uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Gao, Kai
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Brandt, Ingvar
    Goldstone, Jared V.
    Jonsson, Maria E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Cytochrome P450 1A, 1B, and 1C mRNA induction patterns in three-spined stickleback exposed to a transient and a persistent inducer2011In: Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - Part C: Toxicology & Pharmacology, ISSN 1532-0456, E-ISSN 1878-1659, Vol. 154, no 1, p. 42-55Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Gao, Kai
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Brandt, Ingvar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Goldstone, Jared V.
    Jönsson, Maria E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Cytochrome P450 1A, 1B, and 1C mRNA induction patterns in three-spined stickleback exposed to a transient and a persistent inducer2011In: Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - Part C: Toxicology & Pharmacology, ISSN 1532-0456, E-ISSN 1878-1659, Vol. 154, no 1, p. 42-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cytochrome P450 1 (CYP1) mRNA induction patterns in three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) were explored for use in environmental monitoring of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) agonists. The cDNAs of stickleback CYP1A, CYP1B1, CYP1C1, and CYP1C2 were cloned and their basal and induced expression patterns were determined in the brain, gill, liver and kidney. Also, their induction time courses were compared after waterborne exposure to a transient (indigo) or a persistent (3,3',4,4',5-pentacholorbiphenyl PCB 126) AHR agonist. The cloned stickleback CYP1s exhibited a high amino acid sequence identity compared with their zebrafish orthologs and their constitutive tissue distribution patterns largely agreed with those reported in other species. PCB 126 (100 nM) induced different CYP1 expression patterns in the four tissues, suggesting tissue-specific regulation. Both indigo (1 nM) and PCB 126 (10 nM) induced a strong CYP1 expression in gills. However, while PCB 126 gave rise to a high and persistent induction in gills and liver, induction by indigo was transient in both organs. The number of putative dioxin response elements found in each CYP1 gene promoter roughly reflected the induction levels of the genes. The high responsiveness of CYP1A,CYP1B1, and CYP1C1 observed in several organs suggests that three-spined stickleback is suitable for monitoring of pollution with AHR agonists.

  • 3. Holbech, Henrik
    et al.
    Kinnberg, Karin L
    Brande-Lavridsen, Nanna
    Bjerregaard, Poul
    Petersen, Gitte I
    Norrgren, Leif
    Orn, Stefan
    Braunbeck, Thomas
    Baumann, Lisa
    Bomke, Christiane
    Dorgerloh, Michael
    Bruns, Eric
    Ruehl-Fehlert, Christine
    Green, John W
    Springer, Timothy A
    Gourmelon, Anne
    Comparison of zebrafish (Danio rerio) and fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) as test species in the Fish Sexual Development Test (FSDT).2012In: Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - Part C: Toxicology & Pharmacology, ISSN 1532-0456, E-ISSN 1878-1659, Vol. 155, no 2, p. 407-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Results are presented from a validation (with 5 laboratories) of the Fish Sexual Development Test (FSDT) developed to detect endocrine disrupters (EDs) and included in the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) working program. The aromatase-inhibiting fungicide prochloraz was tested in zebrafish (Danio rerio) and fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). The fish were exposed during sexual differentiation and development from 0 to 60 days post hatch (dph). After exposure, the vitellogenin (VTG) concentrations were quantified in head/tail homogenate and the sex ratio was determined (defined as female, male, intersex or undifferentiated). NOEC/LOEC and EC(x) designs were compared to optimize the test approach. Results show that both species are highly sensitive to prochloraz during sexual development. They respond by skewing of the sex ratio towards male phenotype and by a VTG decline in females. The NOEC/LOEC approach is preferred because sex ratio is difficult to analyze with a regression model. The mean NOEC/LOEC for prochloraz on the sex ratio was 43.3/134 μg/L and 101/293 μg/L for zebrafish and fathead minnow, respectively. The mean NOEC/LOEC on the decline in female VTG concentration was 65/110 μg/L and ~30/68 μg/L respectively. In conclusion, zebrafish and fathead minnow are suitable species in the FSDT and their sexual differentiation is equally labile to EDs.

  • 4.
    Jönsson, M.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Abrahamson, A.
    Brunstrom, B.
    Brandt, I.
    Ingebrigtsen, K.
    Jorgensen, E. H.
    EROD activity in gill filaments of anadromous and marine fish as a biomarker of dioxin-like pollutants2003In: Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - Part C: Toxicology & Pharmacology, ISSN 1532-0456, E-ISSN 1878-1659, Vol. 136, no 3, p. 235-243Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Jönsson, Maria E.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Mattsson, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Shaik, Siraz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Brunström, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Toxicity and cytochrome P450 1A mRNA induction by 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ) in chicken and Japanese quail embryos2016In: Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - Part C: Toxicology & Pharmacology, ISSN 1532-0456, E-ISSN 1878-1659, Vol. 179, p. 125-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The tryptophan derivative formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ) binds with high ligand affinity to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and is readily degraded by AHR-regulated cytochrome P450 family 1 (CYP1) enzymes. Whether in vivo exposure to FICZ can result in toxic effects has not been examined and the main objective of this study was to determine if FICZ is embryotoxic in birds. We examined toxicity and CYP1 mRNA induction of FICZ in embryos from chicken (Gallus domesticus) and Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) exposed to FICZ (2200 jag kg(-1)) by yolk and air sac injections. FICZ caused liver toxicity, embryo mortality, and CYP1A4 and CYP1A5 induction in both species with similar potency. This is in stark contrast to the very large difference in sensitivity of these species to halogenated AHR agonists. We also exposed chicken embryos to a low dose of FICZ (4 mu g kg(-1)) in combination with a CYP inhibitor, ketoconazole (KCZ). The mixture of FICZ and KCZ was lethal while FICZ alone had no effect at 4 mu g kg(-1). Furthermore, mixed exposure to FICZ and KCZ caused stronger and more long-lasting hepatic CYP1A4 induction than exposure to each compound alone. These findings indicate reduced biotransformation of FICZ by co-treatment with KCZ as a cause for the enhanced effects although additive AHR activation is also possible. To conclude, FICZ is toxic to bird embryos and it seems reasonable that the toxicity by FICZ involves AHR activation. However, the molecular targets and biological events leading to hepatic damage and mortality are unknown.

  • 6.
    Saibu, Yusuf
    et al.
    Univ Saskatchewan, Toxicol Ctr, 44 Campus Dr, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5B3, Canada.
    Kumar, Saroj
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences. All India Inst Med Sci, Dept Biophys, New Delhi, India.
    Jamwal, Ankur
    Univ Saskatchewan, Dept Biol, 112 Sci Pl, Saskatoon, SK, Canada.
    Peak, Derek
    Univ Saskatchewan, Dept Soil Sci, 114 Sci Pl, Saskatoon, SK, Canada.
    Niyogi, Som
    Univ Saskatchewan, Toxicol Ctr, 44 Campus Dr, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5B3, Canada;Univ Saskatchewan, Dept Biol, 112 Sci Pl, Saskatoon, SK, Canada.
    A FTIRM study of the interactive effects of metals (zinc, copper and cadmium) in binary mixtures on the biochemical constituents of the gills in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)2018In: Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - Part C: Toxicology & Pharmacology, ISSN 1532-0456, E-ISSN 1878-1659, Vol. 211, p. 48-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We employed Fourier Transform Infrared Microspectroscopy to examine, in situ, the effects of waterborne Cu, Cd and Zn, alone and in binary mixtures, during acute exposure on the integrity of major lipid and protein constituents of the gill of a model teleost species, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Our findings demonstrated that acute exposure to metals, both individually and in binary mixture, resulted in the degradations of various components of proteins and lipids in the gill tissue. Generally, when comparing the effects of individual metals, Cu was found to induce the maximum adverse effects followed by Cd and Zn, respectively. Among the binary metal mixture combinations, Cu and Cd produced additive effects on the degradation of major proteins and lipid moieties, whereas the co-exposure of Zn with Cd or Cu elicited ameliorative effects, indicating antagonistic (less than additive) interactions between Zn and Cd or Cu m the rainbow trout gill. Overall, the present study demonstrates that FTIRM can be a useful tool to gain novel mechanistic insights into the biochemical changes induced by metals m the fish gill, which could influence the overall toxicity of metals to fish.

  • 7.
    Strömqvist, Marie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Olsson, Jan A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Kärrman, Anna
    Brunström, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Transcription of genes involved in fat metabolism in chicken embryos exposed to the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR alpha) agonist GW7647 or to perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) or perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA)2012In: Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - Part C: Toxicology & Pharmacology, ISSN 1532-0456, E-ISSN 1878-1659, Vol. 156, no 1, p. 29-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) such as perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) are developmental toxicants in various animal classes, including birds. Both compounds interact with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), but it is not known whether activation of PPARs is involved in their embryo toxicity in birds. We exposed chicken embryos via egg injection at a late developmental stage to GW7647, a potent PPAR alpha agonist in mammals, and to PFOS or PFOA. Mortality was induced by PFOS and PFOA but not by GW7647. Transcripts of a number of genes activated by PPAR alpha agonists in mammals were analyzed in liver and kidney of 18-day-old embryos. Several of the genes were induced in both liver and kidney following exposure to GW7647. Treatment with PFOA resulted in induction of acylcoenzyme A oxidase mRNA in liver, whereas none of the genes were significantly induced by PFOS treatment. No up-regulation of gene transcription was found in kidney following treatment with PFOS or PFOA. Principal component analysis showed that PFOA caused an mRNA expression pattern in liver more similar to the pattern induced by GW7647 than PFOS did. Our findings do not support that the embryo mortality by PFOS and PFOA in chicken embryos involves PPAR alpha activation.

  • 8.
    Säfholm, Moa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Jansson, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Fick, Jerker
    Umea Univ, Dept Chem, KBC 6A, S-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Berg, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Molecular and histological endpoints for developmental reproductive toxicity in Xenopus tropicalis: Levonorgestrel perturbs anti-Mullerian hormone and progesterone receptor expression2016In: Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - Part C: Toxicology & Pharmacology, ISSN 1532-0456, E-ISSN 1878-1659, Vol. 181, p. 9-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is an increasing concern regarding the risks associated with developmental exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals and the consequences for reproductive capability. The present study aimed to refine the Xenopus (Silurana) tropicalis test system for developmental reproductive toxicity by characterising molecular and histological features of sexual development, and to explore effects of exposure to the progestagen levonorgestrel (LNG). Larvae were exposed to LNG (0, 3, 30, 300 ng/L) over the first three weeks of development, encompassing the beginning of gonadal differentiation. mRNA levels of amh (anti-Mullerian hormone), amhr2 (amh receptor 2), ipgr (intracellular progesterone receptor), mpgr beta (membrane progesterone receptor beta), and cyp19a1 (cytochrome p450 19a1) were quantified in larvae and juveniles (4 weeks post-metamorphosis). Relative cyp19a1 and amh expression was used as a molecular marker for phenotypic sex of larvae. Gonadal and Mullerian duct development were characterised histologically in juveniles. Compared to controls, LNG exposure increased the expression of amh and ipgr in male larvae. In juveniles, mpgr beta expression was increased in both sexes and amhr2 expression was decreased in males, implying persistent effects of developmental progestagen exposure on amh and pgr expression signalling. No effects of LNG on the gonadal or Mullerian duct development were found, implying that the exposure window was not critical with regard to these endpoints. In juveniles, folliculogenesis had initiated and the Mullerian ducts were larger in females than in males. This new knowledge on sexual development in X. tropicalis is useful in the development of early life-stage endpoints for developmental reproductive toxicity.

1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf