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  • 1.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Ein unik sivilisasjon: Russlandsførestellingar før og no2012In: Nytt Norsk Tidsskrift, ISSN 0800-336X, E-ISSN 1504-3053, no 3, 237-247 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The article explores the so-called “civilizational nationalism” that is becoming increasingly popular in post-Soviet Russia, as seen most recently in an article Vladimir Putin published in January 2012. Here he adopts the rhetoric of “Russia as a unique civilization” that had previously been developed by Russian public intellectuals and academics. Having outlined the general features of this ideology, the article provides a more detailed discussion of one of the most significant theoreticians of this nationalism, Aleksandr Panarin. His views are compared, in turn, with those of Nikolai Danilevskii, the nineteenth-century writer who introduced “civilization” into Russian public discourse. Despite the many similarities, for instance a shared critique of Eurocentrism, it is demonstrated that nineteenth-century ideas of a Russian civilization differ significantly from the post-Soviet ones, above all in the former’s temporal orientation towards the future. Post-Soviet civilizational nationalism, in contrast, locates Russian civilization first and foremost in the past.

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