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  • 1.
    Krishnamurthy, Shrreya
    et al.
    Indian Inst Sci Educ & Res, Ctr Energy Sci, Dept Phys, Doctor Homi Bhabha Rd, Pune 411008, Maharashtra, India;Savitribai Phule Pune Univ, Dept Phys, Pune 411007, Maharashtra, India.
    Naphade, Rounak
    Indian Inst Sci Educ & Res, Ctr Energy Sci, Dept Phys, Doctor Homi Bhabha Rd, Pune 411008, Maharashtra, India.
    Mir, Wasim J.
    Indian Inst Sci Educ & Res, Ctr Energy Sci, Dept Chem, Doctor Homi Bhabha Rd, Pune 411008, Maharashtra, India.
    Gosavi, Suresh
    Savitribai Phule Pune Univ, Dept Phys, Pune 411007, Maharashtra, India.
    Chakraborty, Sudip
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory.
    Vaidhyanathan, Ramanathan
    Indian Inst Sci Educ & Res, Ctr Energy Sci, Dept Chem, Doctor Homi Bhabha Rd, Pune 411008, Maharashtra, India.
    Ogale, Satishchandra
    Indian Inst Sci Educ & Res, Ctr Energy Sci, Dept Phys, Doctor Homi Bhabha Rd, Pune 411008, Maharashtra, India.
    Molecular and Self-Trapped Excitonic Contributions to the Broadband Luminescence in Diamine-Based Low-Dimensional Hybrid Perovskite Systems2018In: Advanced Optical Materials, ISSN 2162-7568, E-ISSN 2195-1071, Vol. 6, no 20, article id 1800751Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present solid state lighting (SSL) technology is based on using a combination of phosphors to give the desired white light emitting devices. The property of broadband emission from a single phosphor is not only difficult to achieve but also poses a challenge in device fabrication. Hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites especially in low dimensions (2D/1D) are being widely explored for their optoelectronic properties. Few of these materials exhibit broadband emission upon ultraviolet excitation, providing a scope for synthetic engineering in achieving commercially viable single-phosphor materials. In this work, three interesting diammonium-based low-dimensional hybrid perovskites for broadband photoluminescence (PL) are examined. The doubly protonated ethylenediamine-configured monoclinic (P2(1)/n) 1D ribbon assembly (H3NCH2CH2NH3)(8)(Pb4Br18)Br-6 (1) and the orthorhombic (Pbcm) 2D-twisted octahedral (H3NCH2CH2NH3)(Pb2Cl6) (2) show white luminescence, while the doubly protonated piperazine-configured orthorhombic (Pnnm) 0D dual-octahedral (C4N2H12)(4)(Pb2Br11)(Br)(H2O)(4) (3) exhibits bluish-white luminescence. Based on the PL of the organic diammonium salt, the time-resolved PL, Raman signatures, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, it is shown that the broadband luminescence has dual origin: one around 400 nm from diammonium-related molecular fluorescence and another around 516 nm from self-trapped excitons. The structure-specific relative contributions and interplay between the two define the overall character of the broadband luminescence.

  • 2.
    Wang, JunXin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Physics.
    Xu, Changgang
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Physics. Xi'an University of Science and Technology.
    Nilsson, Annica M
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Physics.
    Fernandes, Daniel L. A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Physics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry.
    Strömberg, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Physics.
    Wang, Jianfang
    Chinese University of Hong Kong.
    Niklasson, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Physics.
    General Method for Determining Light Scattering and Absorption of Nanoparticle Composites2018In: Advanced Optical Materials, ISSN 2162-7568, E-ISSN 2195-1071, Vol. 6, no 4, article id 1801315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scattering and absorption from nanoparticles are of major importance in optical research as well as in a range of applications. The Kubelka–Munk two-flux radiative transfer model gives a simple description of light scattering in nanoparticle composite materials, but inversion of experimental transmittance and reflectance data to obtain backscattering and absorption coefficients remains challenging. Here, a general method for evaluating these parameters from transmittance and reflectance spectra, combined with spectral angle resolved light scattering measurements is developed. The angular dependence is approximatedby an extension of the empirical Reynolds–McCormick phase function, which is fitted to the experimental angle resolved light scattering data. This approach is verified by measurements on three typical nanoparticle/polymer composites containing plasmonic Au, ferromagnetic Fe3O4, and dielectric TiO2 particles. An approximation to the angular scattering pattern is further demonstrated, which can be applied to obtain the optical parameters using only reflectance and transmittance data, in cases where angle-resolved measurements are not available. These results can be extended to a wide range of isotropic, anisotropic, and multiple scattering systems, and will be highly useful in the fields of light scattering coatings/metamaterials, UV-shielding films, displays, absorption/scattering layers in solar cells and biological scatterers.

  • 3.
    Zhang, Youwei
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Electronics.
    Wang, Jiao
    Wang, Bing
    Shao, Jinhai
    Deng, Jianan
    Cong, Chunxiao
    Hu, Laigui
    Tian, Pengfei
    Liu, Ran
    Zhang, Shi-Li
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Electronics.
    Qiu, Zhi-Jun
    Extending the Spectral Responsivity of MoS2 Phototransistors by Incorporating Up-Conversion Microcrystals2018In: Advanced Optical Materials, ISSN 2162-7568, E-ISSN 2195-1071, Vol. 6, no 21, article id 1800660Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Layered 2D semiconductors are characterized by unique photoelectric properties and, therefore, constitute a new class of basic building block for next‐generation optoelectronics. However, their wide bandgaps limit the spectral responsivity to a narrow range. Here, a facile approach is demonstrated by integrating β‐NaYF4:Yb3+, Er3+ up‐conversion microcrystals (UCMCs) with monolayer‐MoS2 phototransistors to break this bandgap‐imposed barrier and to drastically extend the responsivity range. In essence, the UCMCs up‐convert a near‐infrared excitation at 980 nm to visible light of photons with energy matching the large bandgap (i.e., 1.8 eV) of monolayer‐MoS2, thereby activating the phototransistor with remarkable photocurrent and minimum interference. This approach leads to preservation of the excellent electrical merits of monolayer‐MoS2 and simultaneous retention of its low dark current and high photoresponsivity to the above‐bandgap lights. Significantly, an enhancement by over 1000 times is achieved for both responsivity and specific detectivity at 980 nm excitation. Moreover, the rate of response is kept identical to that when the MoS2 phototransistor is excited by a visible light. Therefore, integrating with UCMCs can enable the emerging 2D semiconductors of wide bandgap to respond to infrared excitations with high efficacy and without sacrificing their performance in the visible region.

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