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  • 1.
    Bielecki, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Hantke, Max F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Daurer, Benedikt J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Reddy, Hemanth K. N.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Hasse, Dirk
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Larsson, Daniel S. D.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Gunn, Laura H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Svenda, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Munke, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Sellberg, Jonas A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Flueckiger, Leonie
    Pietrini, Alberto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Nettelblad, Carl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Lundholm, Ida
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Okamoto, Kenta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Timneanu, Nicusor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Molecular and Condensed Matter Physics.
    Westphal, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Kulyk, Olena
    Higashiura, Akifumi
    van der Schot, Gijs
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Loh, Ne-Te Duane
    Wysong, Taylor E.
    Bostedt, Christoph
    Gorkhover, Tais
    Iwan, Bianca
    Seibert, M. Marvin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Osipov, Timur
    Walter, Peter
    Hart, Philip
    Bucher, Maximilian
    Ulmer, Anatoli
    Ray, Dipanwita
    Carini, Gabriella
    Ferguson, Ken R.
    Andersson, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Andreasson, Jakob
    Hajdu, Janos
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Maia, Filipe R. N. C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Electrospray sample injection for single-particle imaging with x-ray lasers2019In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 5, no 5, article id eaav8801Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Brynildsrud, Ola B.
    et al.
    Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Div Infect Dis & Environm Hlth, Lovisenberggata 8, N-0456 Oslo, Norway.
    Pepperell, Caitlin S.
    Univ Wisconsin, Sch Med & Publ Hlth, Dept Med, Div Infect Dis, Madison, WI 53726 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Sch Med & Publ Hlth, Dept Med Microbiol & Immunol, Madison, WI 53726 USA.
    Suffys, Philip
    Oswaldo Cruz Inst, Lab Mol Biol Appl Mycobacteria, Ave Brasil 4365,CP 926, BR-21040360 Manguinho, RJ, Brazil.
    Grandjean, Louis
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Paediat Infect Dis, London W2 1NY, England.
    Monteserin, Johana
    ANLIS Carlos Malbran, Inst Nacl Enfermedades Infecciosas, Buenos Aires, DF, Argentina;Consejo Nacl Invest Cient & Tecn, Buenos Aires, DF, Argentina.
    Debech, Nadia
    Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Div Infect Dis & Environm Hlth, Lovisenberggata 8, N-0456 Oslo, Norway.
    Bohlin, Jon
    Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Div Infect Dis & Environm Hlth, Lovisenberggata 8, N-0456 Oslo, Norway.
    Alfsnes, Kristian
    Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Div Infect Dis & Environm Hlth, Lovisenberggata 8, N-0456 Oslo, Norway.
    Pettersson, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Div Infect Dis & Environm Hlth, Lovisenberggata 8, N-0456 Oslo, Norway; Univ Sydney, Charles Perkins Ctr Sch Life & Environm Sci, Marie Bashir Inst Infect Dis & Biosecur, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia;Univ Sydney, Sydney Med Sch, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia;Publ Hlth Agcy Sweden, Nobels Vg 18, SE-17182 Solna, Sweden.
    Kirkeleite, Ingerid
    Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Div Infect Dis & Environm Hlth, Lovisenberggata 8, N-0456 Oslo, Norway.
    Fandinho, Fatima
    Ctr Referincia Prof Helio Fraga Jacarepagu, Lab Bacteriol Tuberculose, Estr Curic 2000, Rio De Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.
    da Silva, Marcia Aparecida
    Ctr Referincia Prof Helio Fraga Jacarepagu, Lab Bacteriol Tuberculose, Estr Curic 2000, Rio De Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.
    Perdigao, Joao
    Univ Lisbon, Fac Farm, Inst Invest Med, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Portugal, Isabel
    Univ Lisbon, Fac Farm, Inst Invest Med, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Viveiros, Miguel
    Univ Nova Lisboa, Inst Higiene & Med Trop, Unidade Microbiol Med Global Hlth & Trop Med, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Clark, Taane
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Fac Infect & Trop Dis, London WC1E 7HT, England;London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Fac Epidemiol & Populat Hlth, London WC1E 7HT, England.
    Caws, Maxine
    Univ Liverpool Liverpool Sch Trop Med, Dept Clin Sci, Liverpool, Merseyside, England;Birat Nepal Med Trust, Kathmandu, Nepal.
    Dunstan, Sarah
    Univ Melbourne, Peter Doherty Inst Infect & Immun, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Thai, Phan Vuong Khac
    Lopez, Beatriz
    ANLIS Carlos Malbran, Inst Nacl Enfermedades Infecciosas, Buenos Aires, DF, Argentina.
    Ritacco, Viviana
    ANLIS Carlos Malbran, Inst Nacl Enfermedades Infecciosas, Buenos Aires, DF, Argentina;Consejo Nacl Invest Cient & Tecn, Buenos Aires, DF, Argentina.
    Kitchen, Andrew
    Univ Iowa, Dept Anthropol, Iowa City, IA 52242 USA.
    Brown, Tyler S.
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Div Infect Dis, Boston, MA 02114 USA.
    van Soolingen, Dick
    Natl Inst Publ Hlth & Environm, Ctr Infect Dis Res Diagnost & Perinatal Screening, POB 1, NL-3720 BA Bilthoven, Netherlands.
    O'Neill, Mary B.
    Univ Wisconsin, Sch Med & Publ Hlth, Dept Med Microbiol & Immunol, Madison, WI 53726 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Lab Genet, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Inst Pasteur, Unit Human Evolutionary Genet, F-75015 Paris, France.
    Holt, Kathryn E.
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Fac Infect & Trop Dis, London WC1E 7HT, England;Univ Melbourne, Dept Biochem & Mol Biol, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Inst Bio21, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Feil, Edward J.
    Univ Bath, Milner Ctr Evolut, Dept Biol & Biochem, Bath BA2 7AY, Avon, England.
    Mathema, Barun
    Columbia Univ, Mailman Sch Publ Hlth, 722 West 168th St, New York, NY 10032 USA.
    Balloux, Francois
    UCL, UCL Genet Inst, London WC1E 6BT, England.
    Eldholm, Vegard
    Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Div Infect Dis & Environm Hlth, Lovisenberggata 8, N-0456 Oslo, Norway.
    Global expansion of Mycobacterium tuberculosis lineage 4 shaped by colonial migration and local adaptation2018In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 4, no 10, article id eaat5869Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    On the basis of population genomic and phylogeographic analyses of 1669 Mycobacterium tuberculosis lineage 4 (L4) genomes, we find that dispersal of L4 has been completely dominated by historical migrations out of Europe. We demonstrate an intimate temporal relationship between European colonial expansion into Africa and the Americas and the spread of L4 tuberculosis (TB). Markedly, in the age of antibiotics, mutations conferring antimicrobial resistance overwhelmingly emerged locally (at the level of nations), with minimal cross-border transmission of resistance. The latter finding was found to reflect the relatively recent emergence of these mutations, as a similar degree of local restriction was observed for susceptible variants emerging on comparable time scales. The restricted international transmission of drug-resistant TB suggests that containment efforts at the level of individual countries could be successful.

  • 3.
    Cedernaes, Jonathan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Schonke, Milena
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Solna, Sweden.
    Westholm, Jakub Orzechowski
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Biochem & Biophys, Sci Life Lab, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mi, Jia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry. Binzhou Med Univ, Med & Pharmarcy Res Ctr, Yantai, Peoples R China.
    Chibalin, Alexander
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Solna, Sweden.
    Voisin, Sarah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Osler, Megan
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Solna, Sweden.
    Vogel, Heike
    German Inst Human Nutr Potsdam Rehbrucke, Dept Expt Diabetol, Potsdam, Germany.
    Hornaeus, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC.
    Dickson, Suzanne L.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Neurosci & Physiol, Dept Physiol Endocrinol, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lind, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Bergquist, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry. Univ Utah, Dept Pathol, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 USA;Binzhou Med Univ, Precis Med, Yantai, Peoples R China.
    Schiöth, Helgi B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Zierath, Juleen R.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Solna, Sweden.
    Benedict, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Acute sleep loss results in tissue-specific alterations in genome-wide DNA methylation state and metabolic fuel utilization in humans2018In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 4, no 8, article id eaar8590Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Curtailed sleep promotes weight gain and loss of lean mass in humans, although the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. We investigated the genomic and physiological impact of acute sleep loss in peripheral tissues by obtaining adipose tissue and skeletal muscle after one night of sleep loss and after one full night of sleep. We find that acute sleep loss alters genome-wide DNA methylation in adipose tissue, and unbiased transcriptome-, protein-, and metabolite-level analyses also reveal highly tissue-specific changes that are partially reflected by altered metabolite levels in blood. We observe transcriptomic signatures of inflammation in both tissues following acute sleep loss, but changes involving the circadian clock are evident only in skeletal muscle, and we uncover molecular signatures suggestive of muscle breakdown that contrast with an anabolic adipose tissue signature. Our findings provide insight into how disruption of sleep and circadian rhythms may promote weight gain and sarcopenia.

  • 4.
    Chapman, Colin Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Benedict, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Schiöth, Helgi B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Experimenter gender and replicability in science2018In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 4, no 1, article id e1701427Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a replication crisis spreading through the annals of scientific inquiry. Although some work has been carried out to uncover the roots of this issue, much remains unanswered. With this in mind, this paper investigates how the gender of the experimenter may affect experimental findings. Clinical trials are regularly carried out without any report of the experimenter's gender and with dubious knowledge of its influence. Consequently, significant biases caused by the experimenter's gender may lead researchers to conclude that therapeutics or other interventions are either overtreating or undertreating a variety of conditions. Bearing this in mind, this policy paper emphasizes the importance of reporting and controlling for experimenter gender in future research. As backdrop, it explores what we know about the role of experimenter gender in influencing laboratory results, suggests possible mechanisms, and suggests future areas of inquiry.

  • 5.
    Dimmock, Andrew P.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Russell, Christopher T.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Dept Earth Planetary & Space Sci, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA.
    Sagdeev, Roald Z.
    Univ Maryland, Dept Phys, College Pk, MD 20742 USA.
    Krasnoselskikh, Vladimir
    Univ Orleans, CNRS, LPC2E, Orleans, France;Univ Calif Berkeley, Space Sci Lab, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.
    Walker, Simon N.
    Univ Sheffield, Dept Automat Control & Syst Engn, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England.
    Carr, Christopher
    Imperial Coll London, London SW7 2AZ, England.
    Dandouras, Iannis
    Univ Toulouse, IRAP, CNRS, UPS,CNES, Toulouse, France.
    Escoubet, C. Philippe
    European Space Agcy, European Space Res & Technol Ctr ESA ESTEC, Noordwijk, Netherlands.
    Ganushkina, Natalia
    Finnish Meteorol Inst, Helsinki, Finland;Univ Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA.
    Gedalin, Michael
    Ben Gurion Univ Negev, Dept Phys, Beer Sheva, Israel.
    Khotyaintsev, Yuri V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Aryan, Homayon
    Univ Sheffield, Dept Automat Control & Syst Engn, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England;NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA.
    Pulkkinen, Tuija, I
    Univ Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA;Aalto Univ, Sch Elect Engn, Dept Elect & Nanoengn, Espoo, Finland.
    Balikhin, Michael A.
    Univ Sheffield, Dept Automat Control & Syst Engn, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England.
    Direct evidence of nonstationary collisionless shocks in space plasmas2019In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 5, no 2, article id eaau9926Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collisionless shocks are ubiquitous throughout the universe: around stars, supernova remnants, active galactic nuclei, binary systems, comets, and planets. Key information is carried by electromagnetic emissions from particles accelerated by high Mach number collisionless shocks. These shocks are intrinsically nonstationary, and the characteristic physical scales responsible for particle acceleration remain unknown. Quantifying these scales is crucial, as it affects the fundamental process of redistributing upstream plasma kinetic energy into other degrees of freedom-particularly electron thermalization. Direct in situ measurements of nonstationary shock dynamics have not been reported. Thus, the model that best describes this process has remained unknown. Here, we present direct evidence demonstrating that the transition to nonstationarity is associated with electron-scale field structures inside the shock ramp.

  • 6.
    Glemin, Sylvain
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution. Univ Rennes, CNRS, UMR 6553, ECOBIO Ecosyst Biodiversite Evolut, F-35042 Rennes, France.
    Scornavacca, Celine
    Univ Montpellier, Inst Sci Evolut, CNRS, IRD,EPHE CC 064, Pl Eugene Bataillon, F-34095 Montpellier 05, France.
    Dainat, Jacques
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Burgarella, Concetta
    Univ Montpellier, AGAP, CIRAD, INRA,Montpellier SupAgro, Montpellier, France;CIRAD, UMR AGAP, F-34398 Montpellier, France.
    Viader, Veronique
    Univ Montpellier, AGAP, CIRAD, INRA,Montpellier SupAgro, Montpellier, France.
    Ardisson, Morgane
    Univ Montpellier, AGAP, CIRAD, INRA,Montpellier SupAgro, Montpellier, France.
    Sarah, Gautier
    Univ Montpellier, AGAP, CIRAD, INRA,Montpellier SupAgro, Montpellier, France;INRA, South Green Bioinformat Platform, BIOVERS, CIRAD,IRD,Montpellier SupAgro, Montpellier, France.
    Santoni, Sylvain
    Univ Montpellier, AGAP, CIRAD, INRA,Montpellier SupAgro, Montpellier, France.
    David, Jacques
    Univ Montpellier, AGAP, CIRAD, INRA,Montpellier SupAgro, Montpellier, France.
    Ranwez, Vincent
    Univ Montpellier, AGAP, CIRAD, INRA,Montpellier SupAgro, Montpellier, France.
    Pervasive hybridizations in the history of wheat relatives2019In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 5, no 5, article id eaav9188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cultivated wheats are derived from an intricate history of three genomes, A, B, and D, present in both diploid and polyploid species. It was recently proposed that the D genome originated from an ancient hybridization between the A and B lineages. However, this result has been questioned, and a robust phylogeny of wheat relatives is still lacking. Using transcriptome data from all diploid species and a new methodological approach, our comprehensive phylogenomic analysis revealed that more than half of the species descend from an ancient hybridization event but with a more complex scenario involving a different parent than previously thought-Aegilops mutica, an overlooked wild species-instead of the B genome. We also detected other extensive gene flow events that could explain long-standing controversies in the classification of wheat relatives.

  • 7. Groeneveld, Jeroen
    et al.
    Henderiks, Jorijntje
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Renema, Willem
    McHugh, Cecilia M.
    De Vleeschouwer, David
    Christensen, Beth A.
    Fulthorpe, Craig S.
    Reuning, Lars
    Gallagher, Stephen J.
    Bogus, Kara
    Auer, Gerald
    Ishiwa, Takeshige
    Zhang, W. (Contributor)
    Australian shelf sediments reveal shifts in Miocene Southern Hemisphere westerlies2017In: Science Advances, ISSN 0036-8156, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 3, no 5, article id e1602567Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global climate underwent a major reorganization when the Antarctic ice sheet expanded ~14 million years ago (Ma) (1). This event affected global atmospheric circulation, including the strength and position of the westerlies and the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), and, therefore, precipitation patterns (25). We present new shallow-marine sediment records from the continental shelf of Australia (International Ocean Discovery Program Sites U1459 and U1464) providing the first empirical evidence linking high-latitude cooling around Antarctica to climate change in the (sub)tropics during the Miocene. We show that Western Australia was arid during most of the Middle Miocene. Southwest Australia became wetter during the Late Miocene, creating a climate gradient with the arid interior, whereas northwest Australia remained arid throughout. Precipitation and river runoff in southwest Australia gradually increased from 12 to 8 Ma, which we relate to a northward migration or intensification of the westerlies possibly due to increased sea ice in the Southern Ocean (5). Abrupt aridification indicates that the westerlies shifted back to a position south of Australia after 8 Ma. Our midlatitude Southern Hemisphere data are consistent with the inference that expansion of sea ice around Antarctica resulted in a northward movement of the westerlies. In turn, this may have pushed tropical atmospheric circulation and the ITCZ northward, shifting the main precipitation belt over large parts of Southeast Asia (4).

  • 8.
    Hill, Jason
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Stockholm Univ, Dept Zool, Populat Genet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rastas, Pasi
    Univ Helsinki, Inst Biotechnol, Helsinki, Finland.
    Hornett, Emily A.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Zool, Cambridge, England;Univ Liverpool, Inst Integrat Biol, Liverpool, Merseyside, England;Univ Liverpool Liverpool Sch Trop Med, Dept Vector Biol, Liverpool, Merseyside, England.
    Neethiraj, Ramprasad
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Zool, Populat Genet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Clark, Nathan
    Univ Pittsburgh, Dept Computat & Syst Biol, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 USA.
    Morehouse, Nathan
    Univ Cincinnati, Dept Biol Sci, Cincinnati, OH 45221 USA.
    Celorio-Mancera, Maria de la Paz
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Zool, Populat Genet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cols, Jofre Carnicer
    Univ Barcelona, Dept Evolutionary Biol Ecol & Environm Sci, E-08028 Barcelona, Spain;Autonomous Univ Barcelona, Global Ecol Unit, CREAF, Cerdanyola Dell Valles 08193, Spain.
    Dircksen, Heinrich
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Zool, Funct Morphol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Meslin, Camille
    Univ Pittsburgh, Dept Computat & Syst Biol, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 USA;INRA, Inst Ecol & Environm Sci Paris, Dept Sensory Ecol, Route St Cyr, F-78026 Versailles, France.
    Keehnen, Naomi
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Zool, Populat Genet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pruisscher, Peter
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Zool, Populat Genet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sikkink, Kristin
    Univ Minnesota, Dept Ecol Evolut & Behav, St Paul, MN 55108 USA;Univ Mississippi, Dept Biol, University, MS 38677 USA.
    Vives, Maria
    Univ Barcelona, Dept Evolutionary Biol Ecol & Environm Sci, E-08028 Barcelona, Spain;Autonomous Univ Barcelona, Global Ecol Unit, CREAF, Cerdanyola Dell Valles 08193, Spain.
    Vogel, Heiko
    Max Planck Inst Chem Ecol, Dept Entomol, D-07745 Jena, Germany.
    Wiklund, Christer
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Zool, Populat Genet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Woronik, Alyssa
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Zool, Populat Genet, Stockholm, Sweden;NYU, Ctr Dev Genet, Dept Biol, 100 Washington Sq East, New York, NY 10003 USA.
    Boggs, Carol L.
    Univ South Carolina, Dept Biol Sci, Columbia, SC 29208 USA.
    Nylin, Soren
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Zool, Populat Genet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wheat, Christopher W.
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Zool, Populat Genet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Unprecedented reorganization of holocentric chromosomes provides insights into the enigma of lepidopteran chromosome evolution2019In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 5, no 6, article id eaau3648Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chromosome evolution presents an enigma in the mega-diverse Lepidoptera. Most species exhibit constrained chromosome evolution with nearly identical haploid chromosome counts and chromosome-level gene collinearity among species more than 140 million years divergent. However, a few species possess radically inflated chromosomal counts due to extensive fission and fusion events. To address this enigma of constraint in the face of an exceptional ability to change, we investigated an unprecedented reorganization of the standard lepidopteran chromosome structure in the green-veined white butterfly (Pieris napi). We find that gene content in P. napi has been extensively rearranged in large collinear blocks, which until now have been masked by a haploid chromosome number close to the lepidopteran average. We observe that ancient chromosome ends have been maintained and collinear blocks are enriched for functionally related genes suggesting both a mechanism and a possible role for selection in determining the boundaries of these genome-wide rearrangements.

  • 9.
    Hochman, Assaf
    et al.
    Tel Aviv Univ, Porter Sch Environm & Earth Sci, Dept Geophys, IL-69978 Tel Aviv, Israel;Tel Aviv Univ, Porter Sch Environm & Earth Sci, Dept Geog & Human Environm, IL-69978 Tel Aviv, Israel;Tel Aviv Univ, Porter Sch Environm & Earth Sci, Porter Sch Environm Studies, IL-69978 Tel Aviv, Israel.
    Alpert, Pinhas
    Tel Aviv Univ, Porter Sch Environm & Earth Sci, Dept Geophys, IL-69978 Tel Aviv, Israel.
    Harpaz, Tzvi
    Tel Aviv Univ, Porter Sch Environm & Earth Sci, Dept Geophys, IL-69978 Tel Aviv, Israel;Tel Aviv Univ, Porter Sch Environm & Earth Sci, Dept Geog & Human Environm, IL-69978 Tel Aviv, Israel.
    Saaroni, Hadas
    Tel Aviv Univ, Porter Sch Environm & Earth Sci, Dept Geophys, IL-69978 Tel Aviv, Israel;Tel Aviv Univ, Porter Sch Environm & Earth Sci, Porter Sch Environm Studies, IL-69978 Tel Aviv, Israel.
    Messori, Gabriele
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. Stockholm Univ, Dept Meteorol, Stockholm, Sweden;Stockholm Univ, Bolin Ctr Climate Res, Stockholm, Sweden.
    A new dynamical systems perspective on atmospheric predictability: Eastern Mediterranean weather regimes as a case study2019In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 5, no 6, article id eaau0936Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The atmosphere is a chaotic system displaying recurrent large-scale configurations. Recent developments in dynamical systems theory allow us to describe these configurations in terms of the local dimension-a proxy for the active number of degrees of freedom-and persistence in phase space, which can be interpreted as persistence in time. These properties provide information on the intrinsic predictability of an atmospheric state. Here, this technique is applied to atmospheric configurations in the eastern Mediterranean, grouped into synoptic classifications (SCs). It is shown that local dimension and persistence, derived from reanalysis and CMIP5 models' daily sea-level pressure fields, can serve as an extremely informative qualitative method for evaluating the predictability of the different SCs. These metrics, combined with the SC transitional probability approach, may be a valuable complement to operational weather forecasts and effective tools for climate model evaluation. This new perspective can be extended to other geographical regions.

  • 10.
    Hoshino, Yosuke
    et al.
    Max Planck Inst Biogeochem, Hans Knoell Str 10, D-07745 Jena, Germany.;Georgia Inst Technol, Sch Biol Sci, 950 Atlantic Dr Northwest, Atlanta, GA 30332 USA..
    Poshibaeva, Aleksandra
    Gubkin Russian State Univ Oil & Gas, Leninsky Prospekt 65, Moscow, Russia..
    Meredith, William
    Univ Nottingham, Fac Engn, Energy Technol Bldg,Triumph Rd, Nottingham NG7 2TU, England..
    Snape, Colin
    Univ Nottingham, Fac Engn, Energy Technol Bldg,Triumph Rd, Nottingham NG7 2TU, England..
    Poshibaev, Vladimir
    Gubkin Russian State Univ Oil & Gas, Leninsky Prospekt 65, Moscow, Russia..
    Versteegh, Gerard J. M.
    Univ Bremen, MARUM Ctr Marine Environm Sci, Leobener Str 8, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.;Helmholtz Zentrum Polar & Meeresforsch, Alfred Wegener Inst, Handelshafen 12, D-27570 Bremerhaven, Germany..
    Kuznetsov, Nikolay
    Gubkin Russian State Univ Oil & Gas, Leninsky Prospekt 65, Moscow, Russia.;Russian Acad Sci, Geol Inst, Pygevsky 7, Moscow, Russia..
    Leider, Arne
    Max Planck Inst Biogeochem, Hans Knoell Str 10, D-07745 Jena, Germany..
    van Maldegem, Lennart
    Max Planck Inst Biogeochem, Hans Knoell Str 10, D-07745 Jena, Germany.;Univ Bremen, MARUM Ctr Marine Environm Sci, Leobener Str 8, D-28359 Bremen, Germany..
    Neumann, Mareike
    Max Planck Inst Biogeochem, Hans Knoell Str 10, D-07745 Jena, Germany..
    Naeher, Sebastian
    Max Planck Inst Biogeochem, Hans Knoell Str 10, D-07745 Jena, Germany.;Univ Bremen, MARUM Ctr Marine Environm Sci, Leobener Str 8, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.;GNS Sci, 1 Fairway Dr, Lower Hutt 5010, New Zealand..
    Moczydlowska-Vidal, Malgorzata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Brocks, Jochen J.
    Australian Natl Univ, Res Sch Earth Sci, Bldg 142,Mills Rd, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia..
    Jarrett, Amber J. M.
    Australian Natl Univ, Res Sch Earth Sci, Bldg 142,Mills Rd, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia..
    Tang, Qing
    Virginia Tech, Dept Geosci, Blacksburg, VA 24061 USA..
    Xiao, Shuhai
    Virginia Tech, Dept Geosci, Blacksburg, VA 24061 USA..
    McKirdy, David
    Univ Adelaide, Dept Earth Sci, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia..
    Das, Supriyo Kumar
    Presidency Univ, Dept Geol, Coll St 86-1, Kolkata 700073, India..
    Alvaro, Jose Javier
    Univ Complutense Madrid, CSIC, Inst Geoci, Novais 12, E-28040 Madrid, Spain..
    Sansjofre, Pierre
    Univ Bretagne Occidentale, UMR CNRS 6538, Lab Geosci Ocean, F-29280 Plouzane, France..
    Hallmann, Christian
    Max Planck Inst Biogeochem, Hans Knoell Str 10, D-07745 Jena, Germany.;Univ Bremen, MARUM Ctr Marine Environm Sci, Leobener Str 8, D-28359 Bremen, Germany..
    Cryogenian evolution of stigmasteroid biosynthesis2017In: Science Advances, ISSN 0036-8156, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 3, no 9, article id e1700887Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sedimentary hydrocarbon remnants of eukaryotic C-26-C-30 sterols can be used to reconstruct early algal evolution. Enhanced C-29 sterol abundances provide algal cellmembranes a density advantage in large temperature fluctuations. Here, we combined a literature review with new analyses to generate a comprehensive inventory of unambiguously syngenetic steranes in Neoproterozoic rocks. Our results show that the capacity for C-29 24ethyl- sterol biosynthesis emerged in the Cryogenian, that is, between 720 and 635 million years ago during the Neoproterozoic Snowball Earth glaciations, which were an evolutionary stimulant, not a bottleneck. This biochemical innovation heralded the rise of green algae to global dominance of marine ecosystems and highlights the environmental drivers for the evolution of sterol biosynthesis. The Cryogenian emergence of C-29 sterol biosynthesis places benchmark for verifying older sterane signatures and sets a new framework for our understanding of early algal evolution.

  • 11.
    Jemth, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Karlsson, Elin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Vogeli, Beat
    Univ Colorado Denver, Dept Biochem & Mol Genet, 12801 East 17th Ave, Aurora, CO 80045 USA.
    Guzovsky, Brenda
    Univ Buenos Aires, IQUIBICEN CONICET, FCEyN, Prot Physiol Lab, Intendente Guiraldes 2160,Ciudad Univ,C1428EGA, Buenos Aires, DF, Argentina.
    Andersson, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Hultqvist, Greta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Dogan, Jakob
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Biochem & Biophys, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Guntert, Peter
    Swiss Fed Inst Technol, Lab Phys Chem, ETH Honggerberg, Zurich, Switzerland;Goethe Univ, Ctr Biomol Magnet Resonance, Inst Biophys Chem, D-60438 Frankfurt, Germany;Tokyo Metropolitan Univ, Grad Sch Sci, Tokyo 1920397, Japan.
    Riek, Roland
    Swiss Fed Inst Technol, Lab Phys Chem, ETH Honggerberg, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Chi, Celestine N.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Structure and dynamics conspire in the evolution of affinity between intrinsically disordered proteins2018In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 4, no 10, article id eaau4130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In every established species, protein-protein interactions have evolved such that they are fit for purpose. However, the molecular details of the evolution of new protein-protein interactions are poorly understood. We have used nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to investigate the changes in structure and dynamics during the evolution of a protein-protein interaction involving the intrinsically disordered CREBBP (CREB-binding protein) interaction domain (CID) and nuclear coactivator binding domain (NCBD) from the transcriptional coregulators NCOA (nuclear receptor coactivator) and CREBBP/p300, respectively. The most ancient low-affinity "Cambrian-like" [540 to 600 million years (Ma) ago] CID/NCBD complex contained less secondary structure and was more dynamic than the complexes from an evolutionarily younger "Ordovician-Silurian" fish ancestor (ca. 440 Ma ago) and extant human. The most ancient Cambrian-like CID/NCBD complex lacked one helix and several interdomain interactions, resulting in a larger solvent-accessible surface area. Furthermore, the most ancient complex had a high degree of millisecond-to-microsecond dynamics distributed along the entire sequences of both CID and NCBD. These motions were reduced in the Ordovician-Silurian CID/NCBD complex and further redistributed in the extant human CID/NCBD complex. Isothermal calorimetry experiments show that complex formation is enthalpically favorable and that affinity is modulated by a largely unfavorable entropic contribution to binding. Our data demonstrate how changes in structure and motion conspire to shape affinity during the evolution of a protein-protein complex and provide direct evidence for the role of structural, dynamic, and frustrational plasticity in the evolution of interactions between intrinsically disordered proteins.

  • 12.
    Krzewinska, Maja
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Archaeol & Class Studies, Archaeol Res Lab, Lilla Frescativagen 7, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kilinc, Gulsah Merve
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Archaeol & Class Studies, Archaeol Res Lab, Lilla Frescativagen 7, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Juras, Anna
    Adam Mickiewicz Univ, Fac Biol, Inst Anthropol, Dept Human Evolutionary Biol, Umultowska 89, PL-61614 Poznan, Poland.
    Koptekin, Dilek
    Middle East Tech Univ, Dept Hlth Informat, TR-06800 Ankara, Turkey.
    Chylenski, Maciej
    Adam Mickiewicz Univ, Fac Hist, Inst Archaeol, Umultowska 89D, PL-61614 Poznan, Poland.
    Nikitin, Alexey G.
    Grand Valley State Univ, Biol Dept, 1 Campus Dr, Allendale, MI 49401 USA.
    Shcherbakov, Nikolai
    Bashkir State Pedag Univ, Lab Methodol & Methods Humanitarian Res, Octyabrskoy Revolutsii 3A, Ufa 450007, Russia.
    Shuteleva, Iia
    Bashkir State Pedag Univ, Lab Methodol & Methods Humanitarian Res, Octyabrskoy Revolutsii 3A, Ufa 450007, Russia;Bashkir State Univ, Inst Hist & State Management, Zaki Validy St 32, Ufa 450076, Russia.
    Leonova, Tatiana
    Bashkir State Pedag Univ, Lab Methodol & Methods Humanitarian Res, Octyabrskoy Revolutsii 3A, Ufa 450007, Russia.
    Kraeva, Liudmila
    Orenburg State Pedag Univ, Archaeol Lab, Orenburg, Russia.
    Sungatov, Flarit A.
    Bashkir State Univ, Archaeol Lab, Str Validi Z 32, Ufa, Russia.
    Sultanova, Alfija N.
    Bashkir State Univ, Archaeol Lab, Str Validi Z 32, Ufa, Russia.
    Potekhina, Inna
    Natl Acad Sci Ukraine, Inst Archaeol, Kiev, Ukraine.
    Lukasik, Sylwia
    Adam Mickiewicz Univ, Fac Biol, Inst Anthropol, Dept Human Evolutionary Biol, Umultowska 89, PL-61614 Poznan, Poland.
    Krenz-Niedbala, Marta
    Adam Mickiewicz Univ, Fac Biol, Inst Anthropol, Dept Human Evolutionary Biol, Umultowska 89, PL-61614 Poznan, Poland.
    Dalen, Love
    Swedish Museum Nat Hist, Dept Bioinformat & Genet, POB 50007, S-10405 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sinika, Vitaly
    Taras Shevchenko Univ Tiraspol, October St 25, Tiraspol 3300, Moldova;Nizhnevartovsk State Univ, Lenin St 56, Khanty Mansi Autonomous 628605, Yugra, Russia.
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Human Evolution. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Univ Johannesburg, Ctr Anthropol Res, POB 524, ZA-2006 Auckland Pk, South Africa;Univ Johannesburg, Dept Anthropol & Dev Studies, POB 524, ZA-2006 Auckland Pk, South Africa.
    Stora, Jan
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Archaeol & Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeol Res Lab, Lilla Frescativagen 7, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gotherstrom, Anders
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Archaeol & Class Studies, Archaeol Res Lab, Lilla Frescativagen 7, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ancient genomes suggest the eastern Pontic-Caspian steppe as the source of western Iron Age nomads2018In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 4, no 10, article id eaat4457Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For millennia, the Pontic-Caspian steppe was a connector between the Eurasian steppe and Europe. In this scene, multidirectional and sequential movements of different populations may have occurred, including those of the Eurasian steppe nomads. We sequenced 35 genomes (low to medium coverage) of Bronze Age individuals (Srubnaya-Alakulskaya) and Iron Age nomads (Cimmerians, Scythians, and Sarmatians) that represent four distinct cultural entities corresponding to the chronological sequence of cultural complexes in the region. Our results suggest that, despite genetic links among these peoples, no group can be considered a direct ancestor of the subsequent group. The nomadic populations were heterogeneous and carried genetic affinities with populations from several other regions including the Far East and the southern Urals. We found evidence of a stable shared genetic signature, making the eastern Pontic-Caspian steppe a likely source of western nomadic groups.

  • 13.
    Kulessa, Bernd
    et al.
    Swansea Univ, Glaciol Grp, Coll of Sci.
    Hubbard, Alun L.
    UiT Arctic Univ Norway, Ctr Arctic Gas Hydrate Environm & Climate, Dept Geosci.; Aberystwyth Univ, Ctr Glaciol, Dept Geog & Earth Sci.
    Booth, Adam D.
    Univ Leeds, Inst Appl Geosci, Sch Earth & Environm.
    Bougamont, Marion
    Univ Cambridge, Scott Polar Res Inst, Dept Geog.
    Dow, Christine F.
    Swansea Univ, Glaciol Grp, Coll Sci, Singleton Pk.; Univ Waterloo, Dept Geog & Environm Management.
    Doyle, Samuel H.
    Aberystwyth Univ, Ctr Glaciol, Dept Geog & Earth Sci.
    Christoffersen, Poul
    Univ Cambridge, Scott Polar Res Inst, Dept Geog.
    Lindback, Katrin
    Norwegian Polar Res Inst, Fram Ctr.
    Pettersson, Rickard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Fitzpatrick, Andrew A. W.
    Aberystwyth Univ, Ctr Glaciol, Dept Geog & Earth Sci.
    Jones, Glenn A.
    Swansea Univ, Glaciol Grp, Coll of Sci.; Aberystwyth Univ, Ctr Glaciol, Dept Geog & Earth Sci.
    Seismic evidence for complex sedimentary control of Greenland Ice Sheet flow2017In: Science Advances, ISSN 0036-8156, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 3, no 8, article id e1603071Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The land-terminating margin of the Greenland Ice Sheet has slowed down in recent decades, although the causes and implications for future ice flow are unclear. Explained originally by a self-regulating mechanism where basal slip reduces as drainage evolves from low to high efficiency, recent numerical modeling invokes a sedimentary control of ice sheet flow as an alternative hypothesis. Although both hypotheses can explain the recent slowdown, their respective forecasts of a long-term deceleration versus an acceleration of ice flow are contradictory. We present amplitude-versus-angle seismic data as the first observational test of the alternative hypothesis. We document transient modifications of basal sediment strengths by rapid subglacial drainages of supraglacial lakes, the primary current control on summer ice sheet flow according to our numerical model. Our observations agree with simulations of initial postdrainage sediment weakening and ice flow accelerations, and subsequent sediment restrengthening and ice flow decelerations, and thus confirm the alternative hypothesis. Although simulated melt season acceleration of ice flow due to weakening of subglacial sediments does not currently outweigh winter slowdown forced by self regulation, they could dominate over the longer term. Subglacial sediments beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet must therefore be mapped and characterized, and a sedimentary control of ice flow must be evaluated against competing self-regulation mechanisms.

  • 14.
    Lee, Jun-Hoe
    et al.
    Max Planck Inst Mol Cell Biol & Genet, Dresden, Germany;Max Planck Inst Phys Komplexer Syst, Dresden, Germany;Ctr Syst Biol Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
    Lewis, Kevin M.
    Washington State Univ, Dept Chem, Pullman, WA 99164 USA.
    Moural, Timothy W.
    Washington State Univ, Dept Chem, Pullman, WA 99164 USA.
    Kirilenko, Bogdan
    Max Planck Inst Mol Cell Biol & Genet, Dresden, Germany;Max Planck Inst Phys Komplexer Syst, Dresden, Germany;Ctr Syst Biol Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
    Borgonovo, Barbara
    Max Planck Inst Mol Cell Biol & Genet, Dresden, Germany.
    Prange, Gisa
    Goethe Univ Frankfurt, Inst Cell Biol & Neurosci, Frankfurt, Germany.
    Koessl, Manfred
    Goethe Univ Frankfurt, Inst Cell Biol & Neurosci, Frankfurt, Germany.
    Huggenberger, Stefan
    Univ Cologne, Dept Anat Neuroanat, Cologne, Germany.
    Kang, ChulHee
    Washington State Univ, Dept Chem, Pullman, WA 99164 USA.
    Hiller, Michael
    Max Planck Inst Mol Cell Biol & Genet, Dresden, Germany;Max Planck Inst Phys Komplexer Syst, Dresden, Germany;Ctr Syst Biol Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
    Molecular parallelism in fast-twitch muscle proteins in echolocating mammals2018In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 4, no 9, article id eaat9660Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Detecting associations between genomic changes and phenotypic differences is fundamental to understanding how phenotypes evolved. By systematically screening for parallel amino acid substitutions, we detected known as well as novel cases (Strc, Tecta, and Cabp2) of parallelism between echolocating bats and toothed whales in proteins that could contribute to high-frequency hearing adaptations. Our screen also showed that echolocating mammals exhibit an unusually high number of parallel substitutions in fast-twitch muscle fiber proteins. Both echolocating bats and toothed whales produce an extremely rapid call rate when homing in on their prey, which was shown in bats to be powered by specialized superfast muscles. We show that these genes with parallel substitutions (Casq1, Atp2a1, Myh2, and Myl1) are expressed in the superfast sound-producing muscle of bats. Furthermore, we found that the calcium storage protein calsequestrin 1 of the little brown bat and the bottlenose dolphin functionally converged in its ability to form calcium-sequestering polymers at lower calcium concentrations, which may contribute to rapid calcium transients required for superfast muscle physiology. The proteins that our genomic screen detected could be involved in the convergent evolution of vocalization in echolocating mammals by potentially contributing to both rapid Ca2+ transients and increased shortening velocities in superfast muscles.

  • 15.
    Maehrlein, Sebastian F.
    et al.
    Max Planck Gesell, Fritz Haber Inst, Faradayweg 4-6, D-14195 Berlin, Germany;Free Univ Berlin, Dept Phys, Arnimallee 14, D-14195 Berlin, Germany;Columbia Univ, Dept Chem, 3000 Broadway, New York, NY 10027 USA.
    Radu, Ilie
    Max Born Inst Nonlinear Opt & Short Pulse Spect, Max Born Str 2A, D-12489 Berlin, Germany;Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin Mat & Energie, Albert Einstein Str 15, D-12489 Berlin, Germany;Tech Univ Berlin, Inst Opt & Atom Phys, Hardenbergstr 36, D-10623 Berlin, Germany.
    Maldonado, Pablo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory.
    Paarmann, Alexander
    Max Planck Gesell, Fritz Haber Inst, Faradayweg 4-6, D-14195 Berlin, Germany.
    Gensch, Michael
    Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr 400, D-01328 Dresden, Germany.
    Kalashnikova, Alexandra M.
    Ioffe Inst, 26 Polytechnicheskaya St, St Petersburg 194021, Russia.
    Pisarev, Roman V.
    Ioffe Inst, 26 Polytechnicheskaya St, St Petersburg 194021, Russia.
    Wolf, Martin
    Max Planck Gesell, Fritz Haber Inst, Faradayweg 4-6, D-14195 Berlin, Germany.
    Oppeneer, Peter M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory.
    Barker, Joseph
    Tohoku Univ, Inst Mat Res, Sendai, Miyagi 9808577, Japan.
    Kampfrath, Tobias
    Max Planck Gesell, Fritz Haber Inst, Faradayweg 4-6, D-14195 Berlin, Germany;Free Univ Berlin, Dept Phys, Arnimallee 14, D-14195 Berlin, Germany.
    Dissecting spin-phonon equilibration in ferrimagnetic insulators by ultrafast lattice excitation2018In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 4, no 7, article id eaar5164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To gain control over magnetic order on ultrafast time scales, a fundamental understanding of the way electron spins interact with the surrounding crystal lattice is required. However, measurement and analysis even of basic collective processes such as spin-phonon equilibration have remained challenging. Here, we directly probe the flow of energy and angular momentum in the model insulating ferrimagnet yttrium iron garnet. After ultrafast resonant lattice excitation, we observe that magnetic order reduces on distinct time scales of 1 ps and 100 ns. Temperature-dependent measurements, a spin-coupling analysis, and simulations show that the two dynamics directly reflect two stages of spin lattice equilibration. On the 1-ps scale, spins and phonons reach quasi-equilibrium in terms of energy through phonon-induced modulation of the exchange interaction. This mechanism leads to identical demagnetization of the ferrimagnet's two spin sublattices and to a previously inaccessible ferrimagnetic state of increased temperature yet unchanged total magnetization. Finally, on the much slower, 100-ns scale, the excess of spin angular momentum is released to the crystal lattice, resulting in full equilibrium. Our findings are relevant for all insulating ferrimagnets and indicate that spin manipulation by phonons, including the spin Seebeck effect, can be extended to antiferromagnets and into the terahertz frequency range.

  • 16.
    Pavliuk, Mariia V.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry.
    Gutiérrez Álvarez, Sol
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry.
    Hattori, Yocefu
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry.
    Messing, Maria E.
    Czapla-Masztafiak, J.
    Szlachetko, J.
    Silva, Jose Luis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory.
    Araujo, Carlos Moyses
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory.
    Fernandes, Daniel L. A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry.
    Lu, L.
    Kiely, C.J.
    Abdellah, Mohamed
    Nordlander, Peter
    Sá, Jacinto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry.
    Hydrated Electron Generation by Excitation of Localized Surface Plasmons in Copper NanoparticlesIn: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Shi, Xun
    et al.
    Univ Colorado, Dept Phys, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;Univ Colorado, JILA, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;NIST, Boulder, CO 80309 USA.
    You, Wenjing
    Univ Colorado, Dept Phys, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;Univ Colorado, JILA, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;NIST, Boulder, CO 80309 USA.
    Zhang, Yingchao
    Univ Colorado, Dept Phys, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;Univ Colorado, JILA, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;NIST, Boulder, CO 80309 USA.
    Tao, Zhensheng
    Univ Colorado, Dept Phys, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;Univ Colorado, JILA, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;NIST, Boulder, CO 80309 USA.
    Oppeneer, Peter M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory.
    Wu, Xianxin
    Julius Maximilians Univ Wurzburg, Inst Theoret Phys & Astrophys, D-97074 Wurzburg, Germany.
    Thomale, Ronny
    Julius Maximilians Univ Wurzburg, Inst Theoret Phys & Astrophys, D-97074 Wurzburg, Germany.
    Rossnagel, Kai
    Univ Kiel, Inst Expt & Appl Phys, D-24098 Kiel, Germany;Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany;Ruprecht Haensel Laboratory, Kiel University and DESY, D-24098 Kiel and D-22607 Hamburg, Germany.
    Bauer, Michael
    Univ Kiel, Inst Expt & Appl Phys, D-24098 Kiel, Germany.
    Kapteyn, Henry
    Univ Colorado, Dept Phys, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;Univ Colorado, JILA, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;NIST, Boulder, CO 80309 USA.
    Murnane, Margaret
    Univ Colorado, Dept Phys, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;Univ Colorado, JILA, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;NIST, Boulder, CO 80309 USA.
    Ultrafast electron calorimetry uncovers a new long-lived metastable state in 1T-TaSe2 mediated by mode-selective electron-phonon coupling2019In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 5, no 3, article id eaav4449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quantum materials represent one of the most promising frontiers in the quest for faster, lightweight, energy-efficient technologies. However, their inherent complexity and rich phase landscape make them challenging to understand or manipulate. Here, we present a new ultrafast electron calorimetry technique that can systematically uncover new phases of quantum matter. Using time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we measure the dynamic electron temperature, band structure, and heat capacity. This approach allows us to uncover a new long-lived metastable state in the charge density wave material 1T-TaSe2, which is distinct from all the known equilibrium phases: It is characterized by a substantially reduced effective total heat capacity that is only 30% of the normal value, because of selective electron-phonon coupling to a subset of phonon modes. As a result, less energy is required to melt the charge order and transform the state of the material than under thermal equilibrium conditions.

  • 18.
    Tengdin, Phoebe
    et al.
    Univ Colorado, Dept Phys, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;Univ Colorado, JILA, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;NIST, Boulder, CO 80309 USA.
    You, Wenjing
    Univ Colorado, Dept Phys, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;Univ Colorado, JILA, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;NIST, Boulder, CO 80309 USA.
    Chen, Cong
    Univ Colorado, Dept Phys, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;Univ Colorado, JILA, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;NIST, Boulder, CO 80309 USA.
    Shi, Xun
    Univ Colorado, Dept Phys, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;Univ Colorado, JILA, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;NIST, Boulder, CO 80309 USA.
    Zusin, Dmitriy
    Univ Colorado, Dept Phys, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;Univ Colorado, JILA, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;NIST, Boulder, CO 80309 USA.
    Zhang, Yingchao
    Univ Colorado, Dept Phys, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;Univ Colorado, JILA, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;NIST, Boulder, CO 80309 USA.
    Gentry, Christian
    Univ Colorado, Dept Phys, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;Univ Colorado, JILA, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;NIST, Boulder, CO 80309 USA.
    Blonsky, Adam
    Univ Colorado, Dept Phys, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;Univ Colorado, JILA, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;NIST, Boulder, CO 80309 USA.
    Keller, Mark
    NIST, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305 USA.
    Oppeneer, Peter M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory.
    Kapteyn, Henry C.
    Univ Colorado, Dept Phys, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;Univ Colorado, JILA, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;NIST, Boulder, CO 80309 USA.
    Tao, Zhensheng
    Univ Colorado, Dept Phys, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;Univ Colorado, JILA, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;NIST, Boulder, CO 80309 USA.
    Murnane, Margaret M.
    Univ Colorado, Dept Phys, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;Univ Colorado, JILA, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;NIST, Boulder, CO 80309 USA.
    Critical behavior within 20 fs drives the out-of-equilibrium laser-induced magnetic phase transition in nickel2018In: Science Advances, ISSN 0036-8156, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 4, no 3, article id eaap9744Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has long been known that ferromagnets undergo a phase transition from ferromagnetic to paramagnetic at the Curie temperature, associated with critical phenomena such as a divergence in the heat capacity. A ferromagnet can also be transiently demagnetized by heating it with an ultrafast laser pulse. However, to date, the connection between out-of-equilibrium and equilibrium phase transitions, or how fast the out-of-equilibrium phase transitions can proceed, was not known. By combining time-and angle-resolved photoemission with time-resolved transverse magneto-optical Kerr spectroscopies, we show that the same critical behavior also governs the ultrafast magnetic phase transition in nickel. This is evidenced by several observations. First, we observe a divergence of the transient heat capacity of the electron spin system preceding material demagnetization. Second, when the electron temperature is transiently driven above the Curie temperature, we observe an extremely rapid change in the material response: The spin system absorbs sufficient energy within the first 20 fs to subsequently proceed through the phase transition, whereas demagnetization and the collapse of the exchange splitting occur on much longer, fluence-independent time scales of similar to 176 fs. Third, we find that the transient electron temperature alone dictates the magnetic response. Our results are important because they connect the out-of-equilibrium material behavior to the strongly coupled equilibrium behavior and uncover a new time scale in the process of ultrafast demagnetization.

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