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  • 1.
    Abdlbari, Abdulbari
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Product registration in e-commerce for small and medium companies (SMEs): Usability aspects2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    People these days are able to buy almost anything online. With a continuously increased E-commerce, small and medium sized companies (SMEs) feel obligated to enter the competitive E-commerce market. Moreover, for small companies with little or no experience in e-commerce it could become overwhelming to get a web-shop up and running. One important tasks in managing a web-shop is to register products into the system. This must be easy and efficient. The focus of this thesis is to answer the question "How can user-centered design principles improve productregistration, particularly in the SME context?". At the start of this study, surveys and interviews were conducted, which showed that product registration is very time consuming at the moment. User tests were conducted to measure the efficiency and the general usability of a system maintaining over 100 active web-shops. Based on the results of the first iteration of the user test conducted, design changes were proposed and implemented. A second iteration of the user test showed improved efficiency and substantially less errors. The most important new design elements were related to navigation, workflow and adjustment of input fields to the data sources. Thus it has been shown that the threshold for SME web-shops to go online can be lowered by a systematic application of user-centered design of the user interface.

  • 2.
    Agadagba, Efeoghene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    The Social Network of Changing Your Mind: 2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    We  are increasingly turn to social media for our news consumption two related media phenomenon that influence media consumption are the “Echo chamber” and “Filter Bubble”. Echo chamber this the phenomenon that we tend to have conversation only with those that has the same likeminded as we do while Filter bubble is created by Social media and information retrieval technology that tends to priorities showing us things it already know we like.

    The aim of this thesis is to suggest design solution for social media that may counter the effect of “Echo chamber” and “Filter Bubble”. The precise method used on this thesis is play centric design method and both intermediate and final evaluations were done through qualitative evaluation.

    At the end a design solution of Viewlette game were presented. It can be concluded that the suggested design solution may have the tendency to counter the effect of Filter bubble and Echo chamber on social networking site by enabling people that has conflicting points of view to still listen to each other and understand an argument from different perspective.

  • 3.
    Ahlberg, Petter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    IKT-användning i undervisningen i ämnet Idrott och hälsa2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 4.
    Akmanlar, Elif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Creating personas from online discussion logs: Case study: Bitcoin users2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Personas are useful design tools that are used for improving the quality of the design and they can be created with the help of various user research methods. However, it is hard for designers to reach out the relevant group of users. Also, it is time and effort consuming to set the interviews & observations with the users and pull the precise information from the gathered data.

    Moreover, users can recall a limited amount of their memories when they are asked unless they are keeping a diary. This study aims to suggest an alternative user research method by figuring out if the online discussions are capable of supplying the necessary information which will be the basis for the Persona. As a result, a set of procedural steps are designed for analyzing the online discussion content and it is implemented to a case where the community is trying to develop the Bitcoin technology and its usage.

    It appeared that discussion logs are such a rich source of information which covers the necessary input for Personas. Finally, Bitcoin users are segmented and five vivid Personas are created.

  • 5.
    Artman, Henrik
    et al.
    Operativa institutionen, Försvarshögskolan, Department of Operational Studies, Swedish National Defence College.
    Persson, Mats
    Operativa institutionen, Försvarshögskolan, Department of Operational Studies, Swedish National Defence College.
    Old Practices – New Technology: Observation of how established practices meet new technology2000In: Designing Cooperative Systems: The Use of Theories and Models- Proc. of the 5th Int. Conf. on the Design of Coop. Syst. (COOP’2000) / [ed] Dieng-Kuntz, R., Giboin, A., Karsenty, L., De Michelis, G., Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2000, Vol. 58, 35-49 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most technology for command and control units is developed from top-down visions and models of an ideal team and technology fit. Such models seldom pay attention to social and historical practises. In Sweden there is a futuristic command and control post under development. The system is intended for civilian and military handling of crises. In spring 1999, a training session was carried out in an elaborated virtual environment. The session was video recorded. In this paper we present and discuss our observations from this session. We have especially focused on the team organisation and use of technology from a bottom-up perspective. As we suspected we found a clash between old practices and what new technology affords. We describe our observations and discuss them in connection to how the system is coupled to external units. One main conclusion is that the team members seem to be more coupled to their subordinate units than to the command and control team.

  • 6.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    New form of social ties through communicating in social media (Sosharu media ga tukuru atarashii kizuna no katachi)2012In: Information and Management  64th Conferenceedings Spring / [ed] Japan Society for Information and Management, 2012, 141-144 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Rethinking ICT's contribution to sustainability and education2012In: New technologies, education for sustainable development and critical pedagogy / [ed] Vassilios Makrakis and Nelly Kostoulas-Makrakis, Rethymnon, Greece: ICTeESD, University of Crete , 2012, 232-235 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The open education system based on Information and communication technology (ICT) can provide great opportunities for people to learn regardless of resident area, language, gender, age and so on. Currently people use it actively and build up new social networks as learning communities or study groups on the Internet. Shared knowledge and the process of sharing knowledge established through online communication are considered as key elements in the context of strengthen the individual and the country. In other words, creating the open education platform and content plays a role of designing a culture and society. However, it is not easy to realize the ideal concept of “open education” because people have many differences in language, culture, political system, ideology, thought, deployment of ICT et cetera. In order to create the open education system, which has a high degree of usability and effectiveness, we need to closely examine social roles and difficulties of the ICT-based education system in designing sustainable societies. And also the ICT-based educational system is established through the continuous human-computer interaction. Therefore, all participants get involved with developing the open education and each of them assumes a responsibility for making the open educational contents more abundant.

  • 8.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Social media as a tool for change2011In: The social impact of social computing / [ed] A. Bisset et al., Sheffield, UK: Sheffield Hallam University , 2011, 44-50 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Social Media as Informal Public Spheres2012In: Creating and applying socially, ethically and professionally acceptable ICT systems: Current challenges and what is next? / [ed] Diane Whitehouse, 2012, 3- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Do social media generate social capital beyond borders between the real and virtual spaces? If so, how do social media function in forming and maintaining social capital? From the beginning of 2011, a huge number of people have seen political turmoil stimulated by use of social media and felt the inner stirrings of people’s cooperative networks via social media. Thus, some people strongly stressed that social media has a great power to change authoritarian regimes from the global political issues perspective. On the other hand, we recognized how social media worked effectively from the local issues perspective, for example in the case of the massive disaster in Japan. Existing media such as TV and newspapers didn’t work well, the Japanese got and exchanged information through social media and in fact some victims were rescued based on information via social media. Both cases, political changes and massive disasters, show information transaction process has been supported by thin trust, generalized reciprocity and loosely tied people’s network, regardless of geographical borders or real/virtual spaces. And some users opened their opinions about governments’ policies or their discontent with the government through social media and discuss with others online. Through this discussing process, it seems that social media plays an important role in fostering a social network leading to social capital. This study reconsiders characteristics of social capital and its role in improving people’s lives through social media. It also examines how social media affects social capital processes, by giving a few examples of using social media under critical social situations.

  • 10.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Social Media Supporting Democratic Dialogue2013In: Ambiguous Technologies: Philosophical Issues, Practical Solutions, Human Nature, Lisbon: Autónoma University , 2013, 36-43 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The term of “social media” appears in newspapers and magazines everyday and the huge number of people use social media actively in daily life. Nowadays, in the highly Information and Communication Technology (ICT) developed country Japan, Japanese people enroll in social media and evolve a new way of communicating with others based on the “virtual” social distance between them. Among social media, Twitter has been focusing on its strong power as the tool for political change recent years. While Twitter has of-expressed problems as well as the “traditional” social media, it is characterized by the limited number of characters, strong propagation and optional reciprocity. Those characteristics stimulate people’s communication online and bring about opportunities for social interaction and democratic dialogue. On the other hand, in the deluge of information, we need to nurture skills to utilize critical and rational way of thinking through dialogue not only between others also between themselves internally. This study explores characteristics of social media and differences between “traditional” social media and Twitter, and how the difference affects people’s information behavior in Japan.

  • 11.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Do social media generate social capital?2012In: ICT, society and human beings / [ed] Gunilla Bradley, Diane Whitehouse and Angela Lin, Lisbon: IADIS Press , 2012, 133-136 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Do social media generate social capital beyond borders between the real and virtual spaces? If so, how do social media function in forming and maintaining social capital? This study is triggered by those simple questions. From the beginning of 2011, a huge number of people have seen political turmoil stimulated by use of social media and felt the inner stirrings of people’s cooperative network via social media. Thus, some people strongly stressed that social media has a great power to change authoritarian regimes from the global political issues perspective. On the other hand, we recognized how social media worked effectively from the local issues perspective, for example in the case of the massive disaster in Japan. Under the critical situation, where existing traditional media like phones, TV, radio and newspapers didn’t work, the Japanese got and exchanged information through social media and in fact some victims were rescued based on information via social media. Both cases, political changes and massive disasters, show information transaction process has been supported by thin trust, generalized reciprocity and loosely tied people’s network, regardless of geographical borders or real/virtual spaces. Therefore it seems that social media plays an important role in fostering a social network leading to social capital. This paper reconsiders characteristics of social capital and its role in improving people’s lives through social media. It also examines how social media influences social capital by giving a few examples of social media and social issues, more specifically, the political turmoil in Tunisia and big earthquake disasters in Japan.

  • 12.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    ICT supported crisis communication and dialog2013In: The possibilities of ethical ICT, Kolding: University of Southern Denmark , 2013, 37-41 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores how people use social media under serious social conditions, and how social media affects people’s behavior after a disaster based on the case of the March 2011 disaster in Japan. In this critical situation, where existing traditional media like phones, television, radio and newspapers did not work well, the Japanese exchanged and received information through social media. In fact some victims were rescued based on information via social media. Corresponding to people’s need, social media provided various services to support people immediately after the disaster. Therefore it seems that social media plays an important role in fostering a social network leading to horizontal communication, critical thinking, dialog; supporting social capital. This study reconsiders characteristics of social capital and its role in improving people’s lives and supporting democratic communication as well as the difficulties in people bonding together through social media.

  • 13.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Regulation of potentially harmful contents on minors2012In: Equity, integrity and beauty in information law and ethics / [ed] Maria Botti, Kerkyra, Greece: Ionian Academy , 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In democratic societies, freedom of expression is the indispensable right and duty of citizens. Although there are a few exceptions, it is generally considered that governments should not intervene and regulate this right. Both in digital and analog environments, sexual and violent descriptions are usually regulated by self-censorship of participants. However, trying to protect minors from potentially harmful contents by controlling and regulating them is very difficult. The definition of what is “potentially harmful contents on minors” varies depending on the values and on the culture of each social group. Moreover, along with the rapid spread of mobile phones and smartphones, it becomes more difficult for parents and teachers to control children’s access to harmful contents; something that might have been easier regarding the use of personal computers. Access to the Internet provides huge opportunities not only of visiting websites but also of participating in online communication such as Social Networking Service (SNS). An incredible surge of SNS evokes some issues in considering juvenile access to SNS, categorized roughly into three types. One is the very old and new problem in accessing the Internet, which is how to shield minors from harmful contents. Second is how to block inappropriate contact with a pedophile. Third is cyber bullying. SNS is a very new medium and its market and technology are evolving drastically and are constantly changing. Thus the agent of taking the lead in making and enforcing rules or self-regulation is still absent. Additionally, SNS services utilize the function of social graph actively, and third parties can provide contents and applications using open API. In response to these situations, European Commission implemented Safer Social Networking Principle for the EU, and United States released the guideline for SNS users and worked on SNS companies and users to promote voluntary efforts for using SNS properly. In Japan, mobile contents companies built the Content Evaluation and Monitoring Association (EMA) as a voluntary reviewing entity. However those measures don’t include any severe legal penalty. Those remain self-regulation relying on voluntary activities of private sectors. On the other hand, self-regulation itself is regulated by laws, social norms, market conditions and technological architectures. In this paper we discuss the conditions of regulation and self-regulation, and we explore some ideas about what would be the best way to regulate SNS.

  • 14.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Robots as companions in feelings and discussions2017In: Retfærdighed – Justice, Robophilosophy / [ed] Martin Mose Bentzen, Copenhagen, 2017, 42-42 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Robots are used in emotional relationships. On the other hand, it is not very common to think that robots can be used as partners in a philosophical dialog. It would be challenging to find the conditions under which a robot can be one of the parts in an emotional relationship or in a Socratic dialog. Robots usable as emotional or philosophical companions need probably to function well at both dimensions, providing continuous and interchanging support for feelings and reasoning. Our aim here is not to investigate the technical possibilities for such a machine but the theoretical requirements and ethical conditions for its creation and use.

  • 15.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Social movement and social media2012In: Critique, democracy and philosophy in 21st century information society: Towards critical theories of social media / [ed] Christian Fuchs, 2012, 76-77 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How do social media affect the process of building a democratic society? Information and communication technology (ICT) made it possible for people to communicate beyond national borders and other obstacles. Social media in particular play an important role in creating a place where people communicate with each other, for example Facebook, MySpace, YouTube and so on. In other words, under these circumstances, social media function as the third place in addition to home and workplaces, which contributes not only to unite people in commu- nities but also to the resolution of various problems and crises. Therefore, the third place nurtures relationships and mutual trust under internet access conditions, and it is open for free discussions, and becomes a ground for democracy.

    In face-to-face communication, participants’ behavior is affected by social context cues, and users let their behavior adjust to particular communication manners. However, in online communicati- on, it is more difficult for participants to understand static and dynamic cues surrounding other participants compared to face-to-face communication. Because, in many cases, whereas social media makes it possible for users to communicate with others easily regardless of physical dis- tance, national boundaries and time difference, it limits the number of characters and the amount of data that they can post and use. However, participation in online communication, especially in social media, is seen as the key element in the recent trend toward democratization. In fact, millions of users send and receive a huge amount of information via social media in order to cultivate a relationship with others and strengthen mutual exchange beyond borders. Generally it is recognized that social media advance participation through exchanging information with minimal social context cues.

    However, communication through social media has some problems. Firstly, exchanged informa- tion via social media minimizes social context cues under severe restricted or censored internet access conditions; because simplified messages can be more understandable and impressive for other users in communicating. Therefore information tends to be extreme, and it could evoke a risk of group polarization. Secondly, in social media, information receivers gather fragmented information in borderless cyberspace, for any purpose. Following this they try to transform infor- mation into something they can understand, something closer to their own experience, or they try to perceive the feelings and experience of the senders of information. Through this process, users develop a sense of solidarity and share expectations and norms, which bring them together as one community. Therefore, social norms have a considerable influence on users in particular communities and advance self-stereotyping among them as solidarity and social identity are en- hanced. This situation carries the social risk of exclusion of others. Some people call Middle-east political change “Facebook revolution” or “twitter revolution” on the internet. Is this naming really pertinent? Indeed, social media has played an important role as “hub for information” and as the third place in political change. Still, social media has to contribute to the development of skills for dialog in order to achieve a really democratic society. 

  • 16.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    The paradoxical nature of privacy2012In: Privacy in the social networked world / [ed] Andrew A. Adams, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Privacy appears to be a very important issue today when ICT permeates more and more aspects of our life. Mainly this is understood as a risk of breaking the privacy of persons, and possibly the privacy of groups, organizations, corporations and states. It is therefore interesting to investigate the main definitions of privacy, try to grasp its nature and to discern its features, and to discuss the possible ways of suitable and needed activities.

     

    There are essentially two types if definitions. One is focused on the protection of information and on the rules that govern openness and protection. Moor (1997), defines privacy like “the expression of a core value, viz., the value of security” or “sometimes used to designate a situation in which people are protected from intrusion or observation by natural or physical circumstances.... In addition to natural privacy there is normative privacy. A normatively private situation is a situation protected by ethical, legal, or conventional norms.” A similar definition is given by Edmund Byrne (1998): Privacy as a “zone of inaccessibility”.

     

    A different approach to the definition of privacy is focused on the control of information, and the main example of this kind of definition is given by Charles Fried (1968): “Privacy is not simply an absence of information about us in the minds of others, rather it is the control we have over information about ourselves”. In the same wavelength we find the definition given by Quinn (2011): “Privacy is a social arrangement that allows individuals to have some level of control over who is able to gain access to their physical selves and their personal information”.

     

    Which of the two lines of definitions is more accurate and fruitful, regarding its power to guide our activities toward the achievement of desired goals? If we make an effort to describe the nature of privacy we can easily and rather fast come to the conclusion that privacy is not only something that has to be protected. Although this is important, underlined by both lines of definitions, it seems that privacy sometimes has to be diminished or invaded in order to satisfy important interests and values. One is to create a bond to another person, group or organization. To achieve this one has to give access to private information, or even to give up part or all limitations toward this special person or organization. It is a matter of trust between each other. The other situation, which is the most common one, is that a person, group or organization, which we may call a separate entity, has always another important interest added to the interest of protecting its own privacy: To break, diminish or invade the privacy of any other entity that is a prospective or actual partner in any sense. It is very important for any entity to acquire access to the information about any other entity that is of some interest.

     

    If we now go back to the definitions of privacy, and look upon them through the glasses of our observations of its nature we may have good arguments to maintain that a definition focused on the control of information is more plausible. Given the controversial nature of privacy (protect it and break it at the same time) and the clashes arising constantly between all entities in a social interaction, the focus cannot be on normative solutions which if they work are always limited to a certain situation, but on the ways skills, methods and tools we use to create, revise and apply policies, guidelines, rules and principles to manage the issues of privacy.

     

    References

    Byrne, E. F. (1998). “Privacy”. Encyclopedia of Applied Ethics, 3, 649-659.

    Fried, C. (1968). “Privacy: A moral analysis”. Yale Law Journal, 77, 475-493.

    Moor, J. (1997). “Towards a theory of privacy in the information age”. Computer and Society, 27, 27-32.

    Quinn, M. J. (2011). Ethics for the Information Age. Boston: Pearson.

  • 17.
    Back, Jon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Designing for Transformative Play2017In: ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, ISSN 1073-0516, E-ISSN 1557-7325, Vol. 24, no 3, 18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerous studies have foregrounded how play is only partially shaped by the artifacts that their designers design. The play activity can change the structures framing it, turning players into co-designers through the mere act of playing. This article contributes to our understanding of how we can design for play taking into account that play has this transformative power. We describe four ways that players can engage with framing structures, which we classify in terms of whether players conform to explore, transgress, or (re)create them. Through the examples of three case studies, we illustrate how this model has been useful in design: as an analytical tool for deconstructing player behavior, to articulate design goals and support specific design choices, and for shaping the design process.

  • 18. Bakardjieva, Maria
    et al.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Karlstads universitet, Avdelningen för medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    Skoric, Marko
    Digital Citizenship and Activism: Questions of Power and Participation Online2012In: eJournal of eDemocracy & Open Government, ISSN 2075-9517, E-ISSN 2075-9517, Vol. 4, no 1, i-iv p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The eJournal of eDemocracy and Open Government (JeDEM) is a peer-reviewed, Open Access journal (ISSN: 2075-9517) published twice a year. It addresses theory and practice in the areas of eDemocracy and Open Government as well as eGovernment, eParticipation, and eSociety. JeDEM publishes ongoing and completed research, case studies and project descriptions that are selected after a rigorous blind review by experts in the field.

  • 19.
    Chen, Yingjie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Exploring Consumers’ Payment Behaviours atCompleting Micro-Transactions withVending Machines in Sweden2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis empirically investigated factors that affect consumers’ choice of paymentoptions including cash, credit card and mobile payment, in completingmicro-transactions with vending machines. For the purpose, a theory-informedqualitative study was conducted through semi-structured interviews in combinationwith observations. As a result, we found that consumers choose cash/coins as apriority payment with vending machines because they are traditionally perceived ascash-operated machines. However, since Sweden is moving toward a cashless society,credit card is suggested to be the most compatible with the purchase habit of Swedishpeople. Despite the compatibility, credit card payment with vending machines isperceived as insecure because of vagueness of transaction, pay without pin code andpotential risk of financial fraud. For mobile payment, the findings suggest thatperceived advantage of using mobile payment with vending machines are efficiency,security and privacy. Several barriers to consumers’ acceptance of mobile payment are also identified, which includes complexity and the lack of social influences.

  • 20.
    Dashevska, Julia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    What are the success strategies for changing behaviour?: An explorative intervention study of an application based and a non-application based approach for reducing smartphone overuse with focus on persuasive design 2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    With the growing role the smartphone technology is gaining in our daily life the concerned voices about its negative impacts on human social skills, social interactions and mental health are getting louder. Smartphone use has become a habit not at least due to high access to different kind of rewards provided by this technology. In this thesis, a qualitative explorative study analyses two approaches, an application based and a non-application based, in their ability to deal with the subjectively perceived smartphone overuse in order to find weaknesses and advantages behind those approaches. The study design is based on behaviour change theories such as the Goal-Setting Theory, the Social Cognitive Theory, and the Cognitive Dissonance Theory and on the persuasive design strategies. The results of the five weeks long intervention study, during which eight participants tried both approaches in a within-group design setup, suggests that a combination of an application based and a non-application based intervention could be more beneficial than relying on technology alone in order to support the user with means to reduce the smartphone overuse. The results furthermore suggest that the application based approach functioned well as an eye opener and as an incentive to prepare participants to take own actions. 

  • 21.
    Enqvist, Juulia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Developing an understanding of users through an insights generation model: How insights about users can be generated from a variety of sources available in an organization2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    User centered design is a process which aims to understand user needs and desires by using different tools and methods. This is challenging in the industry as companies have different goals compared to the academic discipline of user centered design. As companies have different goals, common UCD methods which are used in the academic field are often not used. Therefore, there is a gap in how UCD is done in practice compared to theory. Designers and user experience specialists must use the tools which are available, capitalize on the opportunity to use existing resources in the organization in order to understand users and their needs.

    Insights explain the why and the motivation of the consumer or user, and they are less apparent and intangible, hidden truths that result from continuous digging. Insights can be draw from several different sources, from data and qualitative sources. This thesis investigates from what available sources in an organization can insights be generated from in order to understand users and design better experiences, specifically from the organizations perspective. The purpose is not only to understand users but to drive the organization’s objectives and goals.

    This thesis uses an innovative collaborative workshop methodology, working with digital designers, to answer the research questions and as a result presents an insights generation model. The research has been specifically conducted for an organization, and from their available sources, but the methodology and model creation has the potential to be used in similar settings, domains or projects.

  • 22.
    Glöss, Mareike
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Christian Kehr, Peter Schüßler and Marc-Denis Weitze (eds.) Neue Technologien in der Gesellschaft. Akteure, Erwartungen, Kontroversen und Konjunkturen2012In: Tecnoscienza - Italian Journal of Science and Technology Studies, ISSN 2038-3460, Vol. 3, no 2, 180-183 p.Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Glöss, Mareike
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Technology Encounters: Exploring the essence of ordinary computing2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As computing technology has become a vital part of everyday life, studies have increasingly scrutinized the underlying meaning of computational things. As different devices become interwoven with daily practices and routines, there is a growing interest in understanding not only their functional meaning in computational terms but also their meaning in relation to other non-computation artefacts.

    This thesis investigates how people relate to artefacts and how their individual values and attitudes affect this relationship.  The analysis is based on four ethnographic studies, which look at the richness of ordinary interactions with technology to understand the impact of technology upon practice and experience.

    The process through which humans develop a relationship to artefacts is framed as a continuous series of encounters, through which the individual constantly reshapes their relationship to things.  Artefacts are seen as lines in the mesh of everyday life, and the encounters are the intersections between lines. This approach–grounded in phenomenology and paired with an anthropological understanding of everyday life–reconceptualises understanding of the processes of adaption, meaning-making, disposing and recycling. The work reveals how human relations to all kinds of things–in the form of meaning–is continually transforming. Core to this understanding is the cultural relative essence that becomes perceived of the artefacts themselves. This essence deeply affects the way we encounter and thus interact with technology, as well as objects more broadly. In the daily interaction with computing devices we can observe that computing technology alters the mesh on a different level than non-computational artefacts: digital interfaces pull our lines together, bundle experiences an affect how we encounter the material and the social world. This enables computing devices to have meanings distinct from non-computing technology. To go further, computing is itself a mode of existence – a crucial difference in things that helps us understand the complexity of the material world.

    List of papers
    1. The Value of Things: Cultural Context in the Design of Digital Materiality
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Value of Things: Cultural Context in the Design of Digital Materiality
    2012 (English)In: Proceedings of the 7th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Making Sense Through Design, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2012, 751-756 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the diffusion of computing in all areas of everyday life comes a need for re-thinking the design process in order to account for the changing meaning of digital technologies. This paper argues that there is a need to factor the cultural value that digital artifacts get assigned by users into the design process. Therefore a theoretical framework is developed that builds on phenomenology and Bourdieu's concept of habitus. Main objective is thereby to connect the individual experience with a cultural context and connect micro- and macro-perspective. This framework then builds the foundation for a model that accounts for the heterogeneity of values that artifacts get assigned.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2012
    Keyword
    Design research, phenomenology, ubiquitous computing, experiential computing, materiality
    National Category
    Human Aspects of ICT
    Research subject
    Human-Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-191831 (URN)10.1145/2399016.2399132 (DOI)978-1-4503-1482-4 (ISBN)
    Conference
    NordiCHI 2012, 14th-17th October, 2012, Copenhagen, DENMARK
    Available from: 2013-01-16 Created: 2013-01-14 Last updated: 2016-08-26Bibliographically approved
    2. Exploring meaning and values in artefacts: A case example of the family car
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring meaning and values in artefacts: A case example of the family car
    (English)Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we describe interactions between families and their artefacts in the car using data from ethnographic work with eight families. We see how artefacts - through the interactions and practices around them and affected by family values - develop meaning over time. Outgoing from that artefacts are embedded in the socially dense environment of the car, we scrutinize the relationship between users and artefacts and the environment they are interacting in. Drawing on concepts from the field of material culture we show that the relationship between user and artefact is constituted through individual values and dispositions as they are reflected in everyday interactions with materiality. We observe that artefact interactions are closely tied with changing family dynamics, issues around technology appropriation and prevailing values and parenting practices. Our analysis points to the deliberation of the role of critical, value-based design for the design for families. 

    Keyword
    Car, family, meaning, materiality
    National Category
    Human Aspects of ICT
    Research subject
    Human-Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-301106 (URN)
    Note

    Manuscript submitted for publication

    Available from: 2016-08-18 Created: 2016-08-18 Last updated: 2016-08-26
    3. Connectedness in Mobile Families: Digital and Material Flows of Practices in the Home
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Connectedness in Mobile Families: Digital and Material Flows of Practices in the Home
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In modern day economy, families often have to be geographically flexible and within families computational technology plays a crucial role in making a home, even when far away from their place of origin. We report on an ethnographic study investigating the role of ICT for connectedness in a family context. In order to understand how families are dealing with relocation in their everyday life, we analyze situated material practices and discuss how expat families create a sense of connectedness through the procurement and maintenance of physical as well as digital artifacts. We show in particular how the roles of virtually procured artifacts, such as movies or music content, is tightly connected to but also different from the tangible ‘stuff’ that is a crucial part of home-making. This leads to a different role of ICT in the material fabric of the modern family home and at the same time to new challenges and challenges and potentials whendesigning for connectedness.

    National Category
    Human Aspects of ICT
    Research subject
    Human-Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-301107 (URN)
    Available from: 2016-08-18 Created: 2016-08-18 Last updated: 2016-08-26
    4. Designing for Labour: Uber and the On-Demand Mobile Workforce
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Designing for Labour: Uber and the On-Demand Mobile Workforce
    2015 (English)In: 34Th Annual Chi Conference On Human Factors In Computing Systems, Chi 2016, 2015, 1632-1643 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Apps allowing passengers to hail and pay for taxi service on their phone– such as Uber and Lyft–have affected the livelihood of thousands of workers worldwide. In this paper we draw on interviews with traditional taxi drivers, rideshare drivers and passengers in London and San Francisco to understand how “ride-sharing” transforms the taxi business. With Uber, the app not only manages the allocation of work, but is directly involved in ‘labour issues’: changing the labour conditions of the work itself. We document how Uber driving demands new skills such as emotional labour, while increasing worker flexibility. We discuss how the design of new technology is also about creating new labour opportunities – jobs – and how we might think about our responsibilities in designing these labour relations. 

    Keyword
    On demand labour, sharing economy, uber, ridesharing, on-demand labour, transport, labour issues
    National Category
    Interaction Technologies Human Aspects of ICT
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-276270 (URN)10.1145/2858036.2858476 (DOI)000380532901062 ()9781450333627 (ISBN)
    Conference
    34th Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI4GOOD), MAY 07-12, 2016, San Jose, CA, USA
    Available from: 2016-02-10 Created: 2016-02-10 Last updated: 2017-01-24Bibliographically approved
    5. Stuck in-between: Embracing the ‘messiness’ of Internet of Things at home
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stuck in-between: Embracing the ‘messiness’ of Internet of Things at home
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Human Aspects of ICT
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-301108 (URN)
    Available from: 2016-08-18 Created: 2016-08-18 Last updated: 2016-08-26
    6. The tablet computer as a family canvas
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The tablet computer as a family canvas
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Human Aspects of ICT
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-301109 (URN)
    Available from: 2016-08-18 Created: 2016-08-18 Last updated: 2016-08-26
  • 24.
    Glöss, Mareike
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    The Value of Things: Cultural Context in the Design of Digital Materiality2012In: Proceedings of the 7th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Making Sense Through Design, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2012, 751-756 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the diffusion of computing in all areas of everyday life comes a need for re-thinking the design process in order to account for the changing meaning of digital technologies. This paper argues that there is a need to factor the cultural value that digital artifacts get assigned by users into the design process. Therefore a theoretical framework is developed that builds on phenomenology and Bourdieu's concept of habitus. Main objective is thereby to connect the individual experience with a cultural context and connect micro- and macro-perspective. This framework then builds the foundation for a model that accounts for the heterogeneity of values that artifacts get assigned.

  • 25.
    Glöss, Mareike
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Cycil, Chandrika
    Exploring meaning and values in artefacts: A case example of the family carArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we describe interactions between families and their artefacts in the car using data from ethnographic work with eight families. We see how artefacts - through the interactions and practices around them and affected by family values - develop meaning over time. Outgoing from that artefacts are embedded in the socially dense environment of the car, we scrutinize the relationship between users and artefacts and the environment they are interacting in. Drawing on concepts from the field of material culture we show that the relationship between user and artefact is constituted through individual values and dispositions as they are reflected in everyday interactions with materiality. We observe that artefact interactions are closely tied with changing family dynamics, issues around technology appropriation and prevailing values and parenting practices. Our analysis points to the deliberation of the role of critical, value-based design for the design for families. 

  • 26.
    Glöss, Mareike
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Giaccardi, Elisa
    Robbins, Holly
    D'Olivo, Patricia
    Karana, Elvin
    Connectedness in Mobile Families: Digital and Material Flows of Practices in the HomeManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In modern day economy, families often have to be geographically flexible and within families computational technology plays a crucial role in making a home, even when far away from their place of origin. We report on an ethnographic study investigating the role of ICT for connectedness in a family context. In order to understand how families are dealing with relocation in their everyday life, we analyze situated material practices and discuss how expat families create a sense of connectedness through the procurement and maintenance of physical as well as digital artifacts. We show in particular how the roles of virtually procured artifacts, such as movies or music content, is tightly connected to but also different from the tangible ‘stuff’ that is a crucial part of home-making. This leads to a different role of ICT in the material fabric of the modern family home and at the same time to new challenges and challenges and potentials whendesigning for connectedness.

  • 27.
    Glöss, Mareike
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    McGregor, Moira
    Stockholm Univ, Mobile Life, SE-164 Kista, Sweden.
    Brown, Barry
    Stockholm Univ, Mobile Life, SE-164 Kista, Sweden.
    Designing for Labour: Uber and the On-Demand Mobile Workforce2015In: 34Th Annual Chi Conference On Human Factors In Computing Systems, Chi 2016, 2015, 1632-1643 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Apps allowing passengers to hail and pay for taxi service on their phone– such as Uber and Lyft–have affected the livelihood of thousands of workers worldwide. In this paper we draw on interviews with traditional taxi drivers, rideshare drivers and passengers in London and San Francisco to understand how “ride-sharing” transforms the taxi business. With Uber, the app not only manages the allocation of work, but is directly involved in ‘labour issues’: changing the labour conditions of the work itself. We document how Uber driving demands new skills such as emotional labour, while increasing worker flexibility. We discuss how the design of new technology is also about creating new labour opportunities – jobs – and how we might think about our responsibilities in designing these labour relations. 

  • 28.
    Glöss, Mareike
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    McMillan, Donald
    Cycil, Chandrika
    Tollmar, Konrad
    The tablet computer as a family canvasManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Glöss, Mareike
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    Stuck in-between: Embracing the ‘messiness’ of Internet of Things at homeManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Gong, Liang
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Adding software downloading tasks toLEGO-based assembly simulators for on-sitetraining2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 31.
    Husain, Safa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Online communication between home and school: Case study: Improving the usability of the Unikum e-service in the primary schools of Tierp municipality2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis project, focus on the use of Internet and new media as an online communication to improve the caregiver-pupil-school partnership. In particular the usability of the e-service is investigated by studying a real example: the Unikum system as it is used in Tierps municipality.

    The Unikum e-service is used in many primary schools in different municipalities in Sweden for communication and cooperation between caregivers-pupils and school.

    The aim is to assess the usability of the Unikum e-service in the particular context of Tierps municipality, find out about the benefits of using it, finding the problems that are there, and also to try to design solutions to improve the usability for the e-service.

  • 32. Islam, Nazrul
    et al.
    Tétard, Franck
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Information Systems.
    Exploring the Impact of Interface Signs' Interpretation Accuracy, Design, and Evaluation on Web Usability: A Semiotic Perspective2014In: Journal of Systems and Information Technology, Vol. 16, no 4, 250-276 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose– The purpose of this empirical study was to address two important concerns of Web usability: how user-intuitive interface signs affect Web usability and how applying semiotics (i.e. the doctrine of signs) in user interface (UI) design and evaluation helps to improve usability.

    Design/methodology/approach– An empirical research approach is followed here to conduct three user tests. These tests were conducted on a Web application with 17 test participants. Data were gathered through laboratory-based think-aloud usability test, questionnaires and interviews. Following an empirical research approach, statistics and user behavior analysis were used to analyze the data.

    Findings– This study explores two important concerns of UI design and evaluation. First, users’ interpretation accuracy of interface signs impact on Web usability. The study found that users’ interpretation of signs might be accurate, moderate, conflicting, erroneous or incapable; user-intuitive interface signs led participants to interpret signs’ meaning accurately; and users’ inaccurate interpretation of one or a few task-related interface sign(s) led users to usability problems, resulting in participants performing tasks with lower task-completion performance. Second, considering semiotics perception in UI design and evaluation is important to improve Web usability. This study showed that interface signs, when re-designed considering the semiotics guidelines, have increased the end-users’ interpretation accuracy and the interface signs’ intuitiveness. This study also provides a small set of semiotics guidelines for sign design and evaluation.

    Originality/value– This study empirically demonstrated that signs’ intuitiveness impact on Web usability and that considering the semiotics perception in sign design and evaluation is important to improve Web usability. These outcomes are valuable in a number of ways to HCI researchers and practitioners: the results provide awareness of the importance of user-intuitive interface signs in UI design; practitioners can easily adopt the concept of interpretation accuracy classification to conduct a sign test to obtain an “overall impression of interface signs’ intuitiveness”; practitioners can easily adopt the methodological approach followed in this study to conduct usability test without additional resources; and the results raised important fundamental questions for future research such as “what does a practitioner need to be aware of when designing or evaluating interface signs?”

  • 33.
    Ivanova, Vita
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Open acess to customer product information? A case study of Ericsson Radio Base Station CPIs.2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Ericsson is a Swedish technology company that provides and operates telecommunication networks,television and video systems and related services in the world.A Case study of Ericsson Radio Base Station CPIs is a research work about technical informationavailability problems on Internet.According to customer product information standards, specific company’s divisions are responsible formeaningful technical information content creation and diffusion to the end user.The main research question is what information related to Ericsson RBS can be found on the Internetand what possible solutions should Ericsson offer to these groups in terms of technical informationavailability?An Internet analysis showed that on Internet appears user generated content about RBS 6000 in a wayof video instructions, manuals selling and consultation giving.This situation shows that users are interested and need information related to technical equipment, buton the other hand it is essentially illegal to spread information this way, and it might have seriousconsequences in terms of misuse or misinterpretation of information.This thesis is investigating Ericsson information sharing traditions in relation to the situation of openinformation on the Internet. Some recommendations for further work are given.

  • 34.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Assessing and acquiring ethical leadership competence2012In: Leadership through the Classics: leadership and management in a changing world - lessons from ancient eastern and western philosophy / [ed] Gregory P. Prastacos, Fuming Wang, Klas Eric Soderquist, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2012, 389-400 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Leaders need the ability to handle any moral problem that may arise 5during their professional activities; they need ethical competence. Ethical skill is, in 6psychology and in accordance to the classical philosophical position, understood as 7the basis and the aim of ethical competence of leaders. Based on that, we can 8construct valid assessment tools and training programs that support the acquisition 9and use of ethical competence and skills.

  • 35.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Assessing usability of IT systems2012In: Ergonomics for sustainability and growth / [ed] Antonsson, Ann-Beth; Hägg, Göran M., Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Personal skills and group processes are necessary in the production of knowledge to design and manage usable systems. AvI is a questionnaire that correlates these parameters of usability to utility and work environment. The main goal of AvI is to create a description of the processes that are necessary to achieve good usability: user participation, knowledge support, networking for coordination and cooperation etc, defined as philosophizing processes at personal and group levels. AvI’s ambition is to indicate whether the preconditions for these processes are present in an organization, to allow these to arise and to function in a satisfying and fruitful way. The evaluation of AvI showed that reliability coefficients and correlations to independent criteria were high, supporting the original hypothesis: AvI can be used to acquire information about the above parameters of an IT system’s usability in an easy and quick way. Although AvI only provides an indicative value, such a diagnosis of the usability of an organization’s IT infrastructure is valuable as an alert and to determine the extent of further initiatives.

  • 36.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    How to handle issues of security and privacy2013In: ICT-ethics: Sweden and Japan, Linköping: LiU Tryck , 2013, 54-60 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Different ways to approach privacy and security are critically examined. The main question is how definitions may help us in our efforts to handle these issues in real life and allow us to create suitable and working system designs and policies. Given the controversial nature of privacy and security, and based on philosophical theory and psychological research, we have to focus on the ways, skills, methods and tools we adopt in order to create, revise and apply policies, guidelines, designs, rules and principles.

  • 37.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    ICT and sustainability: skills and methods for dialogue and policy making2015In: Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, ISSN 1477-996X, E-ISSN 1758-8871, Vol. 13, no 1, 13-18 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present an overview and to discuss the following issues: most often, discussions about Information and communication technology (ICT) sustainability focus on environmental issues; however, there are other aspects referring to ICT internal sustainability and to its role as a tool in managing general sustainability issues. The way to handle ICT sustainability issues is also significant.

    Design/methodology/approach: The paper discusses and investigates various aspects of ICT sustainability, and of methods to handle these issues and make decisions.

    Findings: Classical philosophy and psychological empirical research on decision-making demonstrate the way to take care of ICT sustainability issues. This way is philosophizing, which has to be trained and supported for people and organizations involved to acquire the necessary skills and to use suitable methods.

    Originality/value: The paper highlights other significant aspects of ICT sustainability rather than the environmental impact alone. It also proposes focus on the way ICT sustainability issues are handled rather than focus on normative or ideological aspects of it.

  • 38.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    ICT as a horsefly2012In: Critique, Democracy and Philosophy in 21st Century Information Society: Towards Critical Theories of Social Media / [ed] Christian Fuchs, 2012, 38-38 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The way we solve problems and make decisions has been at the focus of philosophy. Since ancient times the issue has been how to think in the right way. Skills, abilities, methods and processes have been investigated. According to Platon philosophers do not have the right answers but they can find the right answers. They have the skills and they can use the right tools to discard false ideas (aporia). Philosophers think and act in a democratic way among themselves. But anybody who has the ability to philosophize, to think self-critically, systematically, scientifically, i.e. has the Aristotelian virtue of phronesis or the Kantian skill of autonomy, and acts according to this, belongs to a democracy together with other like people. Unfortunately, this is not the only definition of democracy. Although democracy itself is a process, the common sense definition is either result oriented or focused on formalistic aspects, or a combination of both. The first means that societies providing high living standards, security, tolerance, good environment and other goods are called democratic. The second definition is based on the existence of certain procedures, institutions, roles and processes, like elections. The presence of formal procedures is sufficient for a democracy definition. But if democracy is a process neither the result of it nor its formal surface characteristics should have the highest significance. Maintaining and running the democratic process is the important aspect as well as the conditions supporting it. By saying this we are back to the philosophical discussion. In essence democracy is dialog between people. That means that people search for solutions to their problems by thinking together with others. But that presupposes that each person has a dialog with himself and that each person starts with the position that own ideas and beliefs need to be better (aporia). This makes it possible to listen to others. Each participant in a democratic process, or a dialog, feels always the need of other participants because he is expecting them to help him and together with other able people find a better idea (phronesis, autonomy).ICT can contribute to this process by making information accessible and therefore facilitating citizens’ participation in political decision making. It can support openness and by that invite people to be more aware and active. Furthermore, it can support horizontal communication among citizens. Issues that are of interest to few people or to people that for some reason have difficulties to contact each other by traditional means may be neglected in the political process even though they are important. ICT can easily overcome such difficulties and provide a powerful tool to connect, inform and coordinate people’s actions. Most important, ICT can support self-critical and systematic thinking, which is the base for successful democratic dialog. ICT systems are currently used to create aporia and to stimulate autonomy during a process of problem solving and decision making. Advanced games simulate the complexity of reality in micro worlds, broadening the spectrum of opportunities and possibilities to support dialog.

  • 39.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Leaders as philosophers2011In: EBEN Annual Conference 2011 / [ed] L. Van Liedekerke, Antwerp: Universiteit Antwerpen , 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A leader has to be a philosopher able to make decisions that other people trust. Leaders need ethical competence, which is the ability of a decision maker to use the right way to think in front of a moral problem. This approach is based on classical philosophy as well as on the findings of psychological research on moral problem solving and decision making. Building on that a training program was developed containing four blocks of seventeen exercises. Participants coming from different organizations used the exercises on their own professional problems. After training, participants showed higher scores on ethical autonomy up to two and a half years later. The results showed clearly that the participants used their new skills in their real professional life and that they were very satisfied.

  • 40.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Philosophizing as a usability method2013In: Ambiguous Technologies: Philosophical Issues, Practical Solutions, Human Nature / [ed] E. Buchanan, P. B. de Laat, H. T. Tavani and J. Klucarich, Lisbon: The International Society of Ethics and Information Technology , 2013, 194-201 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ways of handling problems of IT systems usability and problems of ethics are similar to each other. Working with usability leads most often to the need of discussing problems of ethics, and today’s issues of ethics are mostly related to IT. The nature of IT and ethics seems to be very close to each other. Ready-made answers cannot be found and any solution proposed is easily contested. IT design and use have a strong connection to values. With classical and modern philosophy as a foundation, and based on psychological research on ethical decision making, it is suggested to focus on the way to take care of issues rather than on normative aspects or on the construction and application of usability standards and guidelines. It appears that the method used to handle problems in these areas is of crucial importance; and this is also common to both of them.

  • 41.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Robots and systems as autonomous ethical agents2010In: INTECH 2010: Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Intelligent Technologies / [ed] V. Kreinovich, J. Daengdej and T. Yeophantong, Bangkok: Assumption University , 2010, 5-9 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IT systems and robots can help us to solve many problems caused by the quantity, variation and complexity of information; because we need to handle dangerous and risky situations; or because of our social and emotional needs like elderly care. In helping us, these systems have to make decisions and act accordingly to achieve the goals for which they were built. Ethical decision support tools can be integrated into robots and other decision making systems to secure that decisions are made according to the basic theories of philosophy and to the findings of psychological research.  This can be done, in non-independent systems, as a way for the system to report to its operator, and to support the operator's ethical decision making. On the other hand, fully independent systems should be able to regulate their own decision making strategies and processes. However, this cannot be based on normative predefined criteria, or on the ability to make choices, or on having own control, or on ability of rational processing.  It seems that it is necessary for an independent robot or decision system to have "emotions." That is, a kind of ultimate purposes that can lead the decision process, and depending on the circumstances, guide the adoption of a decision strategy, whatever it may be, rational, heuristic or automatic.

  • 42.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Adams, Andrew A.
    Cantre for Business Ethics, Meiji University, Tokyo, Japan.
    Murata, Kiyoshi
    School of Commerce, Meiji University, Tokyo, Japan.
    Snowden’s revelations and the attitudes of students at Swedish universities2017In: Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, ISSN 1477-996X, E-ISSN 1758-8871, Vol. 15, no 3, 247-264 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This study aims to map Swedish students’ attitudes towards Snowden’s revelations and their effects in the political and socio-cultural environment of Sweden.

    Design/methodology/approach – A questionnaire was answered by 190 Swedish university students. The quantitative responses to the survey and qualitative considerations of free text answers were statistically analysed.

    Findings – Swedish students had a high level of knowledge about the Snowden revelations; they actively searched for information, gave a positive judgement of Snowden’s actions and were willing to follow his example in Sweden, although not in the USA. They trusted their country and most of its institutions and authorities except for secret service agencies and the internet and computer software companies.

    Practical implications – This study could be used as a design of education for university students, especially in information technology programmes.

    Social implications – The study can be used for developing and applying policies on privacy, surveillance and whistle-blowing.

    Originality/value – This study is part of a bigger international study to map students’ attitudes towards Snowden’s revelations and their opinions about privacy, surveillance and whistle-blowing opening up for cross-cultural analyses.

  • 43.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Can machines make ethical decisions?2013In: Artificial Intelligence Applications and Innovations, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2013, 693-699 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Methods for IT security and privacy2013In: ICT, society and human beings / [ed] P. Kommers and C. Gauzente, Prague: IADIS Press, 2013, 155-158 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The similar nature of IT security, privacy and ethics, and the difficulty to find ready-made answers, put the focus on theway one handles the problems in these areas. Philosophy has analyzed this issue in depth and it has given us thephilosophical method as the means to find satisfying solutions. Psychology has shown in empirical research what skillsare necessary for this purpose. Since the issues of IT security, privacy and ethics are very important for us today, we needto create and use tools and methods to take care of them.

  • 45.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Laaksoharju, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Tools and methods for security: Stimulating the skill to philosophize2013In: European Intelligence and Security Informatics Conference: 2013, IEEE Computer Society, 2013, 163-165 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Finding optimal solutions to security issues is verydifficult or impossible. Conflicting interests and values decidewhat has to be done. Every thinkable answer contains both risksand possibilities. I our effort to find solutions we have always tonegotiate and make compromises. A dialectic process is necessaryin security in order to identify significant interests and values,and to formulate principles and policies. Handling security issuesand working for secure IT systems demand continuousadjustment to relevant values as well as the necessary personalskills and suitable group processes. Focusing on the method andmaking sure that the right way of proceeding has been adopted isthe way to get satisfactory answers to the problems of IT security.The philosophical method of deliberative thinking seems to be thebasis of such methods.

  • 46.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Gulliksen, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Informal learning in IT-use: Cognitive support as an operational strategy1999In: Human Centered Processes / [ed] P. Lenca, Brest: ENST Bretagne and Centre Universitaire , 1999, 29-35 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Laaksoharju, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Computerized support of personal and group skills for sustainability2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present a collaborative tool to facilitate and structure dialogue about concrete issues in sustainability, We have experienced that the tool is remarkably powerful in stimulating the inquiry in complex issues by constantly forcing the user to shift focus between the particular and the holistic. The design of the tool is theoretically founded in philosophy and knowledge about the psychological mechanisms, like cognitive biases, that are involved in decision making. It is based on the assumption that people are not making judgments in isolation, but rather in social settings. Problems that involve many people, a trait that questions of sustainability share with ethics, can only be solved by answering questions about how these are affecting the problem situation and how these are affected by any proposed solution. The main advantage with such a tool is that it supplies a shared platform in which an analysis can evolve organically, even in collaboration with competing parties. Policy makers can get help to understand how arguments have been applied in concrete situations and how people and values can be affected by different courses of action. The structure of the tool invites to a proactive, concrete, solution-oriented dialogue where premises are made explicit and thus possible to address.

  • 48.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Laaksoharju, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Training and supporting education in sustainability by the use of an ICT tool2012In: New technologies, education for sustainable development and critical pedagogy / [ed] Vassilios Makrakis and Nelly Kostoulas-Makrakis, Rethymnon, Greece: ICTeESD, University of Crete , 2012, 225-231 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we will present ColLab, a collaborative computerized tool to facilitate dialogue about concrete issues in sustainability. The tool is powerful in stimulating the inquiry in complex issues by constantly forcing the user to shift focus between the particular and the holistic. The design of the tool is theoretically founded in philosophy and knowledge about the psychological mechanisms, like cognitive biases, that are involved in decision making. It is based on the assumption that people are not making judgments in isolation, but rather in social settings. The main advantage with such a tool is that it supplies a shared platform in which an analysis can evolve organically, even in collaboration with competing parties. It is suitable for using in learning environments and for educational purposes as well as for formulation of sustainability policies.

  • 49.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Laaksoharju, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    What are ethical agents and how can we make them work properly?2011In: The computational turn: Past, presetns, futures? / [ed] Charles Ess and Ruth Hagengruber, Münster: MV-Wissenschaft , 2011, 151-153 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To support ethical decision making in autonomous agents, we suggest to implement decision tools based on classical philosophy and psychological research. As one possible avenue, we present EthXpert, which supports the process of structuring and assembling information about situations with possible moral implications.

  • 50.
    Kilicbay, Can
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Taking a step forward: Operator Oriented Solutions for the Future of the Assembly Industry2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study targets assembly industry, which deals with varying businesses that require any product assembly. It reflects on the challenges of the current production lines at assembly industry regarding the trends of both the consumer and the industrial developments on technology investigated which aspects can be improved or re-designed under the given delimitations. Moreover further consideration is done on human operators’ role in the assembly line and their future role in correlation with their current challenges and expectations. Results and further analysis are done from the drift of the R&D on future assembly environment by considering interconnected software-hardware-human sides of the interaction, the change in the balance of products and also to point out new areas of research to Marketing and R&D Departments.

1234 1 - 50 of 166
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