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  • 1.
    Andersson, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Ethics.
    Traces of a Half-Forgotten Dog: Suffering and Animal Humanity in Hélène Cixous' Algerian Scenes2017In: Literature & Theology, ISSN 0269-1205, E-ISSN 1477-4623, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 420-431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hélène Cixous’ engagement with animals is a significant but neglected aspect of her work. In this article I trace one specific character among her animals, Fips, a dog she had when she was living in Algiers during the late 1940s. By reflecting on this figure, I outline the way the dehumanising logic of colonialism and anti-Semitism are critiqued by Cixous. I lift up her themes of relationality and corporeality as constructive for animal studies. Taking the work of Jacques Derrida as a starting point, the article shows how Cixous’ primal encounter with Fips produces a wound that, belatedly, ruptures the barriers between herself and this dog; its dehiscence reveals Fips’ ‘profound animal humanity’ generated by shared suffering, finitude, and love. The lesson Cixous learns from revivifying the memory of this dog is, I suggest, how to become more human. The ‘humanity’ of the dog is the capacity to see and indeed love outside preconceived ideas: ‘Perhaps the irony is that we are never more human than when we are dogs.’ Becoming more human is an assault on the borders of racialised exclusion and a challenge to the false humanism of the colonial project.

  • 2.
    Carlsson, Petra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology.
    A Deleuzian analysis of Thomas Altizer's style2009In: Literature & Theology, ISSN 0269-1205, E-ISSN 1477-4623, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 207-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article offers a new entrance into the radical theology of Thomas J. J. Altizer and suggests a contemporary relevance of his theology that might not yet be fully acknowledged. By relating Altizer's theology to the French thinker Gilles Deleuze's notions of repetition and the actual/virtual the article suggests a subversive force in precisely those stylistic characteristics of Altizer's prose that have been critiqued for indicating an incomplete break with modernist thought.

  • 3. Carlsson, Petra
    Foucault, Manet and New Materialist Theology2016In: Literature & Theology, ISSN 0269-1205, E-ISSN 1477-4623, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 471-492Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses Michel Foucault’s analysis of Edouard Manet in relation to contemporary theology and sacramentality. The article argues that Foucault’s work on Manet instigates a move away not only from earlier forms of art or earlier forms of thought but also away from an overarching idea of Christian thinking, and towards a materialist and immanent approach to art and thought as spiritual practices. It is an approach that highlights invisibilities, or what the article names ‘non-places’, in the tangible and material processes of artistic representation in Manet’s work. By doing so, the article suggests, Foucault’s thoughts on Manet not only precede ideas in what goes under the name of new materialism in contemporary theology but even opens for a purely material understanding of sacramentality.

  • 4.
    Essunger, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Systematic Theology and Studies in World Views.
    To hear the unheard: or re-imagining representation with Primo Levi and Hélène Cixous2017In: Literature & Theology, ISSN 0269-1205, E-ISSN 1477-4623, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 437-454Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With a common Jewish heritage and a personal relation to the Holocaust, both Primo Levi and Helene Cixous have a desire, even a craving, to write. They aim to hear the unheard and to re-present the 'unheard' in different but distinct ways. Levi uses animal symbols and Cixous not only uses her 'magical animots' but creatively elaborates on human and animal differences through what could be called her 'animal thinking'. I argue that Levi's animal symbols and Cixous' animal thinking can prompt a constructive reimagining of how we re-present self and other beyond the confines of the 'human'. In this article I explore Levi's and Cixous' way of interacting with animals and animality in their writings, and relate it to Walter Benjamin's thinking on human language. Following my discussion of Levi and Cixous, Benjamin's writing on language is instructive in considering the possibilities and limits to hear the (what seems to be) unheard and its importance to the potentiality of creating conditions for a greater inclusivity in our daily lives.

  • 5.
    Martinson, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Systematic Theology and Studies in World Views.
    Ontology of Hell: Reflections on Theodor W. Adorno's reception of Sören Kierkegaard2014In: Literature & Theology, ISSN 0269-1205, E-ISSN 1477-4623, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 45-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Theodor W. Adorno’s status as a literary theorist and aesthetic thinker is somewhat ambiguous. His pessimistic tenor is often held against his continued relevance. He has been scorned for his well-known dictum that the writing of poetry after Auschwitz is barbaric. And his devastating critique of Heidegger and existential philosophy is another thing that critics often bring up against him. The key to a more nuanced understanding of Adorno’s thought is his rigorous anti-idealism, focused especially on the Hegelian form of idealism. This was something that Adorno had in common with Kierkegaard, and in his early years he studied Kierkegaard closely. But his early work on Kierkegaard’s philosophy (Kierkegaard. The Construction of the Aesthetic) has not always been taken very seriously, neither within Adorno-scholarship, nor in Kierkegaard-scholarship. In this article, I try to show how Adorno’s eccentric reading of Kierkegaard has importance for the development of Adorno’s aesthetic philosophical alternative to the existential philosophies, which were in vogue in the thirties and forties. Kierkegaard was important for the existentialists, but they tried to cleanse him from theology. I therefore view the theological foundation of Kierkegaard’s thought as the key to Adorno’s distinction between Kierkegaard’s philosophy and later existentialisms. In the last instance, Adorno is very critical of Kierkegaard’s thought, but I argue that Adorno’s aesthetic thought nevertheless was shaped by the literary and theological profile of Kierkegaard’s thought.

    If ontology were possible at all, it would be possible in an ironic sense, as the epitome of negativity.    Theodor W. Adorno

  • 6.
    Wassen, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Old and New Testament Exegesis, New Testament Exegesis.
    The Story of Judah and Tamar in the Eyes of the Earliest Interpreters1994In: Literature & Theology, ISSN 0269-1205, E-ISSN 1477-4623, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 354-366Article in journal (Refereed)
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