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  • 1.
    Angstrom, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    The sociology of Studies of Ethnic Conflict2000In: Civil Wars, ISSN 1369-8249, E-ISSN 1743-968X, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 23-44Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Angstrom, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Towards a Typology of Internal Armed Conflict2001In: Civil Wars, ISSN 1369-8249, E-ISSN 1743-968X, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 93-116Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Egnell, Robert
    Institutionen för freds- och konfliktforskning, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Winning 'hearts and minds'?: A Critical Analysis of Counter-Insurgency Operations in Afghanistan2010In: Civil Wars, ISSN 1369-8249, E-ISSN 1743-968X, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 282-303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article conducts a critical analysis of the historical lessons, theassumptions and the conduct of ‘hearts and minds’ approaches to counterinsurgency.This results in challenges. Theoretically the ‘hearts and minds’approach is rooted in modernisation theory and a normative Western approachto legitimacy that fails to live up to the expectations of the local population.The approach is also based on lessons from past successes such as the British1950s campaign in Malaya. However, a great contextual shift has taken placesince then and the relevance of past experiences is therefore questionable ina context of complex state-building in the wake of intervention. This also haspractical consequences as we seek to rectify the often misapplied approachesof today.

  • 4.
    Finnbogason, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Larsson, Göran
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Literature Hist Ideas & Relig, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Svensson, Isak
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Is Shia-Sunni Violence on the Rise?: Exploring New Data on Intra-Muslim Organised Violence 1989-20172019In: Civil Wars, ISSN 1369-8249, E-ISSN 1743-968X, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 25-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This data study provides the first comprehensive empirical overview of organised violence across the Shia and Sunni Muslim divide, 1989-2017. We present a conceptual framework of sectarian dimensions of armed conflicts: sectarian identities; sectarian ideologies; and sectarian alliances. Our analysis demonstrates the extent to which organised violence has been fought across the Shia-Sunni divide. We also explore the sectarian identity dimension in non-state armed conflicts and one-sided violence. Overall, our study shows that most of the organised violence across the Shia-Sunni divide is driven by states, rebel groups, and militias, rather than communities.

  • 5.
    Hultman, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Keeping Peace or Spurring Violence? Unintended Effects of Peace Operations on Violence against Civilians2010In: Civil Wars, ISSN 1369-8249, E-ISSN 1743-968X, Vol. 12, no 1-2, p. 29-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Are peace operations effective in managing violence against civilians in civil wars? I examine the short-term effects of peace operations on the intensity of violence against the civilian population in internal conflicts. Missions are often sent to ongoing conflicts, where the warring parties have not yet managed to settle their dispute through the use of military means. I propose three mechanisms through which the presence of a third party may increase the parties' incentives to target civilians. A quantitative assessment of all intrastate armed conflicts, 1989–2006, shows that while the presence of a peace operation does not have a clear effect on government violence, it is associated with higher levels of violence by rebel groups. Only UN peace operations with an explicit mandate to protect civilians significantly reduce violence against civilians by rebels.

  • 6.
    Karlborg, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research. Department of Politics, New York University.
    Enforced Hospitality: Local Perceptions of the Legitimacy of International Forces in Afghanistan2014In: Civil Wars, ISSN 1369-8249, E-ISSN 1743-968X, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 425-448Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While local mission legitimacy has prompted intense political and academic attention in the context of peace operations, our grasp of how host citizens understand the legitimacy of international troops remains limited. This article explores how Afghan citizens perceive the legitimacy of International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) troops. A qualitative analysis of in-depth interviews and focus group discussions with citizens in Kabul deepens our understanding of how ideational and security-related concerns interact and shape local perceptions of legitimacy through two oppositional discursive frames: a liberation frame and an occupation frame. The findings suggest that local mission legitimacy builds on the perceived will and capacity of ISAF troops to help and protect Afghans in ways that are in accordance with Afghan, most notably Islamic, ways of life. The article concludes that ISAF troops are widely perceived to have failed on both ideational and security-based grounds.

  • 7.
    Kostic, Roland
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Nation-building as an instrument of peace: Exploring local attitudes towards international nation-building building and reconciliation in Bosnia and Herzegovina2008In: Civil Wars, ISSN 1369-8249, E-ISSN 1743-968X, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 386-414Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Building a durable peace by means of external nationbuilding can be acumbersome and uncertain exercise. The outcome often hinges on the attitudesof the local population and elites and their willingness to endorse the process.This article scrutinises the attitudes of the recipient population and politicalelites towards different aspects of the external nationbuilding in Bosnia andHerzegovina. It addresses the problems of state identity, reconciliation anddemocratisation in an externally administered nationbuilding endeavour. Theempirical findings from Bosnia and Herzegovina are used to illustrate thedegree to which external nationbuilding can lay the infrastructure for adurable peace in the aftermath of ethnic war.

  • 8.
    Regan, Patrick
    et al.
    Joan Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies, University of Notre Dame.
    Wallensteen, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research. University of Notre Dame.
    Federal Institutions, Declarations of Independence and Civil War. 2013In: Civil Wars, ISSN 1369-8249, E-ISSN 1743-968X, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 261-280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Countries at civil war differ across a number of dimensions that are often used to account for onset, duration or severity. A relatively understudied dimension is the role of institutional arrangements on the severity of civil wars. We argue that federal systems put in place the mechanisms to make civil wars shorter but bloodier because they often allow for independent militia, taxation, and infrastructural development. Federal systems also make more credible a declaration of independence. These factors make civil wars looks much more like conventional warfare than their guerilla-based counterpart. We rely on the cases of Yugoslavia and the United States to build and describe our arguments and then we test our arguments against cross national data from the 20th century civil wars. Our results provide insights into the role of institutional arrangements on the management of internal conflicts and suggest that further research could make an important contribution to our understanding of civil wars.

  • 9.
    Rudolfsen, Ida
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research. PRIO, Oslo, Norway..
    State Capacity, Inequality and Inter-Group Violence in Sub-Saharan Africa: 1989-20112017In: Civil Wars, ISSN 1369-8249, E-ISSN 1743-968X, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 118-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most studies on internal armed conflict focus on the dyadic interaction between the state and a rebel group, leaving less attention to inter-group fighting. Addressing this gap in the literature, this study argues that the interplay between economic and political inequality and weak state capacity increases the risk of non-state conflict. An empirical analysis of 178 non-state conflicts in Sub-Saharan Africa between 1989 and 2011 provides support for the theorized conditional effect, but only for the role of economic inequality. The effect of political exclusion in the context of a weak state is not confirmed, suggesting that such conditions may be more prone to violence of another kind (i.e., mobilization against the state). Overall, these findings highlight the importance of a functioning state for maintaining peaceful inter-group relations, while they also lend support to earlier research that reports divergent effects of economic and political inequalities on civil conflict risk.

  • 10. Sindre, Gyda Marås
    et al.
    Söderström, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Understanding Armed Groups and Party Politics2016In: Civil Wars, ISSN 1369-8249, E-ISSN 1743-968X, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 109-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Political parties with an armed history are not unusual, yet how these groups function in politics after the transition has largely been ignored. This special issue examines armed groups in party politics, using single and comparative case studies. The introduction forwards five recommendations for future research: (1) We need to see more comparisons across taken for granted boundaries; (2) the consequences for democracy should figure more prominently in our analysis of armed groups; (3) think more critically about standards and conceptual tools; (4) critically examine the interaction between levels of analysis; and (5) methodological pluralism would enrich the field.

  • 11.
    Svensson, Isak
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    One God, Many Wars: Religious dimensions of armed conflict in the Middle East and North Africa2013In: Civil Wars, ISSN 1369-8249, E-ISSN 1743-968X, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 411-430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the religious dimensions of armed conflicts in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), a region where the monotheistic religions of Judaism, Islam, and Christianity traditionally dominate. Applying a regional perspective, this study finds that about half of the armed conflicts in the MENA region were between parties, where at least one side had made explicit reference to religion in their basic demands, and this category of conflicts has increased substantially over time. Why are religious civil wars becoming relatively more common over time in the MENA region? I argue that the relatively high frequency of religious armed intrastate conflicts in the region can be explained by three major empirical regularities: (1) the intractability of interreligious conflicts; (2) the spread of several but relatively shorter intrareligious disputes; and (3) the increasingly transnational aspect of religious disputes in the MENA region. Although these trends have been countered by the emergence of institutional settlements of some of the armed conflicts, these types of conflict management and conflict resolution attempts have, so far, been too few to generate a general shift in the basic empirical patterns. This paper provides an empirical overview over the main patterns and ends by identifying some important avenues for future research.

  • 12.
    Söderström, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    The Resilient, the Remobilized and the Removed: Party Mobilization among Former M19 Combatants2016In: Civil Wars, ISSN 1369-8249, E-ISSN 1743-968X, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 214-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Armed groups often transform into political parties, which involves a profound transformation of the organizational culture. How these parties condition the continued political mobilization of their members is unclear. Using life history interviews with former combatants of the armed group M19 in Colombia this article demonstrates what aspects of the party mobilize and stymie their political mobilization. Through exploring three typical political life paths - the Resilient, the Remobilized and the Removed - this article demonstrates the long term challenges of post-war politics, the role of the party, as well as the personal journey from (war and) peace to democracy.

  • 13.
    Themnér, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research. Nord Africa Inst, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Utas, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Cultural Anthropology and Ethnology. Nord Africa Inst, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Governance through Brokerage: Informal Governance in Post-Civil War Societies2016In: Civil Wars, ISSN 1369-8249, E-ISSN 1743-968X, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 255-280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is currently a lack of knowledge about how elites rule post-civil war societies without strong state institutions. This paper argues that elites oftentimes overcome such institutional deficiencies by engaging in governance through brokerage. According to this perspective, elites outsource central state functions to influential broker figures. This is particularly true when dealing with war-affected groups that possess much violent agency. By functioning as social membranes, brokers can help elites and war-affected groups to redefine a new social contract. Liberia is employed as an example to illustrate the paper’s central arguments.

  • 14.
    Utas, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Cultural Anthropology and Ethnology.
    Research Brokers We Use and Abuse while Researching Civil Wars and Their Aftermaths – Methodological Concerns2019In: Civil Wars, ISSN 1369-8249, E-ISSN 1743-968X, ISSN 1369-8249, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 271-285Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Utas, Mats
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Cultural Anthropology and Ethnology.
    Eriksson Baaz, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Exploring the Backstage: Methodological and Ethical Issues Surrounding the Role of Research Brokers in Insecure Zones2019In: Civil Wars, ISSN 1369-8249, E-ISSN 1743-968X, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 157-178Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 15 of 15
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