uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
12345 1 - 50 of 216
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Aage, Hans
    Roskilde University, Denmark.
    50. EU enlargement2001In: The Baltic Sea Region: Cultures, Politics, Societies / [ed] Witold Maciejewski, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2001, 1, p. 630-638Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Abdallah, Dalia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Consociationalism in Lebanon: A Case Study on the Functionality of the Consociational Political System in Lebanon2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This research seeks to answer how a consociational political model works in practice in the case of Lebanon. Through an examination of Lebanon’s political system and its power-sharing formula, the case study identifies the four pillars of consociationalism, i.e. grand coalition, minority veto, proportional representation and segmental autonomy, and studies their functionality after the Ta’if Agreement was reached in 1989. Although the agreement ended the Lebanese civil war, it did not provide much in regards to the political system. The study concludes that the four pillars are extremely weak in Lebanon and that the consociational system rather reinforces differences in the Lebanese society instead of neutralizing them.

  • 3.
    Adebjörk, Linnea
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    The refugees' role in the migration-development nexus: The case of policies in three African countries2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 4.
    Airey, John
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics. Linnaeus Univ, Dept Languages, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Lauridsen, Karen M.
    Aarhus Univ, Sch Business & Social Sci, Ctr Teaching & Learning, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Rasanen, Anne
    Univ Jyvaskyla, Language Ctr, Jyvaskyla, Finland.
    Salo, Linus
    Stockholm Univ, Ctr Res Bilingualism, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Schwach, Vera
    Nord Inst Studies Innovat Res & Educ, Oslo, Norway.
    The expansion of English-medium instruction in the Nordic countries: Can top-down university language policies encourage bottom-up disciplinary literacy goals?2017In: Higher Education, ISSN 0018-1560, E-ISSN 1573-174X, Vol. 73, no 4, p. 561-576Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, in the wake of the Bologna Declaration and similar international initiatives, there has been a rapid increase in the number of university courses and programmes taught through the medium of English. Surveys have consistently shown the Nordic countries to be at the forefront of this trend towards English-medium instruction (EMI). In this paper, we discuss the introduction of EMI in four Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden). We present the educational setting and the EMI debate in each of these countries and summarize relevant research findings. We then make some tentative suggestions for the introduction of EMI in higher education in other countries. In particular, we are interested in university language policies and their relevance for the day-to-day work of faculty. We problematize one-size-fits-all university language policies, suggesting that in order for policies to be seen as relevant they need to be flexible enough to take into account disciplinary differences. In this respect, we make some specific suggestions about the content of university language policies and EMI course syllabuses. Here we recommend that university language policies should encourage the discussion of disciplinary literacy goals and require course syllabuses to detail disciplinary-specific language-learning outcomes.

  • 5.
    Aler, Emma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Contested identity, contested struggle: A critical discourse analysis on victim-agent narratives regarding commercial sex in Thailand2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis examines how efforts regarding the commercial sex industry in Thailand can be positioned in relation to an agent-victim framework. In the context of the expanding sex industry in Thailand, it becomes relevant to look at how efforts regarding it risks reproducing notions of ‘the prostitute’ as the victimised Other, and thus reinforcing neo-colonialism. However, the response in the form of an agent narrative has also been criticised for not taking into account intersecting forms of oppression. Here, a model coming from an emerging literature on the ‘third way feminist approach’ is used to illustrate how these instead can be combined. Using critical discourse analysis, this study draws on postcolonial feminist theory to scrutinise the ways in which non-governmental organisations imagine women as either agents or victims, or rather a combination of the two. The starting point has been that this binary definition might not be sufficient, neither for theoretically addressing the issue, nor for describing discourse. Two ideal types based on the agent-victim framework has been used to study to what extent the discursive practice of the organisations NightLight and Asia Pacific Network of Sex Workers can be placed neatly into one of these ideal types, or whether a third perspective is indeed needed to account for their perception of the women they work with. The analysis has been conducted using different forms of information gathered from the official websites of the organisations, in order to understand they ways in which the organisations themselves choose to communicate their work. The results show that the discursive practices of these organisations to some extent can be accounted for using this framework, yet that in order to fully understand them, one should consider the third way which combines the strengths of both.

  • 6. Almén, Oscar
    Authoritarianism Constrained: The Role of Local People’s Congresses in China2005Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Anagrius, Arvid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Constructing the Rainbow Nation: Migration and national identity in Post-Apartheid South Africa2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Post-Apartheid South Africa has seen xenophobic sentiments towards migrants increase, culminating in several deadly riots. The words of equality and diversity, nurtured during the fight for independence seem to be far away. Building on Micheal Neocosmos theories on South African Xenophobia as a political discourse, this thesis examines how nationalist discourse creates and sustains negative perceptions of migrants. Using theories on national identity to undertake a critical discourse analysis of South African parliament proceedings, it illustrates how the perception of a civic and democratic nation, naturalizes a dichotomy between migrants and citizens. How the narrative of an equal and free South Africa, relies on the opposite perception of neighboring countries, as chaotic, undemocratic and un-free, resulting in a negative view of migrants. It argues that the opposing discourse of Pan-Africanism provides an opportunity in which a more inclusive identity can be built. Finally this thesis wishes to contribute to further research on national identity construction, by proposing a four-dimensional framework of exclusion that provides a reference point for contrasting national discourses 

  • 8.
    Andersson, Helene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Colonial Urban Legacies: An analysis of socio-spatial structures in Accra, Ghana2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 9.
    Andersson, Jenny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas. SciencesPo CNRS.
    ”Expectations, claims, interests and the making of future Arctic territory”2018In: Uncertain futures: imaginaries, narratives, and calculation in the economy. / [ed] Jens Beckert and Richard Bronk, London: Oxford University Press, 2018, p. 83-103Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Andersson, Jenny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas. SciencesPo CNRS.
    ”States and future governance”, in eds.  (2017).2017In: Reconfiguring European states in crisis. / [ed] Patrick Le Gales and Desmond King, London: Oxford University Press, 2017, p. 298-313Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 11. Ansell, Nicola
    et al.
    Robson, Elsbeth
    Hajdu, Flora
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, För teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten gemensamma enheter, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development.
    van Blerk, Lorraine
    Chipeta, Lucy
    The new variant famine hypothesis: moving beyond the household in exploring links between AIDS and food insecurity in southern Africa2009In: Progress in Development Studies, ISSN 1464-9934, E-ISSN 1477-027X, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 187-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A number of southern African countries have experienced food crises during recent years. The fact that the scale of these crises has been disproportionate to the apparent triggers of climatic adversity or production decline has led to the suggestion that they are more closely related to the AIDS pandemic, which is at its most extreme in many of the same countries. This hypothesis, developed by de Waal and Whiteside (2003), has been termed 'New Variant Famine'(NVF). The New Variant Famine hypothesis is helpful in drawing attention to the effects of AIDS in diminishing both food production and capacity to purchase food, but it focuses more intensely on the household level than many other theories that seek to explain food insecurity, which tend to emphasise the integration of peasants into a capitalist market economy, and the functioning of markets and institutions. The household level focus also characterises much research on the impacts of AIDS. In this article we argue that the effects of AIDS on food security are not confined to the household level, and that an NVF analysis should also consider processes operating within and beyond the household including social relationships, relations of age and gender, colonial inheritance and contemporary national and international political economy. Recognition of these processes and how they interact with AIDS may offer greater scope for political mobilisation rather than technocratic responses.

  • 12.
    Ansved, Jacob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    “Head, Heart & Hand”: the contribution of collaborative arts programmes to peacebuilding in Myanmar2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis will explore the contribution of collaborative arts programmes to peacebuilding in Myanmar, as perceived by the participants and practitioners of such programmes. It will do so by first investigating the respondents’ perceptions of current obstacles to peace in Myanmar, and then explore and analyse the perceived contributions of the programmes to peacebuilding. Finally, it will attempt to connect these two categories of findings together. The latter will be done using a conceptual framework based on Johan Galtung’s capacities for peace. The study is constructed as a qualitative case study of collaborative arts programmes in Yangon, Myanmar and builds on data generated through interviews and focus group discussions with arts programme participants and practitioners during February to April 2018. By relating to previous research on the arts and peacebuilding, this paper aims to contribute to the research field and provide a perspective on these processes in the context of Myanmar. Based on the data, the study finds that the central obstacles to peace in Myanmar are perceived as being primarily related to ethnic and religious discrimination and the current education system in the country. Furthermore, the paper concludes that there are several aspects that speaks for the potential of collaborative arts programmes to contribute to peacebuilding in Myanmar; in particular the combination of the programmes’ educational and empathetic elements. Lastly, the argument is made for further research and investments in arts programmes in conflict-affected contexts, to confirm and elaborate on the suggested potential of the arts to contribute to peacebuilding.

  • 13.
    Ansved, Jacob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Heartbeats of the Great Dragon: The Space for Political Expression in the Music Scene of Beijing2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay will explore the space for political expression in the music scene of Beijing; as perceived by local musicians. The study tries to answer the question on what the space is for expressing views in music that contradict the Chinese government. Through the accounts of musicians in Beijing, what the perceived political space is and what aspects of musicians’ reality that affect this perception of space are investigated. It does this through a qualitative case study of the Beijing music scene consisting of interviews with musicians as well as related music professionals, conducted during the 15th of May until the 15th of July in 2015. Through relating to previous research on political censorship in authoritarian regimes, it aims to contribute to the research field as well as to put censorship of music in a theoretical context. The study concludes that there is a perceived “indirect” space in Beijing music for non-conforming political views to be expressed, as well as finding and outlining four main factors that contribute to this perception; namely 1. The censorship apparatus; 2. New freedoms: the economy and the Internet; 3. (Music) Career prospects and 4. The politics of Beijing. Conclusively, the argument is made for further analysis of written material in Chinese music (e.g. lyrics and song titles) to enrich these findings.

  • 14.
    Beckman, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    The Impact of Ethnic Homogeneity on Voter Turnout in Sri Lanka: A study of voter turnout at district level2007Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Lipset and Rokkan argued along with their Social Cleavage Model in the 1960’s that ethnicity impacts voter turnout in ethnically divided societies. Lipset and Rokkan had found in their research that voter turnout is affected by a number of aspects such as ethnicity, religion, language, region etc. This has been further explored in later studies by such researchers as B. Geys and K. Hill, who each claim that different ethnic groups participate to different extent in elections. Geys have explicitly suggested that social cohesion increases group solidarity and “social pressure” and that communities with a high degree of socio-economic, racial or ethnic homogeneity will also have a higher political participation. Hill, on the other hand, has in his research found a negative correlative relationship between the concentration of an ethnic minority in an area or district and the voter turnout figures for the same area.

    This paper sets out to test whether Geys’ and Hill’s two theories can be said to hold true for the Sri Lankan context too; if the ethnic composition in a district might explain the highly varying voter turnout rates for the different districts in Sri Lanka. The way to try and prove or disapprove Geys’ and Hill’s theories is therefore to look at the ethnic composition of the districts in Sri Lanka and compare this with the voter turnout rates in a set of three distinguished periods in Sri Lankan history, in order to see whether there is any correlation and if there is any difference over time. The hypothesis assumed is therefore twofold: in ethnically homogeneous districts the voter turnout rate will be higher, while districts with a higher concentration of minority population will have depressed voter turnout figures.

    In my study I have found that there is a strong correlation between ethnic homogeneity of a district and the voter turnout figures for the same district. However, it is noteworthy that this holds true for districts mainly inhabited by the majority population in Sri Lanka, the Sinhalese, while the districts mainly inhabited by ethnic minorities, specifically the Tamils, have significantly low voter turnout figures. This indicates that the Sinhalese population tends to be more inclined to go to the polls on election day. However, the supposition that a higher concentration of an ethnic minority in a district will equivilate low turnout figures was not possible to establish due to variations in results for the years that I studied. In order to establish any such correlative relationship a larger study would need to be carried out.

    The results of this study would be of interest to scholars and practitioners alike and other parties interested in understanding voter mobilization in Sri Lanka.

     

     

     

     

     

  • 15.
    Berg, Elin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Forbidden Love and Deadly Diseases: A Dynamic Frame Analysis About Homophobia and HIV in Uganda2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis has strived to analyze how institutionalized frames may affect how another topic is discussed in a political context. This presented framing strategy is referred to as frame bridging. The aim was to analyze whether the framing of homosexuality in Uganda has affected its HIV policy. It is based on the constructivist understanding of policy as something created in dynamic social processes, which can be strategically framed intentionally or have unintentional consequences. Uganda is a compelling case since its homophobia is institutionalized to a degree that makes it difficult for people in to express gay-positive sentiment. Dynamic frame analysis was chosen as method. The material analyzed consisted primarily of statements from key politicians and official policy documents from the Ugandan government between 2009 and 2017. Firstly, the frames that exist upon homosexuality and HIV in Uganda were distinguished. These frames, illustrated tensions between the West and Africa, conflicting roles on masculinity, HIV as consequence of immoral behavior. Secondly, the frames within HIV policy were scrutinized. These frames outlined HIV as a consequence of promiscuity, as a problem especially to those with ‘risky sexual behavior’ or it failed to at all acknowledge e.g. men having sex with men. This thesis demonstrates that a frame bridging is present although it is not overt but rather implicit. The HIV policy is heteronormative and renders sexual minorities invisible. A possible explanation is that the exclusion of men having sex with men in HIV policy is strategic and due to aid dependency from Western donors. Since actors are confined in their social realities, Ugandan politicians may not be explicitly homophobic in HIV policy since they must acknowledge the Western donors’ influence. This thesis has illustrated that the relationship between homophobia and HIV ultimately turns in to a discussion about tensions between an ‘open’ West and a ‘deprived’ Africa.

  • 16.
    Berg, Fanny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Building Women's Disaster Resilience: An Investigation of Social Capital Generation Through International Disaster Assistance Following Cyclone Pam2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 17.
    Berglund, Christofer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    The Forging of a Demos in Georgia's Armenian Borderland?2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Berglund, Moa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Refugees, Migrants or Displaced People?: A framing analysis of EU and UN problem definitions and advocated solutions in the debate on climate change induced displacement2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 19.
    Berisha, Visar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Collective Identity and Economic Development: A Case Study of How People’s Perception of the Collective Identity Affects The Economic Development in Kosovo2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to show how identity can be of importance to issues relating to development. More specifically, it deals with how the Kosovar Albanians perception of their collective identity have affected Kosovo’s economic development. The study draws primarily from the theories of Identity Economics and Orientalism and presents a hypothesis which is then tested empirically through the analysis of the in-depth interviews and participant observation carried out in Kosovo. The results show that Kosovar Albanians have, to a degree, internalized the Orientalist discourse, which often portrayed them in racist terms as the ’other’, in their view of their collective identity and that this has had a negative effect on how they perceive their potential in the global economic system, which in turn has undermined the country’s economic development. Thus, identity seems to be of significance when it comes to issues relating to development.

  • 20.
    Björck, Hedda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Different Conceptions of Nature in the Paris Agreement2019Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACT

    In 2015, an Agreement was made in Paris at the 21st conference of the Parties of the UN. The purpose of the Paris Agreement was to collectively target climate change and keep the global warming under 2°C. Since then, the strength of this Agreement has been evaluated in numerous ways, optimists and pessimists present arguments for different theories and opinions. While some argue that the agreement is too weak because of its non-binding features and vagueness, others argue that the very same vagueness has opened up a new door. To contribute with a new perspective, the aim of this study is to describe and analyse different conceptions of nature in the Nationally Determined Contributions submitted to the Paris Agreement by Parties who signed it. Based on previous research about different conceptions of nature, an analytical framework is built and used through a text analysis of some of the Contributions. The findings of this qualitative, descriptive case study are meant to create a deeper understanding of the Contributions made to the Paris Agreement, describing if different conceptions of nature are found and whether this affects the way the Parties aim to tackle the climate crisis.

  • 21.
    Blanck, Anton
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Sharing invisible resources in the age of climate change: a transboundary groundwater sharing agreement in Sahel, Africa, analysed through Ostrom’s design principles for collective action2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    With climate change and increasing populations, water availability is becoming even more important in the region of Sahel, Africa, where droughts have plagued the states for centuries. In response to this growing concern, seven Sahelian states have initiated cooperation over their shared groundwater resources, an action that is still quite unique globally, given the overlooked status of groundwater. This paper analyses their agreement using Elinor Ostrom’s framework for sustainable collective management of common-pool resources. It concludes that, although the agreement reflects progressive intentions, the attention towards the local levels of governance is insufficient. This conclusion is important specifically for the future of this agreement, and generally feeds into a discussion of governance of larger-scale, transboundary CPRs.

  • 22. Bliesemann De Guevara, Berit
    et al.
    Kostić, RolandUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Knowledge and Expertise in International Interventions: The Politics of Facts, Truth and Authenticity2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge about violent conflict and international intervention is political. It involves power struggles over the objects of knowing (problematization/silencing), how they are known (epistemic practices), and what interpretations are taken into account in policymaking and implementation. This book unearths the politics, power and performances involved in the social construction of seemingly neutral concepts such as facts, truth and authenticity in knowing about violent conflict and international intervention. Contributors foreground problems of physical and social access to information, explore practices generating knowledge actors' authority and legitimacy, and analyse struggles over competing policy narratives. A first set of chapters focuses on the social construction of facts, truth and authenticity through studies of militia research in the DR Congo, politicians' on-site visits in intervention theatres in the Balkans and Afghanistan, and the epistemic practices of Human Rights Watch and comics journalism. A second set of contributions analyses the strategic side of knowledge through case studies of diplomatic counterinsurgency in Bosnia and Herzegovina, African governments' active role in the `bunkerization' of international aid workers, and authoritarian peacebuilding as a challenge to the liberal power/knowledge regime in world politics. This book was originally published as a special issue of the Journal of Intervention and Statebuilding.

  • 23.
    Blom, Hampus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Africa Online: A Study on the Emulation of Chinese Practices and Policy in the Telecom sectors of Ethiopia and Nigeria2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, Chinese development efforts in Africa have increased in scope making China the second largest investor on the African content with Chinese MNCs dominating multiple markets across the continent. The author investigates whether there is empirical support for the assumption that there is a correlation between market dominance of Chinese MNCs and similarity in policy and practices to those of China, an assumption based on Eleanor Westney’s study on the emulation of organizational models in late 19th century Japan. To affirm this correlation and describe where it exists, the author examines the regulation of the telecom markets in Ethiopia and Nigeria, two cases where Chinese MNCs have varying degrees of control over the telecom market. Whether or not the studied cases share similarities with the policy and practices of China is studied using the functional method of comparative law as described by Mark Van Hoecke. The study is based on data collected from Freedom House’s reports on freedom on the net which scrutinizes legislation, court cases and the behaviour of government institutions in 65 countries. The author then discusses similarities and differences between the studied cases and China, concluding that the before mentioned correlation does exist to a certain extent and that further research is required.

  • 24.
    Blomén, Victoria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Representing group interests: A study on the substantive representation of women and minority groups in the Jordanian House of Representatives2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In the world today there is a tendency that women and minority groups are under-represented in political decision-making. In order to come to terms with the under-representation of women and minorities many countries are taking measures to increase the number of women and minority representatives. However,there is an ongoing debate on whether increased number of group representatives lead to increased representation of group interests. The question is if women and minority representatives are more responsive to their respective group’s interests compared to other representatives. In this study, I have conducted asurvey with members of the Jordanian House of Representatives in order to investigate whether women and minority representatives are more responsive to their respective group’s interests compared to other representatives. The survey has been designed to capture representatives’ priorities and attitudes towards certain policy areas and issues. The results from the survey show that women and minority representatives to a certain extent are more responsive to their respective group’s interests compared to other representatives, indicating that an increased number of women and minority representatives would lead to increased representation of women and minority interests. Furthermore,this study finds that female representatives are more responsive to women’s interests when it comes to priorities than when it comes to attitudes, whereas representatives from the Christian minority are more responsive to Christian issues when it comes to attitudes than when it comes to priorities. These results indicate that there are differences between different groups when it comes to the representation of their groups’ interests. Thus, research on one group might not be directly transferable to other groups.

  • 25.
    Bogren, Ella
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    “The pain she feels, I don’t feel it, but I feel for her”: A case study of urban teenage schoolboys’ knowledge and attitudes towards menstruation in Ghana2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Menstrual health management can be a difficulty for menstruating women and girls, especially in low- and middle-income countries or other areas of poverty. Menstruation being characterized by stigmatisation, myths and taboo makes it especially troublesome, preventing women and girls to handle their menstruation safely and with dignity. Male attitudes have been argued to play an important role in perpetuating these stigmas and taboos, yet little is known about them. This study sets out to investigate male menstrual knowledge and attitudes, the role of religion in shaping menstrual attitudes and the potential consequences for menstruating women and girls. Qualitative data from group interviews with 24 boys aged 15-19 in a Senior High School in Accra, Ghana is used as basis for analysis. The results are organised along three themes, reflecting the three sub-research questions guiding the study. Findings demonstrate how schoolboys have an elemental understanding of the physiological process of menstruation yet demonstrate a deep understanding of cultural restrictions and the way menstruation may be experienced. Attitudes contain both positive and negative elements, including menstruation as normal and natural on the one hand, and the menstruating girl as unclean and impure on the other. Religion seem to play in important role in perpetuating negative menstrual attitudes, reinforcing the idea of menstruation as impure and unclean. Potential consequences of these attitudes risk menstruation continuing being considered as unclean and impure in addition to be neglected as a “girl’s matter”. However, respondents also identified menstrual difficulties which may foster supportive involvement in menstruation. The findings suggest the importance of continuing to address the surrounding communities of menstruating women and girls, including within and outside of educational and religious institutions.

  • 26.
    Bostrom Cabral, Astraea
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Green Canteen: Field Experiments using Nudges in Balinese Middle School Canteens2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 27.
    Bovin, Axel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology.
    Free market or food stockpiles: A comparative case study of food supply in a crisis perspective in Sweden and Finland2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to identify similarities and differences in preparations by Sweden and Finland to ensure food supply in a crisis.

    Previous research consisting of separate studies have showed a decreased ability to ensure food supply in crisis in Sweden, and an increased ability in Finland. In a time of raising awareness, changing security concerns and political will, the contribution of this study is to simultaneously investigate the two countries and provide an understanding of the historical- and present approaches.

    By using comparative case study as method and applying International relations theory, a broader understanding of the different approaches by otherwise similar countries is achieved. The approaches of Sweden can be explained by using realist, neorealist, liberal and neoliberal theories while Finland’s approach best can be explained by realist and neorealist theories.

    The study is relevant for the field of humanitarian action and conflict since it provides an understanding of the countries contingency plans regarding food. Threat assessments from both countries identifies man-made conflicts such as terrorism, cyber-attacks, use of military force and war to have the possibility to create disruptions in the normal cycles of the society and those of surrounding countries. If these threats were to occur, basic needs must be met, one being food supply.

  • 28.
    Bratt, Sandra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Bomullstextiliers komplexa produktion och geografi: Svenska företags arbete för att motverka miljöpåverkan till följd av en global textilindustri.2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Bomullstextilier är en av de mest återkommande råvarorna i textilierproduktion, trots att medvetenheten om dess miljöpåfrestande framställning ökat är den fortfarande en av de viktigaste globala handelsvarorna. I och med den globala handeln har företagens agerande utvecklats från att ha en lokal produktion och försäljning till att handla med olika leverantörer och underleverantörer över hela världen. Det långa ledet leverantörer som krävs för att framställa bomullstextilier kan tillsammans med andra faktorer, som kulturella och etiska skillnader, leda till komplikationer när det kommer till uppföljningen av företagens krav på leverantörerna. Studien har en kvalitativ utgångspunkt där huvudfokus är att undersöka svenska företags möjligheter att påverka och förhindra dessa komplikationer för att uppnå en miljömässigt hållbar produktion. Insamlingen av primärdata har till stor del bestått av 5 genomförda intervjuer med nyckelpersoner inom området. Det teoretiska ramverket utgår från företagens Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) vilket behandlar både dess ansvar samt dess skyldigheter. Studien har identifierat olika verktyg och implementeringsproblem som företagen möter men visar samtidigt företagens möjligheter att på egen hand påverka produktionens utkomst.

  • 29.
    Brodrej, Selma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Voices against the prohibition of abortion: A qualitative text analysis of four women’s rights movements in Nicaragua2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis examines how four different women's rights organizations in Nicaragua are arguing against the current abortion prohibition (2018). The thesis is based on a qualitative text analysis where an analytical framework has been developed to categorize the different arguments that were found. Moreover, the thesis compares how the relevant organizations are arguing compared with how they argued ten years ago (around 2008). Various ways of arguing against the law were found among the organizations. Some based their arguments on the health-related issues the prohibition leads to. Others focused on a rights-based approach and argued against the law based on feminist theory. Regarding the time comparison, some interesting differences were found. In general, the organizations analyzed in this thesis had a more positive relation to feminism than the ones that seemed to be ruling ten years ago which was a difference note-worthy. Another clear difference was that the "modern" organizations were more supportive of an unlimited access to abortion and not only access to therapeutic abortion, which was more frequent among the organizations earlier. 

  • 30.
    Brosché, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Good Understanding enables good solutions2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    “I have heard that before – I think that you should solve the problem in this manner” is a common comment from a partner, student or friend when someone has started to explain a problem. Sometimes the listener understands the situation and is correct in his/her analysis of it. At other times, however, the problem is not at all what the listener thought it was. This often leaves the person telling the story in frustration, and the suggested solution is often mismatched because the real problem has not been understood. The same goes for conflicts – if you do not understand you cannot fix it – but a good understanding enables a good solution.

  • 31.
    Brosché, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    The Crises Continue: Sudan’s Remaining Conflicts2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The current conflicts in Sudan consist of different conflict-types, here presented in a theoretical framework of conflict complementarities. The framework consist of four parallel and interlinked conflicts types: communal conflicts, local elite conflicts, center-periphery conflicts, and cross-border conflicts. The structure of conflict complementarities is used to describe the continuing crisis in Darfur, and the emerging crisis in South Kordofan.

    The complexities of Sudan’s conflict have often been overlooked by outsiders leading to incorrect assessments of the root causes, as well as dynamics of these conflicts. Therefore, this paper makes a call for careful conflict analysis in order to understand the conflicts in Sudan. Although taken place in different areas the root causes of Sudan’s conflicts are similar. Poverty and severe marginalization of the peripheries, in combination with bad governance at the center, are the main reasons for conflicts all over the country. Also other areas of Sudan, such as Eastern Sudan and the far North, suffer from these problems. Thus, there is a risk that Sudan’s crisis will spread to new areas. For conflicts in Sudan to decline the root causes of the problems need to be tackled.

    Decentralization that would decrease the huge differences between the center and the marginalized peripheries would be a step in the right direction. Also, the government’s propensity for using militias and divide-and-rule strategies has to stop for a brighter future for Sudan. Finally, a stronger commitment from, and co-ordination by, the international community is needed to deal with the continuing crisis in Sudan.

  • 32.
    Bylund, Josefine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government. Uppsala University.
    Democracy Promotion in Authoritarian States: A Comparative Study of the Conflictive Objectives of Swedish Financial Aid Strategies2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In an attempt to outline how Sweden manage the conflictive objectives of economic growth

    promotion and democracy promotion in authoritarian states, this study analyzed the Swedish

    development cooperation strategies for Uganda and Rwanda between the years of 2001-2019. By

    using the qualitative method of conventional content analysis, five main precautionary measures

    used to manage the conflictive objectives were identified; the withholding of general budget

    support, strengthening actors of change, balancing governmental support with civil society

    support, engaging in political dialogue, and compensating for the lack of democratic principles

    and respect for human rights in the recipient country’s development plan. In addition to that, the

    study indicates that the recent trend within the international aid community, where strands of

    modernization theory has regained intellectual influence, is also applicable to Sweden.

  • 33.
    Castensson, Alice
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    The Capability of Cups: A comparative field study in Uganda investigating the impact of menstrual cups on women and girls’ achieved capabilities2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Menstrual hygiene management (MHM) has for long been a neglected topic within development research, policy and practice, despite findings recognising how insufficient MHM poses obstacles to women and girls’ well-being and quality of life. Those living in low-resource settings are especially vulnerable to such challenges. This thesis aims to provide empirical evidence for the relationship between improved MHM and human development. Amartya Sen’s capability approach serves as the starting point, suggesting that development is the process of expanding capabilities to lead a life one has reason to value. It is argued that the use of menstrual cups enables the achievement of capabilities, by removing obstacles to these. This hypothesis is tested using material collected during a field study in Uganda. Two groups of women and girls have been interviewed and compared – one in which everyone is using menstrual cups, and one in which everyone is using pads or cloths. The results show that capabilities to a larger extent are achieved among the women and girls using menstrual cups, than among those using pads or cloths. Moreover, obstacles to capabilities were predominantly present in the second group. The findings thereby support the theoretical argument, demonstrating that the use of menstrual cups removes obstacles – positively impacting capabilities. This highlights the importance of considering MHM as a key aspect of sustainable development.

  • 34.
    Chowdhury, Afrida
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Do Small States Matter?: A comparative analysis of the discourses by three of the non-permanent members of the United Nations Security Council on the crisis in Libya and Syria between 2011 and 2012.2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    A new era of wars and instability have left the world shaken with the civil wars in Syria and Libya. Although there are many similarities with Syria and Libya, the two states did not have the same end due to actions by the United Nations Security Council. Libya resulted in a military humanitarian intervention, while Syria did not. Studies about the Security Council usually focuses on the actions of the Permanent Five members who holds institutional power and influence over the council, mostly due to their quantitative economic and military power, leaving smaller states, the non-permanent members out of research. The point of this study is to fill in the lacuna of the studies on the non-permanent members to see they behave in the council by how they problematize the crisis in Syria and Libya. This paper compares the discourses of Colombia, Portugal and South Africa, three of the non-permanent members of the Security Council between 2011-2012 in how they speak about the decision to intervene in Libya and not in Syria. To conduct my normative study I use Tal Dingott Alkopher’s study on Military Humanitarian Intervention Norms by analysing speeches found in UNSC meeting protocols that regarded Syria and Libya. I do this to find evidence for how these non-permanent members argue for or against norms of intervention. My results show that the non-permanent members are more aligned with intervention norms for Libya rather than Syria.

  • 35.
    Claire, Travers
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology.
    NO ONE CARES WE’RE BLEEDING: THE PLACE OF MENSTRUAL MANAGEMENT IN HUMANITARAIN RESPONSE2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Menstrual management is a pervasive issue for women globally, and it becomes critical in times of crisis. During these times of crisis and disaster, humanitarian response seeks to provide relief of suffering by meeting essential needs, in a comprehensive and predictable manner. Yet the provision of menstrual management remains largely ad hoc. Through a comprehensive literature review of documents pertaining to menstrual management in emergencies, this paper offers a qualitative analysis of modern humanitarian strategic approaches, to explore the place of menstrual management in emergencies. The core findings are that menstrual management is not fodder for strategy in humanitarian aid, and therefore lacks a ‘home’ in any of the humanitarian approaches to response. It is not fully integrated into either technical strategic implementation, typified by the cluster approach, nor through cultural implementation approaches, typified by gender mainstreaming. This paper also offers some explanations of why such an omnipresent need has, as yet, remained un-championed. This discussion is based on a theoretical framework offered by feminist theory. Supplemented by an understanding of organisations as gendered structures (Acker, 1990), this thesis posits that these cavities in modern humanitarian response are due to the inherent inability and reluctance of the humanitarian system to concern itself with a bodily, female issue such as menstrual management.

  • 36.
    Connah, Nadezna (Naia)
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    An Analysis of the Framing of Female and Male Post Child Soldiers in Written Media2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 37.
    Dahlback, Filippa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Anti-tourist behaviour in volunteer tourism: ”Then we went for our first lion walk, it could be with or without tourists.”2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 38.
    Dimitrov, Vasil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology.
    The Struggle with Ageing Population. The Cases of Japan and Sweden2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 39.
    Drott, Nadja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Oriental Narratives or a Western script?: Self-Orientalism, the orient and the oriental  - a discourse analysis of three contemporary historical novels2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 40.
    Edberg, Joel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Changed Domain but Sovereign: An Ideational Study on the Russian Federation’s Conceptualisation of State Sovereignty Over a Decade, 2007-2017(18)2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 41.
    Ederyd, Moa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    'The white helper' narrative in the context of marketization2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 42.
    Edholm Widén, Jesper
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Security Council Reform; a new perspective on the necessity of veto abolition: Why should the right to veto in the United Nations Security Council be abolished?2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 43.
    Edlund, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Gendered processes of empowerment and disempowerment2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 44.
    Edström, Josefine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    The Feminized People and the Patriarchal State: Studying the Portrayal of Gender in North Korean Films2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 45.
    Ehrlin, Mikaela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Floods and heavy rainfall wreak havoc in Kenya: The perception of causes, vulnerability and responsibility in media coverage of disasters: - an analysis of debates on climate change, development issues and responsibilities in media coverage of three floods in Kenya between 2013 and 20172018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 46.
    Ekstrand, Moa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology.
    Ord men inga visor: En jämförande masterstudie om humanitära organisationers policy kring dialog och mänskliga rättigheter i relation till praktiskt genomförande av flyktingläger2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The average time for an individual to be located in a refugee situation is 17 years. That people are fleeing for such a long period of their life means that a large part of their human rights can easily be neglected. This study examines the humanitarian organizations MSB’s and UN- HCR's implementation of refugee camps and how they allow refugees to play a part in this process. This essay intends to examine the policy the organizations adhere to, namely the in- ternationally recognized handbooks Handbook of Emergencies and The Sphere Project. Em- pirical material is based on a qualitative interview method where a comparison between poli- cy and practice is investigated. Employees of organizations and experts on refugee camp de- sign, management and urban planning have served as respondents in this study. The city planning theory collaborative rationality is used to examine the empirical data to answer how organizations work with refugee camps, if a dialogue processes occur between organizations and refugees, and what benefits the theory can provide. This is followed by a discussion re- garding the human rights of the refugees and whether these are considered in the implementa- tion of the camp. A question raised in the discussion is whether a clarification of the concept could help the organizations' employees to meet the human rights of the refugees. The aim of this thesis is to create an interdisciplinary understanding across disciplinary boundaries. The idea is that the amalgamation of disciplines can improve the humanitarian organizations’ work and aid refugees living conditions. This study highlights a discrepancy in the relation- ship between policy and practice in relation to the procedure manuals, but also in relation to refugees and the satisfaction of human rights. A majority of the respondents testify a wish that a dialogue should be conducted between the organization and the recipients of humanitar- ian aid but that issues such as time pressure, ignorance and power relations complicates this process. What is needed for an improvement of dialogue processes is that the organizations need to take clearer positions on how the practical implementation should play out which would more easily control their employees to execute their work. States need to review their approach to refugees and to take responsibility for the people who need help. Last but not least, the concept of human rights and Nussbaum's definition of it is offered as a suggestion as to how UNHCR and MSB could simplify their work to accommodate that the refugees are treated within the realms of the human rights legislation. 

  • 47.
    Emelie, Lejonklou Hägg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    The Ocean, a Global Common: A study about multilateral partnership for marine sustainability in the Coral Triangle2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 48.
    Enquist, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Online Preparedness – Redefining Resilience: A qualitative analysis on the role of online social networking in the context of natural hazards – a study of Indonesia.2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Previous literature on social capital theory in disaster research has not been updated according to the modern ways of having social networks with friends and family on online platforms. With an increase of costly disasters caused by natural hazards for especially socio-economically vulnerable countries, there is inevitably a need for expanding research to include this modern view on social networks as well. This study uses an online survey with collected answers from Indonesian citizens in order to investigate the relationship between online social networking and disaster preparedness. Results show that certain parts of preparedness are more influenced by online networking than others, but also that more evidence is needed before reaching any conclusions. Overall this study still demonstrates an indication that online social networking should be included in future disaster research and policy work, since any potential preparedness effort is worth considering.

  • 49.
    Enqvist, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    A country can not be free unless the women are free: A critical discourse analysis of the impact of the ideologies of Abdullah Öcalan on gendered state building in Rojava2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 50.
    Eriksson Baaz, Maria
    et al.
    School of Global Studies.
    Stern, Maria
    Being reformed: Subjectification and security sector reform in the Congolese armed forcesIn: Journal of Intervention and Statebuilding, ISSN 1750-2977, E-ISSN 1750-2985Article in journal (Refereed)
12345 1 - 50 of 216
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf