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  • 1.
    Babulanam, SM
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Electronics.
    AC and DC superimposed AC conduction in sodium fluoride thin films1985In: Physica Status Solidi (a) applications and materials science, ISSN 1862-6300, E-ISSN 1862-6319, Vol. 90, p. 755-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Chulapakorn, Thawatchart
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Primetzhofer, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Sychugov, Ilya
    Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Department of Materials and Nano Physics, SE-164 40 Kista, Sweden.
    Suvanam, Sethu Saveda
    Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), School of Information and Communication Technology, PO Box Electrum 229, SE-16440 Kista, Sweden.
    Linnros, Jan
    Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Department of Materials and Nano Physics, SE-164 40 Kista, Sweden.
    Hallén, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, För teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten gemensamma enheter, Tandem Laboratory. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics. Royal Institute of Technology, School of Information & Communication Technology, SE-16440 Kista, Sweden.
    Impact of H-Uptake from Forming Gas Annealing and Ion Implantation on the Photoluminescence of Si Nanoparticles2018In: Physica Status Solidi (a) applications and materials science, ISSN 1862-6300, E-ISSN 1862-6319, Vol. 215, no 3, article id 1700444Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Silicon nanoparticles (SiNPs) are formed by implanting 70keV Si+ into a SiO2-film and subsequent thermal annealing. SiNP samples are further annealed in forming gas. Another group of samples containing SiNP is implanted by 7.5keV H+ and subsequently annealed in N-2-atmosphere at 450 degrees C to reduce implantation damage. Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) is employed to establish depth profiles of the H-concentration. Enhanced hydrogen concentrations are found close to the SiO2 surface, with particularly high concentrations for the as-implanted SiO2. However, no detectable uptake of hydrogen is observed by NRA for samples treated by forming gas annealing (FGA). H-concentrations detected after H-implantation follow calculated implantation profiles. Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy is performed at room temperature to observe the SiNP PL. Whereas FGA is found to increase PL under certain conditions, i.e., annealing at high temperatures, increasing implantation fluence of H reduces the SiNP PL. Hydrogen implantation also introduces additional defect PL. After low-temperature annealing, the SiNP PL is found to improve, but the process is not found equivalently efficient as conventional FGA.

  • 3. Gavagnin, Marco
    et al.
    Wanzenboeck, Heinz D
    Belic, Domagoj
    Shawrav, Mostafa M
    Persson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Gunnarsson, Klas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Physics.
    Svedlindh, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Physics.
    Bertagnolli, Emmerich
    Magnetic force microscopy study of shape engineered FEBID iron nanostructures2014In: Physica Status Solidi (a) applications and materials science, ISSN 1862-6300, E-ISSN 1862-6319, Vol. 211, no 2, p. 368-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The capability to control matter down to the nanoscale level in combination with the novel magnetic properties of nanomaterials have attracted increasing attention in the last few decades due to their applications in magnetic sensing, hard disc data storage and logic devices. Therefore, many efforts have been devoted to the implementation of both nanofabrication methods as well as characterization of magnetic nanoelements. In this study, Fe-based nanostructures have been synthesized on Si(100) by focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) utilizing iron pentacarbonyl as precursor. The so obtained nanostructures exhibit a remarkably high iron content (Fe>80at.%), expected to give rise to a ferromagnetic behaviour. For that reason, magnetic force microscopy (MFM) analyses were performed on the obtained FEBID Fe nanostructures. Moreover, object oriented micromagnetic framework (OOMMF) magnetic simulations have been executed to study the influence of the geometry on the magnetic properties of iron single-domain nanowires. FEBID is a mask-less nanofabrication method based on the injection of precursor gas molecules in proximity of the deposition area where their decomposition is locally induced by a focused electron beam.

  • 4.
    Guziewicz, Elzbieta
    et al.
    Polish Acad Sci, Inst Phys, Warsaw, Poland.
    Paskaleva, Albena
    Bulgarian Acad Sci, Inst Solid State Phys, Sofia, Bulgaria.
    Knez, Mato
    Basque Fdn Sci, Ikerbasque, San Sebastian, Spain.
    Österlund, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Physics.
    Advanced Oxide Materials - Growth, Application, Characterization2018In: Physica Status Solidi (a) applications and materials science, ISSN 1862-6300, E-ISSN 1862-6319, Vol. 215, no 16, article id 1800546Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Keller, Jan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Electronics.
    Stolt, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Electronics.
    Edoff, Marika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Electronics.
    Törndahl, Tobias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Electronics.
    Atomic layer deposition of In2O3 transparent conductive oxide layers for application in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells with different buffer layers2016In: Physica Status Solidi (a) applications and materials science, ISSN 1862-6300, E-ISSN 1862-6319, Vol. 213, no 6, p. 1541-1552Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This contribution presents the development of atomic layer deposited (ALD) In2O3 films for utilization as transparent conductive oxide (TCO) layers in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe) solar cells. The effects of ALD process parameters on the morphology and growth of In2O3 are studied and related to the electrical and optical properties of the films. Maintaining similar resistivity values compared to commonly used ZnO:Al (AZO) TCOs (ρ = (5–7) × 10−4 Ωcm), a superior mobility of μ ≈ 110 cm2/Vs could be achieved (more than five times higher than a ZnO:Al reference), which results in a significantly reduced parasitic optical absorption in the infrared region. Application of the optimized In2O3 layers in CIGSe solar cells with varying buffer layers (CdS and Zn1–xSnxOy (ZTO)) leads to a distinct improvement in short circuit current density Jsc in both cases. While for solar cells containing the ZTO/In2O3 window structure, a drop in open-circuit voltage Voc and a deterioration under illumination is observed, the TCO exchange (from AZO to In2O3) on CdS buffer layers results in an increase in Voc without detectable light bias degradation. The efficiency η of the best corresponding solar cells could be improved by about 1% absolute.

  • 6.
    Larsen, Jes K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Electronics.
    Scragg, Jonathan JS
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Electronics.
    Frisk, Christopher
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Electronics.
    Ren, Yi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Electronics.
    Platzer-Björkman, Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Electronics.
    Potential of CuS cap to prevent decomposition of Cu2ZnSnS4 during annealing2015In: Physica Status Solidi (a) applications and materials science, ISSN 1862-6300, E-ISSN 1862-6319, Vol. 212, no 12, p. 2843-2849Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the challenges associated with processing of Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) is the thermal decomposition reaction that causes loss of S and SnS from the absorber surface. To reduce the decomposition a sufficiently high SnS and S partial pressure must be supplied during annealing. The absorber surface can alternatively be protected with a thin cap. Aiming to obtain a more flexible process, CZTS precursors were capped with a thin CuS layer before annealing. The cap was subsequently removed with a KCN etch before device finishing. It was found that the cap coverage decreased during annealing, exposing a part of the absorber surface. At the same time, the initially Cu poor absorber took up Cu from the cap, ending up with a stoichiometric Cu content. Devices made from capped precursors or precursors annealed without sulfur had poor device characteristics. An increased doping density of almost one order of magnitude could be the reason for the very poor performance. CuS is therefore not a suitable cap material for CZTS. Other cap materials could be investigated to protect the CZTS absorber surface during annealing.

  • 7.
    Lopez-Lorente, Angela
    et al.
    Univ Ulm, Inst Analyt & Bioanalyt Chem, D-89081 Ulm, Germany.
    Wang, Pei
    Univ Ulm, Inst Analyt & Bioanalyt Chem, D-89081 Ulm, Germany.
    Sieger, Markus
    Univ Ulm, Inst Analyt & Bioanalyt Chem, D-89081 Ulm, Germany.
    Vargas Catalan, Ernesto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Karlsson, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences. Mol Fingerprint Sweden AB, Eksatravagen 130, S-75655 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nikolajeff, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences. Mol Fingerprint Sweden AB, Eksatravagen 130, S-75655 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Österlund, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Physics. Mol Fingerprint Sweden AB, Eksatravagen 130, S-75655 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Mizaikoff, Boris
    Univ Ulm, Inst Analyt & Bioanalyt Chem, D-89081 Ulm, Germany.
    Mid-infrared thin-film diamond waveguides combined with tunable quantum cascade lasers for analyzing the secondary structure of proteins2016In: Physica Status Solidi (a) applications and materials science, ISSN 1862-6300, E-ISSN 1862-6319, Vol. 213, no 8, p. 2117-2123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Diamond has excellent optical properties including broadband transmissivity, low self-absorption, and a high refractive index, which have prompted its use for optical sensing applications. Thin-film diamond strip waveguides (DSWGs) combined with tunable quantum cascade lasers (tQCLs) providing an emission wavelength range of 5.78-6.35 mu m (1735-1570 cm(-1)) have been used to obtain mid-infrared (MIR) spectra of proteins, thereby enabling the analysis of their secondary structure via the amide I band. Three different proteins were analyzed, namely bovine serum albumin (BSA), myoglobin, and gamma-globulin. The secondary structure of BSA and myoglobin has a major contribution of a-helices, whereas gamma-globulins are rich in beta-sheet structures, which is reflected in the amide I band. Acomparison of the spectra obtained via the combination of the tQCL and DSWG with spectra obtained using conventional Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and a commercial diamond attenuated total reflection (ATR) element has been performed. It is shown that the main features evident in FTIR-ATR spectra are also obtained using tQCL-DSWG sensors.

  • 8.
    Song, Yang
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Inorganic Chemistry.
    Larsson, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Inorganic Chemistry.
    A Theoretical Study of Dye Molecules Adsorbed onto Diamond (111) Surfaces2016In: Physica Status Solidi (a) applications and materials science, ISSN 1862-6300, E-ISSN 1862-6319, Vol. 213, no 8, p. 2105-2111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The combinations of different dye molecules adsorbed on 100% H-terminated B-doped diamond (111) surfaces, have been carefully simulated by using DFT under periodic boundary conditions. The dye molecules include C20H13NO3S4, C35H37NO2S3, C34H38OS2, C32H36OS2, and C31H35S3Br. The functional group within these dyes, behaves as an electron acceptor during the sunlight harvesting process. By comparing the upper valence band edge of the diamond surface with the HOMO and LUMO levels of the dyes in an energy diagram, a suitable scheme for a p-type dye sensitized solar cell was constructed. These functionalities were further confirmed by the observation of a partial degree of electron transfer from the diamond surface to the dye molecules. The combination of spectra for the dye molecules showed a wide absorption range from 200nm to 620nm. The effect of B doping on the binding of the dye molecules have furthermore been investigated. Shorter diamond//dye bonds are well correlated with large electron bond populations, and a larger degree of electron transfer. The former is regarded to be a meassure of covalency, and the latter a meassure of ionicity, in the interfacial bond. 

  • 9.
    Tove, PA
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Electronics.
    Ali, MP
    Ibrahim, M
    Norde, Herman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Electronics.
    Electrical properties of junctions between Ge films and monocrystalline silicon1979In: Physica Status Solidi (a) applications and materials science, ISSN 1862-6300, E-ISSN 1862-6319, p. 51-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Tsigkourakos, Menelaos
    et al.
    IMEC, B-3001 Leuven, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Dept Phys & Astron, B-3001 Leuven, Belgium..
    Hantschel, Thomas
    IMEC, B-3001 Leuven, Belgium..
    Xu, Zheng
    IMEC, B-3001 Leuven, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Dept Phys & Astron, B-3001 Leuven, Belgium..
    Douhard, Bastien
    IMEC, B-3001 Leuven, Belgium..
    Meersschaut, Johan
    IMEC, B-3001 Leuven, Belgium..
    Zou, Yiming
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Inorganic Chemistry.
    Larsson, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Inorganic Chemistry.
    Boman, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Inorganic Chemistry.
    Vandervorst, Wilfried
    IMEC, B-3001 Leuven, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Dept Phys & Astron, B-3001 Leuven, Belgium..
    Suppression of boron incorporation at the early growth phases of boron-doped diamond thin films2015In: Physica Status Solidi (a) applications and materials science, ISSN 1862-6300, E-ISSN 1862-6319, Vol. 212, no 11, p. 2595-2599Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The presence of O during the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of B-doped diamond results in the suppression of B incorporation into the diamond film. In this study, we demonstrate that the amount of residual O within the chamber is higher at the beginning of the diamond growth due to the O-contaminated chamber walls, and is decreased after a certain time period. This leads to a gradual increase of the B incorporation by more than one order of magnitude during the early growth phases of nanocrystalline diamond (NCD). We further show that this suppression of B incorporation at the early growth phases of B-doped diamond is influenced by the growth rate of the film. This is attributed to the constant time period whereby most of the residual O interacts with the B-precursors in the gas phase by forming stable B-O species, which are flushed out from the chamber exhaust. Furthermore, the constant B profile of an NCD film grown in a loadlock hot-filament CVD (HFCVD) system reveals that the amount of residual O is constant and minimal during the growth process. Therefore, our work proves that the use of a loadlock overcomes the B-suppression problem at the early growth phases of diamond, making it the optimal solution for the growth of highly conductive thin diamond films.

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