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  • 1.
    Brounéus, Karen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Truth Telling as Talking Cure?: Insecurity and Retraumatization in the Rwandan Gacaca Courts2008In: Security Dialogue, ISSN 0967-0106, E-ISSN 1460-3640, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 55-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents unique material from in-depth interviews with 16 women in Rwanda who have testified in the gacaca, the village tribunals initiated to enhance reconciliation after the 1994 genocide. The aim of the interviews was to learn more of how testifying in such a public event as the gacaca affects psychological health. Do the women find the experience healing or retraumatizing? Are there other effects involved? There has been an assumption that testifying in truth and reconciliation commissions is a healing experience for survivors, and healing has been a central concept in the general reconciliation literature and in political rhetoric around truth commissions. However, the findings of this study are alarming. Traumatization, ill-health, isolation, and insecurity dominate the lives of these testifying women. They are threatened and harassed before, during, and after giving testimony in the gacaca. The article provides a picture of the reconciliation process that we seldom see.

  • 2.
    Eriksson Baaz, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Verweijen, Judith
    University of Ghent, Ghent, Belgium.
    Confronting the colonial: The (re)production of ‘African’ exceptionalism in critical security and military studies2018In: Security Dialogue, ISSN 0967-0106, E-ISSN 1460-3640, Vol. 49, no 1-2, p. 57-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on postcolonial theory, this article queries into the ways in which the concepts of militarism/militarization and securitization are applied to ‘African’ contexts. We highlight the selective nature of such application and probe into the potential reasons for and effects of this selectiveness, focusing on its signifying work. As we argue, the current selective uses of securitization and militarism/militarization in ‘Africa’ scholarship tend to recreate troublesome distinctions between ‘developed’ versus ‘underdeveloped’ spaces within theory and methodology. In particular, they contribute to the reproduction of familiar colonially scripted imagery of a passive and traditional ‘Africa’, ruled by crude force and somehow devoid of ‘liberal’ ideas and modes of governing. Yet we do not suggest simply discarding ‘selectiveness’ or believe that there are any other easy remedies to the tensions between universalism and particularism in theory application. Recognizing the ambivalent workings of colonial discourse, we rather contend that any attempts to trace the colonial into the present use of the concepts of securitization and militarism/militarization need to acknowledge the problematic nature of both discourses of ‘African’ Otherness and those of universalism and sameness.

  • 3.
    Guzzini, Stefano
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Securitization as a causal mechanism2011In: Security Dialogue, ISSN 0967-0106, E-ISSN 1460-3640, Vol. 42, no 4-5, p. 329-341Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article seeks to offer a way forward in discussions about the status of securitization theory. In my reading, this debate has been inhibited by the difficulty of finding an appropriate version of ‘understanding/explanation’ that would be consistent with the meta-theoretical commitments of a post-structuralist theory. By leaving ‘explanation’ and/or all versions of causality to the positivist other, the Copenhagen School also left its own explanatory status often implicit, or only negatively defined. Instead, the present article claims that the explanatory theory used in securitization research de facto relies on causal mechanisms that are non-positivistically conceived. Using the appropriate methodological literature renders this explanatory status explicit, exposing the theory’s non-positivist causality and thus, hopefully, enhancing its empirical theory.

  • 4.
    Sjöstedt, Roxanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Exploring the Construction of Threats: The securitization of HIV/AIDS in Russia2008In: Security Dialogue, ISSN 0967-0106, E-ISSN 1460-3640, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 7-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In April 2006, Russian President Vladimir Putin publicly declared HIV/ AIDS to be a threat to Russia's national security and proposed a guiding strategy to handle it. This move stood in sharp contrast to previous policies of the Russian government. Despite the fact that Russia has experienced one of the fastest growing rates of HIV/AIDS in the world since the turn of the millennium, the government's involvement had previously been minimal, not recognizing AIDS as a national security threat. The question then arises: when is a threat really threatening? This article contributes to the development of theories on threat-framing and security decisionmaking by suggesting an analytical framework that incorporates explanatory variables from different levels of analysis. The adoption of a broad theoretical position facilitates a comprehensive understanding of time and space variations in the securitization of issues. The article demonstrates that norms and identity constructions at the international and domestic levels, combined with their internalization by individual decisionmakers, can together explain Putin's move, and that these factors are of different importance at difference stages of the threat-construction process.

  • 5.
    Svensson, Isak
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research. University of Otago, New Zealand.
    Lindgren, Mathilda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    From Bombs to Banners?: The Decline of Wars and the Rise of Unarmed Uprisings in East Asia2011In: Security Dialogue, ISSN 0967-0106, E-ISSN 1460-3640, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 219-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the most important debates in the field of peace and conflict research concerns whether wars andarmed conflicts are declining over time. The region where this plays out most markedly is East Asia: havingsuffered some of the world’s most brutal wars in the period prior to 1979, the region has since witnessed anera of relative peacefulness. This article asks whether the decline in the level of war in the region reflects achange in the means used to pursue conflicts: are conflicts that previously were fought with arms increasinglymanifested through unarmed uprisings based on strategic nonviolent actions? Examining the empiricalpatterns of armed conflicts and unarmed uprisings in the region, the article shows that there has been asubstantial increase in the number of unarmed uprisings in East Asia that runs parallel with a decrease in theintensity and frequency of warfare. Yet, the article also shows that these nonviolent uprisings do not follow onfrom previous armed campaigns, and that armed and unarmed campaigns differ in terms of aims, nature andoutcome. Thus, the article concludes that there is little support for the hypothesis that those who formerlyused violence have shifted to new nonviolent, unarmed tactics, and that we are rather witnessing two parallel,unrelated processes. These insights call for an enlargement of the research agenda of the ‘East Asian peace’.

  • 6.
    Swain, Ashok
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Conflicts over Water: The Ganges Water Dispute1993In: Security Dialogue, ISSN 0967-0106, E-ISSN 1460-3640, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 429-439Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Tängh Wrangel, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Centre for Multidisciplinary Studies on Racism.
    The biopolitics of algorithmic governmentality: How the US military imagines war in the age of neurobiology and artificial intelligence2024In: Security Dialogue, ISSN 0967-0106, E-ISSN 1460-3640Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the objective to predict and pre-empt the emergence of political violence, the US Department of Defence (DoD) has devoted increasing attention to the intersection between neurobiology and artificial intelligence. Concepts such as ‘cognitive biotechnologies’, ‘digital biosecurity’ and large-scale collection of ‘neurodata’ herald a future in which neurobiological intervention on a global scale is believed to come of age. This article analyses how the relationship between neurobiology and AI – between the human and the machine – is conceived, made possible, and acted upon within the SMA programme, an interdisciplinary research programme sponsored by the DoD. By showcasing the close intersection between the computer sciences and the neurosciences within the US military, the article questions descriptions of algorithmic governmentality as decentring the human, and as juxtaposed to biopolitical techniques to regulate processes of subjectivity. The article shows that within US military discourse, new biotechnologies are seen to engender algorithmic governmentality a biopolitical dimension, capable of monitoring and regulating emotions, thoughts, beliefs, and subjectivity on population level, particularly targeting the minds and brains of ‘vulnerable’ populations in the global South.

1 - 7 of 7
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