uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Hedmark, Eva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Persson, Jens
    Segerström, Peter
    Landa, Arild
    Ellegren, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Paternity and mating system in wolverines Gulo gulo2007In: Wildlife Biology, ISSN 0909-6396, E-ISSN 1903-220X, Vol. 13, no Suppl.2, 13-30 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge of the wolverine Gulo gulo mating system is limited. In this study, we use 20 microsatellite loci for paternity testing in 145 wolverine offspring with known mothers. Samples were collected during > 10 years in two Scandinavian populations, mainly in connection with radio-telemetry studies and as part of long-term population monitoring. In total, 51% of the offspring were assigned a father. Our results demonstrate that the wolverine exhibits a polygamous mating system as some males were shown to produce offspring with more than one female in a single year. Females often reproduced with the same male in subsequent breeding years, but sometimes changed their partner, potentially as a consequence of a change in the territory-holding male in the area. In the majority of litters, siblings were unambiguously assigned the same father, indicating that multiple paternity is rare. Of 23 breeding pairs, for which telemetry data were available, 20 had overlapping home ranges, suggesting that pair formation generally is consistent with the territories held by wolverine males and females.

  • 2.
    Pavlovska, Mariia
    et al.
    Natl Pedag Dragomanov Univ, CISCoS Ecolab, UA-01601 Kiev, Ukraine..
    Höglund, Jacob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Ukrainian black grouse Tetrao tetrix: genetic diversity and population structure2015In: Wildlife Biology, ISSN 0909-6396, E-ISSN 1903-220X, Vol. 21, no 6, 283-293 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied neutral (microsatellite) and adaptive (MHC) genetic diversity of two Ukrainian populations of black grouse Tetrao tetrix to fill a gap in the data on the diversity of European populations of this species. We found that Ukrainian populations are more diverse than recently fragmented central European ones and also highly differentiated from these populations. Both studied populations in Ukraine, the northern and the Carpathian, did not show any signs of recent bottleneck events. The population structure among Ukrainian black grouse was more pronounced for neutral variation than for adaptive MHC diversity, suggesting that a common selective force has led to balancing selection shaping the MHC diversity. The MHC differentiation among the two studied regions was still high (Dest = 0.454), which could be a sign of local adaptation as a response to shifting balance in space. Thus, we suggest that the northern and the Carpathian black grouse populations should be treated as separate Management Units (MU). The black grouse population in the Carpathian Mountains appeared to be more diverse than the one in the north in terms of neutral genetic variation, whereas in terms of adaptive variation the two populations vary in diversity depending on the method of scoring diversity. Therefore, we suggest that the Carpathian Mountains could have been a refuge for the black grouse during the last glaciation.

  • 3.
    Rönnegård, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, The Linnaeus Centre for Bioinformatics.
    Sand, Håkan
    Andrén, Henrik
    Månsson, Johan
    Pehrson, Åke
    Evaluation of four methods used to estimate population density of moose Alces alces2008In: Wildlife Biology, ISSN 0909-6396, E-ISSN 1903-220X, Vol. 14, no 3, 358-371 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Various survey methods are used to monitor and manage ungulate popualations. The choice of optimal method depends on estimation accuracy, management objective and financial constraints. Here we compare estimates produced by four different methods for estimating population size, i.e. aerial counts, hunter observations, pellet group counts and cohort analysis. A Swedish moose Alces alces population was studied during 1973-2005 in the Grimso Wildlife Research Area (135 km(2)). The highest correlation was found between cohort analysis and aerial counts (r = 0.69. P < 0.05). and the hunter observations and the aerial counts (r = 0.76. P < 0.10). The different methods produced relatively consistent trends in population estimates over years. Pellet group counts prior to 1997 were not significantly correlated with the other methods. probably due to unrepresentative spatial sampling. A comparison of the aerial and pellet group counts in 2002 and 2006, showed that the average defecation rate was estimated at approximately 14 pellet groups per day per moose. Our results show the importance of having representative spatial sampling in pellet group surveys and indicate that hunter observations can be a useful tool for estimating long-term population trends even in moderately sized areas.

  • 4.
    Sahlsten, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Population and Conservation Biology.
    Wickström, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Population and Conservation Biology.
    Höglund, Jacob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Population and Conservation Biology.
    Hazel grouse Bonasa bonasia population dynamics in a fragmented landscape: a metapopulation approach2010In: Wildlife Biology, ISSN 0909-6396, E-ISSN 1903-220X, Vol. 16, no 1, 35-46 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    If the deterministic threats of fragmentation can be stopped or reversed, species may find opportunities to disperse between patches and reduce the risk of extinction. In order to realise these opportunities and apply them to conservation programmes, it is necessary to understand the dynamics involved and to estimate which capacity is high enough to sustain a population at the landscape level. In a regional population consisting of several subpopulations, the incidence function model (IFM) is a stochastic, spatially-realistic patch occupancy model which can be applied using few parameters. With this model one can simulate and manipulate a patch network for a species. In IFM, the extinction probability is assumed to be proportional to local population size which in turn is assumed to be proportional to the local patch area. Although, the basic area of patches is of importance, influence from the geometric shape of patches may be equally or more important to determine potential incidence of a species in a particular patch. Basic area measurements might overestimate the probability of occupancy and/or capacity of a certain patch network to sustain a metapopulation. One applicable method to use in dealing with regional dynamics in fragmented landscapes is metapopulation capacity; derived from metapopulation theory, this method can be used to rank different patch networks. In our study, we examine if there is any difference in occupancy level and capacity between four different area scenarios. This allows us to determine if the basic area measurement of patches can result in a biased estimation of population viability in a specific landscape. It is concluded that perimeter-area related measures of patch size combined with capacity could be a more important measure for estimation of population dynamics and impact of landscape changes compared to basic area measurement and occupancy levels.

1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf