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  • 1.
    Alim, Md. Abdul
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet.
    Ackermann, Paul W
    Eliasson, Pernilla
    Blomgran, Parmis
    Kristiansson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Pejler, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Peterson, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Increased mast cell degranulation and co-localization of mast cells with the NMDA receptor-1 during healing after Achilles tendon rupture2017In: Cell and Tissue Research, ISSN 0302-766X, E-ISSN 1432-0878, Vol. 370, no 3, p. 451-460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of inflammation and the mechanism of tendon healing after rupture has historically been a matter of controversy. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the role of mast cells and their relation to the NMDA receptor-1 (a glutamate receptor) during healing after Achilles tendon rupture. Eight female Sprague Dawley rats had their right Achilles tendon transected. Three weeks after rupture, histological quantification of mast cell numbers and their state of degranulation was assessed by histochemistry. Co-localization of mast cell tryptase (a mast cell marker) and NMDA receptor-1 was determined by immunofluorescence. The intact left Achilles tendon was used as control. An increased number of mast cells and a higher proportion of degranulated mast cells were found in the healing Achilles tendon compared to the intact. In addition, increased co-localization of mast cell tryptase and NMDA receptor-1 was seen in the areas of myotendinous junction, mid-tendon proper and bone tendon junction of the healing versus the intact tendon. These findings introduce a possible role for mast cells in the healing phase after Achilles tendon rupture.

  • 2.
    Alim, Md Abdul
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet.
    Ackermann, Paul W
    Eliasson, Pernilla
    Blomgran, Parmis
    Kristiansson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Pejler, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Peterson, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Increased mast cell degranulation and co-localization of mast cells with the NMDA receptor-1 during healing after Achilles tendon rupture2017In: Cell and Tissue Research, ISSN 0302-766X, E-ISSN 1432-0878, Vol. 370, no 3, p. 451-460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of inflammation and the mechanism of tendon healing after rupture has historically been a matter of controversy. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the role of mast cells and their relation to the NMDA receptor-1 (a glutamate receptor) during healing after Achilles tendon rupture. Eight female Sprague Dawley rats had their right Achilles tendon transected. Three weeks after rupture, histological quantification of mast cell numbers and their state of degranulation was assessed by histochemistry. Co-localization of mast cell tryptase (a mast cell marker) and NMDA receptor-1 was determined by immunofluorescence. The intact left Achilles tendon was used as control. An increased number of mast cells and a higher proportion of degranulated mast cells were found in the healing Achilles tendon compared to the intact. In addition, increased co-localization of mast cell tryptase and NMDA receptor-1 was seen in the areas of myotendinous junction, mid-tendon proper and bone tendon junction of the healing versus the intact tendon. These findings introduce a possible role for mast cells in the healing phase after Achilles tendon rupture.

  • 3.
    Briley Saebo, Karen
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Bjørnerud, Atle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Grant, Derek
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Berg, Trond
    Mörk Kindberg, Grete
    Hepatic cellular distribution and degradation of iron oxide nanoparticles following single intravenous injection in rats: implications for magnetic resonance imaging2004In: Cell and Tissue Research, ISSN 0302-766X, E-ISSN 1432-0878, Vol. 316, no 3, p. 315-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to determine the cellular distribution and degradation in rat liver following intravenous injection of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles used for magnetic resonance imaging (NC100150 Injection). Relaxometric and spectrophotometric methods were used to determine the concentration of the iron oxide nanoparticles and their degradation products in isolated rat liver parenchymal, endothelial and Kupffer cell fractions. An isolated cell phantom was also constructed to quantify the effect of the degradation products on the loss of MR signal in terms of decreased transverse relaxation times, T2*. The results of this study show that iron oxide nanoparticles found in the NC100150 Injection were taken up and distributed equally in both liver endothelial and Kupffer cells following a single 5 mg Fe/kg body wt. bolus injection in rats. Whereas endothelial and Kupffer cells exhibited similar rates of uptake and degradation, liver parenchymal cells did not take up the NC100150 Injection iron oxide particles. Light-microscopy methods did, however, indicate an increased iron load, presumably as ferritin/hemosiderin, within the hepatocytes 24 h post injection. The study also confirmed that compartmentalisation of ferritin/hemosiderin may cause a significant decrease in the MRI signal intensity of the liver. In conclusion, the combined results of this study imply that the prolonged presence of breakdown product in the liver may cause a prolonged imaging effect (in terms of signal loss) for a time period that significantly exceeds the half-life of NC100150 Injection iron oxide nanoparticles in liver.

  • 4.
    Chacko, L. Johnson
    et al.
    Med Univ Innsbruck, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, Anichstr 35, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria..
    Blumer, M. J. F.
    Med Univ Innsbruck, Dept Anat Histol & Embryol, Div Clin & Funct Anat, Muellerstr 59, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria..
    Pechriggl, E.
    Med Univ Innsbruck, Dept Anat Histol & Embryol, Div Clin & Funct Anat, Muellerstr 59, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria..
    Rask-Andersen, Helge
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Dietl, W.
    Med Univ Innsbruck, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, Anichstr 35, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria..
    Haim, A.
    Med Univ Innsbruck, Dept Plast Reconstruct & Aesthet Surg, Innerkoflerstr 1, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria..
    Fritsch, H.
    Med Univ Innsbruck, Dept Anat Histol & Embryol, Div Clin & Funct Anat, Muellerstr 59, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria..
    Glueckert, R.
    Med Univ Innsbruck, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, Anichstr 35, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria.;Tirol Kliniken, Univ Clin Innsbruck, Anichstr 35, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria..
    Dudas, J.
    Med Univ Innsbruck, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, Anichstr 35, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria..
    Schrott-Fischer, A.
    Med Univ Innsbruck, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, Anichstr 35, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria..
    Role of BDNF and neurotrophic receptors in human inner ear development2017In: Cell and Tissue Research, ISSN 0302-766X, E-ISSN 1432-0878, Vol. 370, no 3, p. 347-363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The expression patterns of the neurotrophin, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, BDNF, and the neurotrophic receptors-p75NTR and Trk receptors-in the developing human fetal inner ear between the gestational weeks (GW) 9 to 12 are examined via in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. BDNF mRNA expression was highest in the cochlea at GW 9 but declined in the course of development. In contrast to embryonic murine specimens, a decline in BDNF expression from the apical to the basal turn of the cochlea could not be observed. p75NTR immunostaining was most prominent in the nerve fibers that penetrate into the sensory epithelia of the cochlea, the urticule and the saccule as gestational age progresses. TrkB and TrkC expression intensified towards GW 12, at which point the BDNF mRNA localization was at its lowest. TrkA expression was limited to fiber subpopulations of the facial nerve at GW 10. In the adult human inner ear, we observed BDNF mRNA expression in the apical poles of the cochlear hair cells and supporting cells, while in the adult human utricle, the expression was localized in the vestibular hair cells. We demonstrate the highly specific staining patterns of BDNF mRNA and its putative receptors over a developmental period in which multiple hearing disorders are manifested. Our findings suggest that BDNF and neurotrophin receptors are important players during early human inner ear development. In particular, they seem to be important for the survival of the afferent sensory neurons.

  • 5.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Phillipson, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    The neutrophil: one cell on many missions or many cells with different agendas?2018In: Cell and Tissue Research, ISSN 0302-766X, E-ISSN 1432-0878, Vol. 371, no 3, p. 415-423Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The unique role of neutrophils in host defense is not only based on their abilities to kill bacteria but is also due to their abundance in circulation and their ability to quickly migrate and accumulate in great numbers at afflicted sites. The high number of circulating neutrophils is the result of regulated release of new neutrophils from bone marrow as well as from marginated pools to balance their recruitment to tissue. Marginated pools, such as the spleen and lung, have previously been attributed to passively delay neutrophil transit time due to their large capillary network, but recent reports demonstrate that they are comprised of neutrophils with specific functions. The spleen, for instance, holds neutrophil subpopulations at different anatomical locations with distinct functions important for, e.g., bacterial eradication, and the lung was recently shown to re-educate neutrophils that had trafficked from a site of sterile injury to home back to bone marrow for elimination. Further, recent reports demonstrate subpopulations of neutrophils with different actions during homeostasis, infection, tissue restitution and cancer. It is becoming increasingly clear that this cannot be due to different stages of neutrophil activation during their life span but instead points towards distinct subpopulations of neutrophils with different effector functions. Whether these cellular distinctions are due to different education or origin is, however, not yet known. Together, the accumulating information about the heterogeneous neutrophils presents important insights into their role in development of pathologies, as well as revealing novel targets in the form of certain subpopulations to treat disease.

  • 6. Eckhard, Andreas
    et al.
    Gleiser, Corinna
    Rask-Andersen, Helge
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Arnold, Heinz
    Liu, Wei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Mack, Andreas
    Müller, Marcus
    Löwenheim, Hubert
    Hirt, Bernhard
    Co-localisation of Kir4.1 and AQP4 in rat and human cochleae reveals a gap in water channel expression at the transduction sites of endocochlear K+ recycling routes2012In: Cell and Tissue Research, ISSN 0302-766X, E-ISSN 1432-0878, Vol. 350, no 1, p. 27-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sensory transduction in the cochlea depends on perilymphatic-endolymphatic potassium (K+) recycling. It has been suggested that the epithelial supporting cells (SCs) of the cochlear duct may form the intracellular K+ recycling pathway. Thus, they must be endowed with molecular mechanisms that facilitate K+ uptake and release, along with concomitant osmotically driven water movements. As yet, no molecules have been described that would allow for volume-equilibrated transepithelial K+ fluxes across the SCs. This study describes the subcellular co-localisation of the Kir4.1 K+ channel (Kir4.1) and the aquaporin-4 water channel (AQP4) in SCs, on the basis of immunohistochemical double-labelling experiments in rat and human cochleae. The results of this study reveal the expression of Kir4.1 in the basal or basolateral membranes of the SCs in the sensory domain of the organ of Corti that are adjacent to hair cells and in the non-sensory domains of the inner and outer sulci that abut large extracellular fluid spaces. The SCs of the inner sulcus (interdental cells, inner sulcus cells) and the outer sulcus (Hensen’s cells, outer sulcus cells) display the co-localisation of Kir4.1 and AQP4 expression. However, the SCs in the sensory domain of the organ of Corti reveal a gap in the expression of AQP4. The outer pillar cell is devoid of both Kir4.1 and AQP4. The subcellular co-localisation of Kir4.1 and AQP4 in the SCs of the cochlea described in this study resembles that of the astroglia of the central nervous system and the glial Mueller cells in the retina.

  • 7.
    Garvin, Stina
    et al.
    Inst för Experimentell och Klinisk medicin, Linköping.
    Nilsson, Ulrika W
    Inst för Experimentell och Klinisk medicin, Linköping.
    Huss, Fredrik R M
    Inst för Experimentell och Klinisk medicin, Linköping.
    Kratz, Gunnar
    Inst för Experimentell och Klinisk medicin, Linköping.
    Dabrosin, Charlotta
    Inst för Experimentell och Klinisk medicin, Linköping.
    Estradiol increases VEGF in human breast studied by whole-tissue culture.2006In: Cell and Tissue Research, ISSN 0302-766X, E-ISSN 1432-0878, Vol. 325, no 2, p. 245-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sex steroid exposure constitutes a risk factor for breast cancer, but little is known about the effects of sex steroids on the normal breast, largely because of the lack of convenient models. We have developed a method of culturing normal breast tissue ex vivo. We have applied this method to investigate the effects of estradiol and progesterone on the key angiogenic mediator, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), in the breast. Whole breast tissue was obtained from routine reduction mammoplasty. Tissue biopsies were cultured in vitro for 1-3 weeks, and the expression of luminal cytokeratin 18 was determined by immunohistochemistry. As an application, tissue biopsies were treated in vitro for 1 week with or without estradiol or estradiol and progesterone. Estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and Ki-67 were analyzed, and VEGF levels were examined by quantitative immunoassay and immunohistochemistry. Whole breast tissue was cultured ex vivo for 1 week with preserved morphology. Increased detachment of the luminal epithelium was observed after 2 weeks. Estradiol increased extracellular levels of VEGF in normal breast tissue biopsy medium. The addition of progesterone had neither stimulatory nor inhibitory effects on secreted VEGF. The method of whole breast tissue culturing thus provide a means by which to explore the biology of normal breast tissue. Our results suggest that estradiol exerts pro-angiogenic effects in normal breast by increasing levels of biologically active VEGF.

  • 8.
    Hayashi, Hisamitsu
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery. Gifu Univ, Grad Sch Med, Dept Otolaryngol, Gifu, Gifu 5011194, Japan.
    Schrott-Fischer, Annelies
    Med Univ Innsbruck, Dept Otolaryngol, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria.
    Glueckert, Rudolf
    Med Univ Innsbruck, Dept Otolaryngol, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria.
    Liu, Wei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Salvenmoser, Willi
    Univ Innsbruck, Inst Zool, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria.
    Santi, Peter
    Univ Minnesota, Dept Otolaryngol, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA.
    Rask-Andersen, Helge
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Molecular organization and fine structure of the human tectorial membrane: is it replenished?2015In: Cell and Tissue Research, ISSN 0302-766X, E-ISSN 1432-0878, Vol. 362, no 3, p. 513-527Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Auditory sensitivity and frequency resolution depend on the physical properties of the basilar membrane in combination with outer hair cell-based amplification in the cochlea. The physiological role of the tectorial membrane (TM) in hair cell transduction has been controversial for decades. New insights into the TM structure and function have been gained from studies of targeted gene disruption. Several missense mutations in genes regulating the human TM structure have been described with phenotypic expressions. Here, we portray the remarkable gradient structure and molecular organization of the human TM. Ultrastructural analysis and confocal immunohistochemistry were performed in freshly fixed human cochleae obtained during surgery. Based on these findings and recent literature, we discuss the role of human TMs in hair cell activation. Moreover, the outcome proposes that the α-tectorin-positive amorphous layer of the human TM is replenished and partly undergoes regeneration during life.

  • 9.
    Heldin, Carl-Henrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Moustakas, Aristidis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Role of Smads in TGFβ signaling2012In: Cell and Tissue Research, ISSN 0302-766X, E-ISSN 1432-0878, Vol. 347, no 1, p. 21-36Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) is the prototype for a large family of pleiotropic factors that signal via heterotetrameric complexes of type I and type II serine/threonine kinase receptors. Important intracellular mediators of TGFβ signaling are members of the Smad family. Smad2 and 3 are activated by C-terminal receptor-mediated phosphorylation, whereafter they form complexes with Smad4 and are translocated to the nucleus where they, in cooperation with other transcription factors, co-activators and co-repressors, regulate the transcription of specific genes. Smads have key roles in exerting TGFβ-induced programs leading to cell growth arrest and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. The activity and stability of Smad molecules are carefully regulated by a plethora of post-translational modifications, including phosphorylation, ubiquitination, sumoylation, acetylation and poly(ADP)-ribosylation. The Smad function has been shown to be perturbed in certain diseases such as cancer.

  • 10. Jin, Zhe
    et al.
    Mannström, Paula
    Järlebark, Leif
    Ulfendahl, Mats
    Malformation of stria vascularis in the developing inner ear of the German waltzing guinea pig2007In: Cell and Tissue Research, ISSN 0302-766X, E-ISSN 1432-0878, Vol. 328, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Liu, Wei
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Atturo, Francesca
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Aldaya, Robair
    Santi, Peter
    Cureoglu, Sebahattin
    Obwegeser, Sabrina
    Glueckert, Rudolf
    Pfaller, Kristian
    Schrott-Fischer, Annelies
    Rask-Andersen, Helge
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Macromolecular organization and fine structure of the human basilar membrane - RELEVANCE for cochlear implantation2015In: Cell and Tissue Research, ISSN 0302-766X, E-ISSN 1432-0878, Vol. 360, no 2, p. 245-262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Cochlear micromechanics and frequency tuning depend on the macromolecular organization of the basilar membrane (BM), which is still unclear in man. Novel techniques in cochlear implantation (CI) motivate further analyses of the BM. Materials and methods Normal cochleae from patients undergoing removal of life-threatening petro-clival meningioma and an autopsy specimen from a normal human were used. Laser-confocal microscopy, high resolution scanning (SEM) and transmission electronmicroscopy (TEM) were carried out in combination. In addition, one human temporal bone was decellularized and investigated by SEM. Results The human BM consisted in four separate layers: (1) epithelial basement membrane positive for laminin-beta 2 andcollagen IV, (2) BM Bproper boolean AND composed of radial fibers expressing collagen II and XI, (3) layer of collagen IV and (4) tympanic covering layer (TCL) expressing collagen IV, fibronectin and integrin. BM thickness varied both radially and longitudinally (mean 0.55-1.16 mu m). BM was thinnest near the OHC region and laterally. Conclusions There are several important similarities and differences between the morphology of the BM in humans and animals. Unlike in animals, it does not contain a distinct pars tecta (arcuate) and pectinata. Its width increases and thickness decreases as it travels apically in the cochlea. Findings show that the human BM is thinnest and probably most vibration-sensitive at the outer pillar feet/Deiter cells at the OHCs. The inner pillar and IHCs seem situated on a fairly rigid part of the BM. The gradient design of the BM suggests that its vulnerability increases apical wards when performing hearing preservation CI surgery.

  • 12.
    Liu, Wei
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Edin, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Blom, Hans
    Royal Inst Technol, Dept Appl Phys, Sci Life Lab, Tomtebodavagen 23A, S-17121 Solna, Sweden..
    Magnusson, Peetra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Schrott-Fischer, Annelies
    Med Univ Innsbruck, Dept Otolaryngol, Anichstr 35, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria..
    Glueckert, Rudolf
    Med Univ Innsbruck, Dept Otolaryngol, Anichstr 35, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria..
    Santi, Peter A.
    Univ Minnesota, Dept Otolaryngol, 121 Lions Res Bldg,2001 Sixth St SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA..
    Li, Hao
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Laurell, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Rask-Andersen, Helge
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Super-resolution structured illumination fluorescence microscopy of the lateral wall of the cochlea: the Connexin26/30 proteins are separately expressed in man2016In: Cell and Tissue Research, ISSN 0302-766X, E-ISSN 1432-0878, Vol. 365, no 1, p. 13-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Globally 360 million people have disabling hearing loss and, of these, 32 million are children. Human hearing relies on 15,000 hair cells that transduce mechanical vibrations to electrical signals in the auditory nerve. The process is powered by the endo-cochlear potential, which is produced by a vascularized epithelium that actively transports ions in conjunction with a gap junction (GJ) system. This "battery" is located "off-site" in the lateral wall of the cochlea. The GJ syncytium contains the GJ protein genes beta 2 (GJB2/connexin26 (Cx26)) and 6 (GJB6/connexin30 (Cx30)), which are commonly involved in hereditary deafness. Because the molecular arrangement of these proteins is obscure, we analyze GJ protein expression (Cx26/30) in human cochleae by using super-resolution structured illumination microscopy. At this resolution, the Cx26 and Cx30 proteins were visible as separate plaques, rather than being co-localized in heterotypic channels, as previously suggested. The Cx26 and Cx30 proteins thus seem not to be co-expressed but to form closely associated assemblies of GJ plaques. These results could assist in the development of strategies to treat genetic hearing loss in the future.

  • 13.
    Liu, Wei
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Glueckert, Rudolf
    Kinnefors, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Schrott-Fischer, Annelies
    Bitsche, Mario
    Rask-Andersen, Helge
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Distribution of P75 neurotrophin receptor in adult human cochlea: an immunohistochemical study2012In: Cell and Tissue Research, ISSN 0302-766X, E-ISSN 1432-0878, Vol. 348, no 3, p. 407-415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mechanisms underlying the unique survival property of human spiral neurons are yet to be explored. P75 (p75(NTR)) is a low affinity receptor for neurotrophins and is known to interact with Trk receptors to modulate ligand binding and signaling. Up-regulation of this receptor was found to be associated with apoptosis as well as with cell proliferation. Its distribution and injury-induced change in expression pattern in the cochlea have been mainly studied in rodents. There is still no report concerning p75(NTR) in post-natal human inner ear. We analyzed, for the first time, p75(NTR) expression in five freshly fixed human cochleae by using immunohistochemistry techniques, including myelin basic protein (MBP) as a myelin sheath marker and TrkB as the human spiral neuron marker, and by using thin optical sectioning of laser confocal microscopy. The inner ear specimens were obtained from adult patients who had normal pure tone thresholds before the surgical procedures, via a trans-cochlear approach for removal of giant posterior cranial fossa meningioma. The expression of p75(NTR) was investigated and localized in the glial cells, including Schwann cells and satellite glial cells in the Rosenthal canal, in the central nerve bundles within the modiolus, and in the osseous spiral lamina of the human cochleae. The biological significance of p75(NTR) in human cochlea is discussed.

  • 14.
    Liu, Wei
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Glueckert, Rudolf
    Linthicum, Fred H
    Rieger, Gunde
    Blumer, Michael
    Bitsche, Mario
    Pechriggl, Elisabeth
    Rask-Andersen, Helge
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Schrott-Fischer, Annelies
    Possible role of gap junction intercellular channels and connexin 43 in satellite glial cells (SGCs) for preservation of human spiral ganglion neurons: A comparative study with clinical implications2014In: Cell and Tissue Research, ISSN 0302-766X, E-ISSN 1432-0878, Vol. 355, no 2, p. 267-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human spiral ganglion (SG) neurons show remarkable survival properties and maintain electric excitability for a long time after complete deafness and even separation from the organ of Corti, features essential for cochlear implantation. Here, we analyze and compare the localization and distribution of gap junction (GJ) intercellular channels and connexin 43 (Cx43) in cells surrounding SG cell bodies in man and guinea pig by using transmission electron microscopy and confocal immunohistochemistry. GJs and Cx43 expression has been recognized in satellite glial cells (SGCs) in non-myelinating sensory ganglia including the human SG. In man, SG neurons can survive as mono-polar or "amputated" cells with unbroken central projections following dendrite degeneration and consolidation of the dendrite pole. Cx43-mediated GJ signaling between SGCs is believed to play a key role in this "healing" process and could explain the unique preservation of human SG neurons and the persistence of cochlear implant function.

  • 15.
    Liu, Wei
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Kinnefors, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Boström, Marja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Rask-Andersen, Helge
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Expression of peripherin in human cochlea2010In: Cell and Tissue Research, ISSN 0302-766X, E-ISSN 1432-0878, Vol. 342, no 3, p. 345-351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The organ of Corti contains two different types of auditory receptors; the inner (IHCs) and outer (OHCs) hair cells. This dualism is further represented in their innervation, IHCs being innervated by type I neurons, and OHCs by type II neurons (in man, named small ganglion cells). Two efferent systems are also present. Here, we have analyzed the expression of the 57-kDa neuron-specific intermediate filament protein peripherin (PP) in human cochlea. In the human organ of Corti, PP seems to be specifically expressed in OHC afferents. Small or type II spiral ganglion cell bodies also intensely express PP. Thus, PP can be used as a marker for the characterization of the innervation of the OHC system in man.

  • 16.
    Liu, Wei
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Kinnefors, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Boström, Marja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Rask-Andersen, Helge
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Expression of TrkB and BDNF in human cochlea: an immunohistochemical study2011In: Cell and Tissue Research, ISSN 0302-766X, E-ISSN 1432-0878, Vol. 345, no 2, p. 213-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Surgical human cochlear specimens were obtained during the removal of large posterior cranial fossa meningioma by a transcochlear approach in which the cochlea was removed for maximal exposure of the tumor and protection of important structures, such as the brainstem, cranial nerves, and pivotal blood vessels. The cochlear tissue was fixed and cryo-sectioned for tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) immunohistochemistry. TrkB receptor protein was expressed in both neuronal somata and the processes of human spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs). In the human organ of Corti, TrkB immunoreactivity was mainly present in nerve fibers underneath outer hair cells. BDNF expression was found neither in the organ of Corti nor in the spiral ganglion of human cochlea. For antibody specificity and for control and comparative purposes, TrkB immunocytochemistry was performed in primary cultures of cochlear neuron/glia from adult guinea pig. Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that TrkB was homogeneously distributed in the cytoplasm of both neuronal somata and axons. Knowledge of the expression of TrkB receptor in human cochlea should help to determine the target structures for neuron preservation in hearing-impaired patients. Our results indicate that the regeneration of SGNs under pathological conditions can be enhanced with BDNF/TrkB-based pharmaceutical or genetic strategies.

  • 17.
    Liu, Wei
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Loewenheim, Hubert
    Eberhard Karls Univ Tubingen, Tubingen Hearing Res Ctr, Dept Otolaryngol Head & Neck Surg, D-72076 Tubingen, Germany.
    Santi, Peter A.
    Univ Minnesota, Dept Otolaryngol, 121 Lions Res Bldg,2001 Sixth St SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA.
    Glueckert, Rudolf
    Med Univ Innsbruck, Dept Otolaryngol, Anichstr 35, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria.
    Schrott-Fischer, Annelies
    Med Univ Innsbruck, Dept Otolaryngol, Anichstr 35, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria.
    Rask-Andersen, Helge
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Expression of trans-membrane serine protease 3 (TMPRSS3) in the human organ of Corti2018In: Cell and Tissue Research, ISSN 0302-766X, E-ISSN 1432-0878, Vol. 372, no 3, p. 445-456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    TMPRSS3 (Trans-membrane Serine Protease 3) is a type II trans-membrane serine protease that has proteolytic activity essential for hearing. Mutations in the gene cause non-syndromic autosomal recessive deafness (DFNB8/10) in humans. Knowledge about its cellular distribution in the human inner ear may increase our understanding of its physiological role and involvement in deafness, ultimately leading to therapeutic interventions. In this study, we used super-resolution structured illumination microscopy for the first time together with transmission electron microscopy to localize the TMPRSS3 protein in the human organ of Corti. Archival human cochleae were dissected out during petroclival meningioma surgery. Microscopy with Zeiss LSM710 microscope achieved a lateral resolution of approximately 80 nm. TMPRSS3 was found to be associated with actin in both inner and outer hair cells. TMPRSS3 was located in cell surface-associated cytoskeletal bodies (surfoskelosomes) in inner and outer pillar cells and Deiters cells and in subcuticular organelles in outer hair cells. Our results suggest that TMPRSS3 proteolysis is linked to hair cell sterociliary mechanics and to the actin/microtubule networks that support cell motility and integrity.

  • 18.
    Mu, Yabing
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Gudey, Shyam Kumar
    Medical Biosciences, Umeå University, SE-901 85 Umeå, Sweden.
    Landström, Maréne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Non-Smad signaling pathways2012In: Cell and Tissue Research, ISSN 0302-766X, E-ISSN 1432-0878, Vol. 347, no 1, p. 11-20Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF beta) is a key regulator of cell fate during embryogenesis and has also emerged as a potent driver of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition during tumor progression. TGF beta signals are transduced by transmembrane type I and type II serine/threonine kinase receptors (T beta RI and T beta RII, respectively). The activated T beta R complex phosphorylates Smad2 and Smad3, converting them into transcriptional regulators that complex with Smad4. TGF beta also uses non-Smad signaling pathways such as the p38 and Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways to convey its signals. Ubiquitin ligase tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) and TGF beta-associated kinase 1 (TAK1) have recently been shown to be crucial for the activation of the p38 and JNK MAPK pathways. Other TGF beta-induced non-Smad signaling pathways include the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-Akt-mTOR pathway, the small GTPases Rho, Rac, and Cdc42, and the Ras-Erk-MAPK pathway. Signals induced by TGF beta are tightly regulated and specified by post-translational modifications of the signaling components, since they dictate the subcellular localization, activity, and duration of the signal. In this review, we discuss recent findings in the field of TGF beta-induced responses by non-Smad signaling pathways.

  • 19.
    Nilsson, Harriet
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Dragomir, Anca
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Ahlander, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Johannesson, Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Roomans, Godfried M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Effects of hyperosmotic stress on cultured airway epithelial cells2007In: Cell and Tissue Research, ISSN 0302-766X, E-ISSN 1432-0878, Vol. 330, no 2, p. 257-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inhalation of hyperosmotic solutions (salt, mannitol) has been used in the treatment of patients with cystic fibrosis or asthma, but the mechanism behind the effect of hyperosmotic solutions is unclear. The relation between osmolarity and permeability changes was examined in an airway cell line by the addition of NaCl, NaBr, LiCl, mannitol, or xylitol (295–700 mOsm). Transepithelial resistance was measured as an indicator of the tightness of the cultures. Cell-cell contacts and morphology were investigated by immunofluorescence and by transmission electron microscopy, with lanthanum nitrate added to the luminal side of the epithelium to investigate tight junction permeability. The electrolyte solutions caused a significant decrease in transepithelial resistance from 450 mOsm upwards, when the hyperosmolar exposure was gradually increased from 295 to 700 mOsm; whereas the nonelectrolyte solutions caused a decrease in transepithelial resistance from 700 mOsm upwards. Old cultures reacted in a more rigid way compared to young cultures. Immuno-fluorescence pictures showed weaker staining for the proteins ZO-1, claudin-4, and plakoglobin in treated samples compared to the control. The ultrastructure revealed an increased number of open tight junctions as well as a disturbed morphology with increasing osmolarity, and electrolyte solutions opened a larger proportion of tight junctions than nonelectrolyte solutions. This study shows that hyperosmotic solutions cause the opening of tight junctions, which may increase the permeability of the paracellular pathway and result in increased transepithelial water transport.

  • 20.
    Schizas, Nikos
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    König, Niclas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Andersson, Brittmarie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Vasylovska, Svitlana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Hoeber, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Kozlova, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Hailer, Nils
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Neural crest stem cells protect spinal cord neurons from excitotoxic damage and inhibit glial activation by secretion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor2018In: Cell and Tissue Research, ISSN 0302-766X, E-ISSN 1432-0878, Vol. 372, no 3, p. 493-505Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The acute phase of spinal cord injury is characterized by excitotoxic and inflammatory events that mediate extensive neuronal loss in the gray matter. Neural crest stem cells (NCSCs) can exert neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects that may be mediated by soluble factors. We therefore hypothesize that transplantation of NCSCs to acutely injured spinal cord slice cultures (SCSCs) can prevent neuronal loss after excitotoxic injury. NCSCs were applied onto SCSCs previously subjected to N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-induced injury. Immunohistochemistry and TUNEL staining were used to quantitatively study cell populations and apoptosis. Concentrations of neurotrophic factors were measured by ELISA. Migration and differentiation properties of NCSCs on SCSCs, laminin, or hyaluronic acid hydrogel were separately studied. NCSCs counteracted the loss of NeuN-positive neurons that was otherwise observed after NMDA-induced excitotoxicity, partly by inhibiting neuronal apoptosis. They also reduced activation of both microglial cells and astrocytes. The concentration of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was increased in supernatants from SCSCs cultured with NCSCs compared to SCSCs alone and BDNF alone mimicked the effects of NCSC application on SCSCs. NCSCs migrated superficially across the surface of SCSCs and showed no signs of neuronal or glial differentiation but preserved their expression of SOX2 and Krox20. In conclusion, NCSCs exert neuroprotective, anti-apoptotic and glia-inhibitory effects on excitotoxically injured spinal cord tissue, some of these effects mediated by secretion of BDNF. However, the investigated NCSCs seem not to undergo neuronal or glial differentiation in the short term since markers indicative of an undifferentiated state were expressed during the entire observation period.

  • 21.
    Swartling, Fredrik J
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Cančer, Matko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Frantz, Aaron
    Weishaupt, Holger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Persson, Anders I
    Deregulated proliferation and differentiation in brain tumors2015In: Cell and Tissue Research, ISSN 0302-766X, E-ISSN 1432-0878, Vol. 359, no 1, p. 225-254Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neurogenesis, the generation of new neurons, is deregulated in neural stem cell (NSC)- and progenitor-derived murine models of malignant medulloblastoma and glioma, the most common brain tumors of children and adults, respectively. Molecular characterization of human malignant brain tumors, and in particular brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs), has identified neurodevelopmental transcription factors, microRNAs, and epigenetic factors known to inhibit neuronal and glial differentiation. We are starting to understand how these factors are regulated by the major oncogenic drivers in malignant brain tumors. In this review, we will focus on the molecular switches that block normal neuronal differentiation and induce brain tumor formation. Genetic or pharmacological manipulation of these switches in BTSCs has been shown to restore the ability of tumor cells to differentiate. We will discuss potential brain tumor therapies that will promote differentiation in order to reduce treatment resistance, suppress tumor growth, and prevent recurrence in patients.

1 - 21 of 21
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