uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 16 of 16
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Balksten, Kristin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Art History.
    Mebus, Ulrika
    Gotlands museum.
    Thelin, Carl
    Tyréns.
    Visby ringmur: att återuppbygga med autenticitet2015In: Bebyggelsehistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0349-2834, ISSN 0349-2834, Vol. 70, p. 43-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In February 2012, one part of the medieval city wall and Unesco World Heritage of Visby collapsed. It is the best preserved medival city wall of nothern Europe. The wall was built in several stages in the 13th, 14th and partly even 15th centuries. The first wall was made as a lower three-leaf wall with two shells built of lime stone and fat lime mortar and a soft and porous rubble core of lime stone and clay mortar. The second wall was built higher on top of the old one. It was mostly built as a solid wall in lime stone and lime mortar.

    During its 700 year long history parts of the wall has collapsed and been rebuilt many times and after the collapse 2012 it was decided that also this collapsed part of the wall should be rebuilt. To determine a procedure for the rebuilding and to secure a safe work site, it was necessary to define the construction and structural behaviour of the wall. Furthermore, what caused the collapse needed to be identified, in order to assess and predict the risk of future damage to other parts of the wall. An investigation into the construction of the wall was carried out through archival research, building acheology and on-site examinations. Laser scanning made it possible to describe and study the geometry of the wall and the damage in detail, and a structural analysis was carried out.

    The results show that the wall was built in two stages, making its construction complicated. The structural analysis indicates that there is a concentration of forces to the outer masonry leaf of the lower part of the wall. The collapse was most likely triggered by freezing of the water contained in the masonry. The combination of high stress levels in the outer masonry leaf, due to the construction of the wall, with a loose core, thin outer masonry leaf and insufficient binding stones and weak adhesion in the bedding lime mortar in the lower part of the wall, resulted in a domino effect that explains the extent of the collapse. To secure the wall during dismantling, a temporary steel structure was constructed.

    The medieval types of construction and material in a two-leaf masonry wall have proven to be durable if correctly implemented, with sufficient binding stones and a core in order, and will therefore be used for the rebuilding.

    As restorations have been made during 20th century the joints of lime mortar has been partly repointed with strong cement mortar, followed by leached lime inside from the mortar in the wall.

    As the rebuilding took place it has been a desire to use as authentic materials and constructions as ever possible. On Gotland there is a unique knowledge preserved and developed since middle ages how to handle the local lime, from burning, slaking, storing to mixing mortars. This knowledge and avalibility of local traditional materials has made it possible to rebuild the wall with the perspective and wish that the wall built 2014 shall stand another 700 years.

     

    Keywords: Visby city wall, medieval wall, masonry structure, structural behaviour, lime mortar, two-leaf masonry wall

  • 2.
    Folkesdotter, Gärd
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Södersaneringen i Gävle - som lokalt initiativ och nationellt föredöme (Renewal of Söder in Gävle - as local initiative and national model)1994In: Bebyggelsehistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0349-2834, Vol. 28, p. 123-148Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Holmberg, Tora
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Herrgårdens värde: Förvaltning som livsstil2017In: Bebyggelsehistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0349-2834, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 100-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The landed classes stress the importance of custodianshipof country houses and estates for thebenefit of future generations and society as awhole. Working and social practices are built ontradition, but maintaining a large estate oftenrequires new solutions and types of business,and estate life finds itself at the crossroads oftradition and change. The cultural and naturalheritage of past centuries must support itself financially,preferably while making a profit, andresources must never be embezzled. Today thisoften means diversifying from farming and forestry– an estate may often support itself on sixor seven areas of activity. Yet for estate owners,custodianship is more than just a matter of economics;in cultural terms it entails upholding aform of moral lifestyle. This takes the form ofan ideal way of living on, from and with theestate – a way of life not always seen in terms ofa choice. The article uses way of life as an encompassingterm to understand the interactionbetween social spaces and physical places. Thearticle analyses how custodianship as a collective,historically evolved way of life, is presentedin narratives of the past, present and future. Theanalysis focuses in particular on how material,symbolic, social and moral boundaries are defined.The values that emerge as cornerstonesin this way of life are responsibility, respect,sustainability and accessibility. Based on visits toestates, interviews with owners and media analysis,the article examines how the past, presentand future are presented. To understand thesecontemporary narratives about estate life andthe core values of custodianship, we must firstcomprehend the historical continuity that formsthe basis for the concepts and practices of estateowners. This historical continuity, and thefissures seen today caused by the dichotomy betweentradition and change, forms the startingpoint of the analysis. This enables us to portraythe essence of custodianship and place-specificnostalgia, and their effects on modern-day estatelife as viewed from society as a whole.

  • 4.
    Isacson, Maths
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Bergslagens industriella kulturarv (The industrial heritage in Bergslagen)2002In: Bebyggelsehistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0349-2834, no 43, p. 95-108Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Isacson, Maths
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Bylaget som utvecklingskraft i norrländsk avfolkningsbygd2009In: Bebyggelsehistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0349-2834, Vol. 57, p. 35-51Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Isacson, Maths
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Industriarvets utmaningar: Samhällsförändringar och kulturmiljövård från 1960-tal till 2010-tal2013In: Bebyggelsehistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0349-2834, no 65, p. 17-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I artikeln tecknas faserna i arbetet med det industriella kulturarvet i Sverige från slutet av 1960-talet fram till idag. Analysen utgår från Bourdieus fältbegrepp där industriarvet ses som ett delfält inom ett större kulturarvsfält vars centrala offentliga aktörer, Riksantikvarieämbetet och museer, försvarat traditionella kriterier och regler. Ålder, estetiska värden, sällsynthet och äkthet har varit fältets huvudkriterier. Från början av 1970-talet argumenterade en heterogen skara aktörer för vikten av dokumentation och bevarande av enskilda fabriker och industrimiljöer som stängdes under den djupa ekonomiska krisen. De argumenterade kraftfullt för att även avställda storskaliga och nedsmutsade industrimiljöer från senare tid representerade ett omistligt kulturarv som borde upptas på kulturarvsfältet. På orter där fabriker stängts igångsattes studiecirklar om arbetets och fackföreningarnas historia, ibland som ett led i försök att få företag och stat att skapa nya arbetstillfällen. Vissa menade att historieforskningen var en politisk handling. Staten borde ge ekonomiskt stöd för inventeringar, dokumentationer och bevarande av det industriella kulturarvet, det materiella liksom det immateriella arvet. Först med den ekonomiska krisen från början av 1990-talet gav kulturarvsfältets centrala aktörer sitt fulla stöd till satsningar på industriarvet.

     

    Analysen görs i ljuset av förändrade samhällsekonomiska och politiska förhållanden på ett globalt plan, samt med beaktande av den historiska forskningen om industrisamhället, dess företag, byggnader och arbetsliv. Fyra faser urskiljs, en upptaktsperiod från slutet av 1960-talet till några år in på 1980-talet, då en konsolideringsperiod tog vid. Den sträckte sig fram till den djupa ekonomiska krisen i början av 1990-talet och efterföljdesav en tredje fas jag benämner ”expansion & skördetid” med mängder av aktiviteter runt om i landet. Den fasen varade ungefär tio år, till några år in på 2000-talet då centrala myndigheter och museerna nedprioriterade sitt engagemang för detta kulturarv. Den fjärde fasen har namnet ”turism & äventyrsfasen”. Från mitten av 1990-talet öppnade EU dörrarna till nya finansieringskällor. Pengar finns idag att söka om tyngdpunkten läggs på turism och entreprenörskap. Det industriella kulturarvet blir samtidigt allt mer abstrakt och öppet för allehanda brukande och tolkningar. Delar av industriarvet överförs samtidigt till ett kommersiellt inriktat tillväxtfält med andra kriterier och spelregler. Under 2000-talet har de centrala aktörerna dragit ner sitt stöd till dokumentation, bevarande av vård av det industriella kulturarvet. Kommersiella aktörer har istället ökat sitt engagemang på fältet, under förutsättning att det ger ekonomisk utdelning. Risken är därmed överhängande att arbetet lokalt stannar upp, särskilt i kristider och i avfolkningskommuner med stora svårigheter att locka entreprenörer och turister. Alla industrimiljöer kan inte dokumenteras och än mindre bevaras. Priorteringar fordras men de bör baseras på kunskaper om industrihistorien och industriarvet, och ingå i en demokratisk beslutsordning där centrala offentliga aktörer bidrar med sitt uttryckliga stöd. 2010-talet ger tyvärr anledning till tvivel på det senare.  

     

  • 7.
    Isacson, Maths
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Nisser, Marie
    Industrisamhällets omvandling - en utmaning1998In: Bebyggelsehistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0349-2834, no 36, p. 21-42Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Isacson, Maths
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Sjunnesson, Helene
    Inspiratör med tidig blick för industrilalandskapet2016In: Bebyggelsehistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0349-2834, no 72, p. 38-55Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Karlsmo, Emilie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Art History.
    Thunwall, Christina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Ökänt och ändå okänt: Gottsunda-Valsätra - en stadsdel i Uppsala2006In: Bebyggelsehistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0349-2834, no 51, p. 37-53Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Mårdh, Hedvig
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Art History.
    Att skapa utrymme för komplexa kulturarv2018In: Bebyggelsehistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0349-2834, no 75, p. 95-100Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Hur kan kulturmiljövården, själva men också i samarbete med andra aktörer, arbeta för att på olika sätt uppmärksamma, förvalta och förmedla kulturarv som kan upplevas som svåra eller mörka? Ett nystartat projekt vid Uppsala universitet finansierat av Riksantikvarieämbetet undersöker kulturarvsarbetets förutsättningar och hur värdering och urval sker vid omvandlingen av äldre psykiatriska sjukhus. Projektet syftar till att på sikt utveckla metoderna för inkludering av komplexa kulturarv i kulturarvsprocesser kopplade till stadsomvandling. Fokus för studien är Ulleråkersområdet strax söder om Uppsala, ett område som efter drygt 200 år som vårdinstitution i skrivande stund genomgår en snabb omvandling till bostadsområde.

  • 11.
    Thunwall, Christina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Art History.
    Tre torg i Gävle (Three squares in the town of Gävle)1995In: Bebyggelsehistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0349-2834, Vol. 30, p. 89-102Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Ulväng, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Herrgårdsbyggandet i Mälardalen under 1700- och 1800-talet: när, var och av vem?2011In: Bebyggelsehistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0349-2834, Vol. 60, p. 38-57Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Ulväng, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Krapperup mellan renässans och skiftesreformer.2006In: Bebyggelsehistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0349-2834Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Vikstrand, Anna Micro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Art History.
    Fenixpalatset - från nöjespalats till pingstkyrka2007In: Bebyggelsehistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0349-2834, no 53Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Widmark, Henrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Art History.
    Sjöholm Skrubbe, Jessica
    Department of Art History, Stockholm University.
    Vardagsliv, normer och värderingar: Hur urban identitet skapas i bostadsområdet2014In: Bebyggelsehistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0349-2834, no 67, p. 24-44Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Wilson, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Art History.
    Bilden av trä: Föreställningar om levande material i en postindustriell tid2017In: Bebyggelsehistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0349-2834, no 74, p. 8-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article deals with the paradox of a modern-day phenomenon: that wood, which represents authenticity and sustainable development, is communicated via visual media that prevent the tangible experience of physically handling wood.

    One crucial question is the consequences this may have for the built environment and cultural heritage of wood. The article argues that visual representations of wood influence how real wood is handled, and that this cultural use of wood in an abstract sense influences our values when making decisions about historic timber buildings. In current architecture, bare wood often takes the form of a decorative surface with no structural purpose, used only to convey various notions of wood. We must avoid taking these notions for granted, and be more aware of their effects and how they are used.

    To understand this process we may hypothesize that a change in what wood represents has taken place in the post-industrial era. The study uses historical perspectives to identify 20th-century ideas and concepts of wood, showing that perceptions of wood changed through the rational ideas of modernity, which made wood anonymous and marginalized. The article sug- gests that over recent decades wood has devel- oped an identity as a unique, living material. Several trees estimated to be more than a thou- sand years old have received media attention, which shows the ability of trees to encapsulate time. These trees are often given names, such as Adonis in Bosnia for example, which is known as “Europe’s oldest living inhabitant.” Draw- ing attention to unique aspects of trees follows current advertising trends, where products and brands are given identities too.

    The development of dendrochronology has also lent a historical dimension to wood. This aspect of time is enhanced by the protracted process of tree growth, making wood a suitable material for the slow craft movement and hip- ster culture.

    One contribution to the animate natural- ness of wood is the rapid development of digi- tal photography, which allows professional and amateur photographers alike to produce high- quality pictures. Distributing images over social media takes place smoothly and quickly via the Internet. Thus wood can be shown in high-reso- lution, both in print and digital form, making it look freshly hewn and vivid.

    By analysing contemporary media, which presents wood in various cultural contexts, we can identify how notions of sustainable devel- opment and authenticity are conveyed. This paradoxical handling of wood without actually touching it shows that wood possesses a cultural strength that extends far beyond its structural and practical uses.

    As an example the article discusses the Swed- ish medieval church at Södra Råda in Västergöt- land. After the building was destroyed by fire in 2001, it was decided to rebuild the church using medieval techniques. The reconstruction became a media success that spread via the In- ternet. Paradoxically, the virtual version of Södra Råda became more real to the public than the physical church. This came about by presenting painstaking woodworking skills as the church rose slowly, like a phoenix from the ashes. The process was documented and spread via the In- ternet and elsewhere.

    To conclude, virtual and mediated wood, consumed visually, expresses a strong yet underrated cultural discourse. With greater aware- ness, virtual wood can become a resource in the struggle to preserve historic timber buildings, which are often threatened today by globalised economic progress, in which cities compete by building landmark architecture. Rational and logical arguments, picked from the modernist agenda of the 20th-century, are often used to legitimise this form of redevelopment. In this context it is hard to do justice to historic timber buildings, given that they are viewed and discussed in terms of values created by modernity. The results of the study show how wood is culturally impregnated with new and varied meanings. Broadly, the post-industrial, irrational use of wood may be seen as rehabilitating a ma- terial damaged by the rationalist forces of mo- dernity. In handicrafts too, wood is appearing as an unruly queer material, carved and freely cut.

    Is a language taking shape here, stemming from the wood itself? 

1 - 16 of 16
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf