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  • 1.
    Amin, Kawa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Hurst, D. S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Roomans, G. M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Venge, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Sevéus, L.
    Eosinophils and neutrophils in biopsies from the middle ear of atopic children with otitis media with effusion1999In: Inflammation Research, ISSN 1023-3830, E-ISSN 1420-908X, Vol. 48, no 12, p. 626-631Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE AND DESIGN: The majority of patients with otitis media with effusion (OME) and atopy have been shown to have elevated levels of eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) in their middle ear fluid. The mechanism underlying these elevated levels of ECP is not clear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of a quantitative determination of eosinophils and neutrophils in the middle ear lining by specific immunocytochemical markers, in order to study the extent of the involvement of these cells in patients with OME.

    METHODS: Bilateral middle ear biopsies from five children with persistent OME and atopy confirmed by in vitro testing were evaluated for the presence of eosinophils and neutrophils with monoclonal antibodies against specific granule proteins. Five subjects who had no signs of effusion or infection but were undergoing routine tympanoplasty for dry perforations served as controls. The biopsies were embedded in a plastic resin to improve the structural preservation of the target cells and to increase the resolution in the light microscope. Dual markers were used to determine which marker was better for eosinophils and neutrophils, respectively. The following markers were used: eosinophil cationic protein (EG2), and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) for eosinophils and myeloperoxidase (MPO) and human neutrophil lipocalin (HNL) for neutrophils.

    RESULTS: Antibodies against EPO gave a more localized and intense staining than antibodies against EG2. Antibodies against HNL appear more specific to neutrophils than antibodies against MPO that also recognize monocytes. The number of cells was determined both in the tissue and in the mucus covering the epithelium. Eosinophils and neutrophils were present in the subepithelial connective tissue and in the mucus blanket in the middle ear of patients with OME in significantly higher number than in the control group. In general, there were more inflammatory cells in the mucus than in the tissue itself, but the number of inflammatory cells in the mucus showed a significant positive correlation with the number of inflammatory cells in the tissue. There was a significant positive correlation between the number of neutrophils and the number of eosinophils in the tissue as well as in the mucus, irrespective of which marker was used.

    CONCLUSION: The results of this study show the feasibility of using specific antibodies to identify eosinophils and neutrophils in the middle ear. The initial data suggest that atopic children with OME have higher numbers of such cells as compared to non-OME controls.

  • 2.
    Amin, Kawa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology. Dept. of Microbiology/Immunology, University of Sulaimani, Sulaimani, Iraq.
    Hurst, David S
    Roomans, Godfried M
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Venge, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Sveus, Lahja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Eosinophils and neutrophils in biopsies from the middle ear of atopic children with otitis media with effusion1999In: Inflammation Research, ISSN 1023-3830, E-ISSN 1420-908X, Vol. 48, no 12, p. 626-631, article id 10669113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE AND DESIGN:

    The majority of patients with otitis media with effusion (OME) and atopy have been shown to have elevated levels of eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) in their middle ear fluid. The mechanism underlying these elevated levels of ECP is not clear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of a quantitative determination of eosinophils and neutrophils in the middle ear lining by specific immunocytochemical markers, in order to study the extent of the involvement of these cells in patients with OME.

    METHODS:

    Bilateral middle ear biopsies from five children with persistent OME and atopy confirmed by in vitro testing were evaluated for the presence of eosinophils and neutrophils with monoclonal antibodies against specific granule proteins. Five subjects who had no signs of effusion or infection but were undergoing routine tympanoplasty for dry perforations served as controls. The biopsies were embedded in a plastic resin to improve the structural preservation of the target cells and to increase the resolution in the light microscope. Dual markers were used to determine which marker was better for eosinophils and neutrophils, respectively. The following markers were used: eosinophil cationic protein (EG2), and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) for eosinophils and myeloperoxidase (MPO) and human neutrophil lipocalin (HNL) for neutrophils.

    RESULTS:

    Antibodies against EPO gave a more localized and intense staining than antibodies against EG2. Antibodies against HNL appear more specific to neutrophils than antibodies against MPO that also recognize monocytes. The number of cells was determined both in the tissue and in the mucus covering the epithelium. Eosinophils and neutrophils were present in the subepithelial connective tissue and in the mucus blanket in the middle ear of patients with OME in significantly higher number than in the control group. In general, there were more inflammatory cells in the mucus than in the tissue itself, but the number of inflammatory cells in the mucus showed a significant positive correlation with the number of inflammatory cells in the tissue. There was a significant positive correlation between the number of neutrophils and the number of eosinophils in the tissue as well as in the mucus, irrespective of which marker was used.

    CONCLUSION:

    The results of this study show the feasibility of using specific antibodies to identify eosinophils and neutrophils in the middle ear. The initial data suggest that atopic children with OME have higher numbers of such cells as compared to non-OME controls.

  • 3.
    Pejler, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    MAST CELL GRANULES: ARMED WITH HISTAMINE AND FRIENDS2015In: Inflammation Research, ISSN 1023-3830, E-ISSN 1420-908X, Vol. 64, no S1, p. S8-S8Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Sayadi, Ahmed
    et al.
    Institute Molecular and Cell Biology, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), Singapore, Singapore.
    Nguyen, Anh-Tuan
    Institute Molecular and Cell Biology, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), Singapore, Singapore.
    Bard, Frederic A
    Institute Molecular and Cell Biology, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), Singapore, Singapore.
    Bard-Chapeau, Emilie A
    Institute Molecular and Cell Biology, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), Singapore, Singapore.
    Zip14 expression induced by lipopolysaccharides in macrophages attenuates inflammatory response2013In: Inflammation Research, ISSN 1023-3830, E-ISSN 1420-908X, Vol. 62, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE AND DESIGN: We investigated the role and regulation of zinc transporters in the activation of the inflammatory response in macrophages. Our exploratory computational study found that Zip14 (SLC39A14) was consistently up-regulated in activated macrophages; we therefore focused subsequently on that gene in the mechanistic study.

    MATERIAL: The expression and function of Zip14 was assessed in primary macrophages obtained by in-vitro differentiation of monocytes from human blood.

    METHODS: Primary macrophages were subjected to treatments with lipopolysaccharides, cytokines, chemicals, and pharmacological agents. SLC39A14 and inflammatory cytokine gene expressions were assessed by RT-qPCR. Zip14 siRNA knockdown was performed to explore the gene function.

    RESULTS: Lipopolysaccharide's inflammatory stimulus was a strong inducer of SLC39A14 mRNA expression in macrophages. This induction was dependent on calcium signaling, GC-rich DNA-binding, and NF-κB down-regulation. Impregnation of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages with the glucocorticoid dexamethasone further enhanced Zip14 expression while reducing interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α production. Zip14 knockdown in macrophages attenuated the expression and secretion of cytokines, indicating a buffering function for this zinc transporter.

    CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, our results identified the zinc transporter Zip14 as expressed downstream of lipopolysaccharide signals in macrophages. Zip14 induction had a regulatory function in cytokine production.

1 - 4 of 4
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