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  • 1. Mak, W C
    et al.
    Olesen, K
    Sivlér, P
    Lee, C J
    Moreno-Jimenez, I
    Edin, J
    Courtman, D
    Skog, M
    Griffith, M
    Controlled Delivery of Human Cells by Temperature Responsive Microcapsules.2015In: Journal of Functional Biomaterials, ISSN 2079-4983, E-ISSN 2079-4983, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 439-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cell therapy is one of the most promising areas within regenerative medicine. However, its full potential is limited by the rapid loss of introduced therapeutic cells before their full effects can be exploited, due in part to anoikis, and in part to the adverse environments often found within the pathologic tissues that the cells have been grafted into. Encapsulation of individual cells has been proposed as a means of increasing cell viability. In this study, we developed a facile, high throughput method for creating temperature responsive microcapsules comprising agarose, gelatin and fibrinogen for delivery and subsequent controlled release of cells. We verified the hypothesis that composite capsules combining agarose and gelatin, which possess different phase transition temperatures from solid to liquid, facilitated the destabilization of the capsules for cell release. Cell encapsulation and controlled release was demonstrated using human fibroblasts as model cells, as well as a therapeutically relevant cell line-human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). While such temperature responsive cell microcapsules promise effective, controlled release of potential therapeutic cells at physiological temperatures, further work will be needed to augment the composition of the microcapsules and optimize the numbers of cells per capsule prior to clinical evaluation.

  • 2.
    Tummala, Gopi Krishna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Lopes, Viviana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Mihranyan, Albert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Biocompatibility of nanocellulose-reinforced PVA hydrogel with human corneal epithelial cells for Ophthalmic applications2019In: Journal of Functional Biomaterials, ISSN 2079-4983, E-ISSN 2079-4983, Vol. 10, no 3, article id 35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transparent composite hydrogel in the form of a contact lens made from poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) was subjected to in vitro biocompatibility evaluation with human corneal epithelial cells (HCE-2 cells). The cell response to direct contact with the hydrogels was investigated by placing the samples on top of confluent cell layers and evaluating cell viability, morphology, and cell layer integrity subsequent to 24 h culture and removal of the hydrogels. To further characterize the lens-cell interactions, HCE-2 cells were seeded on the hydrogels, with and without simulated tear fluid (STF) pre-conditioning, and cell viability and morphology were evaluated. Furthermore, protein adsorption on the hydrogel surface was investigated by incubating the materials with STF, followed by protein elution and quantification. The hydrogel material was found to have affinity towards protein adsorption, most probably due to the interactions between the positively charged lysozyme and the negatively charged CNCs embedded in the PVA matrix. The direct contact experiment demonstrated that the physical presence of the lenses did not affect corneal epithelial cell monolayers in terms of integrity nor cell metabolic activity. Moreover, it was found that viable corneal cells adhered to the hydrogel, showing the typical morphology of epithelial cells and that such response was not influenced by the STF pre-conditioning of the hydrogel surface. The results of the study confirm that PVA-CNC hydrogel is a promising ophthalmic biomaterial, motivating future in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility studies.

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