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  • 1. Dahlström, Mia
    et al.
    Sjögren, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Jonsson, Per R.
    Göransson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Lindh, Liselott
    Arnebrant, Thomas
    Pinori, Emiliano
    Elwing, Hans
    Berglin, Mattias
    Affinity states of biocides determine bioavailability and release rates in marine paints2015In: Biofouling (Print), ISSN 0892-7014, E-ISSN 1029-2454, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 201-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A challenge for the next generation marine antifouling (AF) paints is to deliver minimum amounts of biocides to the environment. The candidate AF compound medetomidine is here shown to be released at very low concentrations, ie ng ml(-1) day(-1). Moreover, the release rate of medetomidine differs substantially depending on the formulation of the paint, while inhibition of barnacle settlement is independent of release to the ambient water, ie the paint with the lowest release rate was the most effective in impeding barnacle colonisation. This highlights the critical role of chemical interactions between biocide, paint carrier and the solid/aqueous interface for release rate and AF performance. The results are discussed in the light of differential affinity states of the biocide, predicting AF activity in terms of a high surface affinity and preserved bioavailability. This may offer a general framework for the design of low-release paint systems using biocides for protection against biofouling on marine surfaces.

  • 2. Dorkhan, Marjan
    et al.
    Hall, Jan
    Uvdal, Per
    Sandell, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Molecular and condensed matter physics.
    Svensater, Gunnel
    Davies, Julia R.
    Crystalline anatase-rich titanium can reduce adherence of oral streptococci2014In: Biofouling (Print), ISSN 0892-7014, E-ISSN 1029-2454, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 751-759Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dental implant abutments that emerge through the mucosa are rapidly covered with a salivary protein pellicle to which bacteria bind, initiating biofilm formation. In this study, adherence of early colonizing streptococci, Streptococcus gordonii, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus sanguinis to two saliva-coated anodically oxidized surfaces was compared with that on commercially pure titanium (CpTi). Near edge X-ray absorption (NEXAFS) showed crystalline anatase was more pronounced on the anodically oxidized surfaces than on the CpTi. As revealed by fluorescence microscopy, a four-species mixture, as well as individual bacterial species, exhibited lower adherence after 2 h to the saliva-coated, anatase-rich surfaces than to CpTi. Since wettability did not differ between the saliva-coated surfaces, differences in the concentration and/or configuration of salivary proteins on the anatase-rich surfaces may explain the reduced bacterial binding effect. Anatase-rich surfaces could thus contribute to reduced overall biofilm formation on dental implant abutments through diminished adherence of early colonizers.

  • 3.
    Sjögren, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Dahlström, Mia
    Göransson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Jonsson, Per R
    Bohlin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Recruiment in the field of Balanus improvisus and Mytilus edulis in response to the antifouling cyclopeptides barettin and 8,9-dihydrobarettin from the marine sponge Geodia barretti2004In: Biofouling (Print), ISSN 0892-7014, E-ISSN 1029-2454, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 291-297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this field investigation the two cyclopeptides, isolated from the marine sponge Geodia barretti Bowerbank (Geodiidae, Astrophorida), are shown to be very efficient in preventing recruitment of the barnacle Balanus improvisus (Cirripedia, Crustacea) and the blue mussel Mytilis edulis (Protobranchia, Lamellibranchia) when included in different marine paints. These brominated cyclopeptides, named barettin and 8,9-dihydrobarettin were incorporated in different non-toxic coatings. The substances were used in the concentrations 0.1 and 0.01% in all treatments. The most efficient paint was a SPC polymer. This paint, in combination with barettin and 8,9-dihydrobarettin, reduced the recruitment of B. improvisus by 89% (barettin, 0.1%) and by 67% (8,9-dihydrobarettin, 0.1%) as compared to control panels. For M. edulis, the reduction of recruitment was 81% with barettin (0.1%) and 72% with 8,9-dihydrobarettin (0.1%) included in the SPC paint. This indicates that the two compounds from G. barretti could provide non-toxic alternatives as additives in antifouling paints, since the heavy metal-based marine paints are to be replaced.

  • 4.
    Sjögren, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Dahlström, Mia
    Hedner, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Jonsson, Per R.
    Vik, Anders
    Gundersen, Lise-Lotte
    Bohlin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Antifouling activity of the sponge metabolite agelasine D and synthesised analogs on Balanus improvisus.2008In: Biofouling (Print), ISSN 0892-7014, E-ISSN 1029-2454, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 251-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study reports a screening study for antifouling (AF) activity of the natural compound agelasine D isolated from marine sponges of the genus Agelas and 20 synthesised analogs of agelasines and agelasimines. Agelasine D, together with two of the analogs, ie AV1003A and AKB695, displayed a strong inhibitory effect on settlement of Balanus improvisus cypris larvae. Agelasine D had an EC50 value of 0.11 mu M while the two analogs AV1033A and AKB695 had EC50 values of 0.23 and 0.3 mu M, respectively. None of these three compounds affected larval mortality as was the case with several of the analogs tested. Moreover, the effect of AV1033A and AKB695 was reversible. When cyprids after 24 h exposure to the compounds were transferred to fresh seawater, the settlement frequency compared with the controls was completely recovered. The properties of the agelasine D analogs AV1003A and AKB695 make them highly attractive candidates as AF agents in future marine coatings.

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