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  • 1. Agell, Jonas
    et al.
    Bennmarker, Helge
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Wage incentives and wage rigidity: A representative view from within2007In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 347-369Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A recent literature has used surveys of those who set wages to learn about the nature of wage incentives and the sources of wage rigidity. Methodologically, we overcome many of the objections that have been raised against this work. Substantively, we find that: (i) the reasons for real wage rigidity differ significantly between large and small firms, and between the high- and low-end of the labor market; (ii) efficiency wage mechanisms reinforce rigidities due to worker bargaining power; (iii) money illusion is a widespread phenomenon across all segments of the labor market; (iv) unions reinforce nominal wage rigidities due to external pay comparisons; (v) there appears to be gender differences in pay bargaining and work morale.

  • 2.
    Bennmarker, Helge
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Mellander, Erik
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Öckert, Björn
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Do regional payroll tax reductions boost employment?2009In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 480-489Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a Difference-in-Differences approach, we evaluate the effects of a 10 percentage point reduction in the payroll tax introduced in 2002 in northern Sweden. We find no employment effects among firms existing both before and after the reform, whereas the average wage bill per employee increases by about 0.25% per percentage point reduction in the tax rate. Extending the analysis to include entry and exit of firms, we find evidence of positive effects on the number of firms and a tendency to positive employment effects. Moreover, the wage incidence estimates become insignificant when we account for entry and exit of firms.

  • 3.
    Bennmarker, Helge
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Skans, Oskar Nordström
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Vikman, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics, Uppsala Center for Fiscal Studies.
    Workfare for the old and long-term unemployed2013In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 25, p. 25-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We estimate the effects of conditioning benefits on program participation among older long-term unemployed workers. We exploit a Swedish reform which reduced UI duration from 90 to 60 weeks for a group of older unemployed workers in a setting where workers who exhausted their benefits received unchanged transfers if they agreed to participate in a work practice program. Our results show that job finding increased as a result of the shorter duration of passive benefits. The time profile of the job-finding effects suggests that the results are due to deterrence during the program-entry phase. We find no impact on ensuing job durations or wages, suggesting that the increased job-finding rate was driven by increased search intensity rather than lower reservation wages. A crude cost-benefit analysis suggests that the reform reduced the combined cost of programs and transfers.

  • 4.
    Bergström, Pål
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Dahlberg, Matz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Mörk, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    The effects of grants and wages on municipal labour demand2004In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 315-334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we investigate the determinants of municipal labour demand in Sweden 1988–1995. Utilising a major grant reform in 1993, through which a switch from mainly targeted to mainly general central government grants occurred, we are able to identify which type of grants that have the largest effects on municipal employment. We find a larger municipal employment elasticity with respect to grants before the reform, which we interpret as evidence that general grants have less employment effects than specific ones. We further find a short run wage elasticity of approximately -0.5 and a long run ditto of approximately -0.9, and a quite sluggish adjustment process: only 60% of the desired change in municipal employment is implemented in the first year.

  • 5.
    Edmark, Karin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Froelich, Markus
    Wondratschek, Verena
    Sweden's school choice reform and equality of opportunity2014In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 30, no S1, p. 129-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyses whether the Swedish school choice reform, enacted in 1992, had differential effects for students from different socio-economic backgrounds. We use detailed geographical data on students' and schools' locations to construct measures of the degree of potential choice. This allows us to study the effects of choice opportunities among public schools, whereas previous studies have focused on newly opened private schools. Our results indicate that students from a socio-economically disadvantaged or immigrant background did not benefit less from more school choice than those from more advantaged backgrounds. If anything, students from low-income families benefited slightly more than those from higher-income families. However, the differences between groups of students are very small, as are the overall effects of the reform.

  • 6.
    Eriksson, Stefan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Carlsson, Magnus
    Age Discrimination in Hiring Decisions: Evidence from a Field Experiment in the Labor Market2019In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 59, p. 173-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper shows the results of a field experiment in which over 6000 fictitious resumes with randomly assigned information about age (35–70 years) were sent to Swedish employers with vacancies in low- and medium-skilled occupations. We find that the callback rate begins to fall substantially for workers in their early 40s and becomes very low for workers close to the retirement age. The decline in the callback rate by age is steeper for women than for men. Employer stereotypes about the ability to learn new tasks, flexibility, and ambition seem to be an important explanation for age discrimination.

  • 7.
    Grönqvist, Erik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Vlachos, Jonas
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Econ, Univ Vagen 10 A, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;IFN, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    One size fits all?: The effects of teachers' cognitive and social abilities on student achievement2016In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 42, p. 138-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We document a substantial decline in cognitive and social interactive abilities and in GPAs among entering teachers. Then, using matched student-teacher data, we find that teacher abilities have a negligible impact on average student achievement This finding hides interesting heterogeneities. In particular, an increase in teachers' cognitive (social) abilities increases (reduces) the achievement gap between high- and low-aptitude students. Teacher cognitive and social abilities further appear to be complements. We also find strong positive effects of male teachers' GPAs that are uniform across students, but similar effects are not found for female teachers' GPAs.

  • 8.
    Hartman, Laura
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Hesselius, Patrik
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Johansson, Per
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Effects of eligibility screening in the sickness insurance: Evidence from a field experiment2013In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 20, p. 48-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study the effects of screening stringency in the Swedish sickness insurance system by exploiting a field experiment. The experiment was conducted on 270,000 individuals in two geographical areas with the treatment group randomized by date of birth. The screening of eligibility was reduced for the treated by the postponement of the requirement for a doctor's certificate from day eight to day fifteen in a sickness benefit spell. The results show that extending the waiting period increased the length of sickness absence by on average 0.6 days. The experiment increased sickness benefit expenses but reduced the number of visits to a doctor. Our results show that postponing the requirement for a doctor's certificate increases public expenses for the sickness insurance system.

  • 9.
    Holmlund, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    What do labor market institutions do?2014In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 30, no SI, p. 62-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The past couple of decades have seen a huge increase in research on various labor market institutions. This paper offers a brief overview and discussion of research on the labor market impacts of minimum wages (MW), unemployment insurance (UI), and employment protection legislation (EPL). It is argued that research on UI is largely a success story, involving a fruitful interplay between search theory and empirical work. This research has established that UI matters for labor market behavior, in particular the duration of unemployment, although there remains substantial uncertainty about the magnitudes of the effects. The research on MW should have shaken economists' belief in the competitive labor market model as a result of frequent failures to find noticeable employment effects despite considerable effects on wages. EPL research has established that employment protection reduces labor and job turnover but the jury is still out regarding the impact on overall employment and productivity.

  • 10.
    Johansson, Per
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    The importance of employer contacts: Evidence based on selection on observables and internal replication2008In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 350-369Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    I estimate effects of the labor market training program “Swit” on employment using both register and survey data. Swit was initiated in an attempt to increase the supply of qualified personnel in the IT sector. Based on the register data I find a large positive effect from the Swit on employment as compared to conventional programs directed towards IT. By also using survey information I conclude that the effect was due to increased employer contacts. The result is of interest because of the relatively large effect especially for individuals with traditionally weak positions on the labor market. Furthermore, I methodologically demonstrate how information about the contents of the programs may corroborate findings based on conditional independence assumptions.

  • 11.
    Lindquist, Matthew J.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Santavirta, Torsten
    Stockholms universitet, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Does placing children in foster care increase their adult criminality?2014In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 31, no Dec, p. 72-83Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Lombardi, Stefano
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. Uppsala Center For Labor Studies (UCLS), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nordström Skans, Oskar
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics, Uppsala Center for Fiscal Studies.
    Vikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics, Uppsala Center for Fiscal Studies.
    Targeted wage subsidies and firm performance2018In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 53, p. 33-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper studies how targeted wage subsidies affect the performance of the recruiting firms. Using Swedish administrative data from the period 1998-2008, we show that treated firms substantially outperform other recruiting firms after hiring through subsidies, despite identical pre-treatment performance levels and trends in a wide set of key dimensions. The pattern is less clear from 2007 onwards, after a reform removed the involvement of caseworkers from the subsidy approval process. Overall, our results suggest that targeted employment subsidies can have large positive effects on post-match outcomes of the hiring firms, at least if the policy environment allows for pre-screening by caseworkers.

  • 13.
    Lundin, Danlela
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Mörk, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Öckert, Björn
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    How far can reduced childcare prices push female labour supply?2008In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 647-659Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exploiting exogenous variation in childcare prices stemming from a childcare price reform, this paper estimates effects of reductions in childcare costs on female labour supply. The reform introduced a cap on childcare prices, and lead to considerable reductions in prices depending on family type and region of residence. Since the price is determined by a handful of observed characteristics, we are able to match households that are similar in all relevant aspects, but experienced quite different price changes. Our difference-in-differences regression matching estimates are very precise, and close to zero.

  • 14. Mendes, Rute
    et al.
    van den Berg, Gerard J.
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Lindeboom, Maarten
    An empirical assessment of assortative matching in the labor market2010In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 919-929Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In labor markets with worker and firm heterogeneity, the matching between firms and workers may be assortative, meaning that the most productive workers and firms team up. We investigate this with longitudinal population-wide matched employer-employee data from Portugal. Using panel data methods, we quantify a firm-specific productivity term for each firm, and we relate this to the skill distribution of workers in the firm. We find that there is positive assortative matching, in particular among long-lived firms. Using skill-specific estimates of an index of search frictions, we find that the results can only to a small extent be explained by heterogeneity of search frictions across worker skill groups.

  • 15.
    Nykvist, Jenny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Displacement and Self-employment Entry2009In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 556-565Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Displacement is expected to decrease the reservation wage of self-employment by decreasing earnings in paid employment and increasing the probability of unemployment. This paper examines whether displacement increases the probability of self-employment using propensity score matching on Swedish register-based data. The data include all individuals displaced due to plant closures in 1987 and 1988, and a random sample of 200,000 employed individuals. The results suggest that displacement almost doubles the probability of entering self-employment the year after displacement. A sub-sample analysis indicates that individuals with a potentially worse position on the labor market react more strongly to displacement in terms of entering self-employment.

  • 16.
    Olsson, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Thoursie, Peter Skogman
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Sickness insurance and spousal labour supply2015In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 33, p. 41-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Analysing a reform in the Swedish public sickness insurance, we find that an increased replacement rate for one spouse has a negative cross effect on the other spouse's labour supply. The cross effects are present in the labour supply margins that workers can easily adjust. For wives of treated husbands, the total number of sick days increases on average 9.1% per month, whereas labour earnings are unchanged. The cross effect on total sick days for husbands to treated wives is 6.1% on average, with no effect on annual labour earnings. The total number of sick days and annual labour earnings for treated spouses are estimated to be unaffected by the reform, which indicates that the cross effects stem specifically from higher insurance coverage for the couples.

  • 17.
    Sjögren, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Vikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    How long and how much?: Learning about the design of wage subsidies from policy changes and discontinuities2015In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 34, p. 127-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Employment and wage subsidies are used to combat long-term unemployment, yet there is little research to guide the design of such programs. Discontinuities and changes in the design and implementation of wage subsidies under the Swedish New Start Jobs-policy allow us to study effects of both subsidy rate and subsidy duration. We find that wage subsidies have substantial effect on job-finding rates for those eligible. The effect is stronger for larger subsidies and more than doubles as the length of the subsidy doubles. Although employment drops as subsidies expire, the probability of being employed remains higher for workers finding subsidized employment also after the expiry of the employment subsidies.

  • 18.
    Skans, Oskar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    The impact of working-time reductions on actual hours and wages: evidence from Swedish register-data2004In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 11, no 5, p. 647-665Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper studies the impact on actual hours worked and hourly wages of a 5% reduction in working-time for one class of shift workers in Sweden using individual level panel data from employers' payroll records during the second quarter of each year. The main results are that actual hours only declined by approximately 35% of the reduction in standard hours, while hourly wages rose sharply-almost enough to leave monthly wages unaffected. Much larger effects on hours are found when studying the effects of the employees' locally determined scheduled hours. This indicates that a low rate of actual implementation may account for the limited impact on actual hours and suggests that using variation in self-reported, rather than contractual, standard hours may have biased the results of previous studies. (C) 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 19.
    Uusitalo, Roope
    et al.
    University of Helsinki.
    Verho, Jouko
    IFAU.
    The effect of unemployment benefits on re-employment rates: Evidence from Finnish unemployment insurance reform2010In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, no 17Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    van den Berg, Gerard J.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    van Vuuren, Aico
    The effect of search frictions on wages2010In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 875-885Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We aim to test whether the degree of informational search frictions in the labor market has a negative effect on wages. In a range of equilibrium search models of the labor market, this effect is predicted to be negative. Nevertheless, this has never been tested. We perform tests with matched worker-firm data. The worker data are informative on individual wages and labor market transitions, and this allows for estimation of the degree of search frictions. The firm data are informative on labor productivity. This allows us to investigate how the mean difference between labor productivity and wages in a market depends on the degree of frictions and other determinants, and to assess the quantitative relevance of frictions for wages.

  • 21.
    Vikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Dynamic treatment assignment and evaluation of active labor market policies2017In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 49, p. 42-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper considers treatment evaluation in a discrete time setting in which treatment can start at any point in time. We consider evaluation under unconfoundedness and propose a dynamic inverse probability weighting estimator. A typical application is an active labor market program that can start after any elapsed unemployment duration. The identification and estimation results concern both cases with one single treatment as well as sequences of programs. The new estimator is applied to Swedish data on participants in a training program and a work practice program. The work practice program increases re-employment rates. Most sequences of the two programs are inefficient when compared to one single program episode.

  • 22.
    Vikström, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Rosholm, Michael
    Svarer, Michael
    The effectiveness of active labor market policies: Evidence from a social experiment using non-parametric bounds2013In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 24, p. 58-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We re-analyze the effects of a Danish active labor market programme social experiment, which included a range of sub-treatments, including meetings with caseworkers, job search assistance courses, and activation programmes. We use newly developed non-parametric methods to examine how the effects of the experimental treatment vary during the unemployment spell. Non-parametric techniques are important from a methodological point of view, since parametric/distributional assumptions are in conflict with the concept of experimental evidence. We find that the effects of the experiment vary substantially during the unemployment spell.

  • 23. von Below, David
    et al.
    Skogman Thoursie, Peter
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Last in, first out?: Estimating the effect of seniority rules in Sweden2010In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 987-997Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we investigate whether a relaxation in seniority rules (the "last-in-first-out" principle) had any effect on firms' employment behaviour. Seniority rules exist in several countries, but consequences of seniority rules on firms' employment behaviour have not been examined previously. The "last-in-first-out" principle in Sweden was reformed in January 2001 such that employers with ten or fewer employees were allowed to exempt two workers from the seniority rule. Using an employer-employee unbalanced panel data for the period 1996-2005, we find that both hires and separations increased in small firms relative to large firms by 5%. This also implies that there were no effects on firms' net employment. Our results show that firms reacted to changes in the seniority rules, but we argue that the effects are not overwhelmingly large.

  • 24.
    Åslund, Olof
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Bohlmark, Anders
    Nordström, Oskar Skans
    Childhood and family experiences and the social integration of young migrants2015In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 35, p. 135-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study how age at migration affects social integration in adulthood. Using Swedish register data, we estimate the effects of age at migration by comparing siblings arriving (as children) at the same time, but at different ages. Migrants who were older when they arrived are less likely to live close to, work with, and marry natives. We also study 2nd generation immigrants and show that parental time in the host country has similar (although somewhat weaker) effects for this group. The effects do not appear to be propagated through socioeconomic status. Instead, preferences or cultural identities appear as key mechanisms.

  • 25.
    Åslund, Olof
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Grönqvist, Hans
    Family size and child outcomes: Is there really no trade-off?2010In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 130-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study the impact of family size on intermediate and long-term outcomes using twin births as an exogenous source of variation in family size in an unusually rich dataset. Similar to recent studies, we find no evidence of a causal effect on long-term outcomes and show that not taking selection effects into account will likely overstate the effects. We do, however, find a small but significant negative impact of family size on grades in compulsory and secondary school among children who are likely to be vulnerable to further restrictions on parental investments.

  • 26.
    Åslund, Olof
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Grönqvist, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Hall, Caroline
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Vlachos, Jonas
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Econ, Stockholm, Sweden;Res Inst Ind Econ IFN, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Education and criminal behavior: Insights from an expansion of upper secondary school2018In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 52, p. 178-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study the impact on long and short run criminal behavior from a large scale Swedish reform of vocational upper secondary education, extending programs and adding more general theoretical content. The reform directly concerns age groups where criminal activity is high and individuals who are overrepresented among criminal offenders. Using detailed administrative data we show that the reform led to a reduction in property crime, but no significant decrease in violent crime. The effect is mainly concentrated to the third year after enrollment, which suggests that being in school reduces the opportunities and/or inclinations to commit crime.

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