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  • 1.
    Bernhard-Oettel, Claudia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Eib, Constanze
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Griep, Yannick
    University of Calgary, Canada; Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Leineweber, Constanze
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    How do job insecurity and organizational justice relate to depressive symptoms and sleep difficulties: a multilevel study on immediate and prolonged effects in swedish workers2019In: Psychologie Appliquee: Revue Internationale, ISSN 0269-994X, E-ISSN 1464-0597Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on stress and justice literature, we argue that perceptions of job insecurity induce feelings of low procedural justice, which has immediate and prolonged negative effects on health (depressive symptoms, sleep difficulties). Moreover, we explore whether the strength of the job insecurity–justice relationship differs between individuals as a function of their average level of job insecurity over time. Finally, we explore whether the procedural justice–health relationship differs between individuals as a function of variability in justice perceptions over time. We analyzed Swedish panel data from permanent workers over four consecutive waves (with a two‐year time lag between waves) using multilevel analysis, separating within‐ and between‐person variance. Results showed that job insecurity associated negatively with procedural justice at the same time point for all waves. Prolonged effects were less stable. We found immediate (but not prolonged) indirect effects of job insecurity on health outcomes via procedural justice. Average levels in job insecurity over time moderated the within‐person job insecurity–justice relationship. However, variability in procedural justice over time did not moderate the within‐person justice–health relationship. In conclusion, disentangling within‐ and between‐person variability of job insecurity and justice perceptions contributes to the understanding of health effects.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-09-10 00:00
  • 2.
    Hartig, Terry
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Kylin, Camilla
    Johansson, Gunn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    The telework tradeoff: Stress mitigation vs. Constrained restoration2007In: Psychologie Appliquee: Revue Internationale, ISSN 0269-994X, E-ISSN 1464-0597, Vol. 56, no 2, p. 231-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a coping strategy, telework may reduce stress from some sources; however, it may also undermine restorative functions of the home. Investigating this tradeoff between stress mitigation and the constraint of restoration, we analysed questionnaire data from 101 full-time Swedish governmental employees whose workplace relocated to another city. After the relocation, 58 employees performed >= 20 per cent of their ordinary paid work at home. Coping with commuting and parenting demands frequently figured among reasons for teleworking. Having a separate room for telework appeared to ameliorate spatial but not temporal or mental overlap of work and non-work life. Teleworkers and non-teleworkers alike experienced the home more as a place of restoration than one of demands. Teleworking was reliably associated with restoration, conditional on gender; of those who teleworked, women reported less, and men more, effective restoration than their counterparts among non-teleworkers.

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