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  • 1.
    Andersson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Uppsala, Sweden;Texas A&M Univ, College Stn, TX 77843 USA.
    Fisher's quantitative genetic model and the molecular genetics of multifactorial traits2018In: Journal of Animal Breeding and Genetics, ISSN 0931-2668, E-ISSN 1439-0388, Vol. 135, no 6, p. 391-392Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Rönnegård, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, The Linnaeus Centre for Bioinformatics.
    Al-Sarraj, R.
    von Rosen, D.
    Non-iterative variance component estimation in QTL analysis2009In: Journal of Animal Breeding and Genetics, ISSN 0931-2668, E-ISSN 1439-0388, Vol. 126, no 2, p. 110-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In variance component quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis, a mixed model is used to detect the most likely chromosome position of a QTL. The putative QTL is included as a random effect and a method is needed to estimate the QTL variance. The standard estimation method used is an iterative method based on the restricted maximum likelihood (REML). In this paper, we present a novel non-iterative variance component estimation method. This method is based on Henderson's method 3, but relaxes the condition of unbiasedness. Two similar estimators were compared, which were developed from two different partitions of the sum of squares in Henderson's method 3. The approach was compared with REML on data from a European wild boar x domestic pig intercross. A meat quality trait was studied on chromosome 6 where a functional gene was known to be located. Both partitions resulted in estimated QTL variances close to the REML estimates. From the non-iterative estimates, we could also compute good approximations of the likelihood ratio curve on the studied chromosome.

  • 3.
    Sutherland, Dez-Ann Antoinette Therese
    et al.
    Virginia Tech, Dept Anim & Poultry Sci, Blacksburg, VA 24061 USA.
    Honaker, Christa Ferst
    Virginia Tech, Dept Anim & Poultry Sci, Blacksburg, VA 24061 USA.
    Dorshorst, Ben
    Virginia Tech, Dept Anim & Poultry Sci, Blacksburg, VA 24061 USA.
    Andersson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Brisbin, I. Lehr, Jr.
    Univ Georgia, Savannah River Ecol Lab, Odum Sch Ecol, Aiken, SC USA.
    Siegel, Paul B.
    Virginia Tech, Dept Anim & Poultry Sci, Blacksburg, VA 24061 USA.
    Growth patterns for three generations of an intercross between red junglefowl and chickens selected for low body weight2018In: Journal of Animal Breeding and Genetics, ISSN 0931-2668, E-ISSN 1439-0388, Vol. 135, no 4, p. 300-310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Growth is a complex and dynamic process that may be measured at a specific point or over a period of time. Compared was the growth of male and female chickens over a three-generation period. Involved were red junglefowl (RJF; Gallus gallus), a line of White Plymouth Rock chickens (LWS; Gallus gallus domesticus) selected for low body weight, and their reciprocal F-1 and F-2 crosses. In both sexes, Gompertz's description of growth showed that RJF had significantly lower asymptotes, earlier inflection points, and faster growth rates than LWS. Heterosis for these measures was positive for asymptote and negative for growth rate and inflection point. The RJF commenced egg production at a significantly younger age and lower body weight than LWS. Although F-1 and F-2 reciprocal crosses were similar for body weight and for age at first egg, the F-1 reciprocal crosses began lay at significantly younger ages than the F-2 crosses and parental lines. When viewed on a physiological basis where age and body weight were simultaneously standardized, both parental lines and reciprocal F-1 and F-2 crosses had differing rapid and lag growth phases. Overall, sexual dimorphism increased in all populations from hatch to sexual maturity. The LWS males had a longer growth period consistent with their female counterparts who became sexually mature at older ages. Comprehensively, these results indicate additive and nonadditive genetic variation for distinct growth patterns and changes in resource allocation strategies over time.

  • 4.
    Zhang, Tongyu
    et al.
    Chinese Acad Agr Sci, Key Laborary Anim Genet Breeding & Reprod Poultry, Inst Anim Sci, Minist Agr, Beijing 100193, Peoples R China.
    Gao, Hongding
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Mol Biol & Genet, Ctr Quantitat Genet & Genom, Tjele, Denmark.
    Sahana, Goutam
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Mol Biol & Genet, Ctr Quantitat Genet & Genom, Tjele, Denmark.
    Zan, Yanjun
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Fan, Hongying
    Chinese Acad Agr Sci, Key Laborary Anim Genet Breeding & Reprod Poultry, Inst Anim Sci, Minist Agr, Beijing 100193, Peoples R China.
    Liu, Jiaxin
    Chinese Acad Agr Sci, Key Laborary Anim Genet Breeding & Reprod Poultry, Inst Anim Sci, Minist Agr, Beijing 100193, Peoples R China.
    Shi, Liangyu
    Chinese Acad Agr Sci, Key Laborary Anim Genet Breeding & Reprod Poultry, Inst Anim Sci, Minist Agr, Beijing 100193, Peoples R China.
    Wang, Hongwei
    Beijing Compass Biotechnol Co Ltd, Beijing, Peoples R China.
    Du, Lixin
    Chinese Acad Agr Sci, Key Laborary Anim Genet Breeding & Reprod Poultry, Inst Anim Sci, Minist Agr, Beijing 100193, Peoples R China.
    Wang, Lixian
    Chinese Acad Agr Sci, Key Laborary Anim Genet Breeding & Reprod Poultry, Inst Anim Sci, Minist Agr, Beijing 100193, Peoples R China.
    Zhao, Fuping
    Chinese Acad Agr Sci, Key Laborary Anim Genet Breeding & Reprod Poultry, Inst Anim Sci, Minist Agr, Beijing 100193, Peoples R China.
    Genome-wide association studies revealed candidate genes for tail fat deposition and body size in the Hulun Buir sheep2019In: Journal of Animal Breeding and Genetics, ISSN 0931-2668, E-ISSN 1439-0388, Vol. 136, no 5, p. 362-370Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fat-tailed sheep have a unique characteristic of depositing fat in their tails. In the present study, we conducted genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on traits related to tail fat deposition and body size in the Hulun Buir sheep. A total number of 300 individuals belonging to two fat-tailed lines of the Hulun Buir sheep breed genotyped with the Ovine Infinium HD SNP BeadChip were included in the current study. Two mixed models, one for continuous and one for binary phenotypic traits, were employed to analyse ten traits, that is, body length (BL), body height (BH), chest girth (CG), tail length (TL), tail width (TW), tail circumference (TC), carcass weight (CW), tail fat weight (TF), ratio of CW to TF (RCT) and tail type (TT). We identified 7, 6, 7, 2, 10 and 1 SNPs significantly associated with traits TF, CW, RCT, TW, TT and CG, respectively. Their associated genomic regions harboured 42 positional candidate genes. Out of them, 13 candidate genes including SMURF2, FBF1, DTNBP1, SETD7 and RBM11 have been associated with fat metabolism in sheep. The RBM11 gene has already been identified in a previous study on signatures of selection in this specific sheep population. Two more genes, that is, SMARCA5 and GAB1 were associated with body size in sheep. The present study has identified candidate genes that might be implicated in tail fat deposition and body size in sheep.

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