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  • 1.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Akerud, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Schijven, Dick
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Olivier, Jocelien
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Univ Groningen, Dept Behav Physiol, Groningen, Netherlands.;Karolinska Inst, Ctr Gender Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sundström Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Gene Expression in Placentas From Nondiabetic Women Giving Birth to Large for Gestational Age Infants2015In: Reproductive Sciences, ISSN 1933-7191, E-ISSN 1933-7205, Vol. 22, no 10, p. 1281-1288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gestational diabetes, obesity, and excessive weight gain are known independent risk factors for the birth of a large for gestational age (LGA) infant. However, only 1 of the 10 infants born LGA is born by mothers with diabetes or obesity. Thus, the aim of the present study was to compare placental gene expression between healthy, nondiabetic mothers (n = 22) giving birth to LGA infants and body mass index-matched mothers (n = 24) giving birth to appropriate for gestational age infants. In the whole gene expression analysis, only 29 genes were found to be differently expressed in LGA placentas. Top upregulated genes included insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1, aminolevulinate synthase 2, and prolactin, whereas top downregulated genes comprised leptin, gametocyte-specific factor 1, and collagen type XVII 1. Two enriched gene networks were identified, namely, (1) lipid metabolism, small molecule biochemistry, and organismal development and (2) cellular development, cellular growth, proliferation, and tumor morphology.

  • 2.
    Altmäe, Signe
    et al.
    Competence Centre on Reproductive Medicine and Biology, Tartu, Estonia.
    Martinez-Conejero, José A
    IVIOMICS, Valencia, Spain.
    Esteban, Francisco J
    Department of Experimental Biology, University of Jaen, Jaen, Spain.
    Ruiz-Alonso, Maria
    IVIOMICS, Valencia, Spain.
    Stavreus-Evers, Anneli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Horcajadas, José A
    Araid at IþCS, Hospital Miguel Servet, Zaragoza, Spain.
    Salumets, Andres
    Competence Centre on Reproductive Medicine and Biology, Tartu, Estonia.
    MicroRNAs miR-30b, miR-30d, and miR-494 Regulate Human Endometrial Receptivity2013In: Reproductive Sciences, ISSN 1933-7191, E-ISSN 1933-7205, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 308-317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) act as important epigenetic posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression. We aimed to gain more understanding of the complex gene expression regulation of endometrial receptivity by analyzing miRNA signatures of fertile human endometria. We set up to analyze miRNA signatures of receptive (LH + 7, n = 4) versus prereceptive (LH + 2, n = 5) endometrium from healthy fertile women. We found hsa-miR-30b and hsa-miR-30d to be significantly upregulated, and hsa-miR-494 and hsa-miR-923 to be downregulated in receptive endometrium. Three algorithms (miRanda, PicTar, and TargetScan) were used for target gene prediction. Functional analyses of the targets using Ingenuity Pathways Analysis and The Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery indicated roles in transcription, cell proliferation and apoptosis, and significant involvement in several relevant pathways, such as axon guidance, Wnt/β-catenin, ERK/MAPK, transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), p53 and leukocyte extravasation. Comparison of predicted miRNA target genes and our previous messenger RNA microarray data resulted in a list of 12 genes, including CAST, CFTR, FGFR2, and LIF that could serve as a panel of genes important for endometrial receptivity. In conclusion, we suggest that a subset of miRNAs and their target genes may play important roles in endometrial receptivity.

  • 3.
    Altmäe, Signe
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Salumets, Andres
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.
    Bjuresten, Kerstin
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kallak, Theodora Kunovac
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Wånggren, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Landgren, Britt-Marie
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hovatta, Outi
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stavreus-Evers, Anneli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Tissue Factor and Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitors TFPI and TFPI2 in Human Secretory Endometrium - Possible Link to Female Infertility2011In: Reproductive Sciences, ISSN 1933-7191, E-ISSN 1933-7205, Vol. 18, no 7, p. 666-678Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate tissue factor (TF) and its inhibitors TFPI and TFPI2 in secretory endometrium of fertile women and in women with unexplained infertility in relation to endometrial receptivity. In addition, common variation in the regulatory area of TF and TFPI genes was studied. Immunostaining of TF and TFPI, together with the appearance of pinopodes, revealed similar expression pattern in fertile endometrium throughout the secretory phase, being highest at the time of implantation. When compared protein expression levels at the time of implantation, infertile women demonstrated significantly higher TFPI expression in luminal epithelium. Furthermore, polymorphism TF -603 A/G was associated with the endometrial protein level in infertile women, being highest in women with GG genotype, and variation TFPI -287 T/C was associated with unexplained infertility, where infertile women presented more frequently T allele than fertile women. Contrary to TF and TFPI, TFPI2 showed different mRNA and protein expression patterns in fertile endometrium, and no differences between fertile and infertile women were detected. We conclude that the TF pathway is involved in normal endometrial maturation, where TF and TFPI seem to have important roles at the time of embryo implantation. Higher TFPI expression level during the time of embryo implantation and TFPI -287 T allele could be risk factors for unexplained infertility. No distinct involvement of TFPI2 in the regulation of endometrial receptivity and unexplained infertility was found.

  • 4.
    Bergman, Lina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Wikstrom, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Akhter, Tansim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Naessen, Tord
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Akerud, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Plasma Levels of S100B in Women with Preeclampsia2013In: Reproductive Sciences, ISSN 1933-7191, E-ISSN 1933-7205, Vol. 20, no S3, p. 115A-115AArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Bergman, Lina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Clin Res Ctr, Dalarna, Sweden..
    Åkerud, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Plasma Levels of the Cerebral Biomarker, Neuron-Specific Enolase, are Elevated During Pregnancy in Women Developing Preeclampsia2016In: Reproductive Sciences, ISSN 1933-7191, E-ISSN 1933-7205, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 395-400Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Neuron-specific enolase (NSE) is considered to be a peripheral biomarker of central nervous system injury. The aim of this study was to compare levels of NSE throughout pregnancy, in healthy pregnant women and in women developing preeclampsia. Methods: A nested case-control study within a longitudinal study cohort was performed. Four hundred sixty nine healthy pregnant women were enrolled, and plasma samples were collected at gestational weeks 10, 25, 28, 33, and 37. Levels of NSE were analyzed in 16 women with preeclampsia and 36 controls throughout pregnancy with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: In gestational week 37, women who developed preeclampsia had significantly higher plasma levels of NSE than healthy pregnant controls (P < .001). The levels of NSE did not change between gestational weeks 10 and 37 in women who developed preeclampsia, but the levels decreased significantly in healthy pregnant controls (P < .001). Conclusion: In pregnant women developing preeclampsia, the levels of NSE remained high throughout pregnancy, whereas in healthy women, these tended to decline over time, especially at the 2 last time points. The result might be confounded in early pregnancy by extracerebral sources of NSE, such as the corpus luteum. Findings need to be confirmed in a larger prospective study.

  • 6. Campo, S
    et al.
    Campo, V
    Gambadauro, Pietro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Is a positive family history of endometriosis a risk factor for endometrioma recurrence after laparoscopic surgery?2014In: Reproductive Sciences, ISSN 1933-7191, E-ISSN 1933-7205, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 526-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A total of 148 patients were followed up for an average of 30.1 ± 17 months following to laparoscopic excision of ovarian endometriomas by a single surgical team. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to investigate the association between endometrioma recurrence and several factors, age, body mass index, family history, cyst diameter, number and location, adhesions or peritoneal implants, occurrence of spillage, postoperative treatment with gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist, or pregnancies. The overall recurrence rate of the endometriomas was 18.2%. At bivariate analysis, recurrence rate was significantly higher in patients with a positive family history of endometriosis (40% vs 14.8%). Recurrence was also more frequent, albeit nonsignificantly, in patients with a history of dysmenorrhea, intraoperative spillage, and postoperative hormonal suppression. At multivariate analysis with logistic regression, a positive family history of endometriosis was the only variable independently associated with endometrioma recurrence following laparoscopic removal (odds ratio 3.245; 95% confidence interval: 1.090-9.661).

    Keywords endometrioma, endometriosis, laparoscopy, recurrence, family history

  • 7.
    Dabo Pettersson, Fatimah
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Grönblad, Alhild
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Nyberg, Fred
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Sundström-Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Åkerud, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    The A118G Single Nucleotide Polymorphism of Human μ–Opioid Receptor Gene and Use of Labor Analgesia2012In: Reproductive Sciences, ISSN 1933-7191, E-ISSN 1933-7205, Vol. 19, no 9, p. 962-967Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The human µ-opioid receptor (MOR) is the major site of action of endogenous opioids and most of the clinically used opioid analgesics. The single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), A118G of the MOR 1 gene (OPRM1), has been associated with altered pain perception. The aim of this study was to investigate whether this polymorphism of OPRM1 is associated with a number of pain-related behaviors during labor. In this observational retrospective population-based study, pregnant women (n = 814) were recruited at gestational week 18. A plasma sample was collected from each participant and an SNP genotyping assay was performed. No differences in sociodemographic variables or labor pain-related outcomes, such as stage of cervical dilation on arrival at the delivery unit or use of any type of second-line analgesia during spontaneous labor, were found between noncarriers and G-allele carriers of OPRM1. We conclude that there is no association between the A118G polymorphism of OPRM1 regarding pain-related behavior during labor.

  • 8.
    Di Gravio, Chiara
    et al.
    Univ Southampton, MRC Lifecourse Epidemiol Unit, Southampton Gen Hosp, Tremona Rd, Southampton SO16 6YD, Hants, England.
    Lawande, Ashwin
    Dr Joshi Imaging Clin, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.
    Potdar, Ramesh D.
    Ctr Study Social Change, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.
    Sahariah, Sirazul A.
    Ctr Study Social Change, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.
    Gandhi, Meera
    Ctr Study Social Change, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.
    Brown, Nick
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Chopra, Harsha
    Ctr Study Social Change, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.
    Sane, Harshad
    Ctr Study Social Change, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.
    Kehoe, Sarah H.
    Univ Southampton, MRC Lifecourse Epidemiol Unit, Southampton Gen Hosp, Tremona Rd, Southampton SO16 6YD, Hants, England.
    Marley-Zagar, Ella
    Univ Southampton, MRC Lifecourse Epidemiol Unit, Southampton Gen Hosp, Tremona Rd, Southampton SO16 6YD, Hants, England.
    Margetts, Barrie M.
    Univ Southampton, Publ Hlth Nutr, Southampton, Hants, England.
    Jackson, Alan A.
    NIHR Southampton Biomed Res Ctr, Southampton, Hants, England.
    Fall, Caroline H. D.
    Univ Southampton, MRC Lifecourse Epidemiol Unit, Southampton Gen Hosp, Tremona Rd, Southampton SO16 6YD, Hants, England.
    The Association of Maternal Age With Fetal Growth and Newborn Measures: The Mumbai Maternal Nutrition Project (MMNP)2019In: Reproductive Sciences, ISSN 1933-7191, E-ISSN 1933-7205, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 918-927Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Young maternal age is associated with poorer birth outcomes, but the mechanisms are incompletely understood. Using data from a prospective cohort of pregnant women living in Mumbai slums, India, we tested whether lower maternal age was associated with adverse fetal growth.

    Methods: Fetal crown-rump length (CRL) was recorded at a median (interquartile range, IQR) of 10 weeks' gestation (9-10 weeks). Head circumference (HC), biparietal diameter (BPD), femur length (FL), and abdominal circumference (AC) were recorded at 19 (19-20) and 29 (28-30) weeks. Newborns were measured at a median (IQR) of 2 days (1-3 days) from delivery. Gestation was assessed using prospectively collected menstrual period dates.

    Results: The sample comprised 1653 singleton fetuses without major congenital abnormalities, of whom 1360 had newborn measurements. Fetuses of younger mothers had smaller CRL (0.01 standard deviation [SD] per year of maternal age; 95% confidence interval CI: 0.00-0.02(1); P = .04), and smaller HC, FL, and AC at subsequent visits. Fetal growth of HC (0.04 cm; 95% CI: 0.02-0.05; P < .001), BPD (0.01 cm; 95% CI: 0.00-0.01; P = .009), FL (0.04 cm; 95% CI: 0.02-0.06; P < .001), and AC (0.01 cm; 95% CI: 0.00-0.01; P = .003) up to the third trimester increased with maternal age. Skinfolds, head, and mid-upper arm circumferences were smaller in newborns of younger mothers. Adjusting for maternal prepregnancy socioeconomic status, body mass index, height, and parity attenuated the associations between maternal age and newborn size but did not change those with fetal biometry.

    Conclusion: Fetuses of younger mothers were smaller from the first trimester onward and grew slower, independently of known confounding factors.

  • 9.
    Fransson, Emma
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Dubicke, Aurelija
    Ordeberg, Gunvor Ekman
    Hjelmstedt, Anna
    Childhood Experience of Parental Separation Is Associated With Labor IL-6 in Maternal Serum2015In: Reproductive Sciences, ISSN 1933-7191, E-ISSN 1933-7205, Vol. 22, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Helmestam, Malin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Lindgren, Karin Elvine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Stavreus-Evers, Anneli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Olovsson, Matts
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Mifepristone exposure of human endometrial endothelial cells in vitro2014In: Reproductive Sciences, ISSN 1933-7191, E-ISSN 1933-7205, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 408-414Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Nordqvist, Sarah
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Kårehed, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Hambiliki, Fredwell
    Department of Clinical Science, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wånggren, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Stavreus-Evers, Anneli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Åkerud, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    The Presence of Histidine-Rich Glycoprotein in the Female Reproductive Tract and in Embryos2010In: Reproductive Sciences, ISSN 1933-7191, E-ISSN 1933-7205, Vol. 17, no 10, p. 941-947Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A well-regulated angiogenesis is crucial for proper embryo implantation, embryogenesis, and pregnancy development. Monitoring the presence and distribution of angiogenic regulators in the female reproductive tract and in the early embryo is important for a broader understanding of the molecular aspects of fertility, embryogenesis, and pregnancy. Histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG) is a glycoprotein involved in angiogenesis. Its presence in the female reproductive tract or in embryos has not previously been studied. Follicular fluid, culture medium, and embryos were obtained from patients undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF). Biopsies from inner genitalia and placenta were collected at surgery. Histidine-rich glycoprotein presence was investigated by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to determine HRG expression in tissues or by embryos. We identified HRG in follicular fluid, the female reproductive tract, and placenta, as well as in the embryos. Moreover, HRG expression was observed in blastocysts. Thus, the angiogenic properties of HRG might affect fertility.

  • 12.
    Wickström, Karin
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Danderyd Hosp, Dept Clin Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Stavreus-Evers, Anneli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Vercauteren, Olivier
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Olovsson, Matts
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Edelstam, Greta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Effect of Lignocaine on IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1 in Peritoneal Macrophages and Endometriotic Stromal Cells2017In: Reproductive Sciences, ISSN 1933-7191, E-ISSN 1933-7205, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 382-392Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The objective was to evaluate the effect of lignocaine on cytokine expression and secretion in vitro in peritoneal fluid macrophages and endometriotic stromal cells. Design: Experimental in vitro study on human cells. Population and Sample: Peritoneal fluid (n = 10) and samples from endometriotic cysts (n = 7) were collected from 13 women (women with endometriosis n = 8, and healthy controls n = 5) during surgery for clinical reasons. Methods: Macrophages from the peritoneal fluid and cells from the inside of the endometriotic cysts capsules were isolated and cultivated for 24 to 48 hours in medium with and without the supplement of lignocaine 0.1 or 1.0 mg/mL. Relative gene expression of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and IL-8 was evaluated with quantitative polymerase chain reaction and compared between treated and untreated cells with Wilcoxon matched pairs. The concentrations of MCP-1, IL-6, and IL-8 were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and were compared between treated and untreated cells with Wilcoxon matched pairs. Results: The gene expression and protein secretion of IL-8 in endometriotic stromal cells after incubation with lignocaine 0.1 mg/mL were significantly decreased after 24 hours compared to the controls (P =.028 and P =.018). Macrophages from healthy controls had a significant lower gene expression of all tested cytokines (P =.043) after treatment with lignocaine, but there were no significant differences in protein level. Macrophages from women with endometriosis showed diverging results since 3 of 5 samples showed increased gene expression of 1 (n = 2) or 2 cytokines (n = 1) after lignocaine treatment. Conclusion: Lignocaine can affect the gene expression and secretion of some proinflammatory cytokines in vitro.

  • 13. Yung, Hong Wa
    et al.
    Olovsson, Matts
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Charnock-Jones, Steve
    Burton, Graham
    Placental Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Stress as a Novel Molecular Signature to Distinguish Subtypes of Pre-Eclampsia2014In: Reproductive Sciences, ISSN 1933-7191, E-ISSN 1933-7205, Vol. 21, no 3S, p. 405A-406AArticle in journal (Other academic)
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