Logo: to the web site of Uppsala University

uu.sePublications from Uppsala University
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bob-Milliar, George M.
    et al.
    Department of History and Political Studies, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana..
    Paller, Jeffrey W.
    Department of Politics at the University of San Francisco, United States..
    Democratic Ruptures and Electoral Outcomes in Africa: Ghana's 2016 Election2018In: Africa Spectrum, ISSN 0002-0397, E-ISSN 1868-6869, Vol. 53, no 1, p. 5-35Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Finnström, Sverker
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, The Hugo Valentin Centre. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Cultural Anthropology and Ethnology.
    KONY 2012, Military Humanitarianism, and the Magic of Occult Economies2012In: Africa Spectrum, ISSN 0002-0397, E-ISSN 1868-6869, Vol. 47, no 2-3, p. 127-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The global success of the film KONY 2012 by Invisible Chil­dren, Inc., manifests far greater magical powers than those of Joseph Kony and his ruthless Lord’s Resistance Army, which it portrays. The most promi­nent feature of the Invisible Children lobby is the making and constant remaking of a master narrative that depoliticizes and dehistoricizes a murky reality of globalized war into an essentialized black-and-white story. The magic of such a digestible storyline, with Ugandan rebel leader Joseph Kony as a global poster boy for evil personified, not only plays into the hands of the oppres­sive Ugandan government but has also become handy for the US armed forces as they seek to increase their presence on the African conti­nent. As the US-led war on terror is renewed and expanded, Invisible Chil­dren’s humanitarian slogan, “Stop at nothing”, has proven to be exception­ally selective, manifesting the occult economy of global activism that calls for military interventions.

  • 3.
    Hagberg, Sten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Cultural Anthropology and Ethnology.
    "Thousands of New Sankaras": Resistance and Struggle in Burkina Faso2015In: Africa Spectrum, ISSN 0002-0397, E-ISSN 1868-6869, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 109-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses recent political developments in Burkina Faso, particularly the failed coup d’état in September 2015. The coup was led by the former president’s security forces (RSP), comprised of 1,300 heavily equipped and well-trained soldiers. The RSP took the president and government hostage and declared the coup d’état. The coup was condemned by most Burkinabe, civil society organisations, trade unions, and political parties, as well as by the international community. Across the country, people mobilised in popular resistance and civil disobedience. RSP soldiers patrolled and shot live rounds into neighbourhoods, while residents built barricades. Resistance mounted in Ouagadougou and elsewhere in the country, and after a few days it became clear that the coup would fail. In this article, I describe the courage and determination of the Burkinabe people in the face of the coupists and thereby show that popular resistance and revolutionary struggle are part and parcel of Burkinabe political culture. In conclusion, I discuss the prospects for a veritable democratic breakthrough in Burkina Faso.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4.
    Hagberg, Sten
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Cultural Anthropology and Ethnology.
    Körling, Gabriella
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Cultural Anthropology and Ethnology, Cultural Anthropology.
    Socio-political Turmoil in Mali: The Public Debate Following the Coup d’État on 22 March 20122012In: Africa Spectrum, ISSN 0002-0397, E-ISSN 1868-6869, Vol. 47, no 2-3, p. 111-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the night between 21 and 22 March 2012, a group of youngmilitary officers overthrew Mali’s president, Amadou Toumani Touré. Thegroup justified the coup by citing the inability of the regime to both deal withthe crisis in the North and provide the army with the appropriate material andmanpower to defend the national territory. The coup plunged Mali into violence,and caused a de facto partition of the country. The socio-political turmoilpitting different political and armed factions against each other has continuedunabated and has been accompanied by intense mass media debates. Inthis report we focus on the Malian public debate. By looking at the politicalclass, the international community, and the partition of the country, we analyserepresentations and stereotypes prevailing in this debate.

  • 5.
    Höglund, Kristine
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Jarstad, Anna K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Toward Electoral Security: Experiences from KwaZulu-Natal2011In: Africa Spectrum, ISSN 0002-0397, E-ISSN 1868-6869, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 33-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a growing recognition of the dangers of electoral violence. Yet, the theoretical foundation for systematic research and for adequate policy is still underdeveloped. This article aims to develop the theoretical understandings of strategies to manage and prevent electoral violence. This is accomplished by integrating research conducted within the two academic discourses on democratization and conflict management and also by drawing on the experiences from the conflict-ridden province KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa. The five strategies identified are monitoring, mediation, legal measures, law enforcement and self-regulating practices. In the article, the functions and mechanisms of the strategies are discussed. In addition, we analyse the limitations and usefulness of each of the strategies in turn and also provide suggestions on how to improve electoral security.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    Käihkö, Ilmari
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    “No die, no rest”?: Coercive Discipline in Liberian Military Organisations2015In: Africa Spectrum, ISSN 0002-0397, E-ISSN 1868-6869, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 3-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Discipline forms the backbone of all military organisations. While discipline is traditionally associated with draconian punishment, this association is increasingly only applied to non-Western contexts. African rebel movements and similar, weak organisations are represented especially often as lacking non-coercive means of instilling discipline. This article explores the utility of coercive discipline in one such context – the Second Liberian Civil War (1999–2003). I argue that Liberia’s weak military organisations faced significant restrictions when it came to employing direct coercion. Executions, which are often equated with coercion in existing literature, threatened to rive the already frail organisations. Even other formal instruments of discipline, such as military hierarchies and rules and regulations, remained contested throughout the war. Consequently, more indirect means were adopted. Ultimately, the main users of coercion were not military organisations, but peers. This suggests that it is easier for strong organisations to coerce their members, and that the relationship between coercion and organisational strength may need to be reassessed. Furthermore, existing positive perceptions of camaraderie between brothers-in-arms requires re-evaluation.

  • 7.
    Käihkö, Ilmari
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Utas, Mats
    Nordic Africa Institute.
    The Crisis in CAR: Navigating Myths and Interests2014In: Africa Spectrum, ISSN 0002-0397, E-ISSN 1868-6869, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 69-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    “Anarchy”, “religious war”, “genocide” and, recently, “cannibalism”– these are some of the most commonly used words in Westernnews media when referring to the crisis in the Central African Republic(CAR), at least since the takeover of power by the rebel coalition Sélékain March 2013. In the context of these media stereotypes, this articleunravels some of the complexities that have arisen in the CAR conflictsince the fall of the Bozizé regime and the Séléka takeover. We showhow international actors have been pivotal in shaping the current crisis inthe country. In order to help steer CAR out of its predicament, we showhow important it is that international peacekeeping operations, policymakersand diplomats understand not only the situation on the groundbut also the close ties major groups in CAR have with various regionaland other international actors. If context awareness remains scant, thereis a serious risk that their activities will at best be suboptimal and at worstaid in fuelling the crisis.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 8. Melber, Henning
    Colonialism, Land, Ethnicity, and Class: Namibia after the Second National Land Conference2019In: Africa Spectrum, ISSN 0002-0397, E-ISSN 1868-6869, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 73-86Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf