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  • 1.
    Albinsson, Bo
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Laboratory of Clinical Microbiology, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala.
    Vene, Sirkka
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. The Public Health Agency of Sweden, Solna.
    Rombo, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Department of Infectious diseases, Eskilstuna.
    Blomberg, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Microbiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Lundkvist, Åke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Rönnberg, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Laboratory of Clinical Microbiology, Uppsala University Hospital .
    Distinction between serological responses following tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) infection vs vaccination, Sweden 20172018In: Eurosurveillance, ISSN 1025-496X, E-ISSN 1560-7917, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 2-7, article id 17-00838Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) is an important European vaccine-preventable pathogen. Discrimination of vaccine-induced antibodies from those elicited by infection is important. We studied anti-TBEV IgM/IgG responses, including avidity and neutralisation, by multiplex serology in 50 TBEV patients and 50 TBEV vaccinees. Infection induced antibodies reactive to both whole virus (WV) and non-structural protein 1 (NS1) in 48 clinical cases, whereas 47 TBEV vaccinees had WV, but not NS1 antibodies, enabling efficient discrimination of infection/vaccination.

  • 2.
    Dahl, Viktor
    et al.
    Publ Hlth Agcy Sweden, Stockholm, Sweden;European Ctr Dis Prevent & Control ECDC, EPIET, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wisell, Karin T.
    Publ Hlth Agcy Sweden, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Giske, Christian G.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Microbiol, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Div Microbiol, Dept Lab Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tegnell, Anders
    Publ Hlth Agcy Sweden, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wallensten, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Publ Hlth Agcy Sweden, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lyme neuroborreliosis epidemiology in Sweden 2010 to 2014: clinical microbiology laboratories are a better data source than the hospital discharge diagnosis register2019In: Eurosurveillance, ISSN 1025-496X, E-ISSN 1560-7917, Vol. 24, no 20, p. 6-12, article id 1800453Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    In a study from 2013 that prioritised communicable diseases for surveillance in Sweden, we identified Lyme borreliosis as one of the diseases with highest priority. In 2014, when the present study was designed, there were also plans to make neuroborreliosis notifiable within the European Union.

    Aim:

    We compared possibilities of surveillance of neuroborreliosis in Sweden through two different sources: the hospital discharge register and reporting from the clinical microbiology laboratories.

    Methods:

    We examined the validity of ICD-10 codes in the hospital discharge register by extracting personal identification numbers for all cases of neuroborreliosis, defined by a positive cerebrospinal fluid-serum anti-Borrelia antibody index, who were diagnosed at the largest clinical microbiology laboratory in Sweden during 2014. We conducted a retrospective observational study with a questionnaire sent to all clinical microbiology laboratories in Sweden requesting information on yearly number of cases, age group and sex for the period 2010 to 2014.

    Results:

    Among 150 neuroborreliosis cases, 67 (45%) had received the ICD-10 code A69.2 (Lyme borreliosis) in combination with G01.9 (meningitis in bacterial diseases classified elsewhere), the combination that the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare recommends for neuroborreliosis. All 22 clinical laboratories replied to our questionnaire. Based on laboratory reporting, the annual incidence of neuroborreliosis in Sweden was 6.3 cases per 100,000 in 2014.

    Conclusion:

    The hospital discharge register was unsuitable for surveillance of neuroborreliosis, whereas laboratory-based reporting was a feasible alternative. In 2018, the European Commission included Lyme neuroborreliosis on the list of diseases under epidemiological surveillance.

  • 3.
    Dyrdak, R.
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Microbiol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Grabbe, M.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Microbiol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hammas, B.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Microbiol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ekwall, J.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Astrid Lindgren Childrens Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hansson, K. E.
    Soder Sjukhuset, Dept Infect Dis, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Luthander, J.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Astrid Lindgren Childrens Hosp, Pediat Infect Dis Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Naucler, P.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Infect Dis Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Infect Dis, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Reinius, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Rotzen-Ostlund, M.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Microbiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Albert, J.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Microbiol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Outbreak of enterovirus D68 of the new B3 lineage in Stockholm, Sweden, August to September 20162016In: Eurosurveillance, ISSN 1025-496X, E-ISSN 1560-7917, Vol. 21, no 46, p. 5-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report an enterovirus D68 ( EV-D68) outbreak in Stockholm Sweden in 2016. Between 22 August and 25 September EV-D68 was detected in 74/ 495 respiratory samples analysed at the Karolinska University Hospital. During the peak week, 30/ 91 ( 33%) samples were EV-D68 positive. Viral protein ( VP) P4/ VP2 sequencing revealed that cases were caused by B3 lineage strains. Forty-four ( 59%) EV-D68-positive patients were children aged = 5 years. Ten patients had severe respiratory or neurological symptoms and one died. We report an outbreak of enterovirus D68 ( EV-D68) infections in Stockholm, Sweden in late August and September of 2016 caused by the newly described B3 lineage [1].

  • 4.
    Lundkvist, Åke
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Verner-Carlsson, J.
    Plyusnina, A.
    Forslund, L.
    Feinstein, R.
    Plyusnin, A.
    Pet rat harbouring Seoul hantavirus in Sweden, June 20132013In: Eurosurveillance, ISSN 1025-496X, E-ISSN 1560-7917, Vol. 18, no 27, p. 15-18Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5. Rehn, M.
    et al.
    Ringberg, H.
    Runehagen, A.
    Herrmann, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Medicine.
    Olsen, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Medicine.
    Petersson, A. C.
    Hjertqvist, M.
    Kuhlmann-Berenzon, S.
    Wallensten, A.
    Unusual increase of psittacosis in southern Sweden linked to wild bird exposure, January to April 20132013In: Eurosurveillance, ISSN 1025-496X, E-ISSN 1560-7917, Vol. 18, no 19, p. 13-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Free-living wild birds worldwide act as reservoir for Chlamydia psittaci, but the risk of transmission to humans through contact with wild birds has not been widely documented. From 12 January to April 9 2013, a total of 25 cases of psittacosis were detected in southern Sweden, about a threefold increase compared with the mean of the previous 10 years. A matched case-control study investigating both domestic and wild bird exposure showed that cases were more likely than controls to have cleaned wild bird feeders or been exposed to wild bird droppings in other ways (OR: 10.1; 95% CI: 2.1-47.9). We recommend precautionary measures such as wetting bird feeders before cleaning them, to reduce the risk of transmission of C. psittaci when in contact with bird droppings. Furthermore, C. psittaci should be considered for inclusion in laboratory diagnostic routines when analysing samples from patients with atypical pneumonia, since our findings suggest that psittacosis is underdiagnosed.

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