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  • 1.
    Bornfalk Back, Anders
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antik historia, Arkeologi.
    The vitrified wall of Broborg hillfort in Uppland, Sweden – A comment on Sjöblom et al. (2022)2023Inngår i: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2352-4103, Vol. 48, artikkel-id 103904Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, Sjöblom et al. assessed the cause of the vitrified wall of Broborg, the 5th century CE hillfort in East Middle Sweden. By exploring possible incentives and competence to melt stones together, as well as the genesis of the vitrified material, the authors suggested that the builders of Broborg used vitrification as a construction method to strengthen the wall. In this comment, I critically examine the line of arguments presented in support of this claim. The conclusion reached is that there is no convincing evidence to warrant a construction hypothesis.

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  • 2.
    Fraser, Magdalena
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för organismbiologi, Människans evolution. Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antik historia, Arkeologi.
    Sanchez-Quinto, Federico
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för organismbiologi, Människans evolution.
    Evans, Jane
    Natural Environment Research Council, Isotope Geosciences Laboratory, British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG, UK.
    Storå, Jan
    Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Götherström, Anders
    Archaeological Research Laboratory, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wallin, Paul
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antik historia, Arkeologi.
    Knutsson, Kjel
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antik historia, Arkeologi.
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för organismbiologi, Människans evolution.
    New insights on cultural dualism and population structure in the MiddleNeolithic Funnel Beaker culture on the island of Gotland2018Inngår i: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2352-4103, Vol. 17, s. 325-334Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years it has been shown that the Neolithization of Europe was partly driven by migration of farming groups admixing with local hunter-gatherer groups as they dispersed across the continent. However, little research has been done on the cultural duality of contemporaneous foragers and farming populations in the same region. Here we investigate the demographic history of the Funnel Beaker culture [Trichterbecherkultur or TRB, c. 4000–2800 cal BCE], and the sub-Neolithic Pitted Ware culture complex [PWC, c. 3300–2300 cal BCE] during the Nordic Middle Neolithic period on the island of Gotland, Sweden. We use a multidisciplinary approach to investigate individuals buried in the Ansarve dolmen, the only confirmed TRB burial on the island. We present new radiocarbon dating, isotopic analyses for diet and mobility, and mitochondrial DNA haplogroup data to infer maternal inheritance. We also present a new Sr-baseline of 0.71208 ± 0.0016 for the local isotope variation. We compare and discuss our findings together with that of contemporaneous populations in Sweden and the North European mainland.

    The radiocarbon dating and Strontium isotopic ratios show that the dolmen was used between c. 3300–2700 cal BCE by a population which displayed local Sr-signals. Mitochondrial data show that the individuals buried in the Ansarve dolmen had maternal genetic affinity to that of other Early and Middle Neolithic farming cultures in Europe, distinct from that of the contemporaneous PWC on the island. Furthermore, they exhibited a strict terrestrial and/or slightly varied diet in contrast to the strict marine diet of the PWC. The findings indicate that two different contemporary groups coexisted on the same island for several hundred years with separate cultural identity, lifestyles, as well as dietary patterns.

  • 3.
    Fraser, Magdalena
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antik historia, Arkeologi. Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för organismbiologi, Människans evolution.
    Sjödin, Per
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för organismbiologi, Människans evolution.
    Sanchez-Quinto, Federico
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för organismbiologi, Människans evolution.
    Evans, Jane
    Natural Environment Research Council, Isotope Geosciences Laboratory, British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG, UK.
    Svedjemo, Gustaf
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antik historia, Arkeologi.
    Knutsson, Kjel
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antik historia, Arkeologi.
    Götherström, Anders
    Archaeological Research Laboratory, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för organismbiologi, Människans evolution.
    Wallin, Paul
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antik historia, Arkeologi.
    Storå, Jan
    Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden.
    The Stone Cist Conundrum: A multidisciplinary approach to investigate Late Neolithic/ Early Bronze Age population demography on the Island of Gotland2018Inngår i: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2352-4103, Vol. 20, s. 324-337Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The Late Neolithic period in Scandinavia [LN, c. 2350-1700 cal BCE] marks a time of considerable changes in settlement patterns, economy, and material culture. This shift also lays the foundation for the demographic developments in the Early Bronze Age [EBA, c. 1700-1100 cal BCE]. However, little is presently known regarding the developments from these time-periods on the island of Gotland in the Baltic Sea. During the Middle Neolithic period [MN, c. 3300-2350 cal BCE], Gotland was inhabited by groups associated with the Funnel Beaker culture [TRB, c. 4000-2700 cal BCE], and the sub-Neolithic Pitted Ware culture [PWC, c. 3300-2300 cal BCE]. Some indications of connections with the Bathe Axe/Corded Ware cultures [BAC/CWC, c. 2800-2300 cal BCE] have also been found, but no typical BAC/CWC burials have been located on the island to date. Here, we investigate the chronological and internal relationship of twenty-three individuals buried in four LN/EBA stone cist burials; Haffinds, Hagur, Suderkvie, and Utalskog on Gotland. We present eleven mitochondrial genomes [from 23 X to 1271 X coverage], and twenty-three new radiocarbon dates, as well as stable isotope data for diet. We examine the local Sr-baseline range for Gotland, and present new Sr-data to discuss mobility patterns of the individuals. The genetic results are compared and discussed in light of earlier cultural periods from Gotland [TRB and PWC], and CWC from the European continent, as well as contemporaneous LN secondary burials in the MN Ansarve dolmen. We find that all burials were used into the EBA, but only two of the cists showed activity already during the LN. We also see some mobility to Gotland during the LN/EBA period based on Strontium and mitochondrial data. We see a shift in the dietary pattern compared to the preceding period on the island [TRB and PWC], and the two LN individuals from the Ansarve dolmen exhibited different dietary and mobility patterns compared to the individuals from the LN/EBA stone cist burials. We find that most of the cist burials were used by individuals local to the area of the burials, with the exception of the large LN/EBA Haffinds cist burial which showed higher levels of mobility. Our modeling of ancestral mitochondrial contribution from chronologically older individuals recovered in the cultural contexts of TRB, PWC and CWC show that the best model is a 55/45 mix of CWC and TRB individuals. A 3-way model with a slight influx from PWC [5%] also had a good fit. This is difficult to reconcile with the current archaeological evidence on the island. We suggest that the maternal CWC/TRB contribution we see in the local LN/EBA individuals derives from migrants after the Scandinavian MN period, which possible also admixed with smaller local groups connected with the PWC. Further genomic analyses of these groups on Gotland will help to clarify the demographic history during the MN to EBA time periods.

  • 4.
    Kordatzaki, G.
    et al.
    British Sch Athens, Fitch Lab, Souedias 52, Athens 10676, Greece.
    Kiriatzi, E.
    British Sch Athens, Fitch Lab, Souedias 52, Athens 10676, Greece.
    Mueller, N. S.
    British Sch Athens, Fitch Lab, Souedias 52, Athens 10676, Greece.
    Voyatzis, M.
    Univ Arizona, 1009 E South Campus Dr,POB 210030, Tucson, AZ 85721 USA.
    Romano, D.
    Univ Arizona, 1009 E South Campus Dr,POB 210030, Tucson, AZ 85721 USA.
    Petrakis, S.
    Forsen, J.
    Univ Gothenburg, Box 200, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nordquist, Gullög Christine
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antik historia, Antikens kultur och samhällsliv.
    Rodriguez-Alvarez, E.
    Univ Arizona, 1009 E South Campus Dr,POB 210030, Tucson, AZ 85721 USA.
    Linn, S.
    Univ Penn, 3405 Woodland Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA.
    A diachronic investigation of 'local' pottery production and supply at the sanctuary of Zeus, Mount Lykaion, Arcadia, Peloponnese2016Inngår i: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2352-4103, Vol. 7, s. 526-529Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper reports results of an integrated study of a selection of pottery recovered from the altar of Zeus, Mount Lykaion, Arcadia, in the Peloponnese, Greece, dating from the Neolithic to the Early Iron Age. A multianalytical approach based on petrographic and chemical analysis, supported by refiring tests and geological sampling, has been employed to tackle issues of technology and provenance. Results shed light on patterns of raw material sources exploitation and pottery production and supply at the site over time. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 5.
    Marsal, Roser
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antik historia. Univ Barcelona, Inst Recerca Aigua IdRA UB, Marti Franques 1, Barcelona 08028, Spain.
    Early water management systems on the southern Transjordan plateau2023Inngår i: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2352-4103, Vol. 47, artikkel-id 103795Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The efficient management of water resources to supply the needs of societies in territories where water is a scarce and limited resource has been essential throughout time. The site of Sela on the southern Transjordan plateau is unique for understanding water management in this semi-arid area. The analysis of hydraulic installations has allowed us to characterise its hydro technology and spatial distribution in the settlement. To this end, the hy-draulic facilities have been identified, documented, and analysed in detail through two archaeological surveys (2015 and 2016). Spatial analysis has been carried out by preparing extensive 2D planimetry and 3D re-constructions. The results obtained have made it possible to reconstruct the water supply system necessary for the subsistence of the societies that inhabited Sela over time. The system consists of canals, cisterns, and sedi-mentation basins for the collection, conduction, storage, and preservation of water, mainly from rain. Some of Sela's hydraulic structures may have originated in the Bronze Age (mid-late 2nd mill. BCE), but more secure dating is needed to substantiate this possibility.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
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  • 6.
    Nichols, Christopher
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antik historia.
    Domestic dog skeletons at Valsgarde cemetery, Uppland, Sweden: Quantification and morphological reconstruction2021Inngår i: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2352-4103, Vol. 36, artikkel-id 102875Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Thirty inhumations have been excavated at the cemetery of Valsgarde in central Sweden, of which twenty-one have been dated to the Vendel Period and Viking Age (c. 550-1100 CE). Of these graves, twelve contain the positively-identifiable remains of domestic dogs (Canis familiaris). This study aimed to quantify and describe these dogs in terms of withers height and morphological type (morphotype). A minimum of twenty dogs was identified. The majority of dogs were determined to be of medium-large size, with a variety of types represented. The Viking Age graves contain fewer dogs on average than those of the Vendel Period, symptomatic of a general scaling-down of funerary assemblages at the site during this time. Despite this reduction in numbers, their persistence throughout this transition indicates the species held a significant position in the funerary traditions of the region, and certain individuals also appear to have held great personal value for their masters.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
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  • 7.
    Peyroteo-Stjerna, Rita
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för organismbiologi, Människans evolution.
    Simões, Luciana G.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för organismbiologi, Människans evolution.
    Fernandes, Ricardo
    Lopes, Gonçalo
    Günther, Torsten
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för organismbiologi, Människans evolution.
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för organismbiologi, Människans evolution.
    Multidisciplinary investigation reveals an individual of West African origin buried in a Portuguese Mesolithic shell midden four centuries ago2022Inngår i: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2352-4103, Vol. 42, artikkel-id 103370Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Cabeço da Amoreira is a well-studied shell midden with a robust chronology based on a large number ofradiocarbon dates on Mesolithic human burials. Surprisingly, we discovered one individual that lived about 400years ago buried in this site. We employed a multidisciplinary approach integrating archaeology, historical records,genetics, radiocarbon dating and stable isotope analysis to investigate the biogeographic origins of thisindividual and burial circumstances. We could determine that this was a man of West African origin, probablyfrom Senegambia, arriving in Portugal via the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade. Our study provides new insights intoaspects of the life and death of a first-generation African individual in Portugal during the Trans-Atlantic SlaveTrade period and highlights the power of multidisciplinary research to unravel unwritten history.

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  • 8.
    Toonen, W. H. J.
    et al.
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Fac Arts, Egyptol Unit, Leuven, Belgium.
    Graham, Angus
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antik historia, Arkeologi.
    Masson-Berghoff, A.
    British Museum, Dept Greece & Rome, London, England.
    Peeters, J.
    Univ Utrecht, Dept Phys Geog, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Winkels, T. G.
    Univ Utrecht, Dept Phys Geog, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Pennington, B. T.
    Univ Southampton, Geog & Environm, Southampton, Hants, England.
    Hunter, M. A.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Earth Sci, Cambridge, England.
    Strutt, K. D.
    Univ Southampton, Archaeol, Southampton, Hants, England.
    Barker, D. S.
    Univ Southampton, Archaeol, Southampton, Hants, England.
    Emery, V. L.
    Carthage Coll, Kenosha, WI USA.
    Sollars, L.
    Univ Glasgow, Dept Archaeol, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland.
    Sourouzian, H.
    German Inst Archaeol, Cairo, Egypt.
    Amenhotep III's Mansion of Millions of Years in Thebes (Luxor, Egypt): Submergence of high grounds by river floods and Nile sediments2019Inngår i: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2352-4103, Vol. 25, s. 195-205Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    New Kingdom royal cult temples in Thebes (Luxor, Egypt) are all located on the lower desert edge. Kom el-Hettan (Amenhotep III: reign 1391-1353 BCE, 18th Dynasty) is an exception, as it is located in the present Nile floodplain. Its anomalous position has puzzled Egyptologists, as has the termination of its use, which traditionally has been attributed to natural hazards such as flooding or earthquakes. Geoarchaeological analyses of the subsurface shows that Amenhotep III's temple was initially founded on a wadi fan that stood several metres above the contemporary surrounding floodplain landscape. The temple was fronted by a minor branch of the Nile, which connected the temple to the wider region, but the temple itself was relatively safe from the annual flood of the Nile. This geoarchaeological study comprised a coring programme to determine the c. 4000-yr landscape history of the local area. Chronological control was provided by the analysis of ceramic fragments recovered from within the sediments. This study shows that the New Kingdom period was, at least locally, characterised by extremely high sedimentation rates that caused a rapid rise of the floodplain and gradual submergence of the pre-existing high temple grounds. This is, however, not a plausible reason for the destruction of the temple, as frequent inundation did not begin until the temple was already out of use and largely dismantled.

  • 9.
    Wärmländer, Sebastian K. T. S.
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Archaeol & Class Studies, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ljungkvist, John
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antik historia, Arkeologi.
    Jahrehorn, Max
    Oxider AB, POB 980, S-39129 Kalmar, Sweden..
    Hennius, Andreas
    Upplandsmuseet, Drottninggatan 7, S-75310 Uppsala, Sweden..
    A 6th-8th c. wire-drawing iron plate with silver residue from a Vendel Period workshop in Old Uppsala, Sweden2023Inngår i: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2352-4103, Vol. 51, artikkel-id 104193Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Metal wire is in modern society manufactured by drawing metal rods through dies with conical holes of decreasing diameters, until the desired thickness is obtained. The history and origin of this technique remains unclear, although it was likely developed from earlier wire-making techniques such as strip-drawing and rolldrawing. Proper wire-drawing was an established technology in Europe during the High Middle Ages, and numerous draw-plates have been found at Scandinavian Viking Age trading centers. Here, we report the technical examination of an iron draw-plate found in Uppsala in central Sweden. The draw-plate was excavated in a Vendel Period fine metals workshop, located immediately next to the royal hall in Old Uppsala, the central building of the royal estate in the 6th -8th c. X-ray and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of the draw-plate revealed silver particles in the plate's holes, indicating drawing of silver wire. The plate is dated to the 6th - 8th c., which makes it one of the oldest confirmed tools for wire-drawing so far encountered. The presence of this tool in the workshop indicates that some high-quality jewelry in this region was locally produced. Thus, the finding of this draw-plate increases our understanding of Vendel Period jewelry production, and of the social organization of this craft.

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