fisheries, D-18069 Rostock, Germany..
    Bartolino, Valerio
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Inst Marine Res, S-45321 Lysekil, Sweden..
    Ojaveer, Henn
    Univ Tartu, Parnu Coll, Ringi 35, EE-80012 Parnu, Estonia.;Tech Univ Denmark, Natl Inst Aquat Resources, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark..
    Mosegaard, Henrik
    Tech Univ Denmark, Natl Inst Aquat Resources, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark..
    Farrell, Edward D.
    Univ Coll Dublin, Sci Ctr West, Sch Biol & Environm Sci, Dublin 4, Ireland.;Killybegs Fishermens Org, St Catherines Rd, Killybegs, Donegal, Ireland..
    Fedotova, Jelena
    Klaipeda Univ, Marine Res Inst, Smiltyne 1, LT-93100 Klaipeda, Lithuania..
    Hemmer-Hansen, Jakob
    Tech Univ Denmark, Natl Inst Aquat Resources, DK-8600 Silkeborg, Denmark..
    Huwer, Bastian
    Tech Univ Denmark, Natl Inst Aquat Resources, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark..
    Trijoulet, Vanessa
    Tech Univ Denmark, Natl Inst Aquat Resources, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark..
    Albertsen, Christoffer Moesgaard
    Tech Univ Denmark, Natl Inst Aquat Resources, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark..
    Fuentes Pardo, Angela P.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi.
    Gröhsler, Tomas
    Thunen Inst Baltic Sea Fisheries, D-18069 Rostock, Germany..
    Pettersson, Mats
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi.
    Jansen, Teunis
    Tech Univ Denmark, Natl Inst Aquat Resources, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark.;Greenland Inst Nat Resources, Kivioq 2,POB 570, Nuuk 3900, Greenland..
    Folkvord, Arild
    Inst Marine Res IMR, POB 1870 Nordnes, N-5018 Bergen, Norway.;Univ Bergen, Dept Biol Sci, N-5020 Bergen, Norway..
    Andersson, Leif
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi. Texas A&M Univ, Dept Vet Integrat Biosci, College Stn, TX 77843 USA.;Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anim Breeding & Genet, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Mixed-stock analysis of Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus): a tool for identifying management units and complex migration dynamics2023Ingår i: ICES Journal of Marine Science, ISSN 1054-3139, E-ISSN 1095-9289, Vol. 80, nr 1, s. 173-184Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We developed and validated a mixed-stock analysis (MSA) method with 59 single-nucleotide polymorphisms selected from genome-wide data to assign individuals to populations in mixed-stock samples of Atlantic herring from the North and Baltic seas. We analysed 3734 herring from spawning locations and scientific catches of mixed feeding stocks to demonstrate a "one-fits-all" tool with unprecedented accuracy for monitoring spatio-temporal dynamics throughout a large geographical range with complex stock mixing. We re-analysed time-series data (2002-2021) and compared inferences about stock composition with estimates from morphological data. We show that contributions from the western Baltic spring-spawning stock complex, which is under management concern, have likely been overestimated. We also show that a genetically distinctive population of western Baltic autumn spawners, ascribed low fisheries importance, contributes non-negligible and potentially temporally increasing proportions to mixed-stock aggregations, calling for a re-evaluation of stock definitions. MSA data can be implemented in stock assessment and in a variety of applications, including marine ecosystem description, impact assessment of specific fleets, and stock-rebuilding plans.

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  • 7.
    Berg, Florian
    et al.
    Univ Bergen, Dept Biol Sci, Post Box 7803, N-5020 Bergen, Norway.;Inst Marine Res IMR, Post Box 1870, N-5817 Bergen, Norway..
    Ostgaard, Hedda D.
    Univ Bergen, Dept Biol Sci, Post Box 7803, N-5020 Bergen, Norway..
    Slotte, Aril
    Inst Marine Res IMR, Post Box 1870, N-5817 Bergen, Norway..
    Andersson, Leif
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi. Uppsala universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anim Breeding & Genet, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden.;Texas A&M Univ, Dept Vet Integrat Biosci, College Stn, TX 77843 USA..
    Folkvord, Arild
    Univ Bergen, Dept Biol Sci, Post Box 7803, N-5020 Bergen, Norway.;Inst Marine Res IMR, Post Box 1870, N-5817 Bergen, Norway..
    A combination of genetic and phenotypic characterization of spring- and autumn-spawning herring suggests gene flow between populations2021Ingår i: ICES Journal of Marine Science, ISSN 1054-3139, E-ISSN 1095-9289, Vol. 78, nr 2, s. 694-703Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) has complex population structure and dynamics including diverse life histories and spawning times with spring and autumn spawning as the most common modes. Originally, spawning herring were phenotypically identified based on their maturity development or otolith microstructure by determining seasonal specific larval growth patterns. Recently, genetic markers have revealed clear genetic differentiation between spring- and autumn-spawning populations. All three methods were applied to herring caught at the same locations during spring and autumn to determine the coherence of methods. In a selected subset, most herring (similar to 77%) had an otolith microstructure and genetic assignment coinciding with the phenotypically assigned spawning season. Non-spawning herring (<5%) that were classified as belonging to the current spawning season using genotyping and otolith-typing were assigned as skipped spawners. For similar to 8% of spawning herring, the genetic and otolith assignment contradicted the phenotypically assigned spawning season, characteristic of straying individuals. Otolith-typing contradicted the genetic and phenotypical assignment in similar to 7% of the cases, potentially representing individuals reuniting back to the spawning season favoured by their genotype. Although the viability of offspring from these individuals remains undocumented, it is suggested that the observed switching of spawning season may contribute to gene flow between herring populations.

  • 8.
    Bignert, Anders
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bäcklin, Britt-Marie
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Helander, Björn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Roos, Anna
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden.
    9. Contaminants and Health of Aquatic Wildlife2012Ingår i: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, s. 73-85Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
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    ehsa 2-9
  • 9.
    Björkvik, Emma
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Naturresurser och hållbar utveckling.
    Boonstra, Wiebren J.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Naturresurser och hållbar utveckling.
    Telemo, Vera
    Stockholm Univ, Stockholm Resilience Ctr, Kraftriket 2B, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Going on and off the map: Lessons from Swedish fisher knowledge about spawning areas in the Baltic Sea2021Ingår i: Ocean and Coastal Management, ISSN 0964-5691, E-ISSN 1873-524X, Vol. 211, artikel-id 105762Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Scholars frequently promote fishers' rich understanding of marine environments as a legitimate and unique form of knowledge that must be accounted for in fisheries management. It is, however, challenging to combine fisher knowledge (FK) with the conventional scientific knowledge that fisheries management relies upon. In this paper we investigate the (in)commensurability between FK and scientific objectives and procedures. Towards this aim we performed interviews with a group of fishers who participated in an earlier Swedish study in which FK was used to map locations of fish spawning areas along the Swedish Baltic coast. By interviewing these fishers again we were able to identify and assess aspects of FK that were left implicit in the earlier study. Based on our results we discuss the value of these aspects of FK for understanding marine environments.

  • 10.
    Blyth, Samuel
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Naturresurser och hållbar utveckling.
    Bower, Shannon D.
    Infin Social & Ecol Solut, Ottawa, ON, Canada.
    After the spawn and on the hook: Sea trout Salmo trutta biophysical responses to different components of catch and release in a coastal fishery2022Ingår i: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 101, nr 3, s. 464-477Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the biophysical responses of sea run brown trout Salmo trutta to catch-and-release in the coastal fishery around Gotland, Sweden. It used information recorded on individual angled S. trutta (n = 162), including fight time, handling time, total air exposure time, injury, bleeding, fish length, body condition, spawning status, water temperature, hook location and difficulty of hook removal. Reflex action mortality predictors (equilibrium, operculum beats, tail grab response, body flex response and vestibular-ocular response), tests of blood glucose and lactate, and observation of hooking injury were used to measure the relative impact of the angling event on the fish's physical state and stress experienced. The results of this study suggest low rates of post-release mortality and generally limited stress responses to angling events, and relatively high post-release survival supported by the recapture of many tagged S. trutta. However, a number of scenarios were identified in which stress responses are likely to be compounded and where anglers should take additional action to reduce sublethal physiological disturbances and the risk of delayed mortality. Particular care should be taken to limit cumulative total air exposure to <10 s, and to reduce handling time and risk of additional injury in angling events with extended fight times, when water temperatures >10 degrees C, or where S. trutta show evidence of being physically compromised by injury or having recently spawned. The results also indicate the importance of using appropriately sized single hooks rather than larger treble hooks to reduce hooking injury and handling time during unhooking.

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  • 11.
    Bondad-Reantaso, Melba G.
    et al.
    Food & Agr Org United Nations FAO, Fisheries & Aquaculture Div, Rome, Italy..
    MacKinnon, Brett
    City Univ Hong Kong, Jockey Club Coll Vet Med & Life Sci, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Karunasagar, Iddya
    Nitte Univ, Med Sci Complex, Mangaluru, Karnataka, India..
    Fridman, Sophie
    Food & Agr Org United Nations FAO, Fisheries & Aquaculture Div, Rome, Italy..
    Alday-Sanz, Victoria
    Natl Aquaculture Grp NAQUA, Al Lith, Saudi Arabia..
    Brun, Edgar
    Norwegian Vet Inst, As, Norway..
    Le Groumellec, Marc
    Aqualma Unima Grp, Direct Domesticat & Genet Pathol & Biosecur, Majunga, Madagascar..
    Li, Aihua
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Hydrobiol, Wuhan, Peoples R China..
    Surachetpong, Win
    Kasetsart Univ, Fac Vet Med, Dept Vet Microbiol & Immunol, Bangkok, Thailand..
    Karunasagar, Indrani
    Nitte Univ, Med Sci Complex, Mangaluru, Karnataka, India..
    Hao, Bin
    Food & Agr Org United Nations FAO, Fisheries & Aquaculture Div, Rome, Italy..
    Dall'Occo, Andrea
    Food & Agr Org United Nations FAO, Fisheries & Aquaculture Div, Rome, Italy..
    Urbani, Ruggero
    Vet Dept Prevent, Rome, Italy..
    Caputo, Andrea
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Review of alternatives to antibiotic use in aquaculture2023Ingår i: Reviews in Aquaculture, ISSN 1753-5123, E-ISSN 1753-5131, Vol. 15, nr 4, s. 1421-1451Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    With the rapid growth of the aquaculture production since the 1980s, there has been a concomitant increase in disease outbreaks. The injudicious and/or incorrect use of antimicrobial agents against diseases of farmed aquatic species poses a considerable threat to the development and growth of a successful and sustainable aquaculture industry. An increase in antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is an important consequence, resulting to the difficulty in treating common bacterial diseases in populations of aquatic organisms, combined with the presence of antibiotic residues in food fish and their products, leading to import refusals and negative impacts on international trade. To reduce the frequency of AMR, good aquaculture and effective biosecurity practices should include the prudent and responsible use of antibiotics and also consider the use of alternatives to antibiotics, in addition to disease prevention management. This article reviews the literature discussing the scope of the problem pertaining to antibiotic use, the emergence of AMR in aquaculture and to consider and discuss viable alternatives (e.g., vaccination, bacteriophages, quorum quenching, probiotics and prebiotics, chicken egg yolk antibody and medicinal plant derivative). We also discuss lessons learnt, from specific case studies such as the vaccination of farmed salmon in Norway and the use of 'specific pathogen-free' seed-as primary and essential part of a biosecurity strategy.

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  • 12. Both, Adrianus
    et al.
    Parrish, Christopher
    Penney, Randy
    Growth and biochemical composition of Mytilus edulis when reared on effluent from a cod, Gadus morhua, aquaculture facility2012Ingår i: Journal of Shellfish Research, ISSN 0730-8000, E-ISSN 1943-6319, Vol. 31, nr 1, s. 79-85Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study determined the growth and biochemical composition of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) reared on effluent from Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and compared it with mussels reared on a standard shellfish diet. Feeding trials lasted 6 mo, and mussels were sampled on a monthly basis. Dry weight, ash-free dry weight, shell length, and condition index were all significantly higher in algae-fed mussels at the end of the experiment compared with effluent-fed mussels. The carbon content decreased for mussels fed both diets; however, their nitrogen and protein content increased, with effluent-fed mussels having significantly more nitrogen and protein than algae-fed mussels, suggesting that effluent can increase mussel growth. Total lipid and fatty acid (FA) content decreased for effluent-fed mussels at the end of the experiment. There were no significant differences in the lipid class composition between mussels fed the 2 diets. Mussels fed both diets significantly decreased in the amount of 14:0, 16:1ω7, 16:2ω4, 16:4ω1 and 20:5ω3, and effluent-fed mussels also decreased in 18:4ω3 and 21:5ω3, as well as increased in the amount of 17:1, the Zooplankton markers 20:1ω11 and 22:1ω11, and the dienoic nonmethylene-interrupted fatty acids (NMIDs) 20:2a and 22:2b. Significant differences in the amount of individual FAs between mussels fed the 2 diets included a larger amount of 18:2ω6 and 20:4ω6 in algae-fed mussels, and a significantly larger amount of 16:4ω1 in mussels fed effluent. Mussels fed both diets underwent significant increases in the proportion of bacterial FAs, ω6 FAs, Zooplankton markers, and NMIDs. Effluent-fed mussels had a significantly larger proportion of monounsaturated FAs, Zooplankton markers, and NMIDs, as well as a smaller proportion of polyunsaturated FAs, and ω3 and ω6 FAs than algae-fed mussels. The increased presence of Zooplankton markers supports the use of these FAs to track aquaculture wastes.

  • 13. Both, Adrianus
    et al.
    Parrish, Christopher
    Penney, Randy
    Thompson, Raymond
    Lipid composition of Mytilus edulis reared on organic waste from a Gadus morhua aquaculture facility2011Ingår i: Aquatic Living Resources, ISSN 0990-7440, E-ISSN 1765-2952, Vol. 24, nr 3, s. 295-301Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to determine biochemical changes occurring in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) fed effluent from an Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) aquaculture facility over a period of ten weeks, compared to those in mussels fed a commercial shellfish diet and those supplied only filtered seawater. The total lipid and fatty acid content (mg g -1 wet weight) significantly decreased for mussels fed effluent during the experiment. The only change in the lipid class composition (% total lipid) at the end of the experiment was a significant increase in the proportion of acetone mobile polar lipids. There were several significant changes in the fatty acid composition (% total fatty acid) including an increase in the proportion of 18:1ω9, 18:2ω6, 20:4ω6, 21:5ω3 and the dienoic non-methylene-interrupted fatty acids 20:2a and 22:2b and significant decreases in the proportions of 16:0, 18:4ω3 and 20:5ω3. The increase in non-methylene interrupted dienes suggests that the amount of essential fatty acids in the effluent may be insufficient for optimal mussel growth. The presence of the terrestrial plant marker 18:2ω6 in both the fish feed and the effluent and its increased proportion in mussels fed effluent suggest that this fatty acid may have potential as a marker for aquaculture wastes.

  • 14. Both, Adrianus
    et al.
    Parrish, Christopher
    Penney, Randy
    Thompson, Raymond
    Physical and biochemical properties of effluent leaving an onshore Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua, Linnaeus 1758; Gadiformes: Gadidae) aquaculture facility and potential use in integrated multi-trophic aquaculture2013Ingår i: Aquaculture Research, ISSN 1355-557X, E-ISSN 1365-2109, Vol. 44, nr 12, s. 1940-1951Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The physical and biochemical properties of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) wastes were analysed, and the waste remediation potential of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) was assessed. Waste generated daily by Atlantic cod represented 24.9% of the cod feed added to the system. Particle distributions determined using a Coulter Multisizer and image analysis revealed that the majority of the particles in terms of numbers occupy the smaller size ranges; however, larger particles occupy a larger proportion of the volume. Effluent was composed of particles <70 μm (36%), 70-500 μm (31%) and particles >500 μm (33%) by weight. The amount of dissolved carbon and nitrogen associated with the effluent represented 3.1% and 3.7%, respectively, of the total feed added to the system daily. Particles <70 μm had significantly less organic matter, lipids and fatty acids and were expected to be ingested more by mussels than larger particles. The major lipid classes present in effluent were free fatty acids, triacylglycerols, phospholipids, acetone mobile polar lipids and sterol. Cod effluent contained two essential fatty acids DHA and EPA, a diatom marker (16:1ω7), as well as two zooplankton markers 22:1ω11 and 20:1ω9, which accumulated in mussels and may serve as markers for aquaculture wastes. Although only 36% of the effluent was of a size suitable for mussel ingestion, this size fraction has the greatest potential to spread to surrounding areas. These particulates may be useful as an alternate food source when natural seston is low.

  • 15.
    Caputo, Andrea
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Bondad-Reantaso, Melba G.
    Fisheries and Aquaculture Division, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Rome, Italy.
    Karunasagar, Iddya
    Nitte Univ, Med Sci Complex, Mangaluru, Karnataka, India..
    Hao, Bin
    Food & Agr Org United Nations FAO, Fisheries & Aquaculture Div, Viale Terme Caracalla, I-00153 Rome, Italy..
    Gaunt, Patricia
    Mississippi State Univ, Starkville, MS, Brazil..
    Verner-Jeffreys, David
    Centre for Environment Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (CEFAS) and FAO Reference Center on AMR, Weymouth, Dorset, UK.
    Fridman, Sophie
    Fisheries and Aquaculture Division, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Rome, Italy.
    Dorado-Garcia, Alejandro
    Joint FAO/WHO Centre (CODEX Food Standards and Zoonotic Diseases (CJW), Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Rome, Italy.
    Antimicrobial resistance in aquaculture: A global analysis of literature and national action plans2023Ingår i: Reviews in Aquaculture, ISSN 1753-5123, E-ISSN 1753-5131, Vol. 15, nr 2, s. 568-578Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the establishment of a Global Action Plan (GAP) on Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) (68th World Health Assembly, Geneva, Switzerland, 2015), most members of the World Health Organisation (WHO) have developed and implemented a National Action Plan (NAP) based on a "One Health" approach to AMR. Aquaculture, significant among the food producing sectors, has often been overlooked in AMR governance. We did a systematic review of 95 country NAPs and assessed the inclusion of aquaculture. We also reviewed the scientific literature from 1996 until April 2021 to retrieve data characterising AMR in aquaculture during the last 25 years. In our analysis, 37% of countries did not mention an aquaculture component within their AMR NAP. The South-East Asia Region had the highest implementation rate of AMR-aquaculture programmes. Our literature review indicated that most AMR-aquaculture related studies have taken place in China, followed by the United States of America and India. Beta-lactamases, tetracyclines, sulfonamides, macrolides, and fluoroquinolones were the most represented classes of antibiotics, with Vibrio spp. and Aeromonas spp. as the most investigated antimicrobial-resistant bacteria. This review highlighted the gaps in AMR-aquaculture governance and the progress made across WHO members. Countries are encouraged to (i) fulfil their commitments by developing and/or fully implementing the AMR NAP, (ii) further engage in the research, monitoring, and surveillance of antimicrobial usage and AMR within the aquaculture sector, and (iii) collaborate at national and international level for a concerted "One Health" approach.

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    fulltext
  • 16.
    Charisiadou, Stefania
    et al.
    Hellen Ctr Marine Res, Inst Marine Biol Resources & Inland Waters, Anavyssos, Greece.;Stockholm Univ, Dept Ecol Environm & Plant Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Halling, Christina
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Ecol Environm & Plant Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.;Swedish Univ Agr Sci, SLU Swedish Species Informat Ctr, Box 7007, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Jiddawi, Narriman
    Inst Fisheries Res Zanzibar, Zanzibar, Tanzania..
    von Schreeb, Kristina
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Ecol Environm & Plant Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gullstrom, Martin
    Södertörn Univ, Sch Nat Sci Technol & Environm Studies, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Larsson, Terese
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Ecol Environm & Plant Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Mtwana Nordlund, Lina
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Naturresurser och hållbar utveckling. Stockholm Univ, Dept Ecol Environm & Plant Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Coastal aquaculture in Zanzibar, Tanzania2022Ingår i: Aquaculture, ISSN 0044-8486, E-ISSN 1873-5622, Vol. 546, artikel-id 737331Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study provides an overview of the multi-sectoral coastal aquaculture development in Zanzibar (Tanzania) over the last thirty years based on empirical evidence from interviews, field observations, policy reports and literature reviews. Despite the immense potential of aquaculture for food and livelihoods, only seaweed farming has so far established into commercial-scale production. This activity is dominated by women and became widespread in the early 1990s as a small but regular source of income. However, seaweed farming constraints such as frequent seaweed die-offs, as well as economic and institutional constraints inhibit its development. Other types of aquaculture activities such as fish farming, mud crab fattening, half-pearl farming, sea cucumber farming and sponge and coral cultures are under development with limited production or in experimental stages. Common constraints among these activities are economic limitations, lack of technical infrastructure and skills, small and irregular production, and limited trade and market availabilities. At the same time, there is a lack of sufficient management and monitoring systems, while there are no formal regulations or clear strategies to boost aquaculture at the national level. In addition, new aquaculture initiatives are often dominated by donor-driven projects instead of local entrepreneurships. This situation does not encourage engagement in aquaculture and thus such activities are outcompeted by other already established sectors (e.g. agriculture and fisheries). We conclude that aquaculture has great potential to evolve due to high environmental capacity. Nevertheless, achieving profitable production and a stronger commitment within local communities, as well as developing effective mariculture governance through support mechanisms and clear strategies to boost the sector at the national level, are essential for sustainable mariculture development in Zanzibar.

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    fulltext
  • 17.
    Cooke, Steven J.
    et al.
    Carleton Univ, Dept Biol, Fish Ecol & Conservat Physiol Lab, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada;Carleton Univ, Inst Environm & Interdisciplinary Sci, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada.
    Twardek, William M.
    Carleton Univ, Dept Biol, Fish Ecol & Conservat Physiol Lab, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada;Carleton Univ, Inst Environm & Interdisciplinary Sci, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada.
    Reid, Andrea J.
    Carleton Univ, Dept Biol, Fish Ecol & Conservat Physiol Lab, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada;Carleton Univ, Inst Environm & Interdisciplinary Sci, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada.
    Lennox, Robert J.
    Carleton Univ, Dept Biol, Fish Ecol & Conservat Physiol Lab, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada;Carleton Univ, Inst Environm & Interdisciplinary Sci, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada.
    Danylchuk, Sascha C.
    Fish Mission, Amherst, MA USA.
    Brownscombe, Jacob W.
    Carleton Univ, Dept Biol, Fish Ecol & Conservat Physiol Lab, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada;Carleton Univ, Inst Environm & Interdisciplinary Sci, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada.
    Bower, Shannon D.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Naturresurser och hållbar utveckling.
    Arlinghaus, Robert
    Humboldt Univ, Leibniz Inst Freshwater Ecol & Inland Fisheries, Dept Biol & Ecol Fishes, Berlin, Germany;Humboldt Univ, Fac Life Sci, Div Integrat Fisheries Management, Berlin, Germany.
    Hyder, Kieran
    Ctr Environm Fisheries & Aquaculture Sci, Lowestoft, Suffolk, England;Univ East Anglia, Sch Environm Sci, Norwich, Norfolk, England.
    Danylchuk, Andy J.
    Fish Mission, Amherst, MA USA;Univ Massachusetts, Dept Environm Conservat, Amherst, MA 01003 USA.
    Searching for responsible and sustainable recreational fisheries in the Anthropocene2019Ingår i: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 94, nr 6, s. 845-856Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Recreational fisheries that use rod and reel (i.e., angling) operate around the globe in diverse freshwater and marine habitats, targeting many different gamefish species and engaging at least 220 million participants. The motivations for fishing vary extensively; whether anglers engage in catch-and-release or are harvest-oriented, there is strong potential for recreational fisheries to be conducted in a manner that is both responsible and sustainable. There are many examples of recreational fisheries that are well-managed where anglers, the angling industry and managers engage in responsible behaviours that both contribute to long-term sustainability of fish populations and the sector. Yet, recreational fisheries do not operate in a vacuum; fish populations face threats and stressors including harvest from other sectors as well as environmental change, a defining characteristic of the Anthropocene. We argue that the future of recreational fisheries and indeed many wild fish populations and aquatic ecosystems depends on having responsible and sustainable (R&S) recreational fisheries whilst, where possible, addressing, or at least lobbying for increased awareness about the threats to recreational fisheries emanating from outside the sector (e.g., climate change). Here, we first consider how the concepts of R&S intersect in the recreational fishing sector in an increasingly complex socio-cultural context. Next, we explore the role of the angler, angling industry and decision-makers in achieving R&S fisheries. We extend this idea further by considering the consequences of a future without recreational fisheries (either because of failures related to R&S) and explore a pertinent case study situated in Uttarakahand, India. Unlike other fisheries sectors where the number of participants is relatively small, recreational angling participants are numerous and widespread, such that if their actions are responsible, they have the potential to be a key voice for conservation and serve as a major force for good in the Anthropocene. What remains to be seen is whether this will be achieved, or if failure will occur to the point that recreational fisheries face increasing pressure to cease, as a result of external environmental threats, the environmental effects of recreational fishing and emerging ethical concerns about the welfare of angled fish.

  • 18.
    Enbody, Erik D.
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi.
    Pettersson, Mats
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi. Uppsala universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sprehn, Charlotte Grace
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi.
    Palm, Stefan
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Inst Freshwater Res, Dept Aquat Resources, S-17893 Drottningholm, Sweden..
    Wickstrom, Hakan
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Inst Freshwater Res, Dept Aquat Resources, S-17893 Drottningholm, Sweden..
    Andersson, Leif
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi. Uppsala universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Biochem & Microbiol, S-75123 Uppsala, Sweden.;Texas A&M Univ, Dept Vet Integrat Biosci, College Stn, TX 77843 USA.;Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anim Breeding & Genet, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Ecological adaptation in European eels is based on phenotypic plasticity2021Ingår i: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 118, nr 4, artikel-id e2022620118Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The relative role of genetic adaptation and phenotypic plasticity is of fundamental importance in evolutionary ecology [M. J. West-Eberhard, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 102 (suppl. 1), 6543-6549 (2005)]. European eels have a complex life cycle, including transitions between life stages across ecological conditions in the Sargasso Sea, where spawning occurs, and those in brackish and freshwater bodies from northern Europe to northern Africa. Whether continental eel populations consist of locally adapted and genetically distinct populations or comprise a single panmictic population has received conflicting support. Here we use whole-genome sequencing and show that European eels belong to one panmictic population. A complete lack of geographical genetic differentiation is demonstrated. We postulate that this is possible because the most critical life stages-spawning and embryonic development-take place under near-identical conditions in the Sargasso Sea. We further show that within-generation selection, which has recently been proposed as a mechanism for genetic adaptation in eels, can only marginally change allele frequencies between cohorts of eels from different geographic regions. Our results strongly indicate plasticity as the predominant mechanism for how eels respond to diverse environmental conditions during postlarval stages, ultimately solving a long-standing question for a classically enigmatic species.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 19.
    Ermgassen, Philine S. E. Zu
    et al.
    Univ Edinburgh, Sch Geosci, Grant Inst, Changing Oceans Grp, Kings Bldg, Edinburgh EH9 3FE, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Mukherjee, Nibedita
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Zool, David Attenborough Bldg,Pembroke St, Cambridge CB2 3QZ, England..
    Worthington, Thomas A.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Zool, David Attenborough Bldg,Pembroke St, Cambridge CB2 3QZ, England..
    Acosta, Alejandro
    Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservat Commiss, Fish & Wildlife Res Inst, 2796 Overseas Hwy, Marathon, FL 33050 USA..
    da Rocha Araujo, Ana Rosa
    Univ Fed Sergipe, Dept Fishery Engn & Aquaculture, Sao Cristovao, SE, Brazil..
    Beitl, Christine M.
    Univ Maine, Dept Anthropol, 5773 S Stevens Hall,228A, Orono, ME 04469 USA..
    Castellanos-Galindo, Gustavo A.
    Smithsonian Trop Res Inst STRI, Panama City, Panama.;Leibniz Ctr Trop Marine Res ZMT, Bremen, Germany.;Ctr Trop Marine Res ZMT, Fahrenheitstr 6, D-28358 Bremen, Germany..
    Cunha-Lignon, Marilia
    Univ Estadual Paulista, Dept Fishery Engn, UNESP, Campus Registro, BR-1190000 Registro, SP, Brazil..
    Dahdouh-Guebas, Farid
    Univ Libre Bruxelles ULB, Dept Biol Organismes, Lab Syst Ecol & Resource Management, Av FD Roosevelt 50,CPi 264-1, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium.;Vrije Univ Brussel VUB, Biol Dept, Lab Plant Biol & Nat Management, VUB APNA WE,Ecol & Biodivers, Pl Laan 2, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium..
    Diele, Karen
    Edinburgh Napier Univ, Sch Appl Sci, Edinburgh EH11 4BN, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Parrett, Cara L.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Engn, Cambridge, England..
    Dwyer, Patrick G.
    DPI Fisheries, Coastal Syst, 1243 Bruxner Hwy, Wollongbar, NSW 2477, Australia..
    Gair, Jonathan R.
    Univ Edinburgh, Sch Math, Kings Bldg,Peter Guthrie Tait Rd, Edinburgh EH9 3FD, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Johnson, Andrew Frederick
    MarFishEco Fisheries Consultants, 3 F9 Antigua St, Edinburgh EH1 3NH, Midlothian, Scotland.;Heriot Watt Univ, Lyell Ctr, Sch Energy Geosci Infrastruct & Soc, Inst Life & Earth Sci, Edinburgh EH14 4AS, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Kuguru, Baraka
    Tanzania Fisheries Res Inst, POB 9750, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania..
    Lobo, Aaron Savio
    IUCN SSC Marine Conservat Comm, Colombo, Sri Lanka..
    Loneragan, Neil R.
    Murdoch Univ, Coll SHEE, Environm & Conservat Sci, South St, Murdoch, WA 6150, Australia.;Murdoch Univ, Harry Butler Inst, South St, Murdoch, WA 6150, Australia..
    Longley-Wood, Kate
    Nature Conservancy, 1815 N Lynn St, Arlington, VA USA..
    Mendonca, Jocemar Tomasino
    Inst Pesca, Nucleo Pesquisa Litoral, Av Besnard S-N, BR-11990000 Cananeia, SP, Brazil..
    Meynecke, Jan-Olaf
    Griffith Univ, Griffith Ctr Coastal Management & Australian Rive, Gold Coast, Qld 4222, Australia..
    Mandal, Roland Nathan
    Ctr Environm & Geog Informat Serv, Agr & Fisheries Div, Dhaka, Bangladesh..
    Munga, Cosmas Nzaka
    Univ Witwatersrand, Sch Geog, Dept Geog & Environm Studies, ZA-2050 Johannesburg, South Africa.;Tech Univ Mombasa, Dept Environm & Hlth Sci, Marine & Fisheries Program, POB 90420-80100, Mombasa, Kenya..
    Reguero, Borja G.
    Univ Calif Santa Cruz, Inst Marine Sci, 115 McAllister Way, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA..
    Rönnbäck, Patrik
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Naturresurser och hållbar utveckling.
    Thorley, Julia
    GIS Consultant, Penzance, Cornwall, England..
    Wolff, Matthias
    Ctr Trop Marine Res ZMT, Fahrenheitstr 6, D-28358 Bremen, Germany..
    Spalding, Mark
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Zool, David Attenborough Bldg,Pembroke St, Cambridge CB2 3QZ, England.;Univ Siena, Dept Phys Earth & Environm Sci, Nat Conservancy, I-53100 Siena, Italy..
    Fishers who rely on mangroves: Modelling and mapping the global intensity of mangrove-associated fisheries2021Ingår i: Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, ISSN 0272-7714, E-ISSN 1096-0015, Vol. 248, artikel-id 107159Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Mangroves are critical nursery habitats for fish and invertebrates, providing livelihoods for many coastal communities. Despite their importance, there is currently no estimate of the number of fishers engaged in mangrove associated fisheries, nor of the fishing intensity associated with mangroves at a global scale. We address these gaps by developing a global model of mangrove associated fisher numbers and mangrove fishing intensity. To develop the model, we undertook a three-round Delphi process with mangrove fisheries experts to identify the key drivers of mangrove fishing intensity. We then developed a conceptual model of intensity of mangrove fishing using those factors identified both as being important and for which appropriate global data could be found or developed. These factors were non-urban population, distance to market, distance to mangroves and other fishing grounds, and storm events. By projecting this conceptual model using geospatial datasets, we were able to estimate the number and distribution of mangrove associated fishers and the intensity of fishing in mangroves. We estimate there are 4.1 million mangrove associated fishers globally, with the highest number of mangrove fishers found in Indonesia, India, Bangladesh, Myanmar, and Brazil. Mangrove fishing intensity was greatest throughout Asia, and to a lesser extent West and Central Africa, and Central and South America.

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  • 20.
    Evans, Sverker
    The Swedish Agency for Marine and Water Management, Göteborg, Sweden.
    10. Shipping and Oil Production2012Ingår i: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, s. 86-93Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    ehsa 2-10
  • 21.
    Farrell, Edward D. D.
    et al.
    EDF Sci Ltd, Ladysbridge, Cork, Ireland.;Univ Coll Dublin, Earth Inst, Sci Ctr West, Sch Biol & Environm Sci,Area 52 Res Grp, Dublin, Ireland..
    Andersson, Leif
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi. Uppsala universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala Univ, Dept MedTexas A&M Univ, Dept Vet Integrat Biosci, College Stn, TX USA.;Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anim Breeding & Genet, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Bekkevold, Dorte
    Tech Univ Denmark, Natl Inst Aquat Resources, Silkeborg, Denmark..
    Campbell, Neil
    Marine Scotland Sci, 375 Victoria Rd, Aberdeen 119, Scotland..
    Carlsson, Jens
    Univ Coll Dublin, Earth Inst, Sci Ctr West, Sch Biol & Environm Sci,Area 52 Res Grp, Dublin, Ireland..
    Clarke, Maurice W. W.
    Marine Inst, Galway, Ireland..
    Egan, Afra
    Marine Inst, Galway, Ireland..
    Folkvord, Arild
    Univ Bergen, Dept Biol Sci, Bergen, Norway..
    Gras, Michael
    Marine Inst, Galway, Ireland.;European Commiss, Joint Res Ctr JRC, Ispra, Italy..
    Lusseau, Susan Maersk
    Marine Scotland Sci, 375 Victoria Rd, Aberdeen 119, Scotland.;Natl Inst Aquat Resources, Willemoesvej 2,Hovedbygning 067, DK-9850 Hirtshals, Denmark..
    Mackinson, Steven
    Scottish Pelag Fishermens Assoc, Heritage House,135-139 Shore St, Fraserburgh, Aberdeen, Scotland..
    Nolan, Cormac
    Marine Inst, Galway, Ireland..
    O'Connell, Steven
    Marine Scotland Sci, 375 Victoria Rd, Aberdeen 119, Scotland..
    O'Malley, Michael
    Marine Inst, Galway, Ireland..
    Pastoors, Martin
    Pelag Freezer Trawler Assoc, Louis Braillelaan 80, NL-2719 EK Zoetermeer, Netherlands..
    Pettersson, Mats
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi. Uppsala universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    White, Emma
    Marine Inst, Galway, Ireland..
    A baseline for the genetic stock identification of Atlantic herring, Clupea harengus, in ICES Divisions 6.a, 7.b-c2022Ingår i: Royal Society Open Science, E-ISSN 2054-5703, Vol. 9, nr 9, artikel-id 220453Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Atlantic herring in International Council for Exploration of the Sea (ICES) Divisions 6.a, 7.b-c comprises at least three populations, distinguished by temporal and spatial differences in spawning, which have until recently been managed as two stocks defined by geographical delineators. Outside of spawning the populations form mixed aggregations, which are the subject of acoustic surveys. The inability to distinguish the populations has prevented the development of separate survey indices and separate stock assessments. A panel of 45 single-nucleotide polymorphisms, derived from whole-genome sequencing, were used to genotype 3480 baseline spawning samples (2014-2021). A temporally stable baseline comprising 2316 herring from populations known to inhabit Division 6.a was used to develop a genetic assignment method, with a self-assignment accuracy greater than 90%. The long-term temporal stability of the assignment model was validated by assigning archive (2003-2004) baseline samples (270 individuals) with a high level of accuracy. Assignment of non-baseline samples (1514 individuals) from Divisions 6.a, 7.b-c indicated previously unrecognized levels of mixing of populations outside of the spawning season. The genetic markers and assignment models presented constitute a 'toolbox' that can be used for the assignment of herring caught in mixed survey and commercial catches in Division 6.a into their population of origin with a high level of accuracy.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 22.
    Faulks, L. K.
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Östman, O.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Inst Coastal Res, Dept Aquat Resources, Skolvagen 6, S-74242 Oregrund, Sweden..
    Adaptive major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and neutral genetic variation in two native Baltic Sea fishes (perch Perca fluviatilis and zander Sander lucioperca) with comparisons to an introduced and disease susceptible population in Australia (P-fluviatilis): assessing the risk of disease epidemics2016Ingår i: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 88, nr 4, s. 1564-1583Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study assessed the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and neutral genetic variation and structure in two percid species, perch Perca fluviatilis and zander Sander lucioperca, in a unique brackish ecosystem, the Baltic Sea. In addition, to assess the importance of MHC diversity to disease susceptibility in these populations, comparisons were made to an introduced, disease susceptible, P. fluviatilis population in Australia. Eighty-three MHC class II B exon 2 variants were amplified: 71 variants from 92 P. fluviatilis samples, and 12 variants from 82 S. lucioperca samples. Microsatellite and MHC data revealed strong spatial genetic structure in S. lucioperca, but not P. fluviatilis, across the Baltic Sea. Both microsatellite and MHC data showed higher levels of genetic diversity in P. fluviatilis from the Baltic Sea compared to Australia, which may have facilitated the spread of an endemic virus, EHNV in the Australian population. The relatively high levels of genetic variation in the Baltic Sea populations, together with spatial genetic structure, however, suggest that there currently seems to be little risk of disease epidemics in this system. To ensure this remains the case in the face of ongoing environmental changes, fisheries and habitat disturbance, the conservation of local-scale genetic variation is recommended.

  • 23.
    Fitzsimons, John D.
    et al.
    Great Lakes Laboratory for Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, Burlington, Canada.
    Wolgamood, Martha
    Michigan Department of Natural Resources, Mattawan, MI, USA.
    Madenjian, Charles P.
    United States Geological Survey, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
    Bunnell, David B.
    United States Geological Survey, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
    20. Thiamine Deficiency in Aquatic Food Chains: The Cumulative Result of Ecosystem Disruption by Clupeids?2012Ingår i: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, s. 167-180Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    ehsa 2-20
  • 24.
    Gallardo Fernández, Gloria L.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, För teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten gemensamma enheter, Uppsala centrum för hållbar utveckling, CSD Uppsala.
    From Seascapes of Extinction to Seascapes of Confidence: Territorial Use Rights in Fisheries in Chile: El Quisco and Puerto Oscuro2008Bok (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    In Chile, the indiscriminate harvest for export of the edible shellfish, Concholepas concholepas or false abalone, propelled by a neo-liberal market economy during the 1970s, almost led to the extinction of the species, thereby threatening the dependant small-scale artisan fishers’ survival as well as the ecosystem. To reverse this, fishers’ organizations in Chile have adopted the state created regulatory measure, Management and Exploitation Areas for Benthic Resources (MEABR; locally known as Management Areas -- MAs). Replacing the former unsuccessful fishing regulatory measurements, the MEABR regime empowers the fishers with exclusive territorial use rights (TURF) to manage the species, often under commons institutions, thus creating new seascapes of confidence. However, as is often the case with new solutions, emergent problems are posed that threaten to undermine the reform. With the new regulated extraction measure and geographical expansion of this novel labour and production alternative, fishers experience a transition from ‘nomadic’ to sedentary fishing leading to a transformation of their lifestyle and skills. If MAs become permanent, fishing in rural areas may lead to tensions as the fishers settle on coastal lands without entitlement, or are hindered from developing their own fisheries infrastructure. The legal system does not seem to fully foresee the consequences of the reform, and prevailing power relations and private property rights work to disadvantage the fishers. Using a participatory approach for the first research location of El Quisco (Valparaíso Region), and interviews with key informants for the second research location of Puerto Oscuro (Coquimbo Region), fishers’ views of the Chilean TURF were evaluated. How fishers perceive this experience should be central for the success or failure of the MAs as a viable alternative to the earlier conditions of open access. While the assessment of El Quisco deals more with the performance of the MA, Puerto Oscuro is used to portray the seascapes of conflict that have emerged as ownership of the coastal land is contested. The study shows that while the reform has brought better incomes from the benthic resources, the overall economic importance of the MAs for the fishers is reduced relative to the incomes coming from fishing activities realized outside the MAs. Experiences in both cases have been otherwise positive in terms of the recuperation of the species, ecological concerns and strengthening fishers’ so-called soft assets. Nevertheless, many problems remain, among them the problem of access to the sea border and those related to ambiguous land rights to support coastal settlement and fishing infrastructure development.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 25.
    Hanh, Tong Thi Hai
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Naturresurser och hållbar utveckling. College of Food Industry, 101 Lê Hữu Trác, P.O. Box 50400, Da Nang, Viet Nam.
    Why are fisheries agencies unable to facilitate the development of alternative livelihoods in small-scale fisheries and aquaculture in the global South?: A case study of the Tam Giang lagoon, Viet Nam2021Ingår i: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 133, artikel-id 104778Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The establishment of alternative livelihoods in small-scale fisheries is frequently recommended as a way to restore aquatic resources while at the same time improve fishers’ and aquaculturists’ livelihoods. Yet fisheries agencies are often unable to facilitate the development of alternative livelihoods through fisheries policies and management. The aim of this article is to investigate why this is so. Based on a case study of the Tam Giang lagoon, Viet Nam, it finds possible explanation includes: (1) failure to integrate an understanding of the realities of the socio-economic conditions and needs of fishing and aquaculture households; (2) lack of motivation, commitment, and capacity to facilitate alternative livelihoods; and (3) lack of support from local governments. Drawing from the literature on small-scale fisheries in the global South, the article suggests that the development of leadership and provision of knowledge of alternative livelihoods to both fisheries managers and local government leaders can help to address these shortcomings.

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    fulltext
  • 26.
    Hellström, Anders
    et al.
    National Veterinary Institute, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Chukalova, Natalia
    AtlantNiro, Kaliningrad, Russia.
    Rodjuk, Galina
    AtlantNiro, Kaliningrad, Russia.
    Ekman, Elisabet
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Norrgren, Leif
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    8. Aquaculture and Fish Health2012Ingår i: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, s. 63-72Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    ehsa 2-8
  • 27.
    Herlevi, Heidi
    et al.
    Abo Akad Univ, Fac Sci & Engn Environm & Marine Biol, Turku, Finland..
    Kihlberg, Isa Wallin
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Aquat Resources, Oregrund, Sweden..
    Aarnio, Katri
    Abo Akad Univ, Fac Sci & Engn Environm & Marine Biol, Turku, Finland..
    Bonsdorff, Erik
    Abo Akad Univ, Fac Sci & Engn Environm & Marine Biol, Turku, Finland..
    Florin, Ann-Britt
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Aquat Resources, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Ljung, Andreas
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för biologisk grundutbildning, Klubbans biologiska station.
    Lundström, Karl
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Aquat Resources, Lysekil, Sweden..
    Mattila, Johanna
    Aland Univ Appl Sci, Mariehamn, Finland..
    Östman, Örjan
    Environmental abundances of the non-native round goby Neogobius melanostomus influence feeding of native fish predators2023Ingår i: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 102, nr 6, s. 1340-1357Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors assessed the importance of the round goby Neogobius melanostomus as prey for three native predatory fish species, Atlantic cod Gadus morhua, European perch Perca fluviatilis and northern pike Esox lucius, in a northern and southern area of the Baltic Proper, using a combination of visual analysis and DNA metabarcoding of predator stomach contents. To explore the influence of environmental abundances of N. melanostomus on predation, they related the occurrence of N. melanostomus in predator diets to its abundance in survey fishing. Gadus morhua and E. lucius in the southern area showed the highest tendency to feed on N. melanostomus when it was abundant, as N. melanostomus occurred in up to 100% of stomachs and constituted up to 88% of the total diet volume proportion. The diet contribution of N. melanostomus was associated with N. melanostomus abundances for G. morhua and E. lucius, and when N. melanostomus was abundant, these predators exhibited lower prey richness and a higher degree of piscivory. G. morhua and P. fluviatilis also fed less on crustacean prey when N. melanostomus was abundant. The high importance of N. melanostomus in diets of native fish predators may modify indirect interactions between N. melanostomus and native prey species in invaded coastal communities.

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    fulltext
  • 28.
    Hernroth, Bodil
    et al.
    Royal Swedish Acad Sci, Sven Loven Ctr Marine Sci, Kristineberg 566, SE-45178 Fiskebackskil, Sweden;Kristianstad Univ, Dept Nat Sci, SE-29188 Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Baden, Susanne
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Kristineberg 566, SE-45178 Fiskebackskil, Sweden.
    Tassidis, Helena
    Kristianstad Univ, Dept Nat Sci, SE-29188 Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Hörnaeus, Katarina
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Kemiska sektionen, Institutionen för kemi - BMC, Analytisk kemi.
    Guillemant, Julie
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Kemiska sektionen, Institutionen för kemi - BMC, Analytisk kemi.
    Bergström Lind, Sara
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Kemiska sektionen, Institutionen för kemi - BMC, Analytisk kemi.
    Bergquist, Jonas
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Kemiska sektionen, Institutionen för kemi - BMC, Analytisk kemi.
    Impact of ocean acidification on antimicrobial activity in gills of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) 2016Ingår i: Fish and Shellfish Immunology, ISSN 1050-4648, E-ISSN 1095-9947, Vol. 55, s. 452-459Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Here, we aimed to investigate potential effects of ocean acidification on antimicrobial peptide (AMP) activity in the gills of Mytilus edulis, as gills are directly facing seawater and the changing pH (predicted to be reduced from ~8.1 to ~7.7 by 2100). The AMP activity of gill and haemocyte extracts was compared at pH 6.0, 7.7 and 8.1, with a radial diffusion assay against Escherichia coli. The activity of the gill extracts was not affected by pH, while it was significantly reduced with increasing pH in the haemocyte extracts. Gill extracts were also tested against different species of Vibrio (V. parahaemolyticus V. tubiashii, V. splendidus and V. alginoyticus) at pH 7.7 and 8.1. The metabolic activity of the bacteria decreased by ~65-90%, depending on species of bacteria, but was, as in the radial diffusion assay, not affected by pH. The results indicated that AMPs from gills are efficient in a broad pH-range. However, when mussels were pre-exposed for pH 7.7 for four month the gill extracts presented significantly lower inhibit of bacterial growth. A full in-depth proteome investigation of gill extracts, using LC-Orbitrap MS/MS technique, showed that among previously described AMPs from haemocytes of Mytilus, myticin A was found up-regulated in response to lipopolysaccharide, 3 h post injection. Sporadic occurrence of other immune related peptides/proteins also pointed to a rapid response (0.5- 3 h p.i.). Altogether, our results indicate that the gills of blue mussels constitute an important first line defence adapted to act at the pH of seawater. The antimicrobial activity of the gills is however modulated when mussels are under the pressure of ocean acidification, which may give future advantages for invading pathogens.

  • 29.
    Hinrichsen, Hans-Harald
    et al.
    GEOMAR Helmholtz Ctr Ocean Res Kiel, Dusternbrooker Weg 20, D-24105 Kiel, Germany..
    Petereit, Christoph
    GEOMAR Helmholtz Ctr Ocean Res Kiel, Dusternbrooker Weg 20, D-24105 Kiel, Germany..
    Nissling, Anders
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Limnologi.
    Wallin, Isa
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik.
    Ustups, Didzis
    Inst Food Safety Anim Hlth & Environm BIOR, Daugavgrivas Str 8, LV-1048 Riga, Latvia..
    Florin, Ann-Britt
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Aquat Resources, Inst Coastal Res, Skolgatan 6, S-74242 Oregrund, Sweden..
    Survival and dispersal variability of pelagic eggs and yolk-sac larvae of central and eastern baltic flounder (Platichthys flesus): application of biophysical models2017Ingår i: ICES Journal of Marine Science, ISSN 1054-3139, E-ISSN 1095-9289, Vol. 74, nr 1, s. 41-55Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    A hydrodynamic model coupled with a Lagrangian particle tracking technique was utilized to simulate spatially and temporally resolved long-term environmentally related (i) size of habitat suitable for reproduction, (ii) egg/yolk-sac larval survival, (iii) separation of causes of mortality, and (iv) connectivity between spawning areas of Baltic flounder with pelagiceggs. Information on reproduction habitat requirements and mortality sources were obtained from field or laboratory studies. In our modelling study we only quantified physical processes generating heterogeneity in spatial distribution of eggs and yolk-sac larvae, as e.g. predation is not accounted for. The spatial extent of eggs and larvae represented as modelled particles is primarily determined by oxygen and salinity conditions. The reproduction habitat most suitable was determined for the Gdansk Deep, followed by the Bornholm Basin. Relatively low habitat suitability was obtained for the Arkona Basin and the Gotland Basin. The model runs also showed yolk-sac larval survival to be to a large extent affected by sedimentation. Eggs initially released in the Arkona Basin and Bornholm Basin are strongly affected by sedimentation compared with those released in the Gdansk Deep and Gotland Basin. Highest relative survival of eggs occurred in the Gdansk Deep and in the Bornholm Basin. Relatively low survival rates in the Gotland Basin were attributable to oxygen-dependent mortality. Oxygen content had almost no impact on survival in the Arkona Basin. For all spawning areas mortality caused by lethally low temperatures was only evident after severe winters. Buoyancy of eggs and yolk-sac larvae in relation to topographic features appear as a barrier for the transport of eggs and yolk-sac larvae and potentially limits the connectivity of early life stages between the different spawning areas.

  • 30.
    Holborn, Melissa K.
    et al.
    Univ Guelph, Dept Integrat Biol, 50 Stone Rd East, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada.
    Rochus, Christina M.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi. Univ Guelph, Dept Integrat Biol, 50 Stone Rd East, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada.
    Ang, Keng Pee
    Cooke Aquaculture Inc, St John, NB, Canada.
    Elliott, J. A. K.
    Cooke Aquaculture Inc, St John, NB, Canada.
    Leadbeater, Steve
    Fisheries & Oceans Canada, St Andrews Biol Stn, St Andrews, NB, Canada.
    Powell, Frank
    Cooke Aquaculture Inc, St John, NB, Canada.
    Boulding, Elizabeth G.
    Univ Guelph, Dept Integrat Biol, 50 Stone Rd East, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada.
    Family-based genome wide association analysis for salmon lice (Lepeophtheirus salmonis) resistance in North American Atlantic salmon using a 50 K SNP array2019Ingår i: Aquaculture, ISSN 0044-8486, E-ISSN 1873-5622, Vol. 511, artikel-id UNSP 734215Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The salmon louse, Lepeophtheirus salmonis, is an economically important parasite on aquaculture stocks of Atlantic salmon grown in sea cages. The aim of this study was to perform a family-based genome wide association study to identify the genomic architecture of salmon louse resistance in a commercial population of Atlantic salmon using five year classes of data. A total of 1756 fish were genotyped from 248 families, which were experimentally infected with L. salmonis copepodids, using a 50 K SNP array designed specifically for North American Atlantic salmon. A within family-based association test for quantitative traits was run using QFAM in PLINK with salmon lice counts pre-adjusted for contemporary group as the phenotype. Salmon lice counts varied significantly among families and salmon lice resistance had an estimated heritability of 0.21 +/- 0.03. After correcting for multiple testing, seven SNPs from three chromosomes surpassed a suggestive chromosome wide level. Ssa04 had the most suggestive SNP, and four other suggestive SNPs within a close range on the chromosome. A single SNP was suggestive on each of Ssa14 and Ssa20. The most suggestive SNP, and two suggestive tag SNPs, were located near a predicted gene on Ssa04 that codes for ceramide-l-phophate transfer protein which is involved with pathophysiological functions such as cell survival and inflammation. No loci with major effects were detected suggesting a polygenic trait architecture. However, several loci were detected which could be included directly in models used to estimate genomic breeding values. Therefore, genomic selection should continue to be used to breed Atlantic salmon naturally more resistant to L. salmonis infection.

  • 31.
    Holder, Peter E.
    et al.
    Carleton Univ, Dept Biol, Fish Ecol & Conservat Physiol Lab, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada; Carleton Univ, Inst Environm & Interdisciplinary Sci, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada.
    Jeanson, Amanda L.
    Carleton Univ, Dept Biol, Fish Ecol & Conservat Physiol Lab, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada; Carleton Univ, Inst Environm & Interdisciplinary Sci, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada.
    Lennox, Robert J.
    NORCE Norwegian Res Ctr, Lab Freshwater Ecol & Inland Fisheries, Bergen, Norway.
    Brownscombe, Jacob W.
    Carleton Univ, Dept Biol, Fish Ecol & Conservat Physiol Lab, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada; Carleton Univ, Inst Environm & Interdisciplinary Sci, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada; Dalhousie Univ, Dept Biol, 1355 Oxford St, Halifax, NS B4H 4R2, Canada.
    Arlinghaus, Robert
    Leibniz Inst Freshwater Ecol & Inland Fisheries, Dept Biol & Ecol Fishes, Muggelseedamm 310, D-12587 Berlin, Germany; Humboldt Univ, Div Integrativer Fisheries Management, Fac Life Sci, Philippstr 13, D-10115 Berlin, Germany.
    Danylchuk, Andy J.
    Univ Massachusetts, Dept Environm Conservat, 160 Holdsworth Way, Amherst, MA 01003 USA.
    Bower, Shannon D.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Naturresurser och hållbar utveckling.
    Hyder, Kieran
    Ctr Environm Fisheries & Aquaculture Sci, Lowestoft NR33 0HT, Suffolk, England.
    Hunt, Len M.
    Ontario Minist Nat Resources & Forestry, Ctr Northern Forest Ecosyst Res, 103-421 James St South, Thunder Bay, ON P7E 2V6, Canada.
    Fenichel, Eli P.
    Yale Sch Forestry & Environm Studies, 195 Prospect St, New Haven, CT 06460 USA.
    Venturelli, Paul A.
    Ball State Univ, Dept Biol, 121 Cooper Bldg, Muncie, IN 47306 USA.
    Thorstad, Eva B.
    Norwegian Inst Nat Res, Postboks 5685, N-7485 Trondheim, Norway.
    Allen, Micheal S.
    Univ Florida, Fisheries & Aquat Sci Program, Nat Coast Biol Stn, 552 First St, Cedar Key, FL 32625 USA.
    Potts, Warren M.
    Rhodes Univ, Dept Ichthyol & Fisheries Sci, POB 94, ZA-6139 Grahamstown, South Africa.
    Clark-Danylchuk, Sascha
    Keep Fish Wet, 11 Kingman Rd, Amherst, MA 01002 USA.
    Claussen, Julie E.
    Fisheries Conservat Fdn, 302 E Green St 2102, Champaign, IL 61820 USA.
    Lyle, Jeremy M.
    Univ Tasmania, Inst Marine & Antarctic Studies, Private Bag 49, Hobart, Tas 7001, Australia.
    Tsuboi, Jun-ichi
    Yamanashi Prefectural Fisheries Technol Ctr, Yamanashi 7, Kai, Yamanashi 4000121, Japan.
    Brummett, Randall
    World Bank, Environm & Nat Resources Dept, 1818 H St NW, Washington, DC 20433 USA.
    Freire, Kátia M. F.
    Univ Fed Sergipe, Lab Ecol Pesqueira, Dept Engn Pesca & Aquicultura, Cidade Univ Prof Jose Alofsio de Campos, BR-49100000 Sao Cristovao, Sergipe, Brazil.
    Tracey, Sean R.
    Univ Tasmania, Inst Marine & Antarctic Studies, Private Bag 49, Hobart, Tas 7001, Australia; Univ Tasmania, Ctr Marine Socioecol, Private Bag 49, Hobart, Tas 7001, Australia.
    Skov, Christian
    Tech Univ Denmark, DTU AQUA, Sect Inland Fisheries & Ecol, Vejlsovej 39, DK-8600 Silkeborg, Denmark.
    Cooke, Steven J.
    Carleton Univ, Dept Biol, Fish Ecol & Conservat Physiol Lab, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada; Carleton Univ, Inst Environm & Interdisciplinary Sci, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada.
    Preparing for a changing future in recreational fisheries: 100 research questions for global consideration emerging from a horizon scan2020Ingår i: Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries, ISSN 0960-3166, E-ISSN 1573-5184, Vol. 30, nr 1, s. 137-151Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Recreational fisheries hold immense ecological, social, and economic value. The management of these fisheries is increasingly important as we move forward in the Anthropocene. Recreational fisheries managers face several challenges as fisheries often involve diverse social and ecological systems comprised of complex feedback and stakeholder motivations and needs. Here, we used a horizon scanning exercise to yield 100 research questions related to recreational fisheries science and management in the Anthropocene. Initial research questions (n = 205) were collected from recreational fisheries experts (i.e., stakeholders, managers, researchers) from various sectors (i.e., industry, government, NGOs) and geographic locations (14 countries: Australia, Brazil, Canada, Czech Republic, Germany, Italy, New Zealand, Norway, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, USA). These questions were subsequently categorized, thematized, and refined by our authorship team, eventually yielding what we considered to be the top 100 research questions of relevance to management of recreational fisheries. The key themes include: human dimensions; bioeconomics; resource monitoring and data acquisition; governance; management-regulatory actions; management-stock and habitat enhancement; catch-and-release; impacts of recreational fisheries on populations, communities and ecosystems; threats and sustainability; and angler outreach, education and engagement. It is our intention that this comprehensive and forward-looking list will create a framework to guide future research within this field, and contribute to evidence-based recreational fisheries management and policy.

  • 32.
    Holm, Poul
    Uppsala universitet, Kollegiet för avancerade studier (SCAS).
    Historical fishing communities2015Ingår i: Perspectives on Oceans Past: A Handbook of Marine Environmental History / [ed] Kathleen Schwerdtner Máñez; Bo Poulsen, Dordrecht: Springer , 2015, s. 31-46Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 33.
    Jeuthe, Henrik
    et al.
    Vattenbruksctr Norr AB Aquaculture Ctr North, Avagen 17, SE-84461 Kalarne, Sweden;Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anim Breeding & Genet, POB 7023, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Schmitz, Monika
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för organismbiologi, Jämförande fysiologi.
    Brännäs, Eva
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Wildlife Fish & Environm Studies, SE-90183 Umea, Sweden.
    Evaluation of gamete quality indicators for Arctic charr Salvelinus alpinus2019Ingår i: Aquaculture, ISSN 0044-8486, E-ISSN 1873-5622, Vol. 504, s. 446-453Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The reproductive performance of farmed Arctic charr exhibits substantial individual variation. The causes behind this variation have not yet been properly explained, despite the species relatively long history in aqua-culture. The aim of the present study was to provide better understanding of the issue by evaluating parent and gamete traits in relation to fertility and offspring viability under routine hatchery conditions. Are losses mainly due to failed fertilisation or mortality? Are maternal or paternal factor more predominant? The study covered sex hormone status of the broodstock, egg traits (egg size and wateriness of egg batches), milt traits (volume, density, and sperm motility characteristics), and symmetry of early cell division.

    We found that the majority of offspring loss occurred as embryo mortality, although a significant additional loss could be assigned fertilisation failure. Fertilisation and mortality rates were not inter-correlated. Neither of the evaluated egg traits, egg size and wateriness of newly stripped egg batches, proved to be useful indicators of egg quality. With regard to sperm traits, milt density as well as several computer assisted sperm analysis (CASA) parameters, i.e. swimming speed (VAP, VSL, and VCL) and beat cross frequency (BCF), were correlated with reproductive performance and could potentially be used as quality indicators for Arctic charr. Together, male 17,20β-P levels and BCF explained 69.5% of the between male variation in proportion of successfully eyed eggs.

    The results support previous indications that post-ovulatory aging of oocytes is contributing to the impairment of reproductive performance in farmed Arctic charr. In addition, a significant paternal factor to this impairment has been exposed. However, the cause and mechanism involved are still far from clear.

  • 34. Joosse, Sofie
    et al.
    Hensle, Lara
    Boonstra, Wiebren J.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Naturresurser och hållbar utveckling.
    Ponzelar, Charlotte
    Olsson, Jens
    Fishing in the city for food: a paradigmatic case of sustainability in urban blue space2021Ingår i: npj Urban Sustainability, E-ISSN 2661-8001, Vol. 1, nr 1, artikel-id 41Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents fishing in the city for food (FCF) as a trenchant example of urban ecology, and the ways in which urbandwellers use, interact with, and depend on urban blue spaces. Our literature review demonstrates how FCF is studied in a diversebody of scientific publications that rarely draw on each other. As such, FCF and its relevance for sustainable and just planning ofurban blue space remain relatively unknown. Using the literature review, a survey of FCF in European capitals, and examples fromFCF in Stockholm, we demonstrate how attention to FCF raises pertinent and interrelated questions about access to water, foodand recreation; human health; animal welfare and aquatic urban biodiversity.

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    fulltext
  • 35.
    Jude, David J.
    University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
    18. Fisheries, Aquaculture and Exotic Species of the Laurentian Great Lakes2012Ingår i: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, s. 149-162Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    ehsa 2-18
  • 36.
    Karametsidis, Georgios
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik. Univ Balearic Isl, Carretera Valldemossa Km 7-5, Palma De Mallorca 07122, Balearic Island, Spain.;Ecosyst Oceanog Grp GRECO, Ctr Oceanog Baleares IEO, CSIC, Moll Ponet sn, Palma De Mallorca 07190, Balearic Island, Spain.
    Rueda, Lucia
    Ctr Oceanog Malaga IEO, CSIC, Muelle Pesquero S-N, Fuengirola 29640, Malaga, Spain.
    Bellido, Jose M.
    Ctr Oceanog Murcia IEO, CSIC, Varadero 1,San Pedro Pinar, Murcia 30740, Spain.
    Esteban, Antonio
    Ctr Oceanog Murcia IEO, CSIC, Varadero 1,San Pedro Pinar, Murcia 30740, Spain.
    Garcia, Encarnacion
    Ctr Oceanog Murcia IEO, CSIC, Varadero 1,San Pedro Pinar, Murcia 30740, Spain.
    de Sola, Luis Gil
    Ctr Oceanog Malaga IEO, CSIC, Muelle Pesquero S-N, Fuengirola 29640, Malaga, Spain.
    Pennino, Maria Grazia
    Ctr Oceanog Vigo IEO, CSIC, Subida Radio Faro 50-52, Vigo 36390, Spain.
    Perez-Gil, Jose Luis
    Ctr Oceanog Malaga IEO, CSIC, Muelle Pesquero S-N, Fuengirola 29640, Malaga, Spain.
    Hidalgo, Manuel
    Ecosyst Oceanog Grp GRECO, Ctr Oceanog Baleares IEO, CSIC, Moll Ponet sn, Palma De Mallorca 07190, Balearic Island, Spain.
    The trade-off between condition and growth shapes juveniles' survival of harvested demersal fish of the Mediterranean sea2023Ingår i: Marine Environmental Research, ISSN 0141-1136, E-ISSN 1879-0291, Vol. 184, artikel-id 105844Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Fish body condition and growth are two interrelated traits closely associated with species life history and fitness, whose trade-off can ultimately impact population dynamics albeit seldom empirically demonstrated. They can intricately affect survival rates, which are particularly relevant for species under exploitation. Using individual spatiotemporal information in Northwestern Mediterranean, we document for the first time the existence of a trade-off between condition and growth in regulating survival dynamics in two important fish species for the Mediterranean fisheries that are characterized by contrasting life histories. For the European hake (Merluccius merluccius), a benthopelagic species, juveniles' body condition was detected to be positively linked to survival and negatively associated with the growth of this age group. For the red mullet (Mullus barbatus), the same pattern was observed for young adults. We also show that the observed patterns on a regional level have a clear spatial dependence as we found that observed body condition over a local scale had a broad effect on the population dynamics of the whole region, with the Ebro delta area emerging as the demographic engine of the two species. We discuss our results in the context of fisheries management and underline the importance of improving current stock assessment models and spatially based fishery management towards incorporating body condition and growth due to their influence on important parameters such as survival.

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  • 37.
    Koeck, Barbara
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden;Univ Glasgow, Inst Biodivers Anim Hlth & Comparat Med, Coll Med Vet & Life Sci, Graham Kerr Bldg, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Lanark, Scotland.
    Zavorka, Libor
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden;Univ Toulouse, Lab Evolut & Diversite Biol EDB UMR 5174, CNRS, Toulouse, France.
    Aldven, David
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Naslund, Joacim
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden;Univ Stockholm, Dept Zool, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Arlinghaus, Robert
    Leibniz Inst Freshwater Ecol & Inland Fisheries, Dept Biol & Ecol Fishes, Berlin, Germany;Humboldt Univ, Div Integrat Fisheries Management, Fac Life Sci, Berlin, Germany.
    Thörnqvist, Per-Ove
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för neurovetenskap, Fysiologi.
    Winberg, Svante
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för neurovetenskap, Fysiologi.
    Bjornsson, Bjorn Thrandur
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Johnsson, Jorgen I.
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Angling selects against active and stress-resilient phenotypes in rainbow trout2019Ingår i: Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, ISSN 0706-652X, E-ISSN 1205-7533, Vol. 76, nr 2, s. 320-333Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Selection induced by human harvest can lead to different patterns of phenotypic change than selection induced by natural predation and could be a major driving force of evolution of wild populations. The vulnerability of individuals to angling depends on the individual decision to ingest the bait, possibly mediated by their neuroendocrine response towards the associated stimulus. To investigate the mechanisms behind individual vulnerability to angling, we conducted angling experiments in replicated ponds and quantified individual behavioral traits and neuroendocrine stress responsiveness in two salmonid species, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brown trout (Salmo trutta). We discovered a phenotypic syndrome in rainbow trout, but not in brown trout, where lower serotonergic and dopaminergic brain activity and cortisol levels (i.e., lower stress responsiveness) in response to a standardized experimental stressor were associated with higher activity, forming a proactive phenotype that showed increased vulnerability to angling. Our results show that angling targets the most stress-resilient and active phenotypes of rainbow trout, supporting the suggestion that fishing-induced phenotypic selection may lead to an increased representation of stress-responsive and low-activity phenotypes in harvested populations.

  • 38.
    Kurta, Khrystyna
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi. Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anim Breeding & Genet, Box 7090, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Jeuthe, Henrik
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anim Breeding & Genet, Box 7090, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden.;Aquaculture Ctr North, Avagen 17, S-84461 Kalarne, Sweden..
    Naboulsi, Rakan
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Tomtebodavagen 18A, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    de Koning, Dirk-Jan
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anim Breeding & Genet, Box 7090, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Palaiokostas, Christos
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anim Breeding & Genet, Box 7090, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Seasonal and age-related changes in sperm quality of farmed arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus)2023Ingår i: BMC Genomics, E-ISSN 1471-2164, Vol. 24, nr 1, artikel-id 519Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Substantial variation in male fertility is regularly observed in farmed Arctic charr. However, detailed investigations of its fluctuation during a reproductive season and across years are lacking. Furthermore, information about the effect of underlying genetic factors influencing sperm quality is scarce. The current study focused on seasonal and age-related factors that may affect sperm quality characteristics in males reared in natural and delayed photoperiods. Animals were sampled three times for two consecutive years, and sperm quality parameters were recorded using a computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) system. Thereafter, high-throughput sequencing technologies were applied, aiming to identify genomic regions related to the variation of sperm quality throughout the reproductive season.Results An across-season variation in the recorded sperm quality parameters was evident. Overall, 29% and 42% of males from the natural and delayed spawning groups had a highly variable total progressive motility. Males at four years of age showed significantly higher sperm motility and velocities during the early October and November recordings compared to the following year when the same animals were five years of age. On the other hand, the opposite was observed regarding sperm concentration during the last sampling. A genome-wide F-ST scan detected SNP differentiation among males with high and low variability in total progressive motility (PM) on eight chromosomes (F-ST > 0.17), Genome wide windows with the highest F-ST contained SNPs in proximity (within 250 kb up- and downstream distance) to 16 genes with sperm quality biological functions in mammalian species.Conclusion Our findings provide a detailed view of seasonal, age-related, and genetic effects on sperm quality and can be used to guide decisions on broodstock selection and hatchery management.

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  • 39.
    Levengood, Jeffrey M.
    et al.
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
    Martineau, Daniel
    University of Montreal, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC, Canada.
    11. Geological, Hydrological and Anthropogenic Features2012Ingår i: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, s. 97-100Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
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    ehsa 2-11
  • 40.
    Macarus, David P
    United States Environmental Protection Agency, Chicago, IL, USA.
    13. Contaminants in Great Lakes Environs2012Ingår i: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, s. 104-115Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
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    ehsa 2-13
  • 41.
    Macura, Biljana
    et al.
    Stockholm Environm Inst, Mistra Council Evidence Based Environm Management, Linnegatan 87D,Box 24218, S-10451 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lönnstedt, Oona M.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Limnologi.
    Bystrom, Par
    Umea Univ, Fac Sci & Technol, Dept Ecol & Environm Sci, S-90187 Umea, Sweden.
    Airoldi, Laura
    Univ Bologna, Dept Biol, Geol & Environm Sci & Interdept Res Ctr Environm, UO CoNISMa, Via S Alberto 163, I-48123 Ravenna, Italy.
    Eriksson, Britas Klemens
    Univ Groningen, Groningen Inst Evolutionary Life Sci Marine Ecol, Nijenborgh 7, NL-9747 AG Groningen, Netherlands.
    Rudstam, Lars
    Cornell Univ, Dept Nat Resources, Cornell Biol Field Stn, 900 Shackelton Point Rd, Bridgeport, NY 13030 USA.
    Stottrup, Josianne
    Tech Univ Denmark, Natl Inst Aquat Resources, Jaegersborg Alle 1, DK-2920 Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    What is the impact on fish recruitment of anthropogenic physical and structural habitat change in shallow nearshore areas in temperate systems?: A systematic review protocol2016Ingår i: Environmental Evidence, E-ISSN 2047-2382, Vol. 5, nr 1, artikel-id 10Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Shallow nearshore marine ecosystems are changing at an increasing rate due to a range of human activities such as urbanisation and commercial development. The growing numbers of constructions and other physical and structural alterations of the shoreline often take place in nursery and spawning habitats of many fish and other aquatic species. Several coastal fish populations have seen marked declines in abundance and diversity during the past two decades. A systematic review on the topic would clarify if anthropogenic physical and structural changes of near-shore areas have effects on fish recruitment and which these effects are.

    Methods:

    The review will examine how various physical and structural anthropogenic changes of nearshore fish habitats affect fish recruitment. Relevant studies include small- and large-scale field studies in marine and brackish systems or large lakes in temperate regions of the Northern and Southern hemispheres. Relevant studies may be based on comparisons between undisturbed and disturbed areas, before and after disturbance, or both. Relevant outcomes include measures of recruitment defined as abundance of juveniles of nearshore fish communities. Searches will be made for peer-reviewed and grey literature in English, Dutch, Danish, Finnish, German, Swedish and Spanish. All fish species and species groups will be considered in this review. Included relevant studies will be subject to a critical appraisal that will assess study validity. From relevant included studies, we will extract information on study characteristics, measured outcomes, exposure, comparators, effect modifiers and critical appraisal. Data synthesis will contain narrative and summary findings of each included study of sufficient quality. Meta-analysis may be possible in cases where studies report similar types of outcomes.

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  • 42.
    Martineau, Daniel
    University of Montreal, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC, Canada.
    19. Fisheries of the St Lawrence River, Estuary and Gulf2012Ingår i: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, s. 163-166Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
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  • 43.
    Martínez Barrio, Álvaro
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för cell- och molekylärbiologi, Molekylär evolution. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi.
    Lamichhaney, Sangeet
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi. Uppsala universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fan, Guangyi
    State Key Laboratory of Quality Research in Chinese Medicine, Institute of Chinese Medical Sciences, University of Macau, Macau, China; BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzen, China; 5 College of Physics, Qingdao University, Qingdao, China .
    Rafati, Nima
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi. Uppsala universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pettersson, Mats
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi. Uppsala universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zhang, He
    BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzen, China; College of Physics, Qingdao University, Qingdao, China.
    Dainat, Jacques
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi. Uppsala universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ekman, Diana
    Science for Life Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Stockholm University.
    Höppner, Marc P.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi. Uppsala universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Jern, Patric
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi. Uppsala universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Martin, Marcel
    Science for Life Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Stockholm University.
    Nystedt, Björn
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för cell- och molekylärbiologi, Molekylär evolution. Uppsala universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Liu, Xin
    BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzen, China.
    Chen, Wenbin
    BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, China.
    Liang, Xinming
    BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, China.
    Shi, Chengcheng
    BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, China.
    Fu, Yuanyuan
    BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, China.
    Ma, Kailong
    BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, China.
    Zhan, Xiao
    BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, China.
    Feng, Chungang
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi. Uppsala universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gustafson, Ulla
    Department of Animal Breeding and Genetics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Rubin, Carl-Johan
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi. Uppsala universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sällman Almén, Markus
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi. Uppsala universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Blass, Martina
    Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Coastal Research, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Casini, Michele
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Marine Research.
    Folkvord, Arild
    Department of Biology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Hjort Center of Marine Ecosystem Dynamics, Bergen, Norway; Institute of Marine Research, Bergen, Norway .
    Laikre, Linda
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University.
    Ryman, Nils
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lee, Simon Ming-Yuen Lee
    State Key Laboratory of Quality Research in Chinese Medicine, Institute of Chinese Medical Sciences, University of Macau, Macao.
    Xu, Xun
    BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, China.
    Andersson, Leif
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi. Uppsala universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Department of Animal Breeding and Genetics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Veterinary Integrative Biosciences, Texas A&M University, Texas, United States.
    The genetic basis for ecological adaptation of the Atlantic herring revealed by genome sequencing2016Ingår i: eLIFE, E-ISSN 2050-084X, Vol. 5, artikel-id e12081Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Ecological adaptation is of major relevance to speciation and sustainable population management, but the underlying genetic factors are typically hard to study in natural populations due to genetic differentiation caused by natural selection being confounded with genetic drift in subdivided populations. Here, we use whole genome population sequencing of Atlantic and Baltic herring to reveal the underlying genetic architecture at an unprecedented detailed resolution for both adaptation to a new niche environment and timing of reproduction. We identify almost 500 independent loci associated with a recent niche expansion from marine (Atlantic Ocean) to brackish waters (Baltic Sea), and more than 100 independent loci showing genetic differentiation between spring- and autumn-spawning populations irrespective of geographic origin. Our results show that both coding and non-coding changes contribute to adaptation. Haplotype blocks, often spanning multiple genes and maintained by selection, are associated with genetic differentiation.

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  • 44.
    Mouchlianitis, Foivos Alexandros
    et al.
    Aristotle Univ Thessaloniki, Sch Biol, Dept Zool, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Bobori, Dimitra
    Aristotle Univ Thessaloniki, Sch Biol, Dept Zool, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Tsakoumis, Emmanouil
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för organismbiologi, Jämförande fysiologi.
    Sapounidis, Argyris
    Ellinikos Georgikos Organismos DIMITRA, Fisheries Res Inst, Nea Peramos, Kavala, Greece..
    Kritikaki, Efpraxia
    Aristotle Univ Thessaloniki, Sch Biol, Dept Zool, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Ganias, Kostas
    Aristotle Univ Thessaloniki, Sch Biol, Dept Zool, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Does fragmented river connectivity alter the reproductive behavior of the potamodromous fish Alburnus vistonicus?2021Ingår i: Hydrobiologia, ISSN 0018-8158, E-ISSN 1573-5117, Vol. 848, nr 17, s. 4029-4044Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Blocked riverine spawning migration routes constitute one of the main threats of potamodromous fish that require well-connected habitats of high quality to maintain their unique life-history form. Alburnus vistonicus, a potamodromous species inhabiting the Vistonis freshwater system in northern Greece, manages to cope with wide salinity fluctuations in Vistonis Lake, but the impact of the fragmented connectivity of the lake's two main freshwater suppliers, Kosynthos and Kompsatos rivers, has not been assessed. We analyzed the species whole reproductive cycle and we divided it into phases. Cyclicity was observed in gonadosomatic index and oocyte diameter, while total fecundity remained constant prior to the onset of the spawning season. Stomach fullness and condition factor differed among the surveyed habitats. Successful spawning and multiple spawning were verified, as well as spawning migration and potamodromy. However, mature females with markers of recent spawning activity were captured also in the lake, suggesting spawning occurrence in the lake or a previously undocumented oscillatory behavior between the lake and the rivers during the spawning season and between sequential spawning events. Either behavior may serve as a mechanism to overcome the restricted spawning migration routes due to the fragmented river connectivity.

  • 45.
    Naddafi, Rahmat
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och evolution, Limnologi.
    Pettersson, Kurt
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och evolution, Limnologi.
    Eklöv, Peter
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och evolution, Limnologi.
    Effects of the zebra mussel, an exotic freshwater species, on seston stoichiometry2008Ingår i: Limnology and Oceanography, ISSN 0024-3590, E-ISSN 1939-5590, Vol. 53, nr 5, s. 1973-1987Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We examined the effect of the zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha, an exotic species, on seston stoichiometry by conducting laboratory experiments in which we varied nutrient composition of seston and mussels over time. Zebra mussels altered the stoichiometry of seston through removal of particulate organic nutrients and changed the stoichiometry of the dissolved nutrient pool through nutrient excretion. Grazers had stronger effects on carbon : phosphorus (C : P) and nitrogen (N) : P ratios than on the C:N ratio of seston. Elemental residence time in tissue and high mass-specific nutrient excretion by small mussels caused small mussels to be more efficient nutrient recyclers than larger mussels. Zebra mussels reduced P availability through enhancing C: P and N: P molar ratios of seston during the period extending from June to August, when P was limited in the lake, and increased the C:N molar ratio of seston in June, when N was at the minimum level in the lake. C: P and N: P molar ratios for zebra mussel tissue were higher in August and somewhat in September than in all other months. N was retained more efficiently than P in Dreissena tissue. Nutrient mass-specific uptake rate was higher than excretion rate by zebra mussels.

  • 46. Nilsson, A.P.
    et al.
    Eklöv, Peter
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Limnologi.
    Finding food and staying alive2018Ingår i: Biology and ecology of pike / [ed] Christian Skov; P. Anders Nilsson, Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 2018, s. 9-31Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This book sets out to bridge the order scales among pike researchers, populations, communities, management, and fisheries. It emphasizes the progress of pike research during the last two decades, during which the order-bridging approach emerged. This framework underpins the text and the message, to convey its importance to pike research and to fish research in general. In addition, a considerable part of the book is devoted to management implications and highlights aspects of human dimensions in recreational fisheries.

  • 47.
    Nissling, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Limnologi.
    Thorsen, A.
    Inst Marine Res, POB 1870, N-5817 Bergen, Norway..
    da Silva, F. F. G.
    Inst Marine Res, POB 1870, N-5817 Bergen, Norway.;Tech Univ Denmark, Natl Inst Aquat Resources, Alle 1, DK-2920 Charlottenlund, Denmark..
    Fecundity regulation by atresia in turbot Scophthalmus maximus in the Baltic Sea2016Ingår i: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 88, nr 4, s. 1301-1320Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Down-regulation of fecundity through oocyte resorption was assessed in Baltic Sea turbot Scophthalmus maximus at three locations in the period from late vitellogenesis in April to spawning during June to July. The mean +/- s.d. total length of the sampled fish was 327 +/- 31cm and mean +/- s.d. age was 62 +/- 15years. Measurements of atresia were performed using the profile method' with the intensity of atresia adjusted according to the dissector method' (106% adjustment; coefficient of determination was 0675 between methods). Both prevalence (portion of fish with atresia) and intensity (calculated as the average proportion of atretic cells in fish displaying atresia) of atresia were low in prespawning fish, but high from onset of spawning throughout the spawning period. Atretic oocytes categorized as in early alpha and in late alpha state occurred irrespective of maturity stage from late prespawning individuals up to late spawning fish, showing that oocytes may become atretic throughout the spawning period. Observed prevalence of atresia throughout the spawning period was almost 40% with an intensity of c. 20%. This indicates extensive down-regulation, i.e. considerably lower realized (number of eggs spawned) v. potential fecundity (number of developing oocytes), suggesting significant variability in reproductive potential. The extent of fecundity regulation in relation to fish condition (Fulton's condition factor) is discussed, suggesting an association between levels of atresia and fish condition.

  • 48.
    Pastuszak, Marianna
    et al.
    NMFRI, Ul Kollataja 1, PL-81332 Gdynia, Poland.
    Bryhn, Andreas C.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Aquat Resources, Skolgatan 6, S-74242 Oregrund, Sweden.
    Håkanson, Lars
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Luft-, vatten- och landskapslära.
    Stålnacke, Per
    Norwegian Inst Bioecon Res, Pb 115, NO-1431 As, Norway.
    Zalewski, Mariusz
    NMFRI, Ul Kollataja 1, PL-81332 Gdynia, Poland.
    Wodzinowski, Tycjan
    NMFRI, Ul Kollataja 1, PL-81332 Gdynia, Poland.
    Reduction of nutrient emission from Polish territory into the Baltic Sea (1988-2014) confronted with real environmental needs and international requirements2018Ingår i: OCEANOLOGICAL AND HYDROBIOLOGICAL STUDIES, ISSN 1730-413X, Vol. 47, nr 2, s. 140-166Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Eutrophication of the Baltic Sea is considered a major threat to its ecological status. We present and discuss Polish riverine flow normalized loads of total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) discharged into the Baltic Sea in (i) 1988-2014, (ii) periods of maximum TN (1992-1994), TP (1988-1991) emission, (iii) the reference period (1997-2003) established by the Helsinki Commission (HELCOM), (iv) 2012-2014, last years of our study. Despite considerable nutrient load reductions prior to the HELCOM reference period, Poland is expected to reduce TN and TP loads by 30% and 66%, respectively. In the light of our historical and up-to-date findings defining ecological status of the Baltic Sea, we suggest that the proposed TP load reduction is overestimated and its realization may lead to (i) undesirable consequences for the Baltic ecosystem, (ii) would require a decline in TP concentrations to 0.067 mg P dm(-3) (the Vistula River) and 0.083 mg P dm(-3) (the Oder River), values reported for pre-industrial times. The current nutrient concentrations in the Vistula and Oder safely comply with the requirements of the Water Framework Directive. We also comment on the top-down and bottom-up effect resulting in quantitative and qualitative reorganization of the Baltic ecosystem, a phenomenon already observed in the Baltic Sea.

  • 49.
    Petrou, Eleni L.
    et al.
    Univ Washington, Sch Aquat & Fishery Sci, 1122 NE Boat St, Seattle, WA 98105 USA..
    Fuentes Pardo, Angela P.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi.
    Rogers, Luke A.
    Fisheries & Oceans Canada, 8888 Univ Dr, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada..
    Orobko, Melissa
    Simon Fraser Univ, Dept Biol Sci, Earth Ocean Res Grp, 8888 Univ Dr, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada..
    Tarpey, Carolyn
    Univ Washington, Sch Aquat & Fishery Sci, 1122 NE Boat St, Seattle, WA 98105 USA..
    Jimenez-Hidalgo, Isadora
    Univ Washington, Sch Aquat & Fishery Sci, 1122 NE Boat St, Seattle, WA 98105 USA..
    Moss, Madonna L.
    Univ Oregon, Dept Anthropol, Eugene, OR 97403 USA..
    Yang, Dongya
    Simon Fraser Univ, Dept Archaeol, Educ Bldg 9635,8888 Univ Dr, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada..
    Pitcher, Tony J.
    Univ British Columbia, Inst Oceans & Fisheries, Vancouver, BC, Canada..
    Sandell, Todd
    Washington Dept Fish & Wildlife, 16018 Mill Creek Blvd, Mill Creek, WA 98012 USA..
    Lowry, Dayv
    Washington Dept Fish & Wildlife, 1111 Washington St SE,6th Floor, Olympia, WA 98504 USA..
    Ruzzante, Daniel E.
    Dalhousie Univ, Dept Biol, Halifax, NS B3H 4R2, Canada..
    Hauser, Lorenz
    Univ Washington, Sch Aquat & Fishery Sci, 1122 NE Boat St, Seattle, WA 98105 USA..
    Functional genetic diversity in an exploited marine species and its relevance to fisheries management2021Ingår i: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 288, nr 1945, artikel-id 20202398Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The timing of reproduction influences key evolutionary and ecological processes in wild populations. Variation in reproductive timing may be an especially important evolutionary driver in the marine environment, where the high mobility of many species and few physical barriers to migration provide limited opportunities for spatial divergence to arise. Using genomic data collected from spawning aggregations of Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) across 1600 km of coastline, we show that reproductive timing drives population structure in these pelagic fish. Within a specific spawning season, we observed isolation by distance, indicating that gene flow is also geographically limited over our study area. These results emphasize the importance of considering both seasonal and spatial variation in spawning when delineating management units for herring. On several chromosomes, we detected linkage disequilibrium extending over multiple Mb, suggesting the presence of chromosomal rearrangements. Spawning phenology was highly correlated with polymorphisms in several genes, in particular SYNE2, which influences the development of retinal photoreceptors in vertebrates. SYNE2 is probably within a chromosomal rearrangement in Pacific herring and is also associated with spawn timing in Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus). The observed genetic diversity probably underlies resource waves provided by spawning herring. Given the ecological, economic and cultural significance of herring, our results support that conserving intraspecific genetic diversity is important for maintaining current and future ecosystem processes.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 50.
    Raby, Graham D.
    et al.
    Carleton Univ, Dept Biol, Fish Ecol & Conservat Physiol Lab, 1125 Colonel Dr, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada;Univ Windsor, Great Lakes Inst Environm Res, 2601 Union St, Windsor, ON N9B 3P4, Canada.
    Messmer, Vanessa
    James Cook Univ, ARC Ctr Excellence Coral Reef Studies, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia.
    Tobin, Andrew J.
    James Cook Univ, Coll Marine & Environm Studies, Ctr Sustainable Trop Fisheries & Aquaculture, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia.
    Hoey, Andrew S.
    James Cook Univ, ARC Ctr Excellence Coral Reef Studies, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia.
    Jutfelt, Fredrik
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Biol, Hogskoleringen 1, NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway.
    Sundin, Josefin
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för neurovetenskap, Fysiologi.
    Cooke, Steven J.
    Carleton Univ, Dept Biol, Fish Ecol & Conservat Physiol Lab, 1125 Colonel Dr, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada.
    Clark, Timothy D.
    Deakin Univ, Sch Life & Environm Sci, Geelong, Vic, Australia.
    Swim for it: Effects of simulated fisheries capture on the post-release behaviour of four Great Barrier Reef fishes2018Ingår i: Fisheries Research, ISSN 0165-7836, E-ISSN 1872-6763, Vol. 206, s. 129-137Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    After being caught and released by a fishery, some animals may be sufficiently impaired so as to be vulnerable to predators. The duration and severity of post-release impairments have rarely been studied under natural conditions; the vitality of animals is usually assessed aboard a vessel, prior to release, while examinations of post-release behaviour are usually restricted to what is within view of a vessel. In this study, we quantified the post-release behavior of the common coral trout (Plectropomus leopardess), two species of emperor (Lethrinus spp.), and the Spanish flag snapper (Lutjanus carponotatus), each of which is actively fished throughout the Great Barrier Reef. SCUBA divers followed fish in the field and recorded their behavior with underwater video cameras after a simulated catch-and-release event. Relative to a low stress treatment (held in an aerated tank prior to release), fish exposed to forced exercise and 5 min of air exposure spent more time in vulnerable positions after release, including 5.8 x more time immobile under the boat upon release, 1.6 x more time to reach the reef floor, and 2.4 x longer to reach the protection of the reef. The effects of the catch-and-release simulation on tailbeat frequency, ventilation rate, and the proportion of overall time spent immobile were not significant except in L. carponotatus, which spent significantly more time immobile when exposed to the high stress treatment. Indeed, there were some notable differences among species, with the magnitude of the behavioural impairments being lower and less variable in coral trout than in Lethrinus spp. or L. carponotatus. These findings provide support for the notion that minimizing air exposure time in hook-and-line fisheries should reduce post-release behavioural impairments and thus vulnerability to predators.

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