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  • 1.
    Ahlgren, Sara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Reijmar, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Edwards, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Targeting lipodisks enable selective delivery of anticancer peptides to tumor cells2017In: Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine, ISSN 1549-9634, E-ISSN 1549-9642, Vol. 13, no 7, p. 2325-2328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Issues concerning non-specificity, degradation and hemolysis severely hamper the development of membranolytic amphiphilic peptides into safe and efficient anticancer agents. To increase the therapeutic potential, we have previously developed a strategy based on formulation of the peptides in biocompatible nanosized lipodisks. Studies using melittin as model peptide show that the proteolytic degradation and hemolytic effect of the peptide are substantially reduced upon loading in lipodisks. Here, we explored the possibilities to increase the specificity and boost the cytotoxicity of melittin to tumor cells by use of targeting lipodisk. We demonstrate that small (~20 nm) EGF-targeted lipodisks can be produced and loaded with substantial amounts of peptide (lipid/peptide molar ratio >7) by means of a simple and straightforward preparation protocol. In vitro cell studies confirm specific binding of the peptide-loaded disks to tumor cells and suggest that cellular internalization of the disks results in a significantly improved cell-killing effect.

  • 2. Kumar, Abhinav
    et al.
    Bicer, Elif Melis
    Morgan, Anna Babin
    Pfeffer, Paul E
    Monopoli, Marco
    Dawson, Kenneth A
    Eriksson, Jonny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Edwards, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Lynham, Steven
    Arno, Matthew
    Behndig, Annelie F
    Blomberg, Anders
    Somers, Graham
    Hassall, Dave
    Dailey, Lea Ann
    Forbes, Ben
    Mudway, Ian S
    Enrichment of immunoregulatory proteins in the biomolecular corona of nanoparticles within human respiratory tract lining fluid2016In: Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine, ISSN 1549-9634, E-ISSN 1549-9642, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 1033-1043Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    UNLABELLED: When inhaled nanoparticles deposit in the lungs, they transit through respiratory tract lining fluid (RTLF) acquiring a biomolecular corona reflecting the interaction of the RTLF with the nanomaterial surface. Label-free snapshot proteomics was used to generate semi-quantitative profiles of corona proteins formed around silica (SiO2) and poly(vinyl) acetate (PVAc) nanoparticles in RTLF, the latter employed as an archetype drug delivery vehicle. The evolved PVAc corona was significantly enriched compared to that observed on SiO2 nanoparticles (698 vs. 429 proteins identified); however both coronas contained a substantial contribution from innate immunity proteins, including surfactant protein A, napsin A and complement (C1q and C3) proteins. Functional protein classification supports the hypothesis that corona formation in RTLF constitutes opsonisation, preparing particles for phagocytosis and clearance from the lungs. These data highlight how an understanding of the evolved corona is necessary for the design of inhaled nanomedicines with acceptable safety and tailored clearance profiles.; FROM THE CLINICAL EDITOR: Inhaled nanoparticles often acquire a layer of protein corona while they go through the respiratory tract. Here, the authors investigated the identity of these proteins. The proper identification would improve the understanding of the use of inhaled nanoparticles in future therapeutics.

  • 3.
    Kumar, Abhinav
    et al.
    Institute of Pharmaceutical Science, Faculty of Life Sciences and Medicine, King's College, London, UK.
    Bicer, Elif Melis
    MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, Analytical & Environmental Sciences Division, Faculty of Life Sciences and Medicine, King's College, London, UK.
    Pfeffer, Paul
    MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, Analytical & Environmental Sciences Division, Faculty of Life Sciences and Medicine, King's College, London, UK.
    Monopoli, Marco P
    Pharmaceutical and Medical Chemistry, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin 2, Ireland.; Centre for BioNano Interactions, University College Dublin, Dublin 4, Ireland.
    Dawson, Kenneth A
    Centre for BioNano Interactions, University College Dublin, Dublin 4, Ireland.
    Eriksson, Jonny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Edwards, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Lynham, Steven
    Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, Faculty of Life Sciences and Medicine, King's College, London, UK.
    Arno, Matthew
    Genomics Centre, Faculty of Life Sciences and Medicine, King's College, London.
    Behndig, Annelie F
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Division of Medicine/Respiratory Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Anders
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Division of Medicine/Respiratory Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Somers, Graham
    GSK Medicines Research Centre, Gunnels Wood Road, Stevenage, Hertfordshire, UK.
    Hassall, Dave
    GSK Medicines Research Centre, Gunnels Wood Road, Stevenage, Hertfordshire, UK.
    Dailey, Lea Ann
    Institute of Pharmaceutical Science, Faculty of Life Sciences and Medicine, King's College, London, UK.
    Forbes, Ben
    Institute of Pharmaceutical Science, Faculty of Life Sciences and Medicine, King's College, London, UK.
    Mudway, Ian
    MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, Analytical & Environmental Sciences Division, Faculty of Life Sciences and Medicine, King's College, London, UK.
    Differences in the coronal proteome acquired by particles depositing in the lungs of asthmatic versus healthy humans2017In: Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine, ISSN 1549-9634, E-ISSN 1549-9642, Vol. 13, no 8, p. 2517-2521, article id S1549-9634(17)30115-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most inhaled nanomedicines in development are for the treatment of lung disease, yet little is known about their interaction with the respiratory tract lining fluids (RTLFs). Here we combined the use of nano-silica, as a protein concentrator, with label-free snapshot proteomics (LC-MS/MS; key findings confirmed by ELISA) to generate a quantitative profile of the RTLF proteome and provided insight into the evolved corona; information that may be used in future to improve drug targeting to the lungs by inhaled medicines. The asthmatic coronal proteome displayed a reduced contribution of surfactant proteins (SP-A and B) and a higher contribution of α1-antitrypsin. Pathway analysis suggested that asthmatic RTLFs may also be deficient in proteins related to metal handling (e.g. lactoferrin). This study demonstrates how the composition of the corona acquired by inhaled nanoparticles is modified in asthma and suggests depressed mucosal immunity even in mild airway disease.

  • 4.
    Nilsson Ekdahl, Kristina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Davoodpour, Padideh
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Ekstrand-Hammarström, Barbro
    Division of CBRN Defence and Security, Swedish Defence Research Agency, Umeå, Sweden.
    Fromell, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Hamad, Osama A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Hong, Jaan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Bucht, Anders
    Division of CBRN Defence and Security, Swedish Defence Research Agency, Umeå, Sweden;Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Mohlin, Camilla
    Linnæus Centre for Biomaterials Chemistry, Linnæus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Seisenbaeva, Gulaim
    Department of Chemistry and Biotechnology, BioCenter, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kessler, Vadim
    Department of Chemistry and Biotechnology, BioCenter, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Contact (kallikrein/kinin) system activation in whole human blood induced by low concentrations of α-Fe2O3 nanoparticles.2018In: Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine, ISSN 1549-9634, E-ISSN 1549-9642, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 735-744Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Iron-oxide nanoparticles (NPs) generated by environmental events are likely to represent health problems. alpha-Fe2O3 NPs were synthesized, characterized and tested in a model for toxicity utilizing human whole blood without added anticoagulant. MALDI-TOF of the corona was performed and activation markers for plasma cascade systems (complement, contact and coagulation systems), platelet consumption and release of growth factors, MPO, and chemokine/cytokines from blood cells were analyzed. The coronas formed on the pristine alpha-Fe2O3 NPs contained contact system proteins and they induced massive activation of the contact (kinin/kallikrein) system, as well as thrombin generation, platelet activation, and release of two pro-angiogeneic growth factors: platelet-derived growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor, whereas complement activation was unaffected. The alpha-Fe2O3 NPs exhibited a noticeable toxicity, with kinin/kallikrein activation, which may be associated with hypotension and long-term angiogenesis in vivo, with implications for cancer, arteriosclerosis and pulmonary disease.

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