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  • 1.
    Andersson, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    From Valley of Sadness to Hill of Happiness: The Significance of Surroundings for Socio-economic Career2004In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 641-659Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Andersson, Eva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Subramanian, S.V.
    Explorations of neighbourhood and educational outcomes for young Swedes2006In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 43, no 11, p. 2013-2025Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to estimate the impact of neighbourhoods on educational outcome for adolescents in Sweden. Using a multilevel statistical approach and the PLACE database that consists of a census of individuals in 1990-2000 in Sweden, the paper explores different domains of neighbourhood characteristics that predict educational outcomes in adolescents. Educational achievement in year 2000 was measured for three cohorts, geocoded to their neighbourhood environments. It was found that neighbourhood characteristics related to socioeconomic resources and demographic stability are predictors of individual educational outcomes. A strong association between neighbourhood socio-cultural capital variables and education were also observed. Despite national policies on availability and access to education in Sweden, there are substantial inequalities in educational outcomes that are not simply a result of differences in individual characteristics.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Roger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Breaking Segregation - Rhetorical Construct or Effective Policy?: The Case of the Metropolitan Development Initiative in Sweden2006In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 787-799Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Borevi, Karin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Bengtsson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    The tension between choice and need in the housing of newcomers: A theoretical framework and an application on Scandinavian settlement policies2015In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 52, no 14, p. 2599-2615Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The settlement and housing of refugees is high on the agenda in most European countries. This article develops a theoretical perspective on the housing provision of newly arrived migrants and applies it on the national discourses on settlement policies in Sweden, Denmark and Norway. The theoretical discussion focuses on the ambivalence between choice and need in housing policy, and between promoting demos and ethnos in integration policy. The empirical analysis takes its departure in these tensions and investigates the national discourses in terms of three potential arguments for restricting autonomy in the housing market precisely for newly arrived migrants: the legal status, resource and neighbourhood arguments. This frame of analysis makes it possible to interpret and understand the surprisingly strong differences in settlement policies between the three countries.We argue that our theoretical approach and analytical framework should be relevant for understanding national political discourses on settlement policy more generally.

  • 5.
    Bråmå, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    "White flight?": The production and reproduction of immigrant concentration areas in Swedish cities, 1990 – 20002006In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 43, no 7, p. 1127-1146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article investigates whether processes similar to 'White flight' and 'White avoidance', known from American research on residential segregation, have played a role in the increased concentration of immigrants that has affected many residential areas in Swedish cities during the 1990s. By means of a comprehensive and unique dataset, processes of neighbourhood transition and mobility are described and analysed for a selection of residential areas that have experienced increased immigrant concentration during the 1990s. The results show that 'Swedish avoidance', i.e. low in-migration rates among Swedes, rather than 'Swedish flight', i.e. high out-migration rates, has been the main driving-force behind the production and reproduction of immigrant concentration areas.

  • 6.
    Chen, Jie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    The effects of housing allowance benefit levels on recipient duration: Evidence from the Swedish 1997 reform2008In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 347-366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How the duration of housing allowance spells varies with the generosity of the housing allowance system carries important policy implications. In 1997, the Swedish housing allowance system implemented a drastic reform which substantially affected claimants who were couples with children in terms of their financial incentives to utilise housing allowance benefits. However, at the same time, the 1997 reform largely left single-parent claimants unaffected. Exploiting the quasi-experimental feature of this reform, this paper analyses the impacts of benefit shrinkage on couple-with-children recipients' exit hazards using the DD (difference-in-difference) estimation strategy. Careful attention is given to measuring interaction effects appropriately in non-linear models. The findings in this paper suggest that the 1997 reform led to a sharp increase in the leaving speed of the recipients in the 'couples with children' category.

  • 7.
    Dahlberg, Matz
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Eklof, Matias
    Fredriksson, Peter
    Jofre-Monseny, Jordi
    Estimating Preferences for Local Public Services Using Migration Data2012In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 319-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using Swedish micro data, the paper examines the impact of local public services on community choice. The choice of community is modelled as a choice between a discrete set of alternatives. It is found that, given taxes, high spending on child care attracts migrants. Less conclusive results are obtained with respect to the role of spending on education and elderly care. High local taxes deter migrants. Relaxing the independence of the irrelevant alternatives assumption, by estimating a mixed logit model, has a significant impact on the results.

  • 8.
    Elfversson, Emma
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Höglund, Kristine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Home of last resort: Urban land conflict and the Nubians in Kibera, Kenya2017In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amid expansive and often informal urban growth, conflict over land has become a severe source of instability in many cities. In slum areas, policies intended to alleviate tensions, including upgrading programmes, the legal regulation of informal tenure arrangements, and the reform of local governance structures, have had the unintended consequence of also spurring violence and conflict. This paper analyses the conflict over a proposed ‘ethnic homeland’ for the Nubian community in the Kibera slum in Nairobi, Kenya, in order to advance knowledge on the strategies communities adopt to promote their interests and how such strategies impact on urban conflict management. Theoretically, we apply the perspective of ‘institutional bricolage’, which captures how actors make use of existing formal and informal structures in pragmatic ways to meet their conflict management needs. While previous research focuses primarily on how bricolage can facilitate cooperation, the case analysis uncovers how, over time, the land issue has become closely intertwined with claims of identity and citizenship and a political discourse drawn along ethnic lines. In turn, such processes may contribute to the intractability of conflict, causing significant challenges for urban planning.

  • 9. Emmi, Philip C.
    et al.
    Magnusson, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Further evidence on the accuracy of residential vacancy chain models1995In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 32, no 8, p. 1361-1367Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Enström Öst, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Parental Wealth and First-Time Homeownership: A cohort study of family background and young adults' housing situation in Sweden2012In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 49, no 10, p. 2137-2152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates whether family background seems to have any influence on first-time homeownership. Recent studies have indicated that it has become more difficult to become established in the housing market and such situations may increase the importance of parental wealth. In this study, parental wealth is estimated as family background information on parents’ homeownership, father’s socioeconomic status and single parenting. Unique cohort data for three birth cohorts suggest that there is a significant cohort effect in young adults’ tenure decision. Furthermore, the results imply that parents’ homeownership has become a more important predictor of the transition to first-time homeownership for those young adults facing increasing problems in the housing market.

  • 11. Galster, George
    et al.
    Andersson, Roger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Musterd, Sako
    Who Is Affected by Neighbourhood Income Mix?: Gender, Age, Family, Employment and Income Differences2010In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 47, no 14, p. 2915-2944Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses the degree to which the mixture of low-, middle- and high-income males in the neighbourhood affects the subsequent earnings of individuals, and aims to test explicitly the degree to which these impacts vary across gender, age, presence of children, employment status or income at the start of the analysis period. An intertemporal differences specification of an econometric model is employed to eliminate the potential selection bias arising from unmeasured individual characteristics, utilising data on 1.67 million adults living in Swedish metropolitan areas 1991-99. It is found that there are important differences in the nature and magnitude of neighbourhood income mix effects in several dimensions, but many are statistically and economically significant. Neighbourhood mix effects are consistently stronger for parents and those who do not work full-time, independently of other individual dimensions, although a combination of personal attributes typically governs the vulnerability of the individual to the neighbourhood.

  • 12.
    Hedman, Lina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Galster, George
    Wayne State University, Detroit, USA.
    Neighbourhood Income Sorting and the Effects of Neighbourhood Income Mix on Income: A Holistic Empirical Exploration2013In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 107-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An econometric model is specified in which an individual’s income and the income mix of the neighbourhood in which the individual resides are endogenous, thus providing a holistic model of phenomena that previously have been fragmented into neighbourhood effects and neighbourhood selection literatures. To overcome the biases from selection and endogeneity, the parameters of this model are estimated using instrumental variables in a fixed-effect panel analysis employing annual data on 90 438 working-age males in Stockholm over the 1995–2006 period. Evidence is found of both neighbourhood effects and neighbourhood selection, but more importantly, it is found that the magnitudes of these effects are substantially altered when taking selection and endogeneity biases into account, compared with when only controlling for selection. When taking endogeneity into account, the apparent impact of neighbourhood income mix on individual income is magnified and the effect of individual income on the percentage of high income in the neighbourhood is magnified.

  • 13.
    John, Östh
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Malmberg, Bo
    Kulturgeografiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet.
    Andersson, Eva
    Kulturgeografiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet.
    School Choice and Increasing Performance Difference: A Counterfactual Approach.2013In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 406-424Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Klinthäll, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Urban, Susanne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research. LInköping University.
    The strength of ethnic ties: Routes into the labour market in spaces of segregation2016In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 53, no 1, p. 3-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyses whether ethnic segregation leads to social isolation and lack of access to valuable informal channels into the labour market. We use a survey of Swedish-born young adults in Stockholm, whose parents were born either in Turkey (Stratum T) or in Sweden (Stratum S). Stratum T was randomly sampled, whereas Stratum S was sampled according to the residential distribution of Stratum T. Our results show that persons in Stratum T use informal contacts in order to find employment more often than Stratum S. Living in immigrant-dense areas increases the likelihood of finding employment through informal contacts. For Stratum T, co-ethnic contacts are more important than other contacts, in particular if they are neighbours. Access to ethnic networks and the use of ethnic contacts in the labour market differ between persons of Turkish, Kurdish and Assyrian/Syriac backgrounds. In contrast to the isolation thesis, this study shows that young adults in immigrant-dense neighbourhoods have access to and benefit more from informal channels in order to find ways into labour market.

  • 15.
    Kohl, Sebastian
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Blackwell, Timothy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Urban heritages: how history and housing finance matter to housing form and homeownership rates2018In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063XArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Kährik, Anneli
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Temelová, Jana
    Kadarik, Kati
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Kubeš, Jan
    What attracts people to inner city areas?: The cases of two post-socialist cities in Estonia and the Czech Republic2016In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 355-372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the 1990s the inner city residential areas of CEE post-socialist cities have experienced substantial physical and social transformation. Previous studies have recorded a gradual rehabilitation of inner city housing stock and the displacement of lower status groups by middle and higher social status residents, but they have also shown that diverse social groups continue to live in the inner city. The scholarly emphasis on identifying the macro-scale factors that influence inner city change has resulted in a lack of studies considering micro-scale processes. We therefore herein attempt to address this gap in the literature by providing qualitative insight into the drivers of inner city dynamics at the level of the individual actors concerned. Our study is based on an investigation of two second-tier cities: Tartu in Estonia and C ˇ eske´ Budeˇjovice in the Czech Republic. We found that, besides supply side factors which emphasise the conditions of urban spatial fabric, relocations to inner cities can best be explained by a combination of household socio-economic, life course and lifestyle factors. We also provide a typology of relocators to post-socialist inner cities, based on our findings.

  • 17.
    Martinez, Miguel A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research. City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
    Squatters and migrants in Madrid: Interactions, contexts and cycles2017In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 54, no 11, p. 2472-2489Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Squatters and migrants use the city space in a peculiar and anomalous manner. Their contributions to the social and political production of urban space are not usually considered crucial. Furthermore, their mutual relationship is under-researched. In this paper I investigate the participation of migrants in the squatting of abandoned buildings. This may entail autonomous forms of occupation but also various kinds of interactions with native squatters. By looking historically at the city of Madrid I distinguish four major forms of interactions. I collect evidence in order to show that deprivation-based squatting is not necessarily the prevailing type. The forms of ‘empowerment’ and ‘engagement’ were increasingly developed while ‘autonomy’ and ‘solidarity’ were continuously present. These variations occurred because of specific drivers within the cycles of movements’ protests and other social and political contexts which facilitated the cooperation between squatters and migrants, although language barriers, discrimination in the housing market and police harassment constrained them too. Therefore, I argue first that two key social organisations triggered the interactions in different protest cycles. Second, I show how, in spite of the over-representation of Latin American migrants, the political squatting movement in Madrid has consistently incorporated groups of migrants and their struggles in accordance with anti-fascist, anti-racist and anti-xenophobic claims and practices. The analysis also provides a nuanced understanding about the ‘political’ implications of squatting when migrants are involved.

  • 18.
    Myrberg, Gunnar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Strömblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Urban Inequality and Political Recruitment2013In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 50, no 5, p. 1049-1065Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides evidence of segregation-generated differences in political recruitment. Focusing on social-geographical differentiation in the urban landscape, it evaluates—in prior work largely neglected—contextual effects on requests for political participation. Consistent with previous research, the analyses suggest that political activists, who try to convince others to participate, systematically use a set of selection criteria when deciding whom to approach. However, using data based on a sample of inhabitants of Swedish cities and properties of their neighbourhoods, evidence is also presented for aggregate-level social exclusion influences on individual-level recruitment efforts. Consistent with the theoretical framework presented, the results indicate that the contextual effect stems both from the disproportional population composition in residential areas and from recruiters’ rational avoidance of areas marked by high levels of social exclusion. The net result, it is concluded, is a reinforcement of urban inequalities when it comes to the chances to be invited to political life.

  • 19.
    Pasquinelli, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Branding as Urban Collective Strategy-making: The Formation of NewcastleGateshead's Organisational Identity2014In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 51, no 4, p. 727-743Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing attention has focused on relational spatial entities as potentially embedding renewed and alternative paths of local development. This paper discusses the intertwining of an emerging relational configuration of space and the pursuit of post-industrial development, by analysing the formation of an organisational identity. The case of NewcastleGateshead (UK) is interpreted as a brand emerging from urban collective strategy-making, involving two partner cities, thus crossing administrative borders. By suggesting the importance of the emergence of branded relational spaces', research results stress the active role of a collective construction of meanings and their communication in the creation of relational spatial entities. This provides an opportunity to reflect on the extent to which branding, here interpreted as collective strategy-making, goes beyond mere communication and fosters an institutionalisation of the branded space, thus influencing the way in which local development is spatially and strategically conceived.

  • 20.
    Power, Dominic
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Lundmark, Mats
    Working Through Knowledge Pools: Labour Market Dynamics, The Transference Of Knowledge And Ideas, And Industrial Clusters2004In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 41, no 5/6, p. 1025-1044Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Urban, Susanne
    Linköpings universitet, REMESO - Institutet för forskning om Migration, Etnicitet och Samhälle.
    Is the neighbourhood effect an economic or an immigrant issue? A study of the importance of the childhood neighbourhood for future integration into the labour market2009In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 583-603Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purported effects ]of concentrations of immigrants and poverty within cities on inclusion in the labour market are intensively discussed among politicians and researchers. This study uses a multilevel approach to analyse a large longitudinal dataset in Stockholm. The results confirm previous research that concludes that only a small fraction of socioeconomic output can be considered to be a result of neighbourhood origin. Moreover, it is concluded that economic characteristics of neighbourhoods have a larger impact than ethnic ones. Growing up in a wealthy area adds to the risk of having a low income at 24 and 25 years of age, but growing up in a poor area adds to the risk of being unemployed.

  • 22.
    Valli, Chiara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Pushing forwards the gentrification frontier: How the art scene progresses gentrification in Bushwick, New York CityIn: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063XArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Wind, Barend
    et al.
    Tilburg University Netherlands.
    Hedman, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    The uneven distribution of capital gains in times of socio-spatial inequality: Evidence from Swedish housing pathways between 1995 and 20102017In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Housing wealth is the largest component of wealth for a majority of Swedish households. Whereas investments in housing are merely defined by income, the returns on this investment (capital gains) are dependent on local housing market dynamics. Since the 1990s, local housing market dynamics in Swedish cities have been altered by the upswing in levels of socio-spatial inequality. The simultaneous up- and downgrading of neighbourhoods is reflected in house price developments and exacerbates the magnitude of capital gains and losses. This article proposes that the selective redirection of housing pathways that causes an upswing in socio-spatial inequality translates into an uneven distribution of capital gains as well. A sequence analysis of the housing pathways of one Swedish birth cohort (1970–1975), based on population-wide register data (GeoSweden), is used to explain differences in capital gains between different social groups in the period 1995–2010. The results indicate higher capital gains for individuals with higher incomes and lower gains for migrants. When socio-spatial inequality increases, the more resourceful groups can use their economic and cultural capital to navigate through the housing market in a more profitable way.

  • 24.
    Öhman, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Towards a Digital (Societal) Infrastructure?2010In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 183-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In what ways might informational techniques and information technology alter the infrastructure of society? The approach employed in this paper involves a number of fundamental, almost historically determined, conditions for the emergence of an increasingly societal infrastructure. This discussion is then related to analyses of the significance of information and communication technologies (ICT) in terms of ubiquities, agglomerations and clusters. Are there grounds for assuming that these trends are having an impact on the systems of towns and cities of differing sizes and at varying distances? In conclusion, the discussion turns to the issue of whether developments in informational techniques over the past 20 years are leading towards what has been referred to as a digital division of labour and, by extension, also towards a ‘digital (societal) infrastructure’.

  • 25.
    Östh, John
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Andersson, Eva
    Malmberg, Bo
    School Choice and Increasing Performance Difference: A Counterfactual Approach2013In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 407-425Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, structural changes to the school system, including the introduction of independent schools, have increased school choice alternatives in Sweden. Consequently, a large share of today's students attend a school other than the one closest to home. Since the compulsory school system is designed to be free of charge and to offer the same standard of education everywhere, increasing school choice- hypothetically-should not increase the between-school variation in grades. In reality, however, between-school variation in grades has increased in recent years. The aim of this paper is to test whether increasing between-school variance can be explained by changes in residential patterns, or if it must be attributed to structural change. Using a counterfactual approach, the students' variations in grades are compared between observed schools of graduation and hypothetical schools of graduation. The multilevel results indicate that school choice seems to increase between-school variation of grades.

1 - 25 of 25
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