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  • 1.
    Annas, Anita
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Toxicology.
    Granberg, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Strandberg, William
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Brandt, Ingvar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Brittebo, Eva B
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Toxicology.
    Brunström, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Basal and induced EROD activity in the chorioallantoic membrane during chicken embryo development1999In: Environmental Toxicology and Pharmacology, ISSN 1382-6689, E-ISSN 1872-7077, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 49-52Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) is a highly vascularized tissue that takes part in the respiratory exchange of gases through the eggshell. Although the CAM may be exposed to environmental contaminants, its response to pollutants has not been studied. We examined the cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A)-catalyzed deethylation of 7-ethoxyresorufin (EROD) in the CAM during chicken embryo development. EROD was constitutively present and was inducible by the aryl hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor agonist 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126). Our results suggest the CAM as a first line of defence of the avian embryo against toxic compounds, but also as a target for CYP1A-activated chemicals.

  • 2.
    Buratovic, Sonja
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Viberg, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Fredriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Eriksson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Developmental exposure to the polybrominated diphenyl ether PBDE 209: Neurobehavioural and neuroprotein analysis in adult male and female mice2014In: Environmental Toxicology and Pharmacology, ISSN 1382-6689, E-ISSN 1872-7077, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 570-585Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), used as flame retardants in polymer products, are reported to cause developmental neurotoxic effects in mammals. The present study have investigated neurotoxic effects arising from neonatal exposure to PBDE 209, including alterations in sex differences, spontaneous behaviour, learning and memory, neuroproteins and altered susceptibility of the cholinergic system in adults. Three-day-old NMRI mice, of both sexes, were exposed to PBDE 209 (2,2',3,3',4,4',5,5',6,6'-decaBDE at 0, 1.4, 6.0 and 14.0 mu mol/kg b.w.). At adult age (2-7 months) a similar developmental neurotoxic effects in both male and female mice were seen, including lack of or reduced habituation to a novel home environment, learning and memory defects, modified response to the cholinergic agent's paraoxon (males) and nicotine (females) indicating increased susceptibility of the cholinergic system. The behavioural defects were dose-response related and persistent. In mice of both sexes and showing behavioural defects, neuroprotein tau was increased. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 3.
    Buratovic, Sonja
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Viberg, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Fredriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Eriksson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Developmental exposure to the polybrominated diphenylether PBDE 209: Neurobehavioural and neuroprotein analysis in adult male and female mice2014In: Environmental Toxicology and Pharmacology, ISSN 1382-6689, E-ISSN 1872-7077, Vol. 38, p. 570-585Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), used as flame retardants in polymer products,are reported to cause developmental neurotoxic effects in mammals. The present studyhave investigated neurotoxic effects arising from neonatal exposure to PBDE 209, includingalterations in sex differences, spontaneous behaviour, learning and memory, neuroproteinsand altered susceptibility of the cholinergic system in adults.Three-day-old NMRI mice, of both sexes, were exposed to PBDE 209 (2,2,3,3,4,4,5,5,6,6-decaBDE at 0, 1.4, 6.0 and 14.0 mol/kg b.w.). At adult age (2–7 months) a similardevelopmental neurotoxic effects in both male and female mice were seen, including lackof or reduced habituation to a novel home environment, learning and memory defects,modified response to the cholinergic agent’s paraoxon (males) and nicotine (females) indi-cating increased susceptibility of the cholinergic system. The behavioural defects weredose–response related and persistent. In mice of both sexes and showing behaviouraldefects, neuroprotein tau was increased.

  • 4.
    Hallgren, Stefan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Fredriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Viberg, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    More signs of neurotoxicity of surfactants and flame retardants - Neonatal PFOS and PBDE 99 cause transcriptional alterations in cholinergic genes in the mouse CNS2015In: Environmental Toxicology and Pharmacology, ISSN 1382-6689, E-ISSN 1872-7077, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 409-416Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Maternally and lactionally transferred persistent organic pollutants may interfere with CNS development. Here, 10-day-old male mice were exposed to single oral doses of PFOS (perflourooctanosulphonate) or PBDE 99 (2,2',4,4',5-penta-bromodiphenyl ether), and examined for changes in cholinergic gene transcription in the CNS 24 h and 7 weeks later. 24 h after exposure qPCR analyses revealed decreased transcription of nAChR-beta 2 and AChE in cortex, and increased mAChR-5 in hippocampus of PFOS treated mice. Neonatal PFOS treatment altered spontaneous behaviour at 2 months of age but did not affect gene transcription in adults. At 2 months of age neonatally PBDE 99 treated mice had altered spontaneous behaviour, and cortical transcription of AChE, nAChR-alpha 4, nAChR-beta 2 and mAChR-5 were elevated. Our results indicate that PFOS and PBDE 99 affects the developing central cholinergic system by altering gene transcription in cortex and hippocampus, which may in part account for mechanisms causing changes in spontaneous behaviour.

  • 5.
    Hallgren, Stefan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology. Dept. of Organism Biology.
    Viberg, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Postnatal exposure to PFOS, but not PBDE 99, disturb dopaminergic gene transcription in the mouse CNS2016In: Environmental Toxicology and Pharmacology, ISSN 1382-6689, E-ISSN 1872-7077, Vol. 41, p. 121-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The CNS of breast feeding infants and toddlers may be exposed to persistent organic pollutants via lactational transfer. Here, 10 days old mice were exposed to single oral doses of either PFOS, PBDE99 or vehicle control and were examined for changes in dopaminergic gene transcription in CNS tissue collected at 24 h or 2 months post exposure.qPCR analyses of brain tissue from mice euthanized 24 h post exposure revealed that PFOS affected transcription of Dopamine receptor-D5 (DRD5) in cerebral cortex and Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the hippocampus. At 2 months of age, mice neonatally exposed to PFOS displayed decreased transcription of Dopamine receptor-D2 (DRD2) and TH in hippocampus. No significant changes in any of the tested genes were observed in PBDE99 exposed mice. This indicates that PFOS, but not PBDE99, affects the developing cerebral dopaminergic system at gene transcriptional level in cortex and hippocampus, which may account for some of the mechanistic effects behind the aetiology of neuropsychiatric disorders.

1 - 5 of 5
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