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  • 1.
    Andersson, Jan O
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Molecular Evolution.
    Andersson, Siv GE
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Molecular Evolution.
    Insights into the evolutionary process of genome degradation1999In: Current Opinion in Genetics and Development, ISSN 0959-437X, E-ISSN 1879-0380, Vol. 9, no 6, p. 664-671Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of noncoding and pseudogene sequence diversity, particularly in Rickettsia, have begun to reveal the basic principles of genome degradation in microorganisms. Increasingly, studies of genes and genomes suggest that there has been an extensive amount of horizontal gene transfer among microorganisms. As this inflow of genetic material does not seem generally to have resulted in genome size expansions, however, degenerative processes must be at the very least as widespread as horizontal gene transfer. The basic principles of gene degradation and elimination that are being explored in Rickettsia are likely to be of major importance for our understanding of how microbial genomes evolve.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Molecular consequences of animal breeding2013In: Current Opinion in Genetics and Development, ISSN 0959-437X, E-ISSN 1879-0380, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 295-301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The phenotypic diversity in domestic animals provides a unique opportunity to study genotype-phenotype relationships. The identification of causal mutations provides an insight into what types of mutations have contributed to phenotypic evolution in domestic animals. Whole genome sequencing has revealed that fixation of null alleles that inactivate genes, which are essential under natural conditions but disadvantageous on the farm, has not been a common mechanism for genetic adaptation in domestic animals. Numerous examples have been revealed where structural changes cause specific phenotypic effects by altering transcriptional regulation. An emerging feature is also the evolution of alleles by the accumulation of several consecutive mutations which affect gene function.

  • 3.
    Günther, Torsten
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Genes mirror migrations and cultures in prehistoric Europe - a population genomic perspective2016In: Current Opinion in Genetics and Development, ISSN 0959-437X, E-ISSN 1879-0380, Vol. 41, p. 115-123Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genomic information from ancient human remains is beginning to show its full potential for learning about human prehistory. We review the last few years' dramatic finds about European prehistory based on genomic data from humans that lived many millennia ago and relate it to modern-day patterns of genomic variation. The early times, the Upper Paleolithic, appears to contain several population turn-overs followed by more stable populations after the Last Glacial Maximum and during the Mesolithic. Some 11 000 years ago the migrations driving the Neolithic transition start from around Anatolia and reach the north and the west of Europe millennia later followed by major migrations during the Bronze Age. These findings show that culture and lifestyle were major determinants of genomic differentiation and similarity in pre-historic Europe rather than geography as is the case today.

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