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  • 1.
    Edvinsson, Marie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Infectious Diseases.
    Ilbäck, Nils-Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Infectious Diseases.
    Frisk, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Thelin, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Thoracic Surgery.
    Nyström-Rosander, Christina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Infectious Diseases.
    Trace Element Changes in Thoracic Aortic Dissection2016In: Biological Trace Element Research, ISSN 0163-4984, E-ISSN 1559-0720, Vol. 169, no 2, p. 159-163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thoracic aortic dissection is a life-threatening condition with an incompletely understood pathogenesis. Trace elements are essential for the functioning of different processes in the body, including the immune system and associated responses to infection/inflammation. Because inflammation may be part of the pathogenesis of thoracic aortic dissection, we investigated whether trace element changes associated with inflammation occur in serum and tissue samples during the disease. The study included 21 patients undergoing surgery for thoracic aortic dissection, 10 forensic autopsy specimens for tissue controls and 23 healthy blood donors for serum controls. Levels of magnesium (Mg), calcium (Ca), vanadium (V), manganese (Mn), iron (Fe), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), arsenic (As), selenium (Se), cadmium (Cd) and mercury (Hg) were measured in the aortic tissue and serum by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). In the serum, Ca, V, Cu and Zn decreased, whereas Fe increased. In the tissue, Cu and Zn decreased and Fe tended to increase. The Cu/Zn ratio in the serum, a marker of infection/inflammation, did not change in the patients. Concerning trace element changes in the serum and tissue, our data do not support the hypothesis that inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of thoracic aortic dissection.

  • 2.
    Frisk, Peter
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Enheten för metallbiologisk forskning.
    Danersund, Antero
    Hudecek, Romuald
    Lindh, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Enheten för metallbiologisk forskning.
    Changed clinical chemistry pattern in blood after removal of dental amalgam and other metal alloys supported by antioxidant therapy2007In: Biological Trace Element Research, ISSN 0163-4984, E-ISSN 1559-0720, Vol. 120, no 1-3, p. 163-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to investigate a possible connection between removal of dental amalgam restorations supported by antioxidant therapy and indicative changes of clinical chemistry parameters. A group of 24 patients, referred for complaints related to amalgam restorations, underwent a removal of their amalgams. All patients were treated with antioxidants (vitamin B-complex, vitamin C, vitamin E, and sodium selenite). An age- and sex-matched control group of 22 individuals was also included. The mercury (Hg) and selenium (Se) concentration in plasma, Hg concentration in erythrocytes, and 17 clinical chemistry variables were examined in three groups: patients before amalgam removal (Before), patients after amalgam removal (After), and control individuals (Control). The Hg and Se values decreased (p < 0.05) in plasma, and the Hg concentration decreased (p < 0.05) in erythrocytes after amalgam removal. The variables serum lactate dehydrogenase (serum LDH) and serum sodium differed significantly both when comparing Control with Before (p < 0.01) and Before with After (p < 0.01). The variables white blood cell count (WBC), blood neutrophil count, blood eosinophil count, blood basophil count, blood lymphocyte count, blood monocyte count, serum potassium, and serum creatinine differed in the Before/After test (p < 0.05). Multivariate statistics (discriminant function analysis) could separate the groups Before and After with only one misclassification.

  • 3.
    Frisk, Peter
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Enheten för metallbiologisk forskning.
    Lindvall, Anders
    Hudecek, Romuald
    Lindh, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Enheten för metallbiologisk forskning.
    Decrease of trace elements in erythrocytes and plasma after removal of dental amalgam and other metal alloys2006In: Biological Trace Element Research, ISSN 0163-4984, E-ISSN 1559-0720, Vol. 113, no 3, p. 247-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to determine the concentration changes of 13 elements in erythrocytes and plasma after the removal of dental amalgam and other metal alloys. Blood samples from 250 patients were collected, separated into erythrocytes and plasma, and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The 250 patients were divided into 3 groups (Negative, Zero, and Positive) depending on their estimation of quality of life in an earlier study. Magnesium in plasma, selenium and mercury in plasma, and erythrocytes showed decreased concentrations after amalgam removal in all groups (p < 0.05). Titanium in plasma, copper in plasma, and erythrocytes and zinc in plasma exhibited decreased concentrations after amalgam removal in the Negative and Positive groups (p < 0.05). Silver in plasma and gold in erythrocytes decreased in the Zero and Positive groups after amalgam removal (p < 0.05). Copper in erythrocytes and silver and gold in plasma showed higher concentrations after amalgam removal in the Negative compared to the Positive group (p < 0.05), suggesting that patients in the Negative group excrete metals slowly. Moreover, the cobalt levels in plasma were lowest in the Negative group and only this group showed a significant increase in vitamin B12 levels in blood after amalgam removal.

  • 4.
    Habiba, G.
    et al.
    Univ Addis Ababa, Ethiopian Inst Water Resources, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
    Abebe, G.
    Univ Addis Ababa, Dept Zool Sci, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
    Bravo, Andrea G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ermias, D.
    Hawassa Univ, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
    Staffan, Ǻ.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Aquat Sci & Assessment, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bishop, Kevin
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Aquat Sci & Assessment, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Mercury Human Exposure in Populations Living Around Lake Tana (Ethiopia)2017In: Biological Trace Element Research, ISSN 0163-4984, E-ISSN 1559-0720, Vol. 175, no 2, p. 237-243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A survey carried out in Lake Tana in 2015 found that Hg levels in some fish species exceeded internationally accepted safe levels for fish consumption. The current study assesses human exposure to Hg through fish consumption around the Lake Tana. Of particular interest was that a dietary intake of fishes is currently a health risk for Bihar Dar residents and anglers. Hair samples were collected from three different groups: anglers, college students and teachers, and daily laborers. A questionary includes gender, age, weight, activity. Frequency of fish consumption and origin of the eaten fish were completed by each participant. Mercury concentrations in hair were significantly higher (P value <0.05) for anglers (mean ± standard deviation 0.120 ± 0.199 μg/g) than college students (mean ± standard deviation 0.018 ± 0.039 μg/g) or daily workers (mean ± standard deviation 16 ± 9.5 ng/g). Anglers consumed fish more often than daily workers and college group. Moreover, there was also a strong correlation (P value <0.05) between the logarithms of total mercury and age associated with mercury concentration in scalp hair. Mercury concentrations in the hair of men were on average twice the value of the women. Also, users of skin lightening soap on a daily basis had 2.5 times greater mercury in scalp hair than non-users. Despite the different sources of mercury exposure mentioned above, the mercury concentrations of the scalp hair of participants of this study were below levels deemed to pose a threat to health.

  • 5.
    Ilbäck, Nils-Gunnar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Lindh, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Enheten för metallbiologisk forskning.
    Minqin, Ren
    Friman, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Watt, Frank
    Selenium and mercury are redistributed to the brain during viral infection in mice2005In: Biological Trace Element Research, ISSN 0163-4984, E-ISSN 1559-0720, Vol. 108, no 1-3, p. 215-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As part of the general host response to coxsackievirus B3 (CB3) infection, the concentration of essential and nonessential trace elements changes in different target organs of the infection. Essential (e.g., Se) and nonessential (e.g., Hg) trace elements are known to interact and affect inflammatory tissue lesions induced by CB3 infection. However, it is unknown whether these changes involve the brain. In the present study, the brain Hg and Se contents were measured through inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and their distribution investigated by means of nuclear microscopy in the early phase (d 3) of CB3 infection in normally fed female Balb/c mice. Because of the infection, the concentration of Hg (4.07 +/- 0.46 ng/g wet wt) and Se (340 +/- 16 ng/g wet wt) in the brain increased twofold for Hg (8.77 +/- 1.65 ng/g wet wt, p < 0.05) and by 36% for Se (461 +/- 150 ng/g wet wt, ns). Nuclear microscopy of brain sections from mice having elevated Se and Hg concentrations failed to find localized levels of the elements high enough to make detection possible, indicating approximately homogeneous tissue distribution. Although the pathophysiological interpretation of these findings requires further research, the increase of Hg in the brain during infection might have an influence on the pathogenesis of the disease.

  • 6.
    Nyström-Rosander, Christina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Lindh, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Ilbäck, Nils-Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Hjelm, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Thelin, Stefan
    Lindqvist, Olle
    Friman, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Interactions between Chlamydia pneumoniae and trace elements: a possible link to aortic valve sclerosis2003In: Biological Trace Element Research, ISSN 0163-4984, E-ISSN 1559-0720, Vol. 91, no 2, p. 97-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An association between Chlamydia pneumoniae and atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases has been suggested. However, other factors may interact in the pathogenesis of valve sclerosis. Therefore, trace elements important for C. pneumoniae growth and host defense and markers of C. pneumoniae infection were studied in sclerotic valves and serum. Forty-six patients undergoing surgical valve replacement due to advanced aortic sclerosis were prospectively studied. Valves from 15 forensic cases with no heart valve disease and plasma from 46 healthy volunteers served as controls. C. pneumoniae was detected in 16/46 (34.8 %) sclerotic valves and in 0/15 forensic controls. IgG and IgA antibodies to C. pneumoniae were present in 54.3% and 26.1 % patients, respectively. In the patients' valves, iron, magnesium, and zinc each correlated to calcium, a marker of the histopathological severity of disease. Patients showed 10- to 70-fold increases of these trace elements in valves and an increased copper/zinc ratio in serum. In a majority of aortic sclerosis patients, one of several markers of C. pneumoniae infection were detected and all patients had a disturbed trace element balance in valves and serum suggestive of active immune process and infection. The pattern of trace element changes was essentially similar regardless of positive makers of C. pneumoniae, suggesting a similar etiopathogenesis in both subgroups. The 20-fold increase in iron, essential for C. pneumoniae growth, in sclerotic valves suggests a new possible link to this infection in aortic sclerosis.

  • 7.
    Nyström-Rosander, Christina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Lindh, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Thelin, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Lindquist, Olle
    Friman, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Ilbäck, Nils-Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Trace element changes in sclerotic heart valves from patients undergoing aortic valve surgery.2002In: Biological Trace Element Research, ISSN 0163-4984, E-ISSN 1559-0720, Vol. 88, no 1, p. 9-24Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Several trace elements are essential nutrients for an optimal functioning of organs and tissues, including the immune system and the heart. The pathogenesis of some heart diseases has been associated with changes in the balance of certain trace elements. The etiology of nonrheumatic aortic valve sclerosis is unknown, however. A prospective study was performed on trace element changes in the sclerotic valves of 46 patients undergoing surgical aortic valve replacement because of aortic stenosis. Valves from 15 individual forensic cases without known cardiac disease served as controls. The contents of 15 trace elements (Al, As, Cd, Ca, Co, Cu, Fe, Pb, Mg, Mn, Hg, Se, Ag, V, and Zn) were measured by inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) of aortic valve tissue from both patients and forensic autopsy controls. Some trace elements showed similar concentrations in sclerotic and control valves (Al, Ag, Hg, Mn), whereas a few were moderately changed in the sclerotic as compared with the control valves, including an increase in Cd by 52% (p < 0.05) and decreases in Se by 14% (p < 0.05), in V by 42% (p < 0,001), and in Cu by 45% (p < 0.001). However, there were pronounced increases (p < 0.001) in the concentrations of As (5-fold), Ca (70-fold), Co(10-fold), Fe (20-fold), Pb (8-fold), Mg (20-fold), and Zn (10-fold) in the sclerotic valves. Thus, sclerotic aortic valve disease is associated with a pronounced imbalance in several trace elements of well-known importance for cardiovascular and immune function as well as in trace elements with hitherto unknown significance.

  • 8. Roos, Per M.
    et al.
    Vesterberg, Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology.
    Syversen, Tore
    Flaten, Trond Peder
    Nordberg, Monica
    Metal Concentrations in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Blood Plasma from Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis2013In: Biological Trace Element Research, ISSN 0163-4984, E-ISSN 1559-0720, Vol. 151, no 2, p. 159-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive and fatal degenerative disorder of motor neurons. The cause of this degeneration is unknown, and different causal hypotheses include genetic, viral, traumatic and environmental mechanisms. In this study, we have analyzed metal concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood plasma in a well-defined cohort (n = 17) of ALS patients diagnosed with quantitative electromyography. Metal analyses were performed with high-resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Statistically significant higher concentrations of manganese, aluminium, cadmium, cobalt, copper, zinc, lead, vanadium and uranium were found in ALS CSF compared to control CSF. We also report higher concentrations of these metals in ALS CSF than in ALS blood plasma, which indicate mechanisms of accumulation, e.g. inward directed transport. A pattern of multiple toxic metals is seen in ALS CSF. The results support the hypothesis that metals with neurotoxic effects are involved in the pathogenesis of ALS.

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