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  • 1.
    Al-Mashhadi, Ammar Nadhom Farman
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Pediatric Surgery.
    Dukic, Milena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Engstrand Lilja, Helene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Pediatric Surgery.
    Rhabdomyomatous mesenchymal hamartoma presenting in a child as a perineal mass2019In: Journal of Pediatric Surgery Case Reports, ISSN 0022-3476, E-ISSN 2213-5766, Vol. 47, article id 101242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rhabdomyomatous mesenchymal hamartoma (RMH) is a rare hamartomatous lesion in the dermis and subcutaneous tissue. It is mostly found in the face and neck region of children. We report a case of solitary RMH located in the perineum of an 8-month-old boy. Microscopic examination of specimen showed a disordered collection of mature adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, adnexal elements and nerve bundles, and immunohistochemistry confirmed a RMH. This case emphasizes the possibility of RMH in the perineum of the children. Even if RMH is a rare condition in the perineum it should be considered as a differential diagnosis of a perineal mass in children.

  • 2. Boman, Krister K
    et al.
    Viksten, Jonas
    Kogner, Per
    Samuelsson, Ulf
    Serious illness in childhood: the different threats of cancer and diabetes from a parent perspective2004In: Journal of Pediatric Surgery Case Reports, ISSN 0022-3476, E-ISSN 2213-5766, Vol. 145, no 3, p. 373-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the incidence of disease-related distress symptoms in parents of children with cancer and diabetes.

    STUDY DESIGN: A total of 675 parents of patients with cancer, patients with diabetes, and control subjects were assessed for 11 distress symptom clusters. Patient and control parent mean differences were tested by 2-tailed t tests; illness groups were compared by means of analysis of variance. Distress variations as a function of time since diagnosis were examined by regression analysis.

    RESULTS: The distress levels of patient parents exceeded those of control parents for global distress ( P <.0001) and for most symptom subcategories. Distress levels of parents of patients with cancer (CP) significantly exceeded those of parents of patients with diabetes (DP) in anxiety ( P <.0001), physical and psychologic distress ( P <.0001), depression ( P <.005), and loneliness ( P <.05). Levels in DP matched those of CP in uncertainty, loss of control/the patient, self-esteem, disease-related fear, and sleep disturbances. Distress levels were lower in CP most distant in time from diagnosis, whereas DP showed a reversed trend.

    CONCLUSIONS: Parental distress patterns in childhood illness depend on illness type and time passed since diagnosis. Symptom profiles verify the need for psychosocial attention at the initial shock after the cancer diagnosis and indicate long-term consequences for many parents. In pediatric diabetes, the persistence or intensification of distress over time is of specific clinical relevance.

  • 3.
    Canova, Cristina
    et al.
    Univ Padua, Dept Cardiol Thorac & Vasc Sci, Padua, Italy.
    Pitter, Gisella
    Univ Padua, Dept Cardiol Thorac & Vasc Sci, Padua, Italy.
    Zanier, Loris
    Hlth Directorate, Epidemiol Serv, Udine, Italy.
    Simonato, Lorenzo
    Univ Padua, Dept Cardiol Thorac & Vasc Sci, Padua, Italy.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas E.
    Columbia Univ, Coll Phys & Surg, Dept Med, New York, NY USA;Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden;Orebro Univ, Orebro Univ Hosp, Dept Pediat, Orebro, Sweden;Univ Nottingham, Sch Med, Div Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Nottingham, England.
    Risk of Fractures in Youths with Celiac Disease-A Population-Based Study2018In: Journal of Pediatric Surgery Case Reports, ISSN 0022-3476, E-ISSN 2213-5766, Vol. 198, p. 117-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To assess the risk of any fracture requiring hospital care in a cohort of individuals with celiac disease diagnosed in childhood/adolescence compared with reference individuals matched by age and sex. Study design Our study cohort consisted of 213 635 people born and residing in Friuli-Venezia Giulia Region, Italy, in 1989-2011. We selected, through pathology reports, hospital discharge records, or co-payment exemptions, 1233 individuals with celiac disease (aged 0-17 years at diagnosis) and compared them with 6167 reference individuals matched by sex and year of birth. Fractures were identified through hospital discharge records. We calculated hazard ratios (HRs) for any fracture after celiac disease diagnosis (or index date for reference individuals) with Cox regression and ORs for any fracture before celiac disease diagnosis with conditional logistic regression. Results During the follow-up period (maximum 23 years), 22 individuals with celiac disease (9394 person-years) and 128 reference individuals (47 308 person-years) experienced a fracture. giving an overall HR of 0.87 (95% CI 0.55-1.37). The risk was not modified by sex, age at diagnosis, or calendar period of diagnosis. We obtained similar HRs when excluding fractures occurring after the age of 18 years and adjusting for maternal education or vitamin D supplementation. The odds of previous fracture also did not differ between subjects with celiac disease and reference individuals (22 and 96 cases, respectively: OR 1.15: 95% CI 0.72-1.84). Conclusions We did not find any evidence of an increased risk of fractures during childhood and youth among patients with celiac disease.

  • 4.
    Faria, Vanda
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Harvard Med Sch, Ctr Pain & Brain, Dept Anesthesiol Perioperat & Pain Med, Boston Childrens Hosp, Boston, MA USA.;Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Program Placebo Studies, Boston, MA 02215 USA..
    Kossowsky, Joe
    Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Program Placebo Studies, Boston, MA 02215 USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Dept Anesthesiol Perioperat & Pain Med, Boston Childrens Hosp, Boston, MA USA.;Univ Basel, Dept Clin Psychol & Psychotherapy, Basel, Switzerland..
    Petkov, Mike P.
    Harvard Med Sch, Ctr Pain & Brain, Dept Anesthesiol Perioperat & Pain Med, Boston Childrens Hosp, Boston, MA USA..
    Kaptchuk, Ted J.
    Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Program Placebo Studies, Boston, MA 02215 USA..
    Kirsch, Irving
    Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Program Placebo Studies, Boston, MA 02215 USA..
    Lebel, Alyssa
    Harvard Med Sch, Ctr Pain & Brain, Dept Anesthesiol Perioperat & Pain Med, Boston Childrens Hosp, Boston, MA USA..
    Borsook, David
    Harvard Med Sch, Ctr Pain & Brain, Dept Anesthesiol Perioperat & Pain Med, Boston Childrens Hosp, Boston, MA USA..
    Parental Attitudes About Placebo Use in Children2017In: Journal of Pediatric Surgery Case Reports, ISSN 0022-3476, E-ISSN 2213-5766, Vol. 181, p. 272-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To assess parental attitudes regarding placebo use in pediatric randomized controlled trials and clinical care. Study design Parents with children under age 18 years living in the US completed and submitted an online survey between September and November 2014. Results Among all 1300 participants, 1000 (76.9%; 538 mothers and 462 fathers) met the study inclusion criteria. The majority of surveyed parents considered the use of placebos acceptable in some pediatric care situations (86%) and some pediatric trials (91.5%), whereas only 5.7% of parents found the use of placebos in children always unacceptable. The clinical use of placebo was considered acceptable by a majority of parents for only 7 (mostly psychological) of the 17 conditions presented. Respondents' judgment about acceptability was influenced by the doctors' opinions about the therapeutic benefits of placebo treatment, the conditions for pediatric placebo use, transparency, safety, and purity of placebos. Conclusion Most surveyed parents accepted the idea of using placebos in pediatric trials and within the clinic for some conditions without the practice of deception and with the creation of guidelines for ethical and safe use. This study suggests a need to reconsider pediatric trial design and clinical therapy in the light of generally positive parental support of appropriate placebo use.

  • 5.
    Lilja, Helene Engstrand
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Paediatric Surgery.
    Schulten, Daisy
    Univ Hosp Cologne, Kerpener Str 62, D-50937 Cologne, Germany..
    Repair of giant omphalocele in a premature neonate with non-cross-linked porcine acellular dermal matrix (Strattice Tissue Matrix)2016In: Journal of Pediatric Surgery Case Reports, ISSN 0022-3476, E-ISSN 2213-5766, Vol. 12, p. 27-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The management of giant omphalocele (GO) is a major challenge in pediatric surgery and there are many different surgical strategies described. Here we report a complicated case in which the abdominal wall in a premature neonate (gestational age 33 + 2 weeks and 1700 g) with GO was reconstructed with a non-cross-linked acellular porcine dermal matrix (Strattice (TM)) combined with vacuum therapy. This strategy can be an alternative method in the repair of GO in premature neonates with high risk of infection, underdeveloped abdominal cavity and insufficient native tissue.

  • 6.
    Zamir, Itay
    et al.
    Umea Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Pediat, SE-90187 Umea, Sweden.
    Tornevi, Andreas
    Umea Univ, Div Occupat & Environm Med, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Umea, Sweden.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    Linkoping Univ, Div Pediat, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Engström, Eva
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Clin Sci, Dept Pediat, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hallberg, Boubou
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, CLINTEC Dept Neonatol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hansen-Pupp, Ingrid
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci Lund, Pediat, Lund, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Elisabeth Stoltz
    Umea Univ, Dept Food & Nutr, Umea, Sweden.
    Domellöf, Magnus
    Umea Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Pediat, SE-90187 Umea, Sweden.
    Hyperglycemia in Extremely Preterm Infants Insulin Treatment, Mortality and Nutrient Intakes2018In: Journal of Pediatric Surgery Case Reports, ISSN 0022-3476, E-ISSN 2213-5766, Vol. 200, p. 104-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To explore the prevalence of hyperglycemia and the associations between nutritional intakes, hyperglycemia, insulin treatment, and mortality in extremely preterm infants. Study design Prospectively collected data from the Extremely Preterm Infants in Sweden Study (EXPRESS) was used in this study and included 580 infants born <27 gestational weeks during 2004-2007. Available glucose measurements (n = 9850) as well as insulin treatment and nutritional data were obtained retrospectively from hospital records for the first 28 postnatal days as well as 28- and 70-day mortality data. Results Daily prevalence of hyperglycemia >180 mg/dL (10 mmol/L) of up to 30% was observed during the first 2 postnatal weeks, followed by a slow decrease in its occurrence thereafter. Generalized additive model analysis showed that increasing parenteral carbohydrate supply with 1 g/kg/day was associated with a 1.6% increase in glucose concentration (P < .001). Hyperglycemia was associated with more than double the 28-day mortality risk (P< .01). In a logistic regression model, insulin treatment was associated with lower 28- and 70-day mortality when given to infants with hyperglycemia irrespective of the duration of the hyperglycemic episode (P< .05). Conclusions Hyperglycemia is common in extremely preterm infants throughout the first postnatal month. Glucose infusions seem to have only a minimal impact on glucose concentrations. In the EXPRESS cohort, insulin treatment was associated with lower mortality in infants with hyperglycemia. Current practices of hyperglycemia treatment in extremely preterm infants should be reevaluated and assessed in randomized controlled clinical trials.

1 - 6 of 6
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