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  • 1.
    Der Ananian, Cheryl
    et al.
    Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ, USA.
    Soroush, Ali
    Imam Reza Hospital, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran.
    Ainsworth, Barbara E.
    Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ, USA.
    Belyea, Michael
    Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ, USA.
    Swan, Pamela
    Exericse Science and Health Promotion, Phoenix, AZ, USA.
    Walker, Jenelle
    Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ, USA.
    Poortvliet, Eric
    Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Örebro universitet, Restaurang- och hotellhögskolan.
    TRAJECTORIES AND SOCIO-DEMOGRAPHIC PREDICTORS OF STEPS IN A WORKSITE INTERVENTION: ASUKI-STEP2015In: Annals of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 0883-6612, E-ISSN 1532-4796, Vol. 49, S170-S170 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Promoting physical activity (PA) through worksite wellness programs may help decrease physical inactivity in adults. Purpose: This study examined the effects of a pedometer-based intervention (ASUKI-Step) on (1) trajectories of step counts over time; (2) the proportion of individuals who accumulated at least 10,000 steps per day for a minimum of 100 days; and (3) trajectories of accelerometer-determined PA over time in a sub-set of individuals. We also examined the sociodemographic characteristics associated with each outcome. Methods: ASUKI-Step was a 6-month, pedometer-based intervention offered to employees at Arizona State University (n=712) and the Karolinska Institutet (n=1390). The intervention was grounded in the theory of social support and participants enrolled in teams of 3-4 individuals to promote social support. Trajectories of change in PA were evaluated using a single-group, pre-post quasi-experimental design. Linear growth models were used to assess trajectories of change in and predictors of pedometer-based and accelerometer-determined PA. Logistic regression analyses were used to examine the proportion of individuals who met 10,000 steps per day for at least 100 days. Results: There was a significant linear (t = -20.76, p =.001) and curvilinear change in steps over time (t = 7.65, p = 0.001). Steps declined over the six months and there was significant individual variation in the trajectory of change. Men had a greater decline in steps over time while increased age was associated with a slower decline in steps over time (p < 0.05). Overall, 52.9% (n = 1105) of the participants accumulated 10,000 steps on at least 100 days of the study. Older age, being married, working in a non-managerial position, having a normal body weight, and higher initial PA level were positively associated with meeting the step goal (p <0.05). Finally, in the subset of individuals for whom we had accelerometer-derived PA levels (n=226), there were no changes over time in minutes of physical inactivity, light activity, moderate lifestyle or moderate activity. Conclusions: Findings suggest that a low-intensity, pedometer-based intervention can work with some segments of the typical office population but a more intensive intervention may be needed for individuals who are sedentary or overweight.

  • 2.
    Farrand, Paul
    et al.
    University of Exeter.
    Woodford, Joanne
    University of Exeter.
    Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioural Self-Help for the Treatment of Depression and Anxiety in People with Long-Term Physical Health Conditions: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomised Controlled Trials.2015In: Annals of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 0883-6612, E-ISSN 1532-4796, Vol. 49, no 4, 579-93 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Depression and anxiety are prevalent comorbidities in people with long-term physical health conditions; however, there is limited access to evidence-based treatments for comorbid mental health difficulties.

    PURPOSE: This study is a meta-analysis examining the effectiveness of cognitive behavioural self-help for physical symptoms, depression and anxiety in people with long-term conditions.

    METHODS: This study involves a systematic search of electronic databases supplemented by expert contact, reference and citation checking and grey literature.

    RESULTS: The meta-analysis yielded a small effect size for 11 studies reporting primary outcomes of depression (g = -0.20) and 8 studies anxiety (g = -0.21) with a large effect size (g = -1.14) for 1 study examining physical health symptoms. There were no significant moderators of the main effect.

    CONCLUSIONS: Limited evidence supports cognitive behavioural self-help for depression, anxiety and physical symptoms in people with long-term conditions. Small effect sizes for depression and anxiety may result from failure to recruit participants with clinical levels of these difficulties at baseline.

  • 3.
    Gustafsson, Per E
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Allmänmedicin.
    Janlert, Urban
    Umeå universitet, Epidemiologi och global hälsa.
    Theorell, Töres
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå universitet, Allmänmedicin.
    Social and material adversity from adolescence to adulthood and allostatic load in middle-aged women and men: results from the Northern Swedish cohort2012In: Annals of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 0883-6612, E-ISSN 1532-4796, Vol. 43, no 1, 117-128 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background  Little is known about the theoretically assumed association between adversity exposure over the life course and allostatic load in adulthood.

    Purpose  This study aims to examine whether social and material adversity over the life course is related to allostatic load in mid-adulthood.

    Methods  A 27-year prospective Swedish cohort (N = 822; 77% response rate) reported exposure to social and material adversities at age 16, 21, 30 and 43 years. At age 43, allostatic load was operationalized based on 12 biological parameters.

    Results  Social adversity accumulated over the life course was related to allostatic load in both women and men, independently of cumulative socioeconomic disadvantage. Moreover, social adversity in adolescence (in women) and young adulthood (in men) was related to allostatic load, independently of cumulative socioeconomic disadvantage and also of later adversity exposure during adulthood.

    Conclusion  Exposure to adversities involving relational threats impacts on allostatic load in adulthood and operates according to life course models of cumulative risk and a sensitive period around the transition into adulthood.

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