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  • 1.
    Aarsand, Pål Andre
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Forsberg, Lucas
    Producing children’s corporeal privacy: ethnographic video recording as material-discursive practice2010In: Qualitative Research, ISSN 1468-7941, E-ISSN 1741-3109, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 249-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the use of video cameras in participant observation drawing on approximately 300 hours of video data from an ethnographic study of Swedish family life. Departing from Karen Barad's post-humanistic perspective on scientific practices, the aim is to critically analyse how researchers, research participants and technology produce and negotiate children's corporeal privacy. Ethnographic videotaping is understood as a material-discursive practice that creates and sustains boundaries between private and public, where videotaping is ideologically connected to a public sphere that may at times 'intrude' on children's corporeal privacy. The limits of corporeal privacy are never fixed, but open for negotiation; ethnographers may therefore unintentionally transgress the boundary and thus be faced with ethical dilemmas. The fluidity of privacy calls for ethical reflexivity before, during and after fieldwork, and researchers must be sensitive to when ethical issues are at hand and how to deal with them.

  • 2. Aarsand, Pål
    et al.
    Forsberg [Gottzén], Lucas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Producing children's corporeal privacy: ethnographic video recording as material-discursive practice2010In: Qualitative Research, ISSN 1468-7941, E-ISSN 1741-3109, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 249-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the use of video cameras in participant observation drawing on approximately 300 hours of video data from an ethnographic study of Swedish family life. Departing from Karen Barad’s post-humanistic perspective on scientific practices, the aim is to critically analyse how researchers, research participants and technology produce and negotiate children’s corporeal privacy. Ethnographic videotaping is understood as a material-discursive practice that creates and sustains boundaries between private and public, where videotaping is ideologically connected to a public sphere that may at times ‘intrude’ on children’s corporeal privacy. The limits of corporeal privacy are never fixed, but open for negotiation; ethnographers may therefore unintentionally transgress the boundary and thus be faced with ethical dilemmas. The fluidity of privacy calls for ethical reflexivity before, during and after fieldwork, and researchers must be sensitive to when ethical issues are at hand and how to deal with them.

  • 3.
    Bergman Blix, Stina
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Wettergren, Åsa
    The emotional labour of gaining and maintaining access to the field2015In: Qualitative Research, ISSN 1468-7941, E-ISSN 1741-3109, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 688-704Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of emotions in qualitative research receives increasing attention. We argue for an activerather than a reactive approach towards emotions to improve the quality of research; emotionsare a vital source of information and researchers use emotions strategically. Analysing the emotionwork of researchers in the process of gaining, securing and maintaining access to the Swedishjudiciary, we propose that the emotion work involved is a type of emotional labour, requiredby the researcher in order to successfully collect data. The particular case of researching elitesis highlighted. Emotional labour is analysed along three dimensions: 1. Strategic emotion work– building trust outwards and self-confidence inwards; 2. Emotional reflexivity – attentiveness toemotional signals monitoring one’s position and actions in the field; and 3. Emotion work to copewith emotive dissonance – inward-directed emotion work to deal with the potentially alienatingeffects of strategic emotion work.

  • 4.
    Gustafson, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Book review of The Hidden Life of Girls. Games, of Stance, Status and Exclusion, Goodwin, Marjorie Harness (2006) Blackwell Publishing: Oxford, UK / Malden, MA, USA /Victoria, Australia2011In: Qualitative Research, ISSN 1468-7941, E-ISSN 1741-3109, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 465-466Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 5. Roach Anleu, Sharyn
    et al.
    Bergman Blix, Stina
    Stockholms universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Mack, Kathy
    Wettergren, Åsa
    Observing judicial work and emotions: using two researchers2016In: Qualitative Research, ISSN 1468-7941, E-ISSN 1741-3109, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 375-391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Observation is an important component of research to examine complex social settings and iswell-established for studying courtroom dynamics and judicial behaviour. However, the manyactivities occurring at once and the multiple participants, lay and professional, make it impossiblefor a sole researcher to observe and understand everything occurring in the courtroom. Thisarticle reports on the use of two researchers to undertake court observations, in two differentstudies, each nested in a different research design. The social nature of data collection and thevalue of dialogue between the two researchers in interpreting observed events, especially whenstudying emotion, are readily apparent in both studies.

  • 6.
    Söderström, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Life diagrams: a methodological and analytical tool for accessing life histories2020In: Qualitative Research, ISSN 1468-7941, E-ISSN 1741-3109, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 3-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article argues for the utility of life diagrams as a methodological and analytical tool across various life history projects. Using research on post-war political mobilization among former combatants (in Colombia, Namibia and the United States), the article demonstrates how a life diagram can modify the interview and become a useful analytical tool. During the interview the diagram helps both the research participant and the interviewer to compare different events, weigh various experiences, and ensure that all periods of the life are covered even if the interview is not done chronologically. During the analysis, the diagram offers a contrast with the transcript of the interview, and the shape of the life diagram can be compared across interviews in search of similar types. This visual turn can help address issues of empowerment, through promoting the research participants’ own interpretation of their lives.

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