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  • 1. Asiegbu, F O
    et al.
    Nahalkova, Jarmila
    Department of Forest Mycology and Pathology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Li, G S
    Pathogen-inducible cDNAs from the interaction of the root rot fungus Heterobasidion annosum with Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.)2005In: Plant Science, ISSN 0168-9452, E-ISSN 1873-2259, Vol. 168, no 2, p. 365-372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Subtractive hybridization was used to select cDNAs representing genes that are differentially expressed during interaction of the necrotroph Heterobasidion annosum and its conifer host (Pinus sylvestris). We obtained 966 ESTs from the subtraction cDNA library, which included 509 singletons and 147 contigs. The sequences of 492 clones (51%) significantly matched National Centre for Biotechnology Information Database entries. Four hundred and seventy-four ESTs (49%) had not been previously described. The ESTs with moderate to high similarity scores based on BlastX were organized into categories based on their putative function. Among the genes identified, 16% were associated with metabolism and other cellular functions, 14% with cell rescue and defence and 39% were classified as unknown. Seven of the genes shared significant homology to fungal genes. A cDNA encoding an antimicrobial peptide (AMP) was the most abundant transcript representing 2% of the total sequenced clones. The expression pattern of five ESTs (peroxidase, anti-microbial peptide, resistance gene analogue, unknown protein, thaumatin) were analysed by virtual Northern blot, and confirmed elevated levels of the gene transcripts upon pathogen infection. These ESTs provide insight into the host-pathogen interaction and also represent a resource for future research on H. annosum-conifer pathosystems.

  • 2. Baguma, Yona
    et al.
    Sun, Chuanxin
    Ahlandsberg, Staffan
    Mutisya, Joel
    Palmqvist, Sara
    Uppsala University, University Administration, Faculty Offices.
    Rubaihayo, Patrick R.
    Magambo, Michael J.
    Egwang, Thomas G.
    Larsson, HÃ¥kan
    Jansson, Christer
    Expression patterns of the gene encoding starch branching enzyme II in the storage roots of cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz)2003In: Plant Science, ISSN 0168-9452, E-ISSN 1873-2259, Vol. 164, no 5, p. 833-839Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spatial and temporal expression patterns of the sbeII and sbeI genes, encoding starch branching enzyme II and I, respectively, in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) were studied at different phenological stages of the crop. A partial cDNA for sbeII in cassava was cloned and used along with a cDNA-specific fragment of sbeI. As the cassava plant aged, the transcriptional activity of the sbeII and sbeI genes in the underground storage roots increased, whereas the activity in other organs remained the same or declined. At 180 days after planting (d.a.p.), levels of sbeII and sbeI transcripts in storage roots were very low, whereas at 360 d.a.p., the levels had increased dramatically. The 360 d.a.p. old storage roots also accumulated gbssII and gbssI transcripts, as well as a longer gbssI transcript, gbssI′. The difference between the gbssI and gbssI′ transcripts was shown to be due to differential splicing, whereby the gbssI′ transcript retained the first three introns. Unexpectedly, expression of sbeII and sbeI in the 360 d.a.p. storage roots exhibited fluctuations during the 24 h cycle, both under the normal light/dark regime and under continuous light or continuous dark conditions.

  • 3. Blair, Matthew W.
    et al.
    Cortés, Andrés J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    This, Dominique
    Identification of an ERECTA gene and drought adaptation associations in wild and cultivated common bean2016In: Plant Science, ISSN 0168-9452, E-ISSN 1873-2259, Vol. 242, p. 250-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this research, we cloned and accessed nucleotide diversity in the common beanERECTA gene which has been implicated in drought tolerance and stomatal patterning.The homologous gene segment was isolated with degenerate primer and was found to be located on Chromosome 1. The gene had at least one paralog on Chromosome 9 and duplicate copies in soybean for each homolog. ERECTA-like genes were also discovered but the function of these was of less interest due to low similarity with the ERECTA gene from Arabidopsis. The diversity of the 5’ end of the large Chr. 1 PvERECTA gene was evaluated in a collection of 145 wild and cultivated common beans that were also characterized by geographic source and drought tolerance, respectively. Our wild population sampled a range of wet to dry habitats, while our cultivated samples were representative of landrace diversity and the patterns of nucleotide variation differed between groups. The 5’ region exhibited lower levels of diversity in the cultivated collection, which was indicative of population bottlenecks associated with the domestication process, compared to the wild collection where diversity was associated with ecological differences. We discuss associations of nucleotide diversity at PvERECTA with drought tolerance prediction for the genotypes.

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