Logo: to the web site of Uppsala University

uu.sePublications from Uppsala University
Change search
Refine search result
1234567 1 - 50 of 482
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Aage, Hans
    Roskilde University, Denmark.
    50. EU enlargement2001In: The Baltic Sea Region: Cultures, Politics, Societies / [ed] Witold Maciejewski, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2001, 1, p. 630-638Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Download full text (pdf)
    BSR 8-50
  • 2.
    Abdallah, Dalia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Consociationalism in Lebanon: A Case Study on the Functionality of the Consociational Political System in Lebanon2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This research seeks to answer how a consociational political model works in practice in the case of Lebanon. Through an examination of Lebanon’s political system and its power-sharing formula, the case study identifies the four pillars of consociationalism, i.e. grand coalition, minority veto, proportional representation and segmental autonomy, and studies their functionality after the Ta’if Agreement was reached in 1989. Although the agreement ended the Lebanese civil war, it did not provide much in regards to the political system. The study concludes that the four pillars are extremely weak in Lebanon and that the consociational system rather reinforces differences in the Lebanese society instead of neutralizing them.

  • 3.
    Abera Techan, Mahlet
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Gendering Cyber Warfare: A theoretical and exploratory paper addressing the research gap on the gendered aspects of cyber warfare2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    War is gendered. The scholarship of gender and war is comprehensive and multi-layered, yet there seems to be some difficulty to keep up with the new developments in technology and its involvement in warfare. It was only until a few years ago that a new method of warfare - cyber warfare, a form of hybrid warfare, emerged and got the spotlight in the discussions on new methods of warfare. However, as the literature is growing, and international organisations are producing policy and strategy documents on cyber warfare, there seems to be a research gap on the relation between gender and cyber warfare, more specifically the gendered aspects of cyber warfare. This thesis attempts to fill that research gap and intends to answer how cyber warfare may be gendered. This is be done by generally looking at the literature of “Gender and War” and “Gender and Cyber”, and Gunneriusson and Ottis (2013) categorisation of how cyberspace is used in military operations from a hybrid warfare perspective. Gunneriusson and Otitis’s categorisation focus on inter alia cyber-attacks on non-military targets, and the use of propaganda. The overview of the research on gender and cyber focus on the workforce within cyber related sectors and gender-based violence, and the overview of research on gender and war brings up numerous examples of the nexus between gender and war.  Based on the overview of the two fields of research along with Gunneriusson and Ottis categorisation this thesis comes to the conclusion that cyber warfare can be gendered. The purpose of the examples of cyber-attacks are the same when same attacks are conducted offline and these types of attack offline have the same effect online. The difference is that an attack through the cyberspace intensifies the consequences in comparison to when these same methods were used in other domains.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Gendering Cyber Warfare - Abera Techan
  • 4.
    Adebjörk, Linnea
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    The refugees' role in the migration-development nexus: The case of policies in three African countries2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5.
    Adenmark, Cajsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Commercial surrogates; victims or agents?: A frame analysis of how the agency of commercial surrogates is portrayed in U.S. newspapers2022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 6.
    af Ekenstam, Pauline
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Transforming Development?: A Qualitative Study of Sida’s Social Safety Net Programmes2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 7.
    Ahlqvist, Felizia Torres
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Polarization in the Colombian Election?: A study on Centro Democrático’s portrayal of presidential candidate Gustavo Petro2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 8.
    Airey, John
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics. Linnaeus Univ, Dept Languages, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Lauridsen, Karen M.
    Aarhus Univ, Sch Business & Social Sci, Ctr Teaching & Learning, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Rasanen, Anne
    Univ Jyvaskyla, Language Ctr, Jyvaskyla, Finland.
    Salo, Linus
    Stockholm Univ, Ctr Res Bilingualism, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Schwach, Vera
    Nord Inst Studies Innovat Res & Educ, Oslo, Norway.
    The expansion of English-medium instruction in the Nordic countries: Can top-down university language policies encourage bottom-up disciplinary literacy goals?2017In: Higher Education, ISSN 0018-1560, E-ISSN 1573-174X, Vol. 73, no 4, p. 561-576Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, in the wake of the Bologna Declaration and similar international initiatives, there has been a rapid increase in the number of university courses and programmes taught through the medium of English. Surveys have consistently shown the Nordic countries to be at the forefront of this trend towards English-medium instruction (EMI). In this paper, we discuss the introduction of EMI in four Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden). We present the educational setting and the EMI debate in each of these countries and summarize relevant research findings. We then make some tentative suggestions for the introduction of EMI in higher education in other countries. In particular, we are interested in university language policies and their relevance for the day-to-day work of faculty. We problematize one-size-fits-all university language policies, suggesting that in order for policies to be seen as relevant they need to be flexible enough to take into account disciplinary differences. In this respect, we make some specific suggestions about the content of university language policies and EMI course syllabuses. Here we recommend that university language policies should encourage the discussion of disciplinary literacy goals and require course syllabuses to detail disciplinary-specific language-learning outcomes.

  • 9.
    Alami, Ilias
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Copley, Jack
    Moraitis, Alexis
    The ‘wicked trinity’ of late capitalism: Governing in an era of stagnation, surplus humanity, and environmental breakdown2023In: Geoforum, ISSN 0016-7185, E-ISSN 1872-9398, article id 103691Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scholars within the fields of political ecology, environmental political theory, and international political economy tend to evaluate the prospects of state-led environmental transitions in general terms – enquiring as to the capitalist state’s inherent properties and their environmental implications. Less attention has been paid to how the state’s green capacities are conditioned by contemporary evolutions in the form and pace of capital accumulation. Capitalism’s directional pattern of historical development poses unique challenges for green state projects. Its drive to raise labour productivity metabolises nature on a growing scale, while generating conditions of overproduction and rendering a progressively larger portion of the population superfluous to the production process. Thus, the question is not simply whether the state can rise to the challenge of climate change, but rather how states are scrambling to govern the intersecting crises of climate catastrophe, economic stagnation, and surplus humanity. This ‘wicked trinity’ compounds the tensions at the heart of the capitalist state, resulting in an increasing inability to perform its role while sustaining its liberal form. This governance trilemma is illustrated by the case of the solar photovoltaic boom, where the spectacular increase in the productivity and scale of solar panel manufacturing have generated oversupply and falling profitability. States have reacted by indefinitely providing subsidies, financing automation technologies that exacerbate labour superfluity, and relocating solar panel manufacturing to places with authoritarian labour regimes. The case of photovoltaics is a microcosm of the general predicament faced by states as they struggle to govern capitalism’s secular developmental tendencies.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 10.
    Aler, Emma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Contested identity, contested struggle: A critical discourse analysis on victim-agent narratives regarding commercial sex in Thailand2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis examines how efforts regarding the commercial sex industry in Thailand can be positioned in relation to an agent-victim framework. In the context of the expanding sex industry in Thailand, it becomes relevant to look at how efforts regarding it risks reproducing notions of ‘the prostitute’ as the victimised Other, and thus reinforcing neo-colonialism. However, the response in the form of an agent narrative has also been criticised for not taking into account intersecting forms of oppression. Here, a model coming from an emerging literature on the ‘third way feminist approach’ is used to illustrate how these instead can be combined. Using critical discourse analysis, this study draws on postcolonial feminist theory to scrutinise the ways in which non-governmental organisations imagine women as either agents or victims, or rather a combination of the two. The starting point has been that this binary definition might not be sufficient, neither for theoretically addressing the issue, nor for describing discourse. Two ideal types based on the agent-victim framework has been used to study to what extent the discursive practice of the organisations NightLight and Asia Pacific Network of Sex Workers can be placed neatly into one of these ideal types, or whether a third perspective is indeed needed to account for their perception of the women they work with. The analysis has been conducted using different forms of information gathered from the official websites of the organisations, in order to understand they ways in which the organisations themselves choose to communicate their work. The results show that the discursive practices of these organisations to some extent can be accounted for using this framework, yet that in order to fully understand them, one should consider the third way which combines the strengths of both.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 11.
    Alfredéen, Emelie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Reproduction of colonial structures within a Western climate change adaptation project: A critical discourse analysis of the GEF-funded project “ACCC”2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    There is a wide range of literature within the field of postcolonialism that emphasises thenegative aspects of the development discourse used within aid organisations. Postcolonialcriticism has further grown to be a part of the literature on globalisation. As climate changeconstitutes a highly emphasised global problem today, the efforts to diminish the negativeimpacts of it have increased. Climate Change Adaptation (CCA) aid has thus come to play acentral role within international climate negotiations, aiming to decrease the consequences ofthese impacts. As the financial mechanism of the UNFCCC, The Global EnvironmentFacility (GEF) is responsible for funding CCA initiatives. However, the GEF has beentargeted with criticism due to inherent power imbalances. This paper examines the use ofdiscourses within the problem construction in the GEF-funded project “ACCC” from apostcolonial perspective, in order to identify colonial heritage within the project as well as toprovide an understanding of the discursive effects. Such an understanding of discursivemechanisms are crucial for the decolonisation of future aid initiatives. The study finds thatthe problematization is built on Western norms and that the use of discourses within theproblem representation normalizes Western dominance and reproduces power hierarchies.

  • 12.
    Almgren, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Framing Sexual Exploitation and Abuse by UN Peacekeepers: Exploring the UN’s narrative surrounding the sexual misconduct of its peacekeepers2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Throughout the past few decades, accusations of sexual exploitation and abuse by peacekeepers have emerged against the United Nations, ultimately proving to be true. This thesis investigates the UN’s own narrative surrounding sexual misconduct of its peacekeeping personnel, identifying the dominant frames present within UN response to these events. Investigating these frames is a vital contribution to research within SEA, as understanding every angle of an issue can lead to a more competent approach to eventual solutions. Press releases, reports, transcribed interviews, and policy documents are analyzed using framing analysis to do so. Three frames are suggested as reference points, with opportunity for new frames to present themselves during analysis of the material. Ultimately, the study proposes that four multiple frames are present within the UN discourse, however three are of distinct influence, and two are clearly dominant. Finally, the study comes to the conclusion that the UN frames sexual violence perpetrated by peacekeeper as a primarily systemic issue, with individual peacekeepers responsibility playing a secondary role. Further research is encouraged within the field of study, specifically in regards to the ways other actors within the peacekeeping context frame SEA.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 13. Almén, Oscar
    Authoritarianism Constrained: The Role of Local People’s Congresses in China2005Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Aminga, Vane Moraa
    et al.
    Climate Change and Risk Programme, SIPRI.
    Krampe, Florian
    Climate Change and Risk Programme, SIPRI.
    Climate-related Security Risks and the African Union2020Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been considerable attention on the conventional climate mitigation and adaptation debate in Africa, including the prominent efforts of the African Group of Negotiators on Climate Change in global climate forums. However, there is little understanding of how the African Union (AU) is discussing and responding to the security implications of climate change.

    This Policy Brief outlines key strengths of the African Union’s response, such as a rapidly evolving discourse around climate security and efforts to improve collaboration and coordination among different parts of the institution. But also, key weaknesses in the discourse around AU policy responses, such as the lack of tangible policy operationalization as well as financial unpreparedness and limited member state accountability.

    The Policy Brief makes recommendations highlighting entry points for advancing the understanding and response to climate-related security risks within the AU, such as: (a) develop and institutionalize coordinated responses to climate-related security risks, (b) develop strong climate security leadership within the African Union, and (c) change the narrative to focus on shared problems and therefore shared solutions—multilateralism rather than nationalism.

  • 15.
    Anagrius, Arvid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Constructing the Rainbow Nation: Migration and national identity in Post-Apartheid South Africa2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Post-Apartheid South Africa has seen xenophobic sentiments towards migrants increase, culminating in several deadly riots. The words of equality and diversity, nurtured during the fight for independence seem to be far away. Building on Micheal Neocosmos theories on South African Xenophobia as a political discourse, this thesis examines how nationalist discourse creates and sustains negative perceptions of migrants. Using theories on national identity to undertake a critical discourse analysis of South African parliament proceedings, it illustrates how the perception of a civic and democratic nation, naturalizes a dichotomy between migrants and citizens. How the narrative of an equal and free South Africa, relies on the opposite perception of neighboring countries, as chaotic, undemocratic and un-free, resulting in a negative view of migrants. It argues that the opposing discourse of Pan-Africanism provides an opportunity in which a more inclusive identity can be built. Finally this thesis wishes to contribute to further research on national identity construction, by proposing a four-dimensional framework of exclusion that provides a reference point for contrasting national discourses 

    Download full text (pdf)
    Constructing the Rainbow Nation
  • 16.
    Andersson, Helene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Colonial Urban Legacies: An analysis of socio-spatial structures in Accra, Ghana2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Download full text (pdf)
    Colonial Urban Legacies: An analysis of socio-spatial structures in Accra, Ghana
  • 17.
    Andersson, Jenny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas. SciencesPo CNRS.
    Expectations, claims, interests and the making of future Arctic territory2018In: Uncertain futures:: imaginaries, narratives, and calculation in the economy / [ed] Jens Beckert; Richard Bronk, London: Oxford University Press, 2018, p. 83-103Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Uncertain Futures considers how economic actors visualize the future and decide how to act in conditions of radical uncertainty. It starts from the premise that since dynamic capitalist economies are characterized by relentless innovation and novelty, they exhibit an indeterminacy that cannot be reduced to measurable risk. The organizing question then becomes how economic actors form expectations and make decisions despite the uncertainty they face. The current microfoundations of standard economics cannot handle genuinely uncertain futures. Instead, uncertainty requires an entirely new model of economic reasoning. This edited volume helps lay foundations for this new model by showing how economic actors in practice form expectations in conditions of uncertainty. It draws on groundbreaking research in economic sociology, economics, anthropology, and psychology to present theoretically grounded empirical case studies that demonstrate the role of imaginaries, narratives, and calculative technologies—and their various combinations—in enabling economic actors to form expectations and cope with uncertain futures. The book examines risk management techniques, finance models, and discounted cash-flow models as well as methods of envisaging the future that overtly combine calculation with narrative structure and imaginaries. These include central bank forward guidance, economic forecasts, business plans, visions of technological futures, and new era stories. Considerable attention is given to how these fictional expectations influence actors’ behaviour, coordinate action, and provide the confidence to act, and how they become instruments of power in markets and societies. The market impact of shared calculative devices, social narratives, and contingent imaginaries underlines the rationale for a new form of narrative economics.

  • 18.
    Andersson, Jenny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas. SciencesPo CNRS.
    States and future governance: in eds.  (2017).2017In: Reconfiguring European states in crisis / [ed] Desmond King; Patrick Le Gales, London: Oxford University Press, 2017, p. 298-313Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book deals with states in one particular corner of the world: Europe, here understood as the European Union. It examines how states have been reconfigured by five processes. First, the rise of globalization processes and international organizations mean states are increasingly influenced, constrained, measured, and rated by organizations, ideas, and norms over which they have no direct control. Second, the dilution of the classic Weberian state means that comparisons with the nominally ‘weak’ American state are pertinent to understanding new public–private relationships in policy. Third, the impact of unexpected policy crises—fiscal, security, and migration—have resulted in institutional reform and expansion of state policy instruments. Fourth, the changing scale—regional and urban—and rise of regulatory agencies is a major source of reconfiguration in European states. Fifth, the traditional monopoly on violence to protect citizens remains but is overstretched and states have developed new ways to control and monitor populations. The individual chapters cover such issues as how best to measure government performance; the role of the region in European states; planning for unknown futures; the rise of a European identity; conflicts about migration and assimilation; borders and their policing; measuring crises; the reconfiguration of economic policy under neoliberalism; state intervention and banks; sovereign debt crises; defence policy; the rise of populist politics across Europe; and Brexit.

  • 19.
    Andersson, Signe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Echoes of Democracy: Assessing Democratic Values in African Civil Society2024Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis investigates how the level of democratic values differs between active members of different civil society organizations. Civil society has been considered a fundamental aspect of democracy and research have highlighted that some organizational characteristics are associated with democratization and sustainable democracy. However, variations in democratic values at the individual level, disparities between members of different civil society organizations, and the connection to democracy have to some extent been overlooked. This study investigates the nuanced relationship between organizational membership and democratic values across eight African countries using data from the World Value SurveyWave 7. This thesis focuses on exploring the disparities in democratic values among members of quotidian civil society organizations (QCSOs) which have been found to significantly contribute to democratization, compared to members of human rights civil society organizations (HRCSOs) where such significance is not observed. The research employs linear regression analysis to uncover subtle yet statistically significant differences. The findings indicate a marginal but noteworthy distinction in democratic values between active members of QCSOs and HRCSOs. This study highlights the importance of recognizing individual level differences in understanding the diverse landscape of civil society and its relation to democracy.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 20.
    Andersson, Viktor
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Malm, Lydia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Gone with the Crises?: A Case Study on Aid Flows in Sweden, the United States and the United Kingdom in Times of Crises2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Determining whether great crises in donor countries, such as the contemporary COVID-19 pandemic, alter foreign aid allotment represents an urgent research problem. This thesis aims to disentangle if and how aid is increased, reduced or remained the same during crises. The work conducted is a case study of three donor countries: Sweden, the United States and the United Kingdom. Their aid is scrutinized in relation to three crises, the Nordic crisis, the global crisis of 2008 and the COVID-19 pandemic. An identified disagreement in the previous research helps create the theoretical framework guiding this study. A hypothesis is drawn from said framework, that aid allotment is to decrease during crises in donor countries. The findings of this thesis can neither confirm nor reject the hypothesis. Case-specific patterns emerge, implying a relationship between crises and alterations of aid. Seemingly, crises affect foreign aid allotment both positively and negatively, opening up for further research to verify the relationship.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 21. Ansell, Nicola
    et al.
    Robson, Elsbeth
    Hajdu, Flora
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, För teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten gemensamma enheter, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development.
    van Blerk, Lorraine
    Chipeta, Lucy
    The new variant famine hypothesis: moving beyond the household in exploring links between AIDS and food insecurity in southern Africa2009In: Progress in Development Studies, ISSN 1464-9934, E-ISSN 1477-027X, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 187-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A number of southern African countries have experienced food crises during recent years. The fact that the scale of these crises has been disproportionate to the apparent triggers of climatic adversity or production decline has led to the suggestion that they are more closely related to the AIDS pandemic, which is at its most extreme in many of the same countries. This hypothesis, developed by de Waal and Whiteside (2003), has been termed 'New Variant Famine'(NVF). The New Variant Famine hypothesis is helpful in drawing attention to the effects of AIDS in diminishing both food production and capacity to purchase food, but it focuses more intensely on the household level than many other theories that seek to explain food insecurity, which tend to emphasise the integration of peasants into a capitalist market economy, and the functioning of markets and institutions. The household level focus also characterises much research on the impacts of AIDS. In this article we argue that the effects of AIDS on food security are not confined to the household level, and that an NVF analysis should also consider processes operating within and beyond the household including social relationships, relations of age and gender, colonial inheritance and contemporary national and international political economy. Recognition of these processes and how they interact with AIDS may offer greater scope for political mobilisation rather than technocratic responses.

  • 22.
    Ansved, Jacob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    “Head, Heart & Hand”: the contribution of collaborative arts programmes to peacebuilding in Myanmar2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis will explore the contribution of collaborative arts programmes to peacebuilding in Myanmar, as perceived by the participants and practitioners of such programmes. It will do so by first investigating the respondents’ perceptions of current obstacles to peace in Myanmar, and then explore and analyse the perceived contributions of the programmes to peacebuilding. Finally, it will attempt to connect these two categories of findings together. The latter will be done using a conceptual framework based on Johan Galtung’s capacities for peace. The study is constructed as a qualitative case study of collaborative arts programmes in Yangon, Myanmar and builds on data generated through interviews and focus group discussions with arts programme participants and practitioners during February to April 2018. By relating to previous research on the arts and peacebuilding, this paper aims to contribute to the research field and provide a perspective on these processes in the context of Myanmar. Based on the data, the study finds that the central obstacles to peace in Myanmar are perceived as being primarily related to ethnic and religious discrimination and the current education system in the country. Furthermore, the paper concludes that there are several aspects that speaks for the potential of collaborative arts programmes to contribute to peacebuilding in Myanmar; in particular the combination of the programmes’ educational and empathetic elements. Lastly, the argument is made for further research and investments in arts programmes in conflict-affected contexts, to confirm and elaborate on the suggested potential of the arts to contribute to peacebuilding.

  • 23.
    Ansved, Jacob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Heartbeats of the Great Dragon: The Space for Political Expression in the Music Scene of Beijing2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay will explore the space for political expression in the music scene of Beijing; as perceived by local musicians. The study tries to answer the question on what the space is for expressing views in music that contradict the Chinese government. Through the accounts of musicians in Beijing, what the perceived political space is and what aspects of musicians’ reality that affect this perception of space are investigated. It does this through a qualitative case study of the Beijing music scene consisting of interviews with musicians as well as related music professionals, conducted during the 15th of May until the 15th of July in 2015. Through relating to previous research on political censorship in authoritarian regimes, it aims to contribute to the research field as well as to put censorship of music in a theoretical context. The study concludes that there is a perceived “indirect” space in Beijing music for non-conforming political views to be expressed, as well as finding and outlining four main factors that contribute to this perception; namely 1. The censorship apparatus; 2. New freedoms: the economy and the Internet; 3. (Music) Career prospects and 4. The politics of Beijing. Conclusively, the argument is made for further analysis of written material in Chinese music (e.g. lyrics and song titles) to enrich these findings.

  • 24.
    Aspington, Caroline
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Intersektionalitet som metod för global jämställdhet: En intersektionell analys av Sveriges internationella utvecklingssamarbete2022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 25.
    Barkselius, Tilda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Kuxur Rum and the Management of Commons: A qualitative study of the agricultural system Kuxur Rum in Guatemala by using Ostrom’s principles2022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 26.
    Beckman, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    The Impact of Ethnic Homogeneity on Voter Turnout in Sri Lanka: A study of voter turnout at district level2007Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Lipset and Rokkan argued along with their Social Cleavage Model in the 1960’s that ethnicity impacts voter turnout in ethnically divided societies. Lipset and Rokkan had found in their research that voter turnout is affected by a number of aspects such as ethnicity, religion, language, region etc. This has been further explored in later studies by such researchers as B. Geys and K. Hill, who each claim that different ethnic groups participate to different extent in elections. Geys have explicitly suggested that social cohesion increases group solidarity and “social pressure” and that communities with a high degree of socio-economic, racial or ethnic homogeneity will also have a higher political participation. Hill, on the other hand, has in his research found a negative correlative relationship between the concentration of an ethnic minority in an area or district and the voter turnout figures for the same area.

    This paper sets out to test whether Geys’ and Hill’s two theories can be said to hold true for the Sri Lankan context too; if the ethnic composition in a district might explain the highly varying voter turnout rates for the different districts in Sri Lanka. The way to try and prove or disapprove Geys’ and Hill’s theories is therefore to look at the ethnic composition of the districts in Sri Lanka and compare this with the voter turnout rates in a set of three distinguished periods in Sri Lankan history, in order to see whether there is any correlation and if there is any difference over time. The hypothesis assumed is therefore twofold: in ethnically homogeneous districts the voter turnout rate will be higher, while districts with a higher concentration of minority population will have depressed voter turnout figures.

    In my study I have found that there is a strong correlation between ethnic homogeneity of a district and the voter turnout figures for the same district. However, it is noteworthy that this holds true for districts mainly inhabited by the majority population in Sri Lanka, the Sinhalese, while the districts mainly inhabited by ethnic minorities, specifically the Tamils, have significantly low voter turnout figures. This indicates that the Sinhalese population tends to be more inclined to go to the polls on election day. However, the supposition that a higher concentration of an ethnic minority in a district will equivilate low turnout figures was not possible to establish due to variations in results for the years that I studied. In order to establish any such correlative relationship a larger study would need to be carried out.

    The results of this study would be of interest to scholars and practitioners alike and other parties interested in understanding voter mobilization in Sri Lanka.

     

     

     

     

     

    Download (pdf)
    bilaga
  • 27.
    Bendfeldt, Luise
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Clifford, Emily
    Univ London, Royal Holloway, Egham, England..
    Richards, Hannah
    Cardiff Univ, Sch Law & Polit, Cardiff, Wales..
    Coming of age within 'implosion'2024In: Review of International Studies, ISSN 0260-2105, E-ISSN 1469-9044, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 441-456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a recent article, Maria Eriksson Baaz and Swati Parashar1 trace the continued salience of Eurocentrism in critical International Relations (IR), demonstrating how the 'master's outlook' continues to stifle the study of global politics; they ultimately encourage an unsettling and even implosion of the discipline. Starting from this proposed 'implosion' of critical IR, this article reflects on our hopes, as two current PhD candidates and one early career researcher in global politics, for teaching and learning in this future world. We begin by reflecting on our own complicity in reproducing the Western-centrism of the discipline and consider how this discomfort can be used productively. The article then considers the radical potential of the classroom and the necessity of empathetic, collaborative inquiry to the future of the discipline of global politics. We advocate for an IR which is imaginative, relational, messy, and vulnerable - and are hopeful about how this may animate a meaningful and sustainable implosion. Embracing our discomfort and the possibility of failure, we hope to contribute to the ongoing 'unsettling' of academia from the standpoint of incipient feminist scholars and hopeful early-career teachers.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 28.
    Bengtsson, Rebecca Mariana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Breaking Free from a Moral Veto: an analysis of the United Nations Population Fund’s stance on abortion2022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 29.
    Berg, Elin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Forbidden Love and Deadly Diseases: A Dynamic Frame Analysis About Homophobia and HIV in Uganda2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis has strived to analyze how institutionalized frames may affect how another topic is discussed in a political context. This presented framing strategy is referred to as frame bridging. The aim was to analyze whether the framing of homosexuality in Uganda has affected its HIV policy. It is based on the constructivist understanding of policy as something created in dynamic social processes, which can be strategically framed intentionally or have unintentional consequences. Uganda is a compelling case since its homophobia is institutionalized to a degree that makes it difficult for people in to express gay-positive sentiment. Dynamic frame analysis was chosen as method. The material analyzed consisted primarily of statements from key politicians and official policy documents from the Ugandan government between 2009 and 2017. Firstly, the frames that exist upon homosexuality and HIV in Uganda were distinguished. These frames, illustrated tensions between the West and Africa, conflicting roles on masculinity, HIV as consequence of immoral behavior. Secondly, the frames within HIV policy were scrutinized. These frames outlined HIV as a consequence of promiscuity, as a problem especially to those with ‘risky sexual behavior’ or it failed to at all acknowledge e.g. men having sex with men. This thesis demonstrates that a frame bridging is present although it is not overt but rather implicit. The HIV policy is heteronormative and renders sexual minorities invisible. A possible explanation is that the exclusion of men having sex with men in HIV policy is strategic and due to aid dependency from Western donors. Since actors are confined in their social realities, Ugandan politicians may not be explicitly homophobic in HIV policy since they must acknowledge the Western donors’ influence. This thesis has illustrated that the relationship between homophobia and HIV ultimately turns in to a discussion about tensions between an ‘open’ West and a ‘deprived’ Africa.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 30.
    Berg, Fanny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Building Women's Disaster Resilience: An Investigation of Social Capital Generation Through International Disaster Assistance Following Cyclone Pam2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 31.
    Berg, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    “We survive or we sink together”: A Discursive Study of Argumentation by Small Island Developing States Leaders in a Climate Change Context2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis is to investigate the discursive use of first person plural pronoun we through a discourse analysis of the variety of arguments by leaders of Pacific Island States in political debates, specifically within a climate change context. The research question is “How do political leaders of Pacific Island states make discursive use of the first person plural pronoun we in political debates in a climate change context?”

    By using a textual discourse analysis to study statements made by Pacific Island leaders at the UN Conference of the Parties, the investigation finds a wide variety of argumentation styles and pronominal choices. The main finding is how the word we is used in several ways, all of which carry political meaning, and the pronominal choice is found to depend on social context as well as the intention of the speaker. Political leaders utilize the pronoun we as a tool for political rhetoric, to argue both that the international community as a whole will face the negative consequences of climate change while also emphasizing the specific victim status of the islands. Several of the arguments found in the statements that were studied are centered on the vulnerable status of the SIDS (Small Island Developing States), emphasizing how they are severely affected by climate change. The essay demonstrates that the pronominal choices also have actual implications on the dynamics of the political arena. Primarily, the exclusive we isused to create a sense of division between groups, which encourages political mobilization. In addition, leaders are shown to make claims of a leadership role by using an exclusive we to create an image of the own nation as responsible, and opt for an inclusive we to create a feeling of shared responsibility globally.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 32.
    Berglund, Christofer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    The Forging of a Demos in Georgia's Armenian Borderland?2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Berglund, Moa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Refugees, Migrants or Displaced People?: A framing analysis of EU and UN problem definitions and advocated solutions in the debate on climate change induced displacement2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 34.
    Bergsten, Jenny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    “No Escape from Hell”; Securitization of aid and the migration journey in Libya.2022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 35.
    Berisha, Visar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Collective Identity and Economic Development: A Case Study of How People’s Perception of the Collective Identity Affects The Economic Development in Kosovo2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to show how identity can be of importance to issues relating to development. More specifically, it deals with how the Kosovar Albanians perception of their collective identity have affected Kosovo’s economic development. The study draws primarily from the theories of Identity Economics and Orientalism and presents a hypothesis which is then tested empirically through the analysis of the in-depth interviews and participant observation carried out in Kosovo. The results show that Kosovar Albanians have, to a degree, internalized the Orientalist discourse, which often portrayed them in racist terms as the ’other’, in their view of their collective identity and that this has had a negative effect on how they perceive their potential in the global economic system, which in turn has undermined the country’s economic development. Thus, identity seems to be of significance when it comes to issues relating to development.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 36.
    Berming, Moa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    A Path Towards Empowerment?: A study on the perceptions of Men and Masculinities within Microfinance Investment Funds2024Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Feminist research as well as the growing field of ‘Men and Masculinities’ have identified how targeting women and excluding men from development initiatives could have unintended repercussions. As a common tool for development, microfinance is a fitting representation for this emphasis on women. At the same time, Microfinance Investment Funds (MFIFs) have emerged as established actors within the microfinance landscape, and their potential to shape microfinance approaches has been highlighted within literature. This thesis builds upon this previous research to delve into the discourses of MFIFs concerning men and masculinities within the context of microfinance initiatives. Using a theoretical framework that intersects models of empowerment and hegemonic masculinity, the thesis explores the extent to which MFIF discourses incorporate men and masculinities, as well as attempting to explain the presence or absence of these discourses. An analysis reveals that there is mixed alignment with models of empowerment and a lack of discussions concerning men and masculinities. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 37.
    Berming, Moa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    From Nobel Peace Prize Winner to War Criminal: A qualitative text analysis of the Abiy Ahmed administration’s discursive patterns of democratic backsliding2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines if the process of democratic backsliding is observable in the discursive patterns of a government that is the driving force of democratic erosion which can be useful when attempting to discern if a government has undemocratic ambitions. The actor analyzed to answer the research question is the government of Ethiopia. Three hypotheses have been developed based on Levitsky and Ziblatt’s model of democratic backsliding and from these, an analytical framework containing a set of questions has been developed. The questions have been used to systematically analyze the source material. This study found that the Ethiopian government framed those in law and law enforcement agencies and other opposition it perceives as adversaries as illegitimate actors while glorifying and legitimizing their own. In addition, the study found that the government argued that criticism directed at it not following laws or the constitution was either from an illegitimate source or not based on facts.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 38.
    Bexell, Magdalena
    Uppsala University, Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study (SCAS).
    Global Governance, Legitimacy and (De)Legitimation2014In: Globalizations, ISSN 1474-7731, E-ISSN 1474-774X, Globalizations, ISSN 1474-7731, 1474-774X, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 289-299Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Bishop, Matthew Louis
    et al.
    University of Sheffield.
    Muzaka, Valbona
    Southampton University, UK.
    Multilateralism2018In: The Language of World Trade Politics: Unpacking the Terms of Trade / [ed] Klaus Dingwerth, Clara Weinhardt, London: Taylor & Francis Group, 2018, p. 64-79Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Bjursén, Elsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Unwanted Daughters: The Failure of Public Policies Targeting SexSelective Abortion in India2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 41.
    Björck, Hedda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Different Conceptions of Nature in the Paris Agreement2019Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACT

    In 2015, an Agreement was made in Paris at the 21st conference of the Parties of the UN. The purpose of the Paris Agreement was to collectively target climate change and keep the global warming under 2°C. Since then, the strength of this Agreement has been evaluated in numerous ways, optimists and pessimists present arguments for different theories and opinions. While some argue that the agreement is too weak because of its non-binding features and vagueness, others argue that the very same vagueness has opened up a new door. To contribute with a new perspective, the aim of this study is to describe and analyse different conceptions of nature in the Nationally Determined Contributions submitted to the Paris Agreement by Parties who signed it. Based on previous research about different conceptions of nature, an analytical framework is built and used through a text analysis of some of the Contributions. The findings of this qualitative, descriptive case study are meant to create a deeper understanding of the Contributions made to the Paris Agreement, describing if different conceptions of nature are found and whether this affects the way the Parties aim to tackle the climate crisis.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Different Conceptions of Nature in the Paris Agreement
  • 42. Björgvinsson, Edvin
    et al.
    De Genova, NicholasKeshavarz, MahmoudUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Cultural Anthropology and Ethnology. University of Gothenburg.Wulia, Tintin
    Migration2020Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The PARSE journal issue on Migration inquires into the embodied, affective, performative, material, visual, and spatial politics of cross-border human mobilities, through arts/design as well as other disciplines and practices. It concerns all the actors involved in these mobilities: the remarkable proliferation over recent years of heterogeneous human migration formations, including labour migrants and people seeking asylum, the border enforcement infrastructures that arise in response to these mobilities, as well as how these infrastructures incorporate market-based migration industry actors.

    The journal issue is an encounter between artists and migration scholars as we believe that both address and struggle with a crisis of representation when it comes to migration, which should not be confused with over-simplified discourse regarding a "crisis" of borders and migration. We believe that both fields can have a vital role to play in counter-narrating and counter-visualizing dominant discourses and forms of representation of migration.

  • 43.
    Björklöv, Ruth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Introducing women's political representation as an explanatory variable for aid utilization: An analysis of the influence of women's political representation on the utilization of foreign assistance2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis investigates how women's political representation influences foreign aid utilization. While recent contributions show that the impact of foreign aid is highly dependent on the recipient government, there is still limited research on the relationship between women's political representation and aid utilization. Existing work within the research field of female political representation suggests that women are more likely to prioritize resource allocation towards healthcare and education and less likely to prioritize the military. Thus, women’s political representation is predicted to work as a moderating effect on aid utilization, whereby increases in female representation is associated with more aid resources being allocated towards healthcare and education and less to the military. To test the relationship(s) implied, this thesis employs multiple regression analysis on a time series data set of 102 aid-receiving countries from 2000-2017. The hypothesis that women's political representation has a moderating effect on aid utilization could not be supported by the regression analysis. The results do however indicate that female representation in the recipient countries influences government allocation in general. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 44.
    Blanck, Anton
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Sharing invisible resources in the age of climate change: a transboundary groundwater sharing agreement in Sahel, Africa, analysed through Ostrom’s design principles for collective action2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    With climate change and increasing populations, water availability is becoming even more important in the region of Sahel, Africa, where droughts have plagued the states for centuries. In response to this growing concern, seven Sahelian states have initiated cooperation over their shared groundwater resources, an action that is still quite unique globally, given the overlooked status of groundwater. This paper analyses their agreement using Elinor Ostrom’s framework for sustainable collective management of common-pool resources. It concludes that, although the agreement reflects progressive intentions, the attention towards the local levels of governance is insufficient. This conclusion is important specifically for the future of this agreement, and generally feeds into a discussion of governance of larger-scale, transboundary CPRs.

    Download full text (pdf)
    C-uppsats Anton Blanck
  • 45.
    Bliesemann de Guevara, Berit
    et al.
    Department of International Politics, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Penglais, Aberystwyth University.
    Budny, Paulina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Kostić, Roland
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    The global-capitalist elephant in the room: how resilient peacebuilding hinders substantive transformation and undermines long-term peace prospects2023In: Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, ISSN 1877-3435, E-ISSN 1877-3443, Vol. 62, article id 101291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reviews critical responses to recent academic debates on resilience and peacebuilding, with a focus on approaches that question the underlying logics of resilient peacebuilding in fundamental ways. It argues that, while resilience in peacebuilding lends agency and new policy direction to peacebuilding actors, enabling them to uphold the image of active global governance, this also helps to legitimize the existence and reproduction of dominant global-capitalist structures and practices that undermine long-term peacebuilding and give rise to risks of conflict and environmental disasters in the first place. We argue that this process hinders transformation away from an infinite growth economy by focusing on imminent systemic risks and solutions while ignoring potential normative–theoretical and practical–experiential alternatives to the global-capitalist frameworks at the heart of the problem.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 46. Bliesemann De Guevara, Berit
    et al.
    Kostić, RolandUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Knowledge and Expertise in International Interventions: The Politics of Facts, Truth and Authenticity2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge about violent conflict and international intervention is political. It involves power struggles over the objects of knowing (problematization/silencing), how they are known (epistemic practices), and what interpretations are taken into account in policymaking and implementation. This book unearths the politics, power and performances involved in the social construction of seemingly neutral concepts such as facts, truth and authenticity in knowing about violent conflict and international intervention. Contributors foreground problems of physical and social access to information, explore practices generating knowledge actors' authority and legitimacy, and analyse struggles over competing policy narratives. A first set of chapters focuses on the social construction of facts, truth and authenticity through studies of militia research in the DR Congo, politicians' on-site visits in intervention theatres in the Balkans and Afghanistan, and the epistemic practices of Human Rights Watch and comics journalism. A second set of contributions analyses the strategic side of knowledge through case studies of diplomatic counterinsurgency in Bosnia and Herzegovina, African governments' active role in the `bunkerization' of international aid workers, and authoritarian peacebuilding as a challenge to the liberal power/knowledge regime in world politics. This book was originally published as a special issue of the Journal of Intervention and Statebuilding.

  • 47.
    Blom, Hampus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Africa Online: A Study on the Emulation of Chinese Practices and Policy in the Telecom sectors of Ethiopia and Nigeria2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, Chinese development efforts in Africa have increased in scope making China the second largest investor on the African content with Chinese MNCs dominating multiple markets across the continent. The author investigates whether there is empirical support for the assumption that there is a correlation between market dominance of Chinese MNCs and similarity in policy and practices to those of China, an assumption based on Eleanor Westney’s study on the emulation of organizational models in late 19th century Japan. To affirm this correlation and describe where it exists, the author examines the regulation of the telecom markets in Ethiopia and Nigeria, two cases where Chinese MNCs have varying degrees of control over the telecom market. Whether or not the studied cases share similarities with the policy and practices of China is studied using the functional method of comparative law as described by Mark Van Hoecke. The study is based on data collected from Freedom House’s reports on freedom on the net which scrutinizes legislation, court cases and the behaviour of government institutions in 65 countries. The author then discusses similarities and differences between the studied cases and China, concluding that the before mentioned correlation does exist to a certain extent and that further research is required.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 48.
    Blomqvist, Agnes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    'Men-streaming' Disaster Risk Reduction: A qualitative study on male engagement in the context of Disaster Risk Reduction2022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Incorporating gender into disasters and Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) is important given women’s and men’s different needs, vulnerabilities, capacities and roles in the context of disasters. Male engagement or ‘men-streaming’ has gained increased attention in research on gender and development, yet it has been overlooked in the field of DRR. This thesis aims to transfer the discussion on male engagement from development to disasters by studying how ‘men-streaming’ is described in the context of DRR. The analysis will build upon a case-study of the Gender Equality Toolkit by The Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency (MSB). A qualitative content analysis will be the main method for the thesis. The Toolkit will be analyzed using an open analytical framework, consisting of three themes: Men as Vulnerable, Men as Capable and Men as Allies. The results illustrate that all three themes of male engagement are described in gender policy for DRR, with a main focus on men’s vulnerabilities. The contribution of this thesis is the recognition that while men are increasingly seen as vulnerable rather than obstacles in the context of DRR, men’s capacities and allyship to women are not fully included in gender policy.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 49.
    Blomén, Victoria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Representing group interests: A study on the substantive representation of women and minority groups in the Jordanian House of Representatives2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In the world today there is a tendency that women and minority groups are under-represented in political decision-making. In order to come to terms with the under-representation of women and minorities many countries are taking measures to increase the number of women and minority representatives. However,there is an ongoing debate on whether increased number of group representatives lead to increased representation of group interests. The question is if women and minority representatives are more responsive to their respective group’s interests compared to other representatives. In this study, I have conducted asurvey with members of the Jordanian House of Representatives in order to investigate whether women and minority representatives are more responsive to their respective group’s interests compared to other representatives. The survey has been designed to capture representatives’ priorities and attitudes towards certain policy areas and issues. The results from the survey show that women and minority representatives to a certain extent are more responsive to their respective group’s interests compared to other representatives, indicating that an increased number of women and minority representatives would lead to increased representation of women and minority interests. Furthermore,this study finds that female representatives are more responsive to women’s interests when it comes to priorities than when it comes to attitudes, whereas representatives from the Christian minority are more responsive to Christian issues when it comes to attitudes than when it comes to priorities. These results indicate that there are differences between different groups when it comes to the representation of their groups’ interests. Thus, research on one group might not be directly transferable to other groups.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Master thesis Victoria Blomen
  • 50.
    Bogren, Ella
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    “The pain she feels, I don’t feel it, but I feel for her”: A case study of urban teenage schoolboys’ knowledge and attitudes towards menstruation in Ghana2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Menstrual health management can be a difficulty for menstruating women and girls, especially in low- and middle-income countries or other areas of poverty. Menstruation being characterized by stigmatisation, myths and taboo makes it especially troublesome, preventing women and girls to handle their menstruation safely and with dignity. Male attitudes have been argued to play an important role in perpetuating these stigmas and taboos, yet little is known about them. This study sets out to investigate male menstrual knowledge and attitudes, the role of religion in shaping menstrual attitudes and the potential consequences for menstruating women and girls. Qualitative data from group interviews with 24 boys aged 15-19 in a Senior High School in Accra, Ghana is used as basis for analysis. The results are organised along three themes, reflecting the three sub-research questions guiding the study. Findings demonstrate how schoolboys have an elemental understanding of the physiological process of menstruation yet demonstrate a deep understanding of cultural restrictions and the way menstruation may be experienced. Attitudes contain both positive and negative elements, including menstruation as normal and natural on the one hand, and the menstruating girl as unclean and impure on the other. Religion seem to play in important role in perpetuating negative menstrual attitudes, reinforcing the idea of menstruation as impure and unclean. Potential consequences of these attitudes risk menstruation continuing being considered as unclean and impure in addition to be neglected as a “girl’s matter”. However, respondents also identified menstrual difficulties which may foster supportive involvement in menstruation. The findings suggest the importance of continuing to address the surrounding communities of menstruating women and girls, including within and outside of educational and religious institutions.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
1234567 1 - 50 of 482
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf