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  • 1.
    Holmberg, Tora
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Ideland, Malin
    Malmo Univ, SISEME, Studies Sci Environm & Math Educ, Malmo, Sweden.
    Imagination laboratory: Making sense of bio-objects in contemporary genetic art2016In: Sociological Review, ISSN 0038-0261, E-ISSN 1467-954X, Vol. 64, no 3, p. 447-467Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Public engagement in biotechnology has declined as cloning, genetic engineering and regenerative medicine have become socially and culturally normalized. Zooming in on existing bio-technological debates, this article turns to contemporary genetic art as sites for ethical reflections. Art can be viewed as an imagination laboratory', a space through which un-framing and rupturing of contemporary rationalities are facilitated, and, in addition, enabling sense-making and offering fantastic connections otherwise not articulated. In this article, the framework of bio-objectification' is enriched with Bennett's (2001) notion of enchantment and the importance of wonder and openness to the unusual, in order to highlight alternative matters of concern than articulated through conventional politico-moral discourse. Drawing on a cultural sociological analysis of Eduardo Kac's Edunia, Lucy Glendinning's Feather Child, Patricia Piccinini's Still Life with Stem Cells and Heather Dewey-Hagborg's Stranger Visions, we discuss how the intermingling of art, science, critics, art historians, science fiction, internet, and physical space, produce a variety of attachments that this article will unpack. The article demonstrates that while some modern boundaries and rationalities are highlighted and challenged through the imagination laboratory' of the art process, others are left untouched.

  • 2.
    Ivana, Greti-Iulia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Fake it till you make it: imagined social capital2017In: Sociological Review, ISSN 0038-0261, E-ISSN 1467-954X, Vol. 65, no 1, p. 52-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social capital is one of the most widely used (in both scholarly and non-scholarly contexts) and one of the least critically examined concepts in Bourdieu's framework. This article aims at questioning the objectivist standpoint from which the concept of social capital has been developed, by looking into the interpretative processes which shape it. In doing so, it proposes a new understanding of the notion of imagined social capital, which has gained prominence in the literature of the last several years. The contribution of the current paper lays in elaborating on the ways in which the existing notion of imagined social capital can be put in dialogue with Bourdieu's work and in introducing the overlooked, yet fundamental question of otherness into the debate on imagined social capital.

  • 3.
    Neuman, Nicklas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Gottzén, Lucas
    Department of Child and Youth Studies, Stockholm University.
    Fjellström, Christina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Masculinity and the sociality of cooking in men’s everyday lives2017In: Sociological Review, ISSN 0038-0261, E-ISSN 1467-954X, Vol. 65, no 4, p. 816-831Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores how 31 Swedish men (22–88 years old) talk about the sociality of domestic cooking in everyday life. We demonstrate how domestic cooking – for oneself, for others and with others – is part of the understanding of contemporary Swedish men and how the expressed sociality of cooking is intertwined with accomplishments of masculinity. The sociality of cooking is not only about homosocial leisure but also a way for men to maintain heterosocial relationships and assume domestic responsibility. We discuss a potential cultural transition in men's domestic meal sociality and suggest the need for studies of gendered divisions of domestic work and the sociology of food to analyse how cooking shares similar properties to those of commensality, and the implications of this regarding gender relations.

  • 4.
    Redmalm, David
    Mälardalens högskola, Hälsa och välfärd.
    Pet grief: When is non-human life grievable?2015In: Sociological Review, ISSN 0038-0261, E-ISSN 1467-954X, Vol. 63, no 1, p. 19-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores how pet owners grieve their pets and view their pets' transience. Drawing on Butler's notion of the differential allocation of grievability, I have analysed interviews with eighteen pet owners. Butler argues that grievability is made possible by a normative framework which allows for some human or human-like lives to be grieved, while other lives are rendered 'lose-able'. All the interviewed pet owners say that they are capable of grieving a non-human animal, but analysis suggests that they make their pets grievable and ungrievable by turns. I argue that by maintaining this ambivalence, the interviewees negotiate pets' inclusion in a human moral community while simultaneously defending human exceptionalism. The article concludes with a discussion of pet grief as a potentially destabilizing emotion. I suggest that grieving beings on the border between grievable human and lose-able animal - 'werewolves' according to Giorgio Agamben - may be a powerful way of challenging normative frameworks which arbitrarily render some human and non-human lives lose-able.

  • 5.
    Thapar-Björkert, Suruchi
    et al.
    University of Bristol and University of St. Andrews.
    Sanghera, Gurchathen
    University of Bristol and University of St. Andrews.
    Social capital, educational aspirations and young Pakistani Muslim men and women in Bradford, West Yorkshire2010In: Sociological Review, ISSN 0038-0261, E-ISSN 1467-954X, Vol. 58, no 2, p. 244-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on research with the Pakistani Muslim ‘community’ in inner-city Bradford, West Yorkshire, this paper critically engages with relevant debates on social capital and educational aspirations. It examines the processes and mechanisms in the accumulation of social capital within the family and the immediate community, to demonstrate how three sets of interpersonal relationships (parent-child, child–child and between co-ethnic peers) facilitate educational aspirations among a group that has traditionally been portrayed as under-achieving.

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