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  • 1.
    Airey, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Talking about teaching in English: Swedish university lecturers’ experiences of changing teaching language2011In: Ibérica, ISSN 1139-7241, E-ISSN 2340-2784, Vol. 22, p. 35-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study documents the experiences of Swedish university lecturers when theychange from teaching in their first language to teaching in English. Eighteenlecturers from two Swedish universities took part in a training course for teacherswho need to give content courses in English. As part of the course theparticipants gave mini-lectures in their first language in a subject area that theyusually teach. The following week, the lecturers gave the same lectures again, thistime in English. The pairs of lectures were videoed and commented on by thelecturers themselves and the whole course cohort in an online discussion forum(an input of approximately 60 000 words). In addition, twelve of the lecturerswere interviewed about their experiences of changing language in this way (totalof 4 hours of recorded material). The paper presents a qualitative analysis of thethoughts and experiences expressed by the lecturers in their online discussionsand in the interviews concerning the process of changing the language ofinstruction to English. These results are presented as nine themes. Ninerecommendations for teachers changing to teaching in English are alsopresented. The findings replicate those of earlier studies with one notableexception: the lecturers in this study were acutely aware of their limitations whenteaching in English. It is suggested that this may be due to the lecturers’ relativeinexperience of English-medium instruction.

  • 2.
    Falk, Angela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Teaching undergraduate academic writing in Sweden: Notes on a new book with developmental and sociolinguistic perspectives2011In: Ibérica, ISSN 1139-7241, E-ISSN 2340-2784, Vol. 22, p. 163-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thinking and Writing in Academic Contexts: A University Companion (Falk, 2011), is designed to help students, especially those with L2 (or incipient L2) English, increase their proficiency levels in composing essays and short research papersin English. The book also aims to raise students’ awareness of the typical expectations academic readers have when they consider the quality level of a text. This research note first provides a brief description of the language proficiency levels of incoming undergraduate students who study English in Sweden. Spoken proficiency in English usually ranges from satisfactory to excellent among incoming Swedish students, but these undergraduates typically need support and feedback on their texts so that their writing gains sophistication in language, structure, and content. The theoretical portion of this research note highlights some sociolinguistic perspectives concerning the linguistic development of young adults relating to the “developmental imperative” (Eckert, 2000), the “linguistic market” or “marketplace dialect”(Chambers, 2009), and the dynamic continuum of standard English (Wolfram& Schilling-Estes, 2006; see also Karstadt, 2002; Falk, 2005). The second half of the research note provides a brief synopsis of the chapters in the book; it also mentions some of the approaches that are taken to share advice withreaders.

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