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  • 1.
    Ahlkvist, Felix
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology.
    Hjälp alla så långt du förmår!: En undersökning av Arthur Schopenhauers etik2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The subject of this thesis is the ethics of German 19th century philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer. The study examines Schopenhauer’s ethics and investigates his criticism of the ethics of his older German colleague Immanuel Kant. By arguing that all true morally acceptable and good actions originate from compassion, Schopenhauer distinguishes his view from the deontological ethics held by Kant. The study focuses on Schopenhauer’s view on the basis of morals. Its purpose is to consider an ethical perspective that interconnect moral considerations with human empathy. By comparing the arguments presented by these two philosophers one can get a clearer view of the extent to which Schopenhauer’s criticism of Kant’s ethics is justified. In the analysis, five major parts of Schopenhauer’s criticism are identified and studied one by one. The findings suggest that Schopenhauer’s ethics and the ethics of Kant can be represented as two different ethical paradigms.

  • 2.
    Algander, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Ethics and Social Philosophy.
    Variabilism is not the solution to the asymmetry2015In: Thought: a journal of philosophy, ISSN 2161-2234, Vol. 4, no 1, 1-9 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to “the asymmetry”, the fact that a future person would have a life not worth living counts against bringing that person into existence but the fact that a future person would have a life worth living does not count in favour of bringing that person into existence. While this asymmetry seems intuitive, it is also puzzling: if we think that it is of moral importance to prevent people from living lives not worth living, shouldn’t we also that it is of moral importance to create people with lives worth living? Melinda Roberts has suggested a view, “Variabilism”, which she argues solves this problem. I argue that Variabilism fails as a solution to the asymmetry. First, Variabilism relies on a particular distinction between gains and losses which is at least as puzzling as the asymmetry itself. Second, in some cases Variabilism is incompatible with the asymmetry. In these cases, the fact that a person would have a life worth living does count in favour of creating her.

  • 3.
    Ancillotti, Mirko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Centre for Research Ethics and Bioethics.
    John Harris. Persona, potenzialità e pre-persona2013In: Sintesi Dialettica, ISSN 2037-2957, Vol. 6, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [it]

    Secondo la nozione sviluppata da John Harris è da considerare persona l’individuo che dimostri la capacità di concepire se stesso in differenti tempi e luoghi e che sia capace di desiderare di fare esperienza di una vita a cui assegna un valore. Tale concezione viene analizzata ricostruendone la genesi, chiarendo quali criteri sottendono le scelte effettuate. L’elaborazione teorica di Harris viene posta a confronto con altre due formulazioni contemporanee, sviluppate rispettivamente da Peter Singer e Vittorio Possenti. Nell’ultima parte sono stati approfonditi criticamente due concetti che emergono dalla descrizione di Harris della persona e che sono ad essa collegati, ossia i concetti di potenzialità e pre-persona.

  • 4.
    Ancillotti, Mirko
    Graduate student, University of Pisa.
    The Value of the Pre-Person: Potentiality, Person-Maker Criteria, and Social Dimension2013In: Journal of Philosophy of Life, ISSN 2185-4505, E-ISSN 2185-4505, Vol. 3, no 3, 190-201 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a sense in distinguishing persons from other beings. Persons are forms of life towards whom an agent should feel morally responsible to the highest degree. The aim of this paper is to try and respond to the question: what line of conduct should we adopt with regard to those beings that are not persons but that we have well-founded reasons for thinking may be so in the future? The pre-persons are not, neither should they be considered as they were, persons. If we decide to guarantee their existence or well-being this decision must be based on considerations that are independent of their ontological constitution, of their actual biological status, and of the concept of potentiality. This decision can be taken only accounting for social aspects involved in the consideration of what a person is.

  • 5.
    Andersson, Dan-Erik
    et al.
    Lund university.
    Lennerfors, Thomas Taro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Etik2011Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Etik handlar om gott och ont, om rätt och fel. Men det är svårt att veta vad som är gott och rätt. Hela vår tillvaro är fylld av situationer som ställer oss inför etiska frågor och problem. Vilket ansvar har vi gemensamt för att människor tvingas bo på gatan eller att sjukvården inte kommer alla till del? Utifrån tre utgångspunkter – gränsöverskridande, mångfald och ambivalens – vill författarna visa vad som har gjorts och vad man kan göra med etikbegreppet.

  • 6.
    Andersson, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Ethics.
    Animal and Human Subjectivity in Cixous' Algerian narratives2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the place of the human and the animal in Hélène Cixous' work. It takes the figure of Fips, the dog of the Cixous family that she writes about in her autobiographical narratives, as a starting point. By thinking through this figure, I argue, Cixous analyses the dehumanizing logic of colonialism and anti-Semitism in Algeria and develops her own response to it, arguing for human relationality and animal corporeality. The paper shows that Cixous’ primal encounter with Fips produces a stigma that, belatedly, ruptures the barrier between herself and this specific dog; its dehiscence reveals a profound animal humanity generated by suffering, finitude, and compassion. The lesson Cixous learns from the memory of the Dog is how to become ‘more human’. This becoming is also an assault on the false humanism of the colonial project, on the closed gates as markers of colonial dehumanization and racialized social exclusion.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Ethics.
    Assault on the Borders: Hélène Cixous on Animals and the Human2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the continual displacement of nearly every established conception of the human, the figure of the human remains a powerful idea for political and ethical theorizing. In the era of human rights, the language of dehumanization has become a dominant frame for accounting for and criticizing a wide range of abuses and social harms. Likewise, the human has come to mark a status that promises protection from the dehumanizing effects of violence, discrimination and other modes of injustice. Cixous’ recent work on the concept have contributed to this discussion by providing an analysis of the borders between what we call human and inhuman and by pointing to the precarious conditions of hospitality towards other beings (human and nonhuman). This paper examines the place of the human and animals in Cixous’ work. It takes the figure of Fips, the dog of the Cixous family in Algiers, as a starting point. By thinking through this figure, Cixous analyses the dehumanizing logic of colonialism and anti-Semitism in Algeria and develops her own response to it, arguing for human relationality and animal corporeality. The paper shows that Cixous’ relationship with Fips produces a stigma that, belatedly, disrupt the barrier between herself and this specific dog. The lesson Cixous learns from revivifying the memory of the Dog is how to become ‘more human’. This becoming is also an assault on the false humanism of the colonial project, on the closed Gates as markers of colonial dehumanization and racialized social exclusion. The lesson of hospitality Cixous learns by another primal event: the resurrection of Fips in the form of another animal – the unexpected arrival of a cat (Thea) that puts conditional hospitality into question simply by demanding (and giving) an unconditional hospitality.

  • 8.
    Andersson, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Ethics. Lunds universitet.
    Att böjas efter genus - eller den maskerad vi kallar identitet: Om Judith Butlers performativa genusteori1995In: Aktuellt om kvinnoforskning, ISSN 1104-795X, Vol. 2, no 1, 3-5, 16 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Andersson, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Ethics. Lund University.
    Det etiska projektet och det estetiska: Tvärvetenskapliga perspektiv på Lars Ahlins författarskap1998Book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Andersson, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Ethics.
    Fiktionens värld och religionens: Etiska och estetiska aspekter2000In: Svensk religionshistorisk årsskrift, ISSN 0283-0302, Vol. 9, 81-111 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Andersson, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Ethics.
    Franz Kafka’s and Hannah Arendt’s perceptions of membership in a human community2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the complex, paradoxical and tortuous relationship between human, nonhuman and inhuman in the fiction of Franz Kafka and the philosophy of Hannah Arendt in connection with the issues of the ethical importance of being human and the political processes that produces the ideological concept of “the human.” Whereas Arendt, as a philosopher, is especially concerned with the legal or quasi-legal norms that should entitle every subject, even a stateless refugee, to appear as a member in a political community, Kafka, as a literary writer, analyzes the social norms of “imagination” that determine whether a human being appears to fellow human beings as a member of the human community at all.

  • 12.
    Andersson, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Ethics.
    Hundmannen: Om djur och djurblivande i J. M. Coetzees Onåd2010In: Subaltern, ISSN 1652-7046, no 1, 49-59 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Andersson, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Ethics. Etik.
    Kvinnor och filosofi: Ett mönter av dissonanser1993In: Kvinnovetenskaplig tidskrift, ISSN 0348-8365, no 2, 67-70 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Andersson, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Ethics. Lunds universitet.
    La nuda vita och kvarlevans vittnesbörd: Om Giorgio Agambens etik2007In: Möten: Festskrift till Anders Palm / [ed] Karin Nykvist m.fl., Lund: Anacapri förlag , 2007, 285-294 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Andersson, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Ethics.
    Lars Ahlin växer upp2002In: Finsk tidskrift : kultur, ekonomi, politik, ISSN 0015-248X, no 1, 56-60 p.Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 16.
    Andersson, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Ethics.
    Litteratur och vittnesbörd: Om W. G. Sebalds Austerlitz2016Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Andersson, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Ethics. Lund University.
    Litteratur som virtuell verklighet och drömvision: Exemplet Dykungens dotter2004In: Mediekulturer: Hybrider och förvandlingar / [ed] Claes-Göran Holmberg & Jan Svensson, Stockholm: Carlsson Bokförlag, 2004, första, 18-52 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Andersson, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Ethics.
    Mellan människa och icke-människa: Livet med och utan pass2010In: Etiska undersökningar: Om samhällsmoral, etisk teori och teologi / [ed] Elena Namli, Per Sundman m.fl., Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis , 2010, 87-105 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Andersson, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Ethics.
    Metaforens mirakel: Den politiska etikens undantagstillstånd2010In: Subaltern, ISSN 1652-7046, no 2, 44-49 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Andersson, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Ethics.
    Metaforens mirakel: Den politiska etikens undantagstillstånd2010In: Svensson och svenskan: Med sinnen känsliga för språk / [ed] Gunilla Byrman m.fl., Lund: Plantago media , 2010, 13-23 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Andersson, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Ethics.
    Monstrens återkomst: En modern teratologi2006In: Religion och existens: Årsskrift för Teologiska föreningen i Uppsala, ISSN 1653-8110, Vol. 1, 65-78 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Andersson, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Ethics.
    'My little wild fever-struck brother': Human and animal subjectivity in Hélène Cixous' Algeria2017In: International Journal of Philosophy and Theology, ISSN 2169-2327, E-ISSN 2169-2335, Vol. 78, no 4-5, 451-468 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the place of human and animal subjectivityin two autobiographically informed texts by Hélène Cixous. It takesher view on the word ‘human’ and the figure of Fips, the dog ofthe Cixous family, as a point of departure. By thinking through thisfigure, I argue, Cixous analyses the dehumanizing logic of colonialismand anti-Semitism in Algeria and develops her own responseto such kinds of political evils, arguing for human relationality andanimal corporeality. The article shows that Cixous’ meeting withFips creates a stigma that, belatedly, breaks through the barrierbetween herself and the dog; the reopening of the wound takesplace in a poetical writing that reveals an intense ‘animal humanity’formed by communal suffering, finiteness, and love. The lessonCixous learns from the memory of Fips the dog is how to become‘better human’. This becoming is also an assault on the falsehumanism of the colonial project and on racialized social exlusion.

  • 23.
    Andersson, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Ethics.
    Negotiating the Human: Franz Kafka's and Hannah Arendt's conceptualiations of membership in a community2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Andersson, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Ethics.
    On the Humanity of Animals in Cixous and Derrida2016In: On the Humanity of Animals in Cixous and Derrida, 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Andersson, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Ethics. Lund University and Copenhagen University.
    Rättens fiktion och fiktionens rättvisa: Etiska och estetiska perspektiv på diké och adikia2001In: Retfærd. Nordisk Juridisk Tidsskrift, ISSN 0105-1121, Vol. 24, no 2, 35-53 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Andersson, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Ethics.
    Rått kött och tillagat: Monster i amerikansk skräckfilm2005In: Film och religion.: Livstolkning på vita duken / [ed] Tomas Axelson & Ola Sigurdson, Stockholm: Cordia , 2005, 243-265 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Andersson, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Ethics.
    The Moment of a Star: The Ethics of Narration2002In: Studia Theologica, ISSN 0039-338X, E-ISSN 1502-7791, Vol. 56, no 1, 44-63 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Andersson, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Ethics.
    Traces of a Half-Forgotten Dog: Suffering and Animal Humanity in Hélène Cixous’ Algerian Scenes2017In: Literature & Theology, ISSN 0269-1205, E-ISSN 1477-4623, Vol. 31, no 4, 420-431 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hélène Cixous’ engagement with animals is a significant but neglected aspect of her work. In this article I trace one specific character among her animals, Fips, a dog she had when she was living in Algiers during the late 1940s. By reflecting on this figure, I outline the way the dehumanising logic of colonialism and anti-Semitism are critiqued by Cixous. I lift up her themes of relationality and corporeality as constructive for animal studies. Taking the work of Jacques Derrida as a starting point, the article shows how Cixous’ primal encounter with Fips produces a wound that, belatedly, ruptures the barriers between herself and this dog; its dehiscence reveals Fips’ ‘profound animal humanity’ generated by shared suffering, finitude, and love. The lesson Cixous learns from revivifying the memory of this dog is, I suggest, how to become more human. The ‘humanity’ of the dog is the capacity to see and indeed love outside preconceived ideas: ‘Perhaps the irony is that we are never more human than when we are dogs.’ Becoming more human is an assault on the borders of racialised exclusion and a challenge to the false humanism of the colonial project.

  • 29.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Between Insanity and Love2015In: Computers & Society: The Newsletter of the ACM Special Interest Group on Computers and Society Special Issue on 20 Years of ETHICOMP / [ed] Mark Coeckelbergh, Bernd Stahl, and Catherine Flick, 2015, 154-158 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technology has opened up more opportunities to find bet- ter partners, especially via online dating sites . In addition, technology related to love and sex currently goes far beyond online dating sites. Technology influences our intimate life more and more. Media started to pick up romantic rela- tionship between human beings and digital characters of- ten. Furthermore, today, many wearable devices to experi- ence virtual sex have come into the market. And also robots designed for having a sex with human beings are being de- veloped rapidly. Some might claim having a sex without love or without reproduction is just totally pointless. Or, having a sex with robots is totally “insane”. But apparently there are big market needs, and modern technology seems to be able to satisfy them. This paper explores how it is possible for us to feeling love or sexual desire for non-organic objects by conducting the interview survey, and also considers why people want to have technology for satisfying sexual desire from a philosophical perspective. 

  • 30.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Designing "Open Education": How does the ICT-based system function as a new medium of participation for sustainability?2013In: The possibilities of ethical ICT, Kolding: University of Southern Denmark , 2013, 33-36 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information and communication technology (ICT) has developed and deployed rapidly since 1980’s. Until now ICT has been considered as one of the most important infrastructures in living in the present globalized society. Along with diffusion of personal computers and highly leveraging information on the web, the way of learning has been changing gradually. Hundreds universities, institutes and companies constructs and releases the “open education” platform based on ICT, for example iTunes U, TakingITGlobal and so on. These open education platforms are basically open for everyone who wants to learn by using contents on the website for free in so far as they can access the Internet. And the movement toward the construction and use of ICT-based education platform is supported by international organizations, such as the Centre for Educational Research and Innovation (CERI) in OECD and UNESCO’s project “the Virtual University and e-learning”.

  • 31.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Research in Computer/Information Ethics: A Gender Gap Analysis and Consequences2013In: Ambiguous Technologies: Philosophical Issues, Practical Solutions, Human Nature, Lisbon: Universidade Autonoma de Lisboa , 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technology democratization enforces a never-ending process of risk/responsibility harmonization through with ethical assumptions. However, it is crucial to debate the gender gap within our community (reasons) and explore the potential “outcome” of female contribution. This panel does not promote a direct hit with the sessions, although the intention is to be controversial and influencer concerning a latent problem inside our community. 

  • 32.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Social media as a tool for change2011In: The social impact of social computing / [ed] A. Bisset et al., Sheffield, UK: Sheffield Hallam University , 2011, 44-50 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Technology as Mask2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    情報倫理研究におけるジェンダーの射程 (The range of gender perspective in computer ethics research)2014In: 経営情報学会誌 (The Japan Society of Management Information (JASMIN) Journal), ISSN 0918-7324, Vol. 23, no 2, 158-161 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [ja]

    情報通信技術(Information and CommunicationTechnology: ICT)は現代社会において必要不可欠なものであり,ICT なくしては私達の日常生活は成り立たない.一方で,ICT を利用するがゆえにかつては予想されなかった新たな社会的問題ないし社会的リスクが引き起こされている.顕著な例としては,監視社会,ソーシャル・エンジニアリングあるいはサイバーセキュリティなどが挙げられよう.これらの問題は互いに複雑に入り組み合い,より大きな社会的問題へと発展してきた.またICT が普及し人々のライフスタイルが変化するなかでは,セックスやジェンダーといった性にまつわる事象もICT からの影響を免れることは難しく,性別に基づくデジタル・デバイドや,サイバーストーキング,ポルノグラフィ,出会い系サイトなどICT と性との関係性における倫理的問題が議論されるに至る.本稿では,ICT が性に与える影響と,その影響をジェンダーの視角からどのように考察することが可能かについて検討する.

  • 35.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Balancing between the conflicting interests of different stakeholders in research2017In: European Business Ethics Network: Research / [ed] Ioannis Filos, Athens: Deree, American College of Greece College , 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We in academia produce a lot of research in the form of papers, technologies, methods, medicines and so on. All those outcomes are of great importance for society and people. On the other hand, there are many stakeholders in the process of producing research outcomes nowadays. Researchers themselves are of course the main stakeholders because their career is dependent on research. However, when research projects are connected to various political goals or affect profits for industries, many other stakeholders like politicians and business people get involved to research activities as well. Especially industries offer a lot of research funds to academic projects, and actually today many collaborative research projects between industry and academia are in progress. Thus, research environments are very complex and morally challenging since many different and conflicting interests interfere. Many academic researchers believe that what they produce belongs to society, and that their work is there mainly to satisfy the interests and needs of society and people. But, at the same time, they need to fulfill the demands coming from research supporters who offer funds and research opportunities. In producing research of good quality, it is unavoidable and very important for researchers to make a fair choice between the quality of scientific research and the satisfaction of stakeholders’ demands. This paper explores how researchers make justice between these conflicting interests, what kind of ethical dilemmas and problems they face in their daily research activities, and how they solve the ethical problems. This study is the first step of a research project that focuses on how scientific research activities and outcomes become 'social' and 'valuable'.

  • 36.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Ethical Competence and Social Responsibility in Scientific Research using ICT Tools2015In: Computers & Society: The Newsletter of the ACM Special Interest Group on Computers and Society Special Issue on 20 Years of ETHICOMP / [ed] Mark Coeckelbergh, Bernd Stahl, and Catherine Flick; Vaibhav Garg and Dee Weikle, ACM Digital Library, 2015, 345-347 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores how to improve and support researchers'ethical competence in scientic research and how to conduct research ethically, especially in research activities using Information and Communication Technology (ICT). Refining research ethics relating to ICT is unavoidable in the highly technological society of today, for example big data is used in different scientic research activities, and systems which support our daily lives are constructed based on the existing systems. In other words, technology reproduces technology itself. And almost all research activities need to use ICT through the whole research process. Moreover, researchers are required to be able to participate and react sensibly in ethical dialogues with society and citizens. Seen in that light, this study could be applicable not only to computer science and technology but also to a broad spectrum of research areas as the constructive notions of ethics, liberty and responsibility in research activity.

  • 37.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    ICT supported crisis communication and dialog2013In: The possibilities of ethical ICT, Kolding: University of Southern Denmark , 2013, 37-41 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores how people use social media under serious social conditions, and how social media affects people’s behavior after a disaster based on the case of the March 2011 disaster in Japan. In this critical situation, where existing traditional media like phones, television, radio and newspapers did not work well, the Japanese exchanged and received information through social media. In fact some victims were rescued based on information via social media. Corresponding to people’s need, social media provided various services to support people immediately after the disaster. Therefore it seems that social media plays an important role in fostering a social network leading to horizontal communication, critical thinking, dialog; supporting social capital. This study reconsiders characteristics of social capital and its role in improving people’s lives and supporting democratic communication as well as the difficulties in people bonding together through social media.

  • 38.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Responsibility and Competence in Political Ethics2014In: Proceedings International Political Science Association, 23rd World Congress of Political Science, 2014: Challenges of contemporay governance, Montreal, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At present, our society is globalized, chaotic, changing, and also highly affected by individualization. That is, it is more difficult for out society to reach goals or conclusions collectively as one nation or one society. Under the situation, society needs political leaders to gather individual values, interests and opinions, and to take a lead in making collective decisions in the proper manner. Political leaders are required to have ability of making decisions and acting in the best way for society. Their responsibility is high even for future generations. According to Weber there are two categories of ethics pertaining to politics and to political leaders. One is the "ethic of ultimate ends" and the other is the "ethic of responsibility". "Ethic of responsibility" of political leaders is considered as a critical element. It is perceived as a kind of ability to consider possible social options and their impact, and also to take responsibility of their consequences in the future. In this context, it is very well compatible to the idea of ethical competence. It binds together philosophy and modern empirical research on ethical decision making, opening up for interventions like training and education for political leaders. 

  • 39.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    The paradoxical nature of privacy2012In: Privacy in the social networked world / [ed] Andrew A. Adams, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Privacy appears to be a very important issue today when ICT permeates more and more aspects of our life. Mainly this is understood as a risk of breaking the privacy of persons, and possibly the privacy of groups, organizations, corporations and states. It is therefore interesting to investigate the main definitions of privacy, try to grasp its nature and to discern its features, and to discuss the possible ways of suitable and needed activities.

     

    There are essentially two types if definitions. One is focused on the protection of information and on the rules that govern openness and protection. Moor (1997), defines privacy like “the expression of a core value, viz., the value of security” or “sometimes used to designate a situation in which people are protected from intrusion or observation by natural or physical circumstances.... In addition to natural privacy there is normative privacy. A normatively private situation is a situation protected by ethical, legal, or conventional norms.” A similar definition is given by Edmund Byrne (1998): Privacy as a “zone of inaccessibility”.

     

    A different approach to the definition of privacy is focused on the control of information, and the main example of this kind of definition is given by Charles Fried (1968): “Privacy is not simply an absence of information about us in the minds of others, rather it is the control we have over information about ourselves”. In the same wavelength we find the definition given by Quinn (2011): “Privacy is a social arrangement that allows individuals to have some level of control over who is able to gain access to their physical selves and their personal information”.

     

    Which of the two lines of definitions is more accurate and fruitful, regarding its power to guide our activities toward the achievement of desired goals? If we make an effort to describe the nature of privacy we can easily and rather fast come to the conclusion that privacy is not only something that has to be protected. Although this is important, underlined by both lines of definitions, it seems that privacy sometimes has to be diminished or invaded in order to satisfy important interests and values. One is to create a bond to another person, group or organization. To achieve this one has to give access to private information, or even to give up part or all limitations toward this special person or organization. It is a matter of trust between each other. The other situation, which is the most common one, is that a person, group or organization, which we may call a separate entity, has always another important interest added to the interest of protecting its own privacy: To break, diminish or invade the privacy of any other entity that is a prospective or actual partner in any sense. It is very important for any entity to acquire access to the information about any other entity that is of some interest.

     

    If we now go back to the definitions of privacy, and look upon them through the glasses of our observations of its nature we may have good arguments to maintain that a definition focused on the control of information is more plausible. Given the controversial nature of privacy (protect it and break it at the same time) and the clashes arising constantly between all entities in a social interaction, the focus cannot be on normative solutions which if they work are always limited to a certain situation, but on the ways skills, methods and tools we use to create, revise and apply policies, guidelines, rules and principles to manage the issues of privacy.

     

    References

    Byrne, E. F. (1998). “Privacy”. Encyclopedia of Applied Ethics, 3, 649-659.

    Fried, C. (1968). “Privacy: A moral analysis”. Yale Law Journal, 77, 475-493.

    Moor, J. (1997). “Towards a theory of privacy in the information age”. Computer and Society, 27, 27-32.

    Quinn, M. J. (2011). Ethics for the Information Age. Boston: Pearson.

  • 40.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Virtue as ethical competence2011In: EBEN Annual Conference 2011 / [ed] Luc Van Liedekerke, Antwerp: Universiteit Antwerpen , 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organizations active in an environment of increasing internal and external diversity and change need the guidance of suitable moral values. This implies many challenges. However, focus on processes is unavoidable and necessary. Particularly, regarding ethical aspects this is the only possible way for the construction and applicationof right values. In achieving that, skills and processes are very helpful because they provide a good base for the promotion of personal and organizational ethical competence, a competence referring to the ability using the right ways to handle ethical issues and which is not constrained by normative aspects. Since it is not possible to create moral values once and for all, in the diverse and changing conditions of today, continuous moral value creation and interpretation is the only way. Consequently, the focus must be on the process itself, and on the skills and structures behind this process, i.e. on personal and organizational ethical competence. Ethical competence is therefore a virtue.

  • 41.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Murata, Kiyoshi
    The holding function of robots in highly technological society2015In: Proceedings of Japan Society for Infomation and Management 70th Annual Conference, 2015, Vol. 70, 65-68 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Atry, Ashkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Centre for Research Ethics and Bioethics.
    Transforming the Doping Culture: Whose responsibility, what responsibility?2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The doping culture represents an issue for sport and for society. Normative debates on doping have been mainly concerned with questions of the justifiability of doping. The practice of assigning responsibility for doping behaviour has chiefly been individual-based, focusing mainly on the individual athlete’s doping behaviour. The overarching aim of this thesis is to investigate the relevance and the importance of the ideas of responsibility in relation to ethical debates on doping. The more specific aim is to examine the possibility of broadening the scope of responsibility beyond the individual athlete, and to sketch a theoretical framework within which this expansion could be accommodated. In the first study, it is argued that bioethicists have a moral/professional responsibility to start out from a realistic and up-to-date view of genetics in ethical debates on gene doping, and that good bioethics requires good empirics. In study 2, the role played by affective processes in influencing athletes’ attitudes towards doping behaviour is investigated, both on an individual and on a collective level. It is concluded that an exclusive focus on individual-level rule violation and sanctions may entail overlooking the greater social picture and would prove to be ineffective in the long term. In study 3, the common doping-is-cheating arguments are examined and it is argued that they fail to capture vital features of people’s moral responses to doping behaviour. An alternative account of cheating in sport is presented in terms of failure to manifest good will and respect. It is concluded that putting cheating in the broader context of human interpersonal relationships makes evident the need to broaden the scope of moral responsibility and agency beyond the individual athlete. In study 4, the particular case of assigning responsibility for doping to sports physicians is used to examine the current individual-based approach to responsibility. This approach underestimates the scope of the responsibility by leaving out a range of other actors from the discourse of responsibility. The central conclusion of the thesis is that transforming the current doping culture requires broadening the scope of responsibility to include individuals and groups of individuals other than the athletes themselves.  

    List of papers
    1. Gene Doping and the Responsibility of Bioethicists
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gene Doping and the Responsibility of Bioethicists
    2011 (English)In: Sport, Ethics and Philosophy, ISSN 1751-1321, E-ISSN 1751-133X, Vol. 5, no 2, 149-160 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we will argue: (1) that scholars, regardless of their normative stand against or for genetic enhancement indeed have a moral/professional obligation to hold on to a realistic and up-to-date conception of genetic enhancement; (2) that there is an unwarranted hype surrounding the issue of genetic enhancement in general, and gene doping in particular; and (3) that this hype is, at least partly, created due to a simplistic and reductionist conception of genetics often adopted by bioethicists.

    Keyword
    genetic enhancement; gene-doping; sport
    National Category
    Ethics
    Research subject
    Ethics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-206595 (URN)10.1080/17511321.2010.536960 (DOI)
    Available from: 2013-09-02 Created: 2013-09-02 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    2. Beyond the Individual: Sources of Attitudes Towards Rule Violation in Sport
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Beyond the Individual: Sources of Attitudes Towards Rule Violation in Sport
    2012 (English)In: Sport, Ethics and Philosophy, ISSN 1751-1321, E-ISSN 1751-133X, Vol. 6, no 4, 467-479 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Today, certain rule-violating behaviours, such as doping, are considered to be an issue of concern for the sport community. This paper underlines and examines the affective dimensions involved in moral responses to, and attitudes towards, rule-violating behaviours in sport. The key role played by affective processes underlying individual-level moral judgement has already been implicated by recent developments in moral psychological theories, and by neurophysiological studies. However, we propose and discuss the possibility of affective processes operating on a social level which may influence athletes’ individual-level attitudes. We conclude that one-sided focus on individual rule- violating behaviour and individual sanctions may prove to be ineffective in coming to terms with the issue. In this regard we recommend a twofold approach by addressing underlying social dimensions, along with preventive measures through affect-oriented education.

    Keyword
    rule-violating behaviour, emotion, emotion culture, moral response, moral psychology
    National Category
    Ethics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-206599 (URN)10.1080/17511321.2012.739194 (DOI)
    Available from: 2013-09-02 Created: 2013-09-02 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    3. Cheating is the name of the game: Conventional cheating arguments fail to articulate moral responses to doping
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cheating is the name of the game: Conventional cheating arguments fail to articulate moral responses to doping
    2013 (English)In: Physical Culture and Sport. Studies and Research, ISSN 2081-2221, E-ISSN 1899-4849, Vol. 59, no 1, 21-32 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    One of the most common arguments in the discussion on doping is that it represents a form of cheating. In this paper, it is argued that common doping-is-cheating arguments based on notions of rule-violation and unfair advantage are inadequate, since they treat cheating as distinct from the structure and the logic of competitive sport. An alternative approach to cheating in sport as regards performance enhancement will be offered based on the ethics of participation in interpersonal relationships. This participatory perspective points towards the need to broaden our conception of agency and moral responsibility in relation to doping, beyond the notion of the individual “drug-cheat” who acts in a vacuum.

     

    Keyword
    Doping, Cheating, unfair advantage, rule violation, interpersonal relationships
    National Category
    Ethics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-206601 (URN)10.2478/pcssr-2013-0020 (DOI)
    Available from: 2013-09-02 Created: 2013-09-02 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    4. Doping and The Participatory Responsibility of Sports Physicians
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Doping and The Participatory Responsibility of Sports Physicians
    2013 (English)Article in journal (Other academic) Submitted
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper it will be argued that notwithstanding the need for more clear regulative measures in relation to sports physicians’ doping behaviour, the predominant medical/legalistic approach in/by itself is not sufficient, and fails in doing what sports anti-doping authorities whish it to do, i.e., to define and to assign sports physicians’ responsibility in an adequate way. High-performance sport is a form of social practice and sports physicians are an integrated part of the practice. In dealing with such a large-scale social process as high-performance sport, the above approach is lacking since it (a) proceeds from a conception of responsibility which limits the scope of responsibility in athletic settings, and (b) overlooks social aspects of responsibility and responsibility-attributing processes. Furthermore, it will be maintained that responsibility is relational, and as such, it is chiefly created and assigned within the social practice, rather than imposed from authoritative sources that are external to the practice itself. It will be concluded that sports physicians, given their position in relation to athletes and sports management, should actively assume prospective responsibilities beyond those pre- defined responsibilities that are expressed in rules, regulations and policies issued by sports’ governing bodies.

    Keyword
    Sports Physician, Doping, Responsibility
    National Category
    Ethics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-206605 (URN)
    Available from: 2013-09-02 Created: 2013-09-02 Last updated: 2014-01-23Bibliographically approved
  • 43.
    Atry, Ashkan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Centre for Research Ethics and Bioethics.
    Hansson, Mats G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Centre for Research Ethics and Bioethics.
    Kihlbom, Ulrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Centre for Research Ethics and Bioethics.
    Beyond the Individual: Sources of Attitudes Towards Rule Violation in Sport2012In: Sport, Ethics and Philosophy, ISSN 1751-1321, E-ISSN 1751-133X, Vol. 6, no 4, 467-479 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, certain rule-violating behaviours, such as doping, are considered to be an issue of concern for the sport community. This paper underlines and examines the affective dimensions involved in moral responses to, and attitudes towards, rule-violating behaviours in sport. The key role played by affective processes underlying individual-level moral judgement has already been implicated by recent developments in moral psychological theories, and by neurophysiological studies. However, we propose and discuss the possibility of affective processes operating on a social level which may influence athletes’ individual-level attitudes. We conclude that one-sided focus on individual rule- violating behaviour and individual sanctions may prove to be ineffective in coming to terms with the issue. In this regard we recommend a twofold approach by addressing underlying social dimensions, along with preventive measures through affect-oriented education.

  • 44.
    Atry, Ashkan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Centre for Research Ethics and Bioethics.
    Hansson, Mats G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Centre for Research Ethics and Bioethics.
    Kihlbom, Ulrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Centre for Research Ethics and Bioethics.
    Cheating is the name of the game: Conventional cheating arguments fail to articulate moral responses to doping2013In: Physical Culture and Sport. Studies and Research, ISSN 2081-2221, E-ISSN 1899-4849, Vol. 59, no 1, 21-32 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the most common arguments in the discussion on doping is that it represents a form of cheating. In this paper, it is argued that common doping-is-cheating arguments based on notions of rule-violation and unfair advantage are inadequate, since they treat cheating as distinct from the structure and the logic of competitive sport. An alternative approach to cheating in sport as regards performance enhancement will be offered based on the ethics of participation in interpersonal relationships. This participatory perspective points towards the need to broaden our conception of agency and moral responsibility in relation to doping, beyond the notion of the individual “drug-cheat” who acts in a vacuum.

     

  • 45.
    Atry, Ashkan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Centre for Research Ethics and Bioethics.
    Hansson, Mats G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Centre for Research Ethics and Bioethics.
    Kihlbom, Ulrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Centre for Research Ethics and Bioethics.
    Doping and The Participatory Responsibility of Sports Physicians2013Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper it will be argued that notwithstanding the need for more clear regulative measures in relation to sports physicians’ doping behaviour, the predominant medical/legalistic approach in/by itself is not sufficient, and fails in doing what sports anti-doping authorities whish it to do, i.e., to define and to assign sports physicians’ responsibility in an adequate way. High-performance sport is a form of social practice and sports physicians are an integrated part of the practice. In dealing with such a large-scale social process as high-performance sport, the above approach is lacking since it (a) proceeds from a conception of responsibility which limits the scope of responsibility in athletic settings, and (b) overlooks social aspects of responsibility and responsibility-attributing processes. Furthermore, it will be maintained that responsibility is relational, and as such, it is chiefly created and assigned within the social practice, rather than imposed from authoritative sources that are external to the practice itself. It will be concluded that sports physicians, given their position in relation to athletes and sports management, should actively assume prospective responsibilities beyond those pre- defined responsibilities that are expressed in rules, regulations and policies issued by sports’ governing bodies.

  • 46.
    Atry, Ashkan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Centre for Research Ethics and Bioethics.
    Hansson, Mats G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Centre for Research Ethics and Bioethics.
    Kihlbom, Ulrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Centre for Research Ethics and Bioethics.
    Gene Doping and the Responsibility of Bioethicists2011In: Sport, Ethics and Philosophy, ISSN 1751-1321, E-ISSN 1751-133X, Vol. 5, no 2, 149-160 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we will argue: (1) that scholars, regardless of their normative stand against or for genetic enhancement indeed have a moral/professional obligation to hold on to a realistic and up-to-date conception of genetic enhancement; (2) that there is an unwarranted hype surrounding the issue of genetic enhancement in general, and gene doping in particular; and (3) that this hype is, at least partly, created due to a simplistic and reductionist conception of genetics often adopted by bioethicists.

  • 47.
    Bergsten, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology.
    Religionsdialog: Kommunikativ etik som resurs i mötet mellan kristna och muslimer i Sverige2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study presents, interprets and analyzes Seyla Benhabib's discourse ethics, and investigates its implications for religious dialogue as practical discourse. On the basis of the fundamental principles of universal moral respect and egalitarian reciprocity, as well as the idea of ​​the situated moral self, the author proposes ten normative starting points for inter-religious dialogue between Christians and Muslims in Sweden. Aspects of gender and power are commented in particular. The study shows how discourse ethics impose far-reaching demands on the conditions of the dialogue, on the preparation of it as well as on its participants. The continuity of dialogue is emphasized as the overall goal.

  • 48.
    Björk, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Robots, ethics and language2015In: Computers & Society: The Newsletter of the ACM Special Interest Group on Computers and Society Special Issue on 20 Years of ETHICOMP / [ed] Mark Coeckelbergh, Bernd Stahl, and Catherine Flick; Vaibhav Garg and Dee Weikle, ACM Digital Library, 2015, 268-273 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Following the classical philosophical definition of ethics and the psychological research on problem solving and decision making, the issue of ethics becomes concrete and opens up the way for the creation of IT systems that can support handling of moral problems. Also in a sense that is similar to the way humans handle their moral problems. The processes of communicating information and receiving instructions are linguistic by nature. Moreover, autonomous and heteronomous ethical thinking is expressed by way of language use. Indeed, the way we think ethically is not only linguistically mediated but linguistically construed – whether we think for example in terms of conviction and certainty (meaning heteronomy) or in terms of questioning and inquiry (meaning autonomy). A thorough analysis of the language that is used in these processes is therefore of vital importance for the development of the above mentioned tools and methods. Given that we have a clear definition based on philosophical theories and on research on human decision-making and linguistics, we can create and apply systems that can handle ethical issues. Such systems will help us to design robots and to prescribe their actions, to communicate and cooperate with them, to control the moral aspects of robots’ actions in real life applications, and to create embedded systems that allow continuous learning and adaptation.

  • 49.
    Blom, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Ethics.
    Paragon & Renegade: En intern analys av etiken i Mass Effect2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 50.
    Boisen, Lovisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology.
    The Protection of Civilians in the Event of Emergency or Armed Conflict: A Study of the International Humanitarian Law and Real Life Experiences of Armed Conflict2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The Human Rights were established after the Second World War to prevent that kind of civilian harm from ever happening again. Despite of this, people are being violated all the time in today’s conflicts. Why is that?

    This study aims to illustrate the problem of the protection of human rights in the event of a state of emergency and armed conflict. The following research questions have been asked; is international humanitarian law sufficient protection for civilians in the event of a state of emergency and armed conflict? To what extent does the legal framework and the theories of conflict match the “real situation"? The study is limited to a few articles from international treaties together with three informants. A qualitative approach was employed and as a theoretical starting point, Agamben's theory of the state of exception and van Creveld’s theory of armed conflicts have been used. Interpretations of the four Geneva Conventions of 1949 and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights have been text analyzed and are the basis for the legal framework. Finally qualitative interviews were conducted with, a legal advisor, an ex-combatant and a journalist who all have been in armed conflict. The results of the study show that the legal protection of civilians in armed conflict is relatively good compared to that of a state of emergency, which should be more strictly regulated. The biggest problem is that the law is not complied which is due to lack of knowledge. The conclusion is that education should lead to better understanding of international regulations, which should lead to better compliance of them.

     

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