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  • 1.
    Ahlin, Gustav
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Karlsson, Johan
    Pedersen, Jenny M
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Gustavsson, Lena
    Larsson, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology.
    Matsson, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Norinder, Ulf
    Bergström, Christel A S
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Artursson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Structural requirements for drug inhibition of the liver specific human organic cation transport protein 12008In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 51, no 19, p. 5932-5942Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The liver-specific organic cation transport protein (OCT1; SLC22A1) transports several cationic drugs including the antidiabetic drug metformin and the anticancer agents oxaliplatin and imatinib. In this study, we explored the chemical space of registered oral drugs with the aim of studying the inhibition pattern of OCT1 and of developing predictive computational models of OCT1 inhibition. In total, 191 structurally diverse compounds were examined in HEK293-OCT1 cells. The assay identified 47 novel inhibitors and confirmed 15 previously known inhibitors. The enrichment of OCT1 inhibitors was seen in several drug classes including antidepressants. High lipophilicity and a positive net charge were found to be the key physicochemical properties for OCT1 inhibition, whereas a high molecular dipole moment and many hydrogen bonds were negatively correlated to OCT1 inhibition. The data were used to generate OPLS-DA models for OCT1 inhibitors; the final model correctly predicted 82% of the inhibitors and 88% of the noninhibitors of the test set.

  • 2.
    Alterman, Mathias
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Andersson, Hans O.
    Garg, Neeraj
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Ahlsén, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry.
    Lövgren, Seved
    Classon, Björn
    Danielson, U. Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry.
    Kvarnström, Ingemar
    Vrang, Lotta
    Unge, Torsten
    Samuelsson, Bertil
    Hallberg, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Design and fast synthesis of C-terminal duplicated potent C2-symmetric P1/P1'-modified HIV-1 protease inhibitors1999In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 42, no 19, p. 3835-3844Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Alterman, Mathias
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Björsne, Magnus
    Mühlman, Anna
    Classon, Björn
    Kvarnstrom, Ingemar
    Danielson, U. Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry.
    Markgren, Per-Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry.
    Nillroth, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry.
    Unge, Torsten
    Hallberg, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Samuelsson, Bertil
    Design and synthesis of new potent C2-symmetric HIV-1 protease inhibitors: Use of L-mannaric acid as a peptidomimetic scaffold1998In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 41, no 20, p. 3782-3792Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Andaloussi, Mounir
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Henriksson, Lena M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structure and Molecular Biology.
    Wieckowska, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Lindh, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Björkelid, Christofer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structure and Molecular Biology.
    Larsson, Anna M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structure and Molecular Biology.
    Suresh, Surisetti
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Iyer, Harini
    Srinivasa, Bachally R.
    Bergfors, Terese
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structure and Molecular Biology.
    Unge, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structure and Molecular Biology.
    Mowbray, Sherry L.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structure and Molecular Biology.
    Larhed, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Jones, T. Alwyn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structure and Molecular Biology.
    Karlén, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Design, Synthesis, and X-ray Crystallographic Studies of alpha-Aryl Substituted Fosmidomycin Analogues as Inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis 1-Deoxy-D-xylulose 5-Phosphate Reductoisomerase2011In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 54, no 14, p. 4964-4976Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The natural antibiotic fosmidomycin acts via inhibition of 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR), an essential enzyme in the non-mevalonate pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis. Fosmidomycin is active on Mycobacterium tuberculosis DXR (MtDXR), but it lacks antibacterial activity probably because of poor uptake. alpha-Aryl substituted fosmidomycin analogues have more favorable physicochemical properties and are also more active in inhibiting malaria parasite growth. We have solved crystal structures of MtDXR in complex with 3,4-dichlorophenyl substituted fosmidomycin analogues; these show important differences compared to our previously described forsmidomycin-DXR complex. Our best inhibitor has an IC(50) = 0.15 mu M on MtDXR but still lacked activity in a mycobacterial growth assay (MIC > 32 mu g/mL). The combined results, however, provide insights into how DXR accommodates the new inhibitors and serve as an excellent starting point for the design of other novel and more potent inhibitors, particularly against pathogens where uptake is less of a problem, such as the malaria parasite.

  • 5.
    Andappan, Murugaiah M. S.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Wu, Xiongyu
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Wallinder, Charlotta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Mahalingam, A. K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Wan, Yiqian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Sköld, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Botros, Milad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Guimond, Marie-Odile
    Joshi, Advait
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Nyberg, Fred
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Gallo-Payet, Nicole
    Hallberg, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Alterman, Mathias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    From the First Selective Non-Peptide AT(2) Receptor Agonist to Structurally Related Antagonists2012In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 55, no 5, p. 2265-2278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A para substitution pattern of the phenyl ring is a characteristic feature of the first reported selective AT(2) receptor agonist M024/C21 (1) and all the nonpeptidic AT(2) receptor agonists described so far. Two series of compounds structurally related to 1 but with a meta substitution pattern have now been synthesized and biologically evaluated for their affinity to the AT(1) and AT(2) receptors. A high AT(2)/AT(1) receptor selectivity was obtained with all 41 compounds synthesized, and the majority exhibited K-i ranging from 2 to 100 nM. Five compounds were evaluated for their functional activity at the AT(2) receptor, applying a neurite outgrowth assay in NG108-15 cells.. Notably, four of the five compounds, with representatives from both series, acted as potent AT(2) receptor antagonists. These compounds were found to be considerably more effective than PD 123,319, the standard AT(2) receptor antagonist used in most laboratories. No AT(2) receptor antagonists were previously reported among the derivatives with a para substitution pattern. Hence, by a minor modification of the agonist 1 it could be transformed into the antagonist, compound 38. These compounds should serve as valuable tools in the assessment of the role of the AT(2) receptor in more complex physiological models.

  • 6.
    Andersson, Hanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Demaegdt, Heidi
    Department of Molecular and Biochemical Pharmacology, Vrije Universiteit Brussels.
    Johnsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Vauquelin, Georges
    Department of Molecular and Biochemical Pharmacology, Vrije Universiteit Brussels.
    Lindeberg, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Hallberg, Mathias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Erdélyi, Máté
    Department of Chemistry, University of Gothenburg.
    Karlén, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Hallberg, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Potent Macrocyclic Inhibitors of Insulin-Regulated Aminopeptidase (IRAP) by Olefin Ring-Closing Metathesis2011In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 54, no 11, p. 3779-3792Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Macrocyclic analogues of angiotensin IV (Ang IV, Val1-Tyr2-Ile3-His4-Pro5-Phe6) targeting the insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) have been designed, synthesized, and evaluated biologically. Replacement of His4-Pro5-Phe6 by a 2-(aminomethyl)phenylacetic acid (AMPAA) moiety and of Val1 and Ile3 by amino acids bearing olefinic side chains followed by macrocyclization provided potent IRAP inhibitors. The impact of the ring size and the type (saturated versus unsaturated), configuration, and position of the carbon–carbon bridge was assessed. The ring size generally affects the potency more than the carbon–carbon bond characteristics. Replacing Tyr2 by β3hTyr or Phe is accepted, while N-methylation of Tyr2 is deleterious for activity. Removal of the carboxyl group in the C-terminal slightly reduced the potency. Inhibitors 7 (Ki = 4.1 nM) and 19 (Ki = 1.8 nM), both encompassing 14-membered ring systems connected to AMPAA, are 10-fold more potent than Ang IV and are also more selective over aminopeptidase N (AP-N). Both compounds displayed high stability against proteolysis by metallopeptidases.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Hanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Demaegdt, Heidi
    Department of Molecular and Biochemical Pharmacology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel.
    Vauquelin, Georges
    Department of Molecular and Biochemical Pharmacology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel.
    Lindeberg, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Karlén, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Hallberg, Mathias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Erdélyi, Máté
    Hallberg, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Disulfide cyclized tripeptide analogues of angiotensin IV as potent and selective inhibitors of insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP)2010In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 53, no 22, p. 8059-8071Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) localized in areas of the brain associated with memory and learning is emerging as a new promising therapeutic target for the treatment of memory dysfunctions. The angiotensin II metabolite angiotensin IV (Ang IV, Val1-Tyr2-Ile3-His4-Pro5-Phe6) binds with high affinity to IRAP and inhibits this aminopeptidase (Ki = 62.4 nM). Furthermore, Ang IV has been demonstrated to enhance cognition in animal models and seems to play an important role in cognitive processes. It is herein reported that displacement of the C-terminal tripeptide His4-Pro5-Phe6 with a phenylacetic acid functionality combined with a constrained macrocyclic system in the N-terminal affords potent IRAP inhibitors that are less peptidic in character than the hexapeptide Ang IV. The best inhibitors in the series, compound 8 and 12, incorporating a 13- and 14-membered disulfide ring system, respectively, and both with a β3-homotyrosine residue (β3hTyr) replacing Tyr2, exhibit Ki values of 3.3 nM and 5.2 nM, respectively.

  • 8.
    Andersson, Vincent
    et al.
    AstraZeneca R&D, CVMD iMed, SE-43183 Molndal, Sweden..
    Bergström, Fredrik
    AstraZeneca R&D, CVMD iMed DMPK, SE-43183 Molndal, Sweden..
    Branalt, Jonas
    AstraZeneca R&D, CVMD iMed, SE-43183 Molndal, Sweden..
    Grönberg, Gunnar
    AstraZeneca R&D, RIA iMed, SE-43183 Molndal, Sweden..
    Gustafsson, David
    AstraZeneca, AZ Bioventure Hub, Emeriti Pharma AB, S-43183 Molndal, Sweden..
    Karlsson, Staffan
    AstraZeneca R&D, CVMD iMed, SE-43183 Molndal, Sweden..
    Polla, Magnus
    AstraZeneca R&D, CVMD iMed, SE-43183 Molndal, Sweden..
    Bergman, Joakim
    AstraZeneca R&D, CVMD iMed, SE-43183 Molndal, Sweden..
    Kihlberg, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Organic Chemistry.
    Macrocyclic Prodrugs of a Selective Nonpeptidic Direct Thrombin Inhibitor Display High Permeability, Efficient Bioconversion but Low Bioavailability2016In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 59, no 14, p. 6658-6670Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The only oral direct thrombin inhibitors that have reached the market, ximelagatran and dabigatran etexilat, are double prodrugs with low bioavailability in humans. We have evaluated an alternative strategy: the preparation of a nonpeptidic, polar direct thrombin inhibitor as a single, macrocyclic esterase-cleavable (acyloxy)alkoxy prodrug. Two homologous prodrugs were synthesized and displayed high solubilities and Caco-2 cell permeabilities, suggesting high absorption from the intestine. In addition, they were rapidly and completely converted to the active zwitterionic thrombin inhibitor in human hepatocytes. Unexpectedly, the most promising prodrug displayed only moderately higher oral bioavailability in rat than the polar direct thrombin inhibitor, most likely due to rapid metabolism in the intestine or the intestinal wall. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first in vivo ADME study of macrocyclic (acyloxy)alkoxy prodrugs, and it remains to be established if the modest increase in bioavailability is a general feature of this category of prodrugs or not.

  • 9.
    Azuaje, Jhonny
    et al.
    Univ Santiago de Compostela, Ctr Singular Invest Quim Biol & Mat Mol CIQUS, Santiago De Compostela 15782, Spain.;Univ Santiago de Compostela, Fac Farm, Dept Quim Organ, Santiago De Compostela 15782, Spain..
    Jespers, Willem
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational Biology and Bioinformatics.
    Yaziji, Vicente
    Univ Santiago de Compostela, Ctr Singular Invest Quim Biol & Mat Mol CIQUS, Santiago De Compostela 15782, Spain.;Univ Santiago de Compostela, Fac Farm, Dept Quim Organ, Santiago De Compostela 15782, Spain..
    Mallo, Ana
    Univ Santiago de Compostela, Ctr Singular Invest Quim Biol & Mat Mol CIQUS, Santiago De Compostela 15782, Spain.;Univ Santiago de Compostela, Fac Farm, Dept Quim Organ, Santiago De Compostela 15782, Spain..
    Majellaro, Maria
    Univ Santiago de Compostela, Ctr Singular Invest Quim Biol & Mat Mol CIQUS, Santiago De Compostela 15782, Spain.;Univ Santiago de Compostela, Fac Farm, Dept Quim Organ, Santiago De Compostela 15782, Spain..
    Caamano, Olga
    Univ Santiago de Compostela, Fac Farm, Dept Quim Organ, Santiago De Compostela 15782, Spain..
    Loza, Maria I.
    Univ Santiago de Compostela, Ctr Singular Invest Med Mol & Enfermedades Cronic, Santiago De Compostela 15782, Spain..
    Cadavid, Maria I.
    Univ Santiago de Compostela, Ctr Singular Invest Med Mol & Enfermedades Cronic, Santiago De Compostela 15782, Spain..
    Brea, Jose
    Univ Santiago de Compostela, Ctr Singular Invest Med Mol & Enfermedades Cronic, Santiago De Compostela 15782, Spain..
    Åqvist, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational Biology and Bioinformatics.
    Sotelo, Eddy
    Univ Santiago de Compostela, Ctr Singular Invest Quim Biol & Mat Mol CIQUS, Santiago De Compostela 15782, Spain.;Univ Santiago de Compostela, Fac Farm, Dept Quim Organ, Santiago De Compostela 15782, Spain..
    Gutiérrez-de-Terán, Hugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational Biology and Bioinformatics.
    Effect of Nitrogen Atom Substitution in A(3) Adenosine Receptor Binding: N-(4,6-Diarylpyridin-2-yl)acetamides as Potent and Selective Antagonists2017In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 60, no 17, p. 7502-7511Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the first family of 2-acetamidopyridines as potent and selective A, adenosine receptor (AR) antagonists. The computer -assisted design was focused on the bioisosteric replacement of the N1 atom by a CH group in a previous series of diarylpyrimidines. Some of the generated 2-acetamidopyridines elicit an antagonistic effect with excellent affinity (K-j < 10 nM) and outstanding selectivity profiles, providing an alternative and simpler chemical scaffold to the parent series of diarylpyrimidines. In addition, using molecular dynamics and free energy perturbation simulations, we elucidate the effect of the second nitrogen of the parent diarylpyrimidines, which is revealed as a stabilizer of a water network in the binding site. The discovery of 2,6-diaryl-2-acetamidopyridines represents a step forward in the search of chemically simple, potent, and selective antagonists for the hA(3)AR, and exemplifies the benefits of a joint theoretical- experimental approach to identify novel hA(3)AR antagonists through succinct and efficient synthetic methodologies.

  • 10. Bach, Anders
    et al.
    Chi, Celestine N
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Olsen, Thomas B
    Pedersen, Søren W
    Røder, Martin U
    Pang, Gar F
    Clausen, Rasmus P
    Jemth, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Strømgaard, Kristian
    Modified peptides as potent inhibitors of the postsynaptic density-95/N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor interaction.2008In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 51, no 20, p. 6450-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The protein-protein interaction between the NMDA receptor and its intracellular scaffolding protein, PSD-95, is a potential target for treatment of ischemic brain diseases. An undecapeptide corresponding to the C-terminal of the NMDA was used as a template for finding lead candidates for the inhibition of the PSD-95/NMDA receptor interaction. Initially, truncation and alanine scan studies were carried out, which resulted in a pentapeptide with wild-type affinity, as examined in a fluorescence polarization assay. Further examination was performed by systematic substitutions with natural and unnatural amino acids, which disclosed a tripeptide with micromolar affinity and N-methylated tetrapeptides with improved affinities. Molecular modeling studies guided further N-terminal modifications and introduction of a range of N-terminal substitutions dramatically improved affinity. The best compound, N-cyclohexylethyl-ETAV (56), demonstrated up to 19-fold lower K i value ( K i = 0.94 and 0.45 microM against PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95, respectively) compared to wild-type values, providing the most potent inhibitors of this interaction reported so far. These novel and potent inhibitors provide an important basis for development of small molecule inhibitors of the PSD-95/NMDA receptor interaction.

  • 11. Barlind, Jonas G
    et al.
    Bauer, Udo A
    Birch, Alan M
    Birtles, Susan
    Buckett, Linda K
    Butlin, Roger J
    Davies, Robert D M
    Eriksson, Jan W
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hammond, Clare D
    Hovland, Ragnar
    Johannesson, Petra
    Johansson, Magnus J
    Kemmitt, Paul D
    Lindmark, Bo T
    Morentin Gutierrez, Pablo
    Noeske, Tobias A
    Nordin, Andreas
    O'Donnell, Charles J
    Petersson, Annika U
    Redzic, Alma
    Turnbull, Andrew V
    Vinblad, Johanna
    Design and optimization of pyrazinecarboxamide-based inhibitors of diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) leading to a clinical candidate dimethylpyrazinecarboxamide phenylcyclohexylacetic acid (AZD7687)2012In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 55, no 23, p. 10610-10629Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new series of pyrazinecarboxamide DGAT1 inhibitors was designed to address the need for a candidate drug with good potency, selectivity, and physical and DMPK properties combined with a low predicted dose in man. Rational design and optimization of this series led to the discovery of compound 30 (AZD7687), which met the project objectives for potency, selectivity, in particular over ACAT1, solubility, and preclinical PK profiles. This compound showed the anticipated excellent pharmacokinetic properties in human volunteers.

  • 12. Barreca, Maria Letizia
    et al.
    Manfroni, Giuseppe
    Leyssen, Pieter
    Winquist, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC.
    Kaushik-Basu, Neerja
    Paeshuyse, Jan
    Krishnan, Ramalingam
    Iraci, Nunzio
    Sabatini, Stefano
    Tabarrini, Oriana
    Basu, Amartya
    Danielson, U. Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Biochemistry.
    Neyts, Johan
    Cecchetti, Violetta
    Structure-Based Discovery of Pyrazolobenzothiazine Derivatives As Inhibitors of Hepatitis C Virus Replication2013In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 56, no 6, p. 2270-2282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase is an attractive target for the development of novel and selective inhibitors of hepatitis C virus replication. To identify novel structural hits as anti-HCV agents, we performed structure based virtual screening of our in-house library followed by rational drug design, organic synthesis, and biological testing. These studies led to the identification of pyrazolobenzothiazine scaffold as a suitable template for obtaining novel anti-HCV agents targeting the NS5B polymerase. The best compound of this series was the meta-fluoro-N-1-phenyl pyrazolobenzothiazine derivative 4a, which exhibited an EC50 = 3.6 mu M, EC90 = 25.6 mu M, and CC50 > 180 mu M in the Huh 9-13 replicon system, thus providing a good starting point for further hit evolution.

  • 13.
    Bergström, Christel A S
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Strafford, M
    Lazorova, Lucia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Avdeef, A
    Luthman, K
    Artursson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Absorption classification of oral drugs based on molecular surface properties2003In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 558-570Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether easily calculated and comprehended molecular surface properties can predict drug solubility and permeability with sufficient accuracy to allow theoretical absorption classification of drug molecules. For this purpose, structurally diverse, orally administered model drugs were selected from the World Health Organization (WHO)'s list of essential drugs. The solubility and permeability of the drugs were determined using well-established in vitro methods in highly accurate experimental settings. Descriptors for molecular surface area were generated from low-energy conformations obtained by conformational analysis using molecular mechanics calculations. Correlations between the calculated molecular surface area descriptors, on one hand, and solubility and permeability, on the other, were established with multivariate data analysis (partial least squares projection to latent structures (PLS)) using training and test sets. The obtained models were challenged with external test sets. Both solubility and permeability of the druglike molecules could be predicted with high accuracy from the calculated molecular surface properties alone. The established correlations were used to perform a theoretical biopharmaceutical classification of the WHO-listed drugs into six classes, resulting in a correct prediction for 87% of the essential drugs. An external test set consisting of Food and Drug Administration (FDA) standard compounds for biopharmaceutical classification was predicted with 77% accuracy. We conclude that PLS models of easily comprehended molecular surface properties can be used to rapidly provide absorption profiles of druglike molecules early on in drug discovery.

  • 14.
    Bergström, Christel A. S.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Strafford, Melissa
    Lazorova, Lucia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Avdeef, Alex
    Luthman, Kristina
    Artursson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Absorption classification of oral drugs based on molecular surface properties2003In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 558-570Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether easily calculated and comprehended molecular surface properties can predict drug solubility and permeability with sufficient accuracy to allow theoretical absorption classification of drug molecules. For this purpose, structurally diverse, orally administered model drugs were selected from the World Health Organization (WHO)'s list of essential drugs. The solubility and permeability of the drugs were determined using well-established in vitro methods in highly accurate experimental settings. Descriptors for molecular surface area were generated from low-energy conformations obtained by conformational analysis using molecular mechanics calculations. Correlations between the calculated molecular surface area descriptors, on one hand, and solubility and permeability, on the other, were established with multivariate data analysis (partial least squares projection to latent structures (PLS)) using training and test sets. The obtained models were challenged with external test sets. Both solubility and permeability of the druglike molecules could be predicted with high accuracy from the calculated molecular surface properties alone. The established correlations were used to perform a theoretical biopharmaceutical classification of the WHO-listed drugs into six classes, resulting in a correct prediction for 87% of the essential drugs. An external test set consisting of Food and Drug Administration (FDA) standard compounds for biopharmaceutical classification was predicted with 77% accuracy. We conclude that PLS models of easily comprehended molecular surface properties can be used to rapidly provide absorption profiles of druglike molecules early on in drug discovery.

  • 15.
    Bergström, Christel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Wassvik, Carola M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Johansson, Kajsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Hubatsch, Ina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Poorly soluble marketed drugs display solvation limited solubility2007In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 50, no 23, p. 5858-5862Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We determined the intrinsic aqueous solubility of 15 poorly soluble drugs with solubilities ranging from 2.9 nM to 1.1 μM. We then analyzed the data from a physicochemical perspective, using experimentally determined solid-state properties and easily interpretable two-dimensional molecular descriptors, to better understand the factors underlying poor solubility. The analysis shows that poorly soluble drugs that have reached the market are solubility limited by solvation rather than by their solid state.

  • 16.
    Bharate, Sandip B.
    et al.
    CSIR Indian Inst Integrat Med, Div Med Chem, Canal Rd, Jammu 180001, Jammu & Kashmir, India.;CSIR Indian Inst Integrat Med, Acad Sci & Innovat Res AcSIR, Canal Rd, Jammu 180001, Jammu & Kashmir, India..
    Singh, Baljinder
    CSIR Indian Inst Integrat Med, Nat Prod Chem Div, Canal Rd, Jammu 180001, Jammu & Kashmir, India..
    Kachler, Sonja
    Univ Wurzburg, Inst Pharmakol & Toxikol, Versbacher Str 9, D-97078 Wurzburg, Germany..
    Oliveira, Ana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational Biology and Bioinformatics.
    Kumar, Vikas
    CSIR Indian Inst Integrat Med, Acad Sci & Innovat Res AcSIR, Canal Rd, Jammu 180001, Jammu & Kashmir, India.;CSIR Indian Inst Integrat Med, Preformulat Lab, Canal Rd, Jammu 180001, Jammu & Kashmir, India..
    Bharate, Sonali S.
    CSIR Indian Inst Integrat Med, Preformulat Lab, Canal Rd, Jammu 180001, Jammu & Kashmir, India..
    Vishwakarma, Ram A.
    CSIR Indian Inst Integrat Med, Div Med Chem, Canal Rd, Jammu 180001, Jammu & Kashmir, India.;CSIR Indian Inst Integrat Med, Acad Sci & Innovat Res AcSIR, Canal Rd, Jammu 180001, Jammu & Kashmir, India..
    Klotz, Karl-Norbert
    Univ Wurzburg, Inst Pharmakol & Toxikol, Versbacher Str 9, D-97078 Wurzburg, Germany..
    de Teran, Hugo Gutierrez
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Cell & Mol Biol, Box 596, SE-75124 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Discovery of 7-(Prolinol-N-yl)-2-phenylamino-thiazolo[5,4-d]pyrimidines as Novel Non-Nucleoside Partial Agonists for the A(2A) Adenosine Receptor: Prediction from Molecular Modeling2016In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 59, no 12, p. 5922-5928Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe the identification of 7-(prolinol-N-yl)-2-phenylamino-thiazolo[5,4-d]pyrimidines as a novel chemotype of non-nucleoside partial agonists for the A(2A) adenosine receptor (A(2A)AR). Molecular-modeling indicated that the (S)-2-hydroxymethylene-pyrrolidine could mimic the interactions of agonists' ribose, suggesting that this class of compounds could have agonistic properties. This was confirmed by functional assays on the A(2A)AR, where their efficacy could be associated with the presence of the 2-hydroxymethylene moiety. Additionally, the best compound displays promising affinity, selectivity profile, and physicochemical properties.

  • 17. Björklund, Catarina
    et al.
    Oscarson, Stefan
    Benkestock, Kurt
    Borkakoti, Neera
    Jansson, Katarina
    Lindberg, Jimmy
    Vrang, Lotta
    Hallberg, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Rosenquist, Åsa
    Samuelsson, Bertil
    Design and Synthesis of Potent and Selective BACE-1 Inhibitors2010In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 53, no 4, p. 1458-1464Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Highly potent BACE-1 protease inhibitors have been developed from ill inhibitors containing a hydroxyethylene (HE) core displaying aryloxymethyl or benzyloxymethyl P1 side chain and a methoxy P1' side chain. The target molecules were synthesized in good overall yields from chiral carbohydrate starting materials. The inhibitors show high BACF-1 potency and good selectivity against cathepsin D, where the most potent inhibitor Furnishes BACE-1 Ki << 1 nM and displays > 1000-fold selectivity over cathepsin D.

  • 18. Brandt, Peter
    et al.
    Geitmann, Matthis
    Danielson, U Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry, Biochemistry.
    Deconstruction of Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 for Exploration of the Optimization Landscape of Fragments2011In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study has taken a closer look at the theoretical basis for protein-fragment interactions. The approach involved the deconstruction of 3 non-nucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and investigation of the interaction between 21 substructures and the enzyme. It focused on the concept of ligand efficiency and showed that ligand independent free energy fees (ΔG(ind)) are crucial for the understanding of the binding affinities of fragments. A value of 7.0 kcal mol(-1) for the ΔG(ind) term is shown to be a lower limit for the NNRTI binding pocket of HIV-1 RT. The addition of the ΔG(ind) term to the dissociation free energy in the calculation of a corrected ligand efficiency, in combination with the lack of an efficient ligand binding hot spot in the NNIBP, fully explains the existence of nonbinding NNRTI substructures. By applying the concept to a larger set of ligands, we could define a binding site profile that indicates the absence of an efficient fragment binding hot spot but an efficient binding of full-sized NNRTIs. The analysis explains some of the challenges in identifying fragments against flexible targets involving conformational changes and how fragments may be prioritized.

  • 19.
    Bäckbro, Kristina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Löwgren, Seved
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Österlund, Katrin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Atepo, Johnson
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Unge, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Hulten, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Bonham, Nicholas M
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Schaal, Wesley
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Karlen, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Hallberg, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Unexpected binding mode of a cyclic sulfamide HIV-1 protease inhibitor1997In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 40, no 6, p. 898-902Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two cyclic, C2-symmetric HIV-1 protease inhibitors, one sulfamide and one urea derivative, both comprising phenyl ether groups in the P1/P1‘ positions, were cocrystallized with HIV-1 protease, and the crystal structures were determined to 2.0 Å resolution. The structure of the urea 2 showed a conformation similar to that reported for the related urea 3 by Lam et al., while the sulfamide 1 adopted an unanticipated conformation in which the P1‘ and P2‘ side chains were transposed.

  • 20.
    Carbajales, Carlos
    et al.
    Univ Santiago de Compostela, Fac Farm, Ctr Singular Invest Quim Biol & Mat Mol CIQUS, Santiago De Compostela 15782, Spain.;Univ Santiago de Compostela, Fac Farm, Dept Quim Organ, Santiago De Compostela 15782, Spain..
    Azuaje, Jhonny
    Univ Santiago de Compostela, Fac Farm, Ctr Singular Invest Quim Biol & Mat Mol CIQUS, Santiago De Compostela 15782, Spain.;Univ Santiago de Compostela, Fac Farm, Dept Quim Organ, Santiago De Compostela 15782, Spain..
    Oliveira, Ana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational Biology and Bioinformatics.
    Loza, Maria I.
    Univ Santiago de Compostela, Drug Screening Platform Biofarma Res Grp, Ctr Singular Invest Med Mol & Enfermedades Cron C, Santiago De Compostela 15782, Spain..
    Brea, Jose
    Univ Santiago de Compostela, Drug Screening Platform Biofarma Res Grp, Ctr Singular Invest Med Mol & Enfermedades Cron C, Santiago De Compostela 15782, Spain..
    Cadavid, Maria I.
    Univ Santiago de Compostela, Drug Screening Platform Biofarma Res Grp, Ctr Singular Invest Med Mol & Enfermedades Cron C, Santiago De Compostela 15782, Spain..
    Masaguer, Christian F.
    Univ Santiago de Compostela, Fac Farm, Dept Quim Organ, Santiago De Compostela 15782, Spain..
    Garcia-Mera, Xerardo
    Univ Santiago de Compostela, Fac Farm, Dept Quim Organ, Santiago De Compostela 15782, Spain..
    Gutiérrez-de-Terán, Hugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Sotelo, Eddy
    Univ Santiago de Compostela, Fac Farm, Ctr Singular Invest Quim Biol & Mat Mol CIQUS, Santiago De Compostela 15782, Spain.;Univ Santiago de Compostela, Fac Farm, Dept Quim Organ, Santiago De Compostela 15782, Spain..
    Enantiospecific Recognition at the A(2B) Adenosine Receptor by Alkyl 2-Cyanoimino-4-substituted-6-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydropyrimidine-5-carboxylates2017In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 60, no 8, p. 3372-3382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel family of structurally simple, potent, and selective nonxanthine A(2B)AR ligands was identified, and its antagonistic behavior confirmed through functional experiments. The reported alkyl 2-cyanoimino-4-substituted-6-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahy-dropyrimidine-5-carboxylates (16) were designed by bioisosteric replacement of the carbonyl group at position 2 in a series of 3,4-dihydropyrimidin-2-ones. The scaffold (16) documented herein contains a chiral center at the heterocycle. Accordingly, the most attractive ligand of the series [(+/-)16b, K-i = 24.3 nM] was resolved into its two enantiomers by chiral HPLC, and the absolute configuration was established by circular dichroism. The biological evaluation of both enantiomers demonstrated enantiospecific recognition at A(2B)AR, with the (S)-16b enantiomer retaining all the affinity (K-i = 15.1 nM), as predicted earlier by molecular modeling. This constitutes the first example of enantiospecific recognition at the A(2B) adenosine receptor and opens new possibilities in ligand design for this receptor.

  • 21.
    Carlsson, Jens
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structural Molecular Biology.
    Boukharta, Lars
    Åqvist, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structural Molecular Biology.
    Combining docking, molecular dynamics and the linear interaction energy method to predict binding modes and affinities for non-nucleoside inhibitors to HIV-1 reverse transcriptase2008In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 51, no 9, p. 2648-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Docking, scoring, molecular dynamics (MD), and the linear interaction energy (LIE) method are used here to predict binding modes and affinities for a set of 43 non-nucleoside inhibitors to HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. Starting from a crystallographic structure, the binding modes of 43 inhibitors are predicted using automated docking. The Goldscore scoring function and the LIE method are then used to determine the relative binding free energies for the inhibitors. The Goldscore scoring function does not reproduce the relative binding affinities for the inhibitors, while the standard parametrization of the LIE method reproduces the experimental binding free energies for 39 inhibitors with an R (2) = 0.70 and an unsigned average error of 0.8 kcal/mol. The present calculations provide a validation of the combination of docking, MD, and LIE as a powerful tool in structure-based drug design, and the methodology is easily scalable for attaining a higher throughput of compounds.

  • 22. Chofor, Rene
    et al.
    Sooriyaarachchi, Sanjeewani
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structure and Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Risseeuw, Martijn D. P.
    Bergfors, Terese
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structure and Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pouyez, Jenny
    Johny, Chinchu
    Haymond, Amanda
    Everaert, Annelien
    Dowd, Cynthia S.
    Maes, Louis
    Coenye, Tom
    Alex, Alexander
    Couch, Robin D.
    Jones, T. Alwyn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structure and Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wouters, Johan
    Mowbray, Sherry L.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structure and Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Van Calenbergh, Serge
    Synthesis and Bioactivity of beta-Substituted Fosmidomycin Analogues Targeting 1-Deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate Reductoisomerase2015In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 58, no 7, p. 2988-3001Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Blocking the 2-C-methyl-d-erythrithol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis offers interesting prospects for inhibiting Plasmodium or Mycobacterium spp. growth. Fosmidomycin (1) and its homologue FR900098 (2) potently inhibit 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase (Dxr), a key enzyme in this pathway. Here we introduced aryl or aralkyl substituents at the beta-position of the hydroxamate analogue of 2. While direct addition of a beta-aryl moiety resulted in poor inhibition, longer linkers between the carbon backbone and the phenyl ring were generally associated with better binding to the enzymes. X-ray structures of the parasite Dxr-inhibitor complexes show that the longer compounds generate a substantially different flap structure, in which a key tryptophan residue is displaced, and the aromatic group of the ligand lies between the tryptophan and the hydroxamates methyl group. Although the most promising new Dxr inhibitors lack activity against Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium smegmatis, they proved to be highly potent inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum in vitro growth.

  • 23.
    Cimitan, Samanta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry.
    Lindgren, Maria T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry.
    Bertucci, Carlo
    Danielson, U. Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry.
    Early absorption and distribution analysis of antitumor and anti-AIDS drugs: lipid membrane and plasma protein interactions2005In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 48, no 10, p. 3536-46Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24. de Kloe, Gerdien E
    et al.
    Retra, Kim
    Geitmann, Matthis
    Källblad, Per
    Nahar, Tariq
    van Elk, René
    Smit, August B
    van Muijlwijk-Koezen, Jacqueline E
    Leurs, Rob
    Irth, Hubertus
    Danielson, U. Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry, Biochemistry.
    de Esch, Iwan J P
    Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor Based Fragment Screening Using Acetylcholine Binding Protein Identifies Ligand Efficiency Hot Spots (LE Hot Spots) by Deconstruction of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor α7 Ligands2010In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 53, no 19, p. 7192-7201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The soluble acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP) is a homologue of the ligand-binding domain of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). To guide future fragment-screening using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor technology as a label-free, direct binding, biophysical screening assay, a focused fragment library was generated based on deconstruction of a set of α7 nAChR selective quinuclidine containing ligands with nanomolar affinities. The interaction characteristics of the fragments and the parent compounds with AChBP were evaluated using an SPR biosensor assay. The data obtained from this direct binding assay correlated well with data from the reference radioligand displacement assay. Ligand efficiencies for different (structural) groups of fragments in the library were correlated to binding with distinct regions of the binding pocket, thereby identifying ligand efficiency hot spots (LE hot spots). These hot spots can be used to identity the most promising hit fragments in a large scale fragment library screen.

  • 25.
    De Rosa, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Unge, Johan
    Motwani, Hitesh V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Rosenquist, Asa
    Vrang, Lotta
    Wallberg, Hans
    Larhed, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Synthesis of P1 '-Functionalized Macrocyclic Transition-State Mimicking HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors Encompassing a Tertiary Alcohol2014In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 57, no 15, p. 6444-6457Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Seven novel tertiary alcohol containing linear HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs), decorated at the para position of the benzyl group in the P1' side with (hetero)aromatic moieties, were synthesized and biologically evaluated. To study the inhibition and antiviral activity effect of P1-P3 macro-cyclization, 14- and 15-membered macrocyclic Pis were prepared by ring-closing metathesis of the corresponding linear PIs. The macrocycles were more active than the linear precursors and compound 101, with a 2-thiazoly1 group in the P1' position, was the most potent PI of this new series (K-1 2.2 nM, EC50 0.2 mu M). Co-crystallized complexes of both linear and macrocyclic PIs with the HIV-1 protease enzyme were prepared and analyzed.

  • 26.
    Dinér, Peter
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC.
    Alao, John P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC.
    Söderlund, Johan
    Sunnerhagen, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC.
    Grøtli, Morten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC.
    Preparation of 3-Substituted-1-Isopropyl-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidin-4-amines as RET Kinase Inhibitors2012In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 55, no 10, p. 4872-4876Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A series of 3-substituted-1-isopropyl-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidin-4-amines have been designed, synthesized, and evaluated as RET protein kinase inhibitors. On the basis of docking results, a small library of pyrazolopyrimidine compounds with an extended hydrophobic side arm was synthesized. The most promising of the compounds (7a) displayed efficient inhibition in vitro and good selectivity when tested on a panel of kinases. Furthermore, 7a inhibited GDNF-induced RET phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in MCF-7 breast cancer cells at concentrations as low as 100 nM.

  • 27.
    Doak, Bradley C
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC.
    Zheng, Jie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC.
    Dobritzsch, Doreen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC.
    Kihlberg, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC.
    How Beyond Rule of 5 Drugs and Clinical Candidates Bind to Their Targets.2016In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 59, no 6, p. 2312-2327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To improve discovery of drugs for difficult targets, the opportunities of chemical space beyond the rule of 5 (bRo5) were examined by retrospective analysis of a comprehensive set of structures for complexes between drugs and clinical candidates and their targets. The analysis illustrates the potential of compounds far beyond rule of 5 space to modulate novel and difficult target classes that have large, flat, and groove-shaped binding sites. However, ligand efficiencies are significantly reduced for flat- and groove-shape binding sites, suggesting that adjustments of how to use such metrics are required. Ligands bRo5 appear to benefit from an appropriate balance between rigidity and flexibility to bind with sufficient affinity to their targets, with macrocycles and nonmacrocycles being found to have similar flexibility. However, macrocycles were more disk- and spherelike, which may contribute to their superior binding to flat sites, while rigidification of nonmacrocycles lead to rodlike ligands that bind well to groove-shaped binding sites. These insights should contribute to altering perceptions of what targets are considered "druggable" and provide support for drug design in beyond rule of 5 space.

  • 28.
    Dyrager, Christine
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Nilsson Möllers, Linda
    University of Gothenburg.
    Kjäll, Linda Karlsson
    University of Gothenburg.
    Alao, John Patrick
    University of Gothenburg.
    Diner, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry.
    Wallner, Fredrik
    University of Gothenburg.
    Sunnerhagen, Per
    University of Gothenburg.
    Grøtli, Morten
    University of Gothenburg.
    Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Chromone-based p38 MAP Kinase Inhibitors2011In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 54, no 20, p. 7427-7431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A series of 3-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-(4-pyridyl)-chromone derivs. were synthesized and evaluated as p38 MAP kinase inhibitors. Introduction of an amino group in the 2-position of the pyridyl moiety gave p38 inhibitors with IC50 values in the low nanomolar range (e.g. 8a; IC50 = 17 nm). Addnl., the inhibitors (8a and 8e) demonstrate an excellent selectivity profile towards the p38 kinase among other kinases, as well as inhibition (8e) of p38 signaling in human breast cancer cells. [on SciFinder(R)]

  • 29.
    Ekegren, Jenny K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Ginman, Nina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Johansson, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Wallberg, Hans
    Larhed, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Samuelsson, Bertil
    Unge, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Hallberg, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Microwave-accelerated synthesis of P1'-extended HIV-1 protease inhibitors encompassing a tertiary alcohol in the transition-state mimicking scaffold2006In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 49, no 5, p. 1828-1832Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two series of P1'-extended HIV-1 protease inhibitors comprising a tertiary alcohol in the transition-state mimic exhibiting Ki values ranging from 2.1 to 93 nM have been synthesized. Microwave-accelerated palladium-catalyzed cross-couplings were utilized to rapidly optimize the P1' side chain. High cellular antiviral potencies were encountered when the P1' benzyl group was elongated with a 3- or 4-pyridyl substituent (EC50 = 0.18-0.22 microM). X-ray crystallographic data were obtained for three inhibitors cocrystallized with the enzyme.

  • 30.
    Ekegren, Jenny K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structural Molecular Biology.
    Unge, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structural Molecular Biology.
    Safa, Mayada Zreik
    Wallberg, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Samuelsson, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Hallberg, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structural Molecular Biology.
    A new class of HIV-1 protease inhibitors containing a tertiary alcohol in the transition-state mimicking scaffold2005In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 48, no 25, p. 8098-8102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Novel HIV-1 protease inhibitors encompassing a tertiary alcohol as part of the transition-state mimicking unit have been synthesized. Variation of the P1‘−P3‘ residues and alteration of the tertiary alcohol absolute stereochemistry afforded 10 inhibitors. High potencies for the compounds with (S)-configuration at the carbon carrying the tertiary hydroxyl group were achieved with Ki values down to 2.4 nM. X-ray crystallographic data for a representative compound in complex with HIV-1 protease are presented.

  • 31.
    El Maatougui, Abdelaziz
    et al.
    Univ Santiago Compostela, Ctr Singular Invest Quim Biol & Mat Mol CIQUS, E-15782 Santiago De Compostela, Spain.;Univ Santiago Compostela, Dept Quim Organ, Fac Farm, E-15782 Santiago De Compostela, Spain..
    Azuaje, Jhonny
    Univ Santiago Compostela, Ctr Singular Invest Quim Biol & Mat Mol CIQUS, E-15782 Santiago De Compostela, Spain.;Univ Santiago Compostela, Dept Quim Organ, Fac Farm, E-15782 Santiago De Compostela, Spain..
    Gonzalez-Gomez, Manuel
    Univ Santiago Compostela, Ctr Singular Invest Quim Biol & Mat Mol CIQUS, E-15782 Santiago De Compostela, Spain.;Univ Santiago Compostela, Dept Quim Organ, Fac Farm, E-15782 Santiago De Compostela, Spain..
    Miguez, Gabriel
    Univ Santiago Compostela, Ctr Singular Invest Quim Biol & Mat Mol CIQUS, E-15782 Santiago De Compostela, Spain.;Univ Santiago Compostela, Dept Quim Organ, Fac Farm, E-15782 Santiago De Compostela, Spain..
    Crespo, Abel
    Univ Santiago Compostela, Ctr Singular Invest Quim Biol & Mat Mol CIQUS, E-15782 Santiago De Compostela, Spain.;Univ Santiago Compostela, Dept Quim Organ, Fac Farm, E-15782 Santiago De Compostela, Spain..
    Carbajales, Carlos
    Univ Santiago Compostela, Ctr Singular Invest Quim Biol & Mat Mol CIQUS, E-15782 Santiago De Compostela, Spain.;Univ Santiago Compostela, Dept Quim Organ, Fac Farm, E-15782 Santiago De Compostela, Spain..
    Escalante, Luz
    Univ Santiago Compostela, Ctr Singular Invest Quim Biol & Mat Mol CIQUS, E-15782 Santiago De Compostela, Spain.;Univ Santiago Compostela, Dept Quim Organ, Fac Farm, E-15782 Santiago De Compostela, Spain..
    Garcia-Mera, Xerardo
    Univ Santiago Compostela, Ctr Singular Invest Quim Biol & Mat Mol CIQUS, E-15782 Santiago De Compostela, Spain.;Univ Santiago Compostela, Dept Quim Organ, Fac Farm, E-15782 Santiago De Compostela, Spain..
    Gutierrez-de-Teran, Hugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Sotelo, Eddy
    Univ Santiago Compostela, Ctr Singular Invest Quim Biol & Mat Mol CIQUS, E-15782 Santiago De Compostela, Spain.;Univ Santiago Compostela, Dept Quim Organ, Fac Farm, E-15782 Santiago De Compostela, Spain..
    Discovery of Potent and Highly Selective A(2B) Adenosine Receptor Antagonist Chemotypes2016In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 59, no 5, p. 1967-1983Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three novel families of A(2B) adenosine receptor antagonists were identified in the context of the structural exploration of the 3,4-dihydropyrimidin,2(1H)-one chemotype. The most appealing series contain imidazole, 1,2,4-triazole, or benzimidazole rings fused to the 2,3-positions of the parent diazinone core. The optimization process enabled identification of a highly potent (3.49 nM) A(2B) ligand that exhibits complete selectivity toward A(1), A(2A), and A(3) receptors. The results of functional cAMP experiments confirmed the antagonistic behavior of representative ligands. The main SAR trends identified within the series were substantiated by a molecular modeling study based on a receptor-driven docking model constructed on the basis of the crystal structure of the human A(2A) receptor.

  • 32.
    Ersmark, Karolina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Feierberg, Isabella
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Bjelic, Sinisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Hamelink, Elizabeth
    Hackett, Fiona
    Blackman, Michael J.
    Hulten, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Samuelsson, Bertil
    Aqvist, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Hallberg, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Potent inhibitors of the Plasmodium falciparum enzymes plasmepsin I and II devoid of cathepsin D inhibitory activity2004In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 110-22Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33. Ferrins, Lori
    et al.
    Gazdik, Michelle
    Rahmani, Raphael
    Varghese, Swapna
    Sykes, Melissa L.
    Jones, Amy J.
    Avery, Vicky M.
    White, Karen L.
    Ryan, Eileen
    Charman, Susan A.
    Kaiser, Marcel
    Bergstroem, Christel A. S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Baell, Jonathan B.
    Pyridyl Benzamides as a Novel Class of Potent Inhibitors for the Kinetoplastid Trypanosoma brucei2014In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 57, no 15, p. 6393-6402Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A whole-organism screen of approximately 87000 compounds against Trypanosoma brucei brucei identified a number of promising compounds for medicinal chemistry optimization. One of these classes of compounds we termed the pyridyl benzamides. While the initial hit had an IC50 of 12 mu M, it was small enough to be attractive for further optimization, and we utilized three parallel approaches to develop the structure-activity relationships. We determined that the physicochemical properties for this class are generally favorable with particular positions identified that appear to block metabolism when substituted and others that modulate solubility. Our most active compound is 79, which has an IC50 of 0.045 mu M against the human pathogenic strain Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and is more than 4000 times less active against the mammalian L6 cell line.

  • 34.
    Fransson, Rebecca
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Botros, Milad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Sköld, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Nyberg, Fred
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Lindeberg, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Hallberg, Mathias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Biological Research on Drug Dependence.
    Sandström, Anja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Discovery of Dipeptides with High Affinity to the Specific Binding Site for Substance P1-72010In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 53, no 6, p. 2383-2389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Substance P 1-7 (SP1-7, H-Arg-Pro-Lys-Pro-Gln-Gln-Phe-OH) is the major bioactive metabolite of substance P. The interest in this heptapeptide originates from the observation that it modulates, and in certain cases opposes the effects of the parent peptide. e.g., the nociceptive effect. The p-opioid receptor agonist endomorphin-2 (EM-2, H-Tyr-Pro-Phe-Phe-NH2) has been found to also interact with the specific binding site of SP1-7 with only a 10-fold lower affinity compared to the native peptide. Considering the smaller size of EM-2 compared to the target heptapeptide, it was selected as a lead compound in the development of low-molecular-weight ligands to the SP1-7 binding site. An alanine scan and truncation study led to the unexpected discovery of the dipeptide H-Phe-Phe-NH2 (K-i = 1.5 nM), having equal affinity as the endogenous heptapeptide SP1-7. Moreover, the studies show that the C-terminal phenylalanine amide is crucial for the affinity of the dipeptide.

  • 35.
    Fransson, Rebecca
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Sköld, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Kratz, Jadel M
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Svensson, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Artursson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Nyberg, Fred
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Hallberg, Mathias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Sandström, Anja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Constrained H-Phe-Phe-NH2 Analogues With High Affinity to the Substance P 1-7 Binding Site and With Improved Metabolic Stability and Cell Permeability2013In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 56, no 12, p. 4953-4965Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We recently reported the discovery of H-Phe-Phe-NH2 as a small and high affinity ligand for the substance P 1-7 (SP1-7, H-Arg-Pro-Lys-Pro-Gln-Gln-Phe-OH) specific binding site and its intriguing ability to reduce neuropathic pain. With the overall aim to develop stable and orally bioavailable SP1-7 mimetics, the dipeptide was chosen as a lead compound. Herein the structure-activity relationship (SAR) of a set of modified H-Phe-Phe-NH2 analogues is presented together with their potential active uptake by PEPT1 transporter, intestinal permeability, and metabolic stability. Local constraints via peptide backbone methylation or preparation of cyclized analogues based on pyrrolidine were evaluated and were shown to significantly improve the in vitro pharmacokinetic properties. The SAR was rationalized by deriving a plausible binding pose for the high affinity ligands. Rigidification using a 3-phenylpyrrolidine moiety in the C-terminal of H-Phe-Phe-NH2 resulted in high affinity and improved intrinsic clearance and intestinal epithelial permeability.

  • 36. Frederick, Raphael
    et al.
    Bruyere, Celine
    Vancraeynest, Christelle
    Reniers, Jeremy
    Meinguet, Celine
    Pochet, Lionel
    Backlund, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Masereel, Bernard
    Kiss, Robert
    Wouters, Johan
    Novel Trisubstituted Harmine Derivatives with Original in Vitro Anticancer Activity2012In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 55, no 14, p. 6489-6501Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To overcome the intrinsic resistance of cancer cells to apoptotic stimuli, we designed and synthesized approximately 50 novel beta-carbolines structurally related to harmine. Harmine is known for its anticancer properties and is a DYRK1A inhibitor. Of the synthesized compounds, the most active in terms of growth inhibition of five cancer cell lines are cytostatic and approximately 100 times more potent than harmine but demonstrated no DYRK1A inhibitory activity. These novel beta-carbolines display similar growth inhibitory activity in cancer cells that are sensitive and resistant to apoptotic stimuli. Using ChemGPS-NP, we found that the more active beta-carbolines are all more lipophilic and larger than the less active compounds. Lastly, on the basis of the NCI human tumor cell line anticancer drug screen and the NCI COMPARE algorithm, it appears that some of these compounds, including 5a and 5k, seem to act as protein synthesis inhibitors.

  • 37.
    Fridén, Markus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Winiwarter, Susanne
    Jerndal, Gunilla
    Bengtsson, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Wan, Hong
    Bredberg, Ulf
    Hammarlund-Udenaes, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Antonsson, Madeleine
    Structure-brain exposure relationships in rat and human using a novel data set of unbound drug concentrations in brain interstitial and cerebrospinal fluids2009In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 52, no 20, p. 6233-6243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New experimental methodologies were applied to measure the unbound brain-to-plasma concentration ratio (K(p,uu,brain)) and the unbound CSF-to-plasma concentration ratio (K(p,uu,CSF)) in rats for 43 structurally diverse drugs. The relationship between chemical structure and K(p,uu,brain) was dominated by hydrogen bonding. Contrary to popular understanding based on the total brain-to-plasma concentration ratio (logBB), lipophilicity was not a determinant of unbound brain exposure. Although changing the number of hydrogen bond acceptors is a useful design strategy for optimizing K(p,uu,brain), future improvement of in silico prediction models is dependent on the accommodation of active drug transport. The structure-brain exposure relationships found in the rat also hold for humans, since the rank order of the drugs was similar for human and rat K(p,uu,CSF). This cross-species comparison was supported by K(p,uu,CSF) being within 3-fold of K(p,uu,brain) in the rat for 33 of 39 drugs. It was, however, also observed that K(p,uu,CSF) overpredicts K(p,uu,brain) for highly effluxed drugs, indicating lower efflux capacity of the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier compared to the blood-brain barrier.

  • 38. Geitmann, Matthis
    et al.
    Elinder, Malin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry.
    Seeger, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry.
    Brandt, Peter
    de Esch, Iwan J P
    Danielson, U Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry, Biochemistry.
    Identification of a Novel Scaffold for Allosteric Inhibition of Wild Type and Drug Resistant HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase by Fragment Library Screening2011In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 54, no 3, p. 699-708Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel scaffold inhibiting wild type and drug resistant variants of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1RT) has been identified in a library consisting of 1040 fragments. The fragments were significantly different from already known non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), as indicated by a Tversky similarity analysis. A screening strategy involving SPR biosensor-based interaction analysis and enzyme inhibition was used. Primary biosensor-based screening, using short concentration series, was followed by analysis of nevirapine competition and enzyme inhibition, thus identifying inhibitory fragments binding to the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) binding site. Ten hits were discovered, and their affinities and resistance profiles were evaluated with wild type and three drug resistant enzyme variants (K103N, Y181C, and L100I). One fragment exhibited submillimolar K(D) and IC(50) values against all four tested enzyme variants. A substructure comparison between the fragment and 826 structurally diverse published NNRTIs confirmed that the scaffold was novel. The fragment is a bromoindanone with a ligand efficiency of 0.42 kcal/mol(-1).

  • 39.
    Geitmann, Matthis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry.
    Unge, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structural Molecular Biology.
    Danielson, U. Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry.
    Biosensor-based kinetic characterization of the interaction between HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and non-nucleoside inhibitors2006In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 49, no 8, p. 2367-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Details of the interaction between HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and non-nucleoside inhibitors (NNRTIs) have been elucidated using a biosensor-based approach. This initial study was performed with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase mutant K103N, the phenethylthioazolylthiourea compound (PETT) MIV-150, and the three NNRTIs licensed for clinical use: nevirapine, delavirdine, and efavirenz. Mathematical evaluation of the experimental data with several interaction models revealed that the four inhibitors interacted with HIV-1 RT with varying degrees of complexity. The simplest adequate model accounted for two different conformations of the free enzyme, of which only one can bind the inhibitor, consistent with a previously hypothesized population-shift model including a preformation of the NNRTI binding site. In addition, a heterogeneous binding was observed for delavirdine, efavirenz, and MIV-150, indicating that two noncompetitive and kinetically distinct enzyme-inhibitor complexes could be formed. Furthermore, for these compounds, there were indications for ligand-induced conformational changes.

  • 40.
    Geitmann, Matthis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry.
    Unge, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structural Molecular Biology.
    Danielson, U. Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry.
    Interaction kinetic characterization of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase non-nucleoside inhibitor resistance2006In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 49, no 8, p. 2375-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To decipher the mechanism for non-nucleoside inhibitor resistance of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, the kinetics of the interaction between wild type and drug-resistant variants of the enzyme and structurally diverse inhibitors were determined. Substitution of amino acid residues in the inhibitor binding site resulted in altered rate constants for the pre-equilibrium between two unliganded forms of the enzyme, and for the association and dissociation of the inhibitor-enzyme interaction. The Y181C, V108I, and P225H substitutions affected primarily the association and dissociation rate constants, while the K103N and the L100I substitutions also influenced the equilibrium between the two forms of the free enzyme. The K103N and the L100I substitutions were found to facilitate both the entry of the inhibitor into the binding pocket as well as its exit, in contrast to what has been reported elsewhere. Interaction kinetic-based resistance profiles showed that phenethylthiazolylthiourea compounds were relatively insensitive to the studied substitutions.

  • 41.
    Georgsson, Jennie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Sköld, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Botros, Milad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Biological Research on Drug Dependence.
    Lindeberg, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Nyberg, Fred
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Biological Research on Drug Dependence.
    Karlén, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Hallberg, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Larhed, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Synthesis of a new class of druglike angiotensin II C-terminal mimics with affinity for the AT2 receptor2007In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 50, no 7, p. 1711-1715Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Four tripeptides corresponding to the C-terminal region of angiotensin II were synthesized. One of these peptides (Ac-His-Pro-Ile) showed moderate binding affinity for the AT2 receptor. Two aromatic histidine-related scaffolds were synthesized and introduced in the tripeptides to give eight new peptidomimetic structures. Three of the new peptide-derived druglike molecules exhibited selective, nanomolar affinity for the AT2 receptor. These ligands may become lead compounds in the future development of novel classes of selective AT2 receptor agonists.

  • 42.
    Georgsson, Jennie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Sköld, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Plouffe, Bianca
    Lindeberg, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Botros, Milad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Biological Research on Drug Dependence.
    Larhed, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Nyberg, Fred
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Biological Research on Drug Dependence.
    Gallo-Payet, Nicole
    Gogoll, Adolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Karlén, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Hallberg, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Angiotensin II Pseudopeptides Containing 1,3,5-Trisubstituted Benzene Scaffolds with High AT2 Receptor Affinity2005In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 48, no 21, p. 6620-6631Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two 1,3,5-trisubstituted aromatic scaffolds intended to serve as γ-turn mimetics have been synthesized and incorporated in five pseudopeptide analogues of angiotensin II (Asp-Arg-Val-Tyr-Ile-His-Pro-Phe), replacing Val-Tyr-Ile, Val-Tyr, or Tyr-Ile. All the tested compounds exhibited nanomolar affinity for the AT2 receptor with the best compound (3) having a Ki of 1.85 nM. Four pseudopeptides were AT2 selective, while one (5) also exhibited good affinity for the AT1 receptor (Ki = 30.3 nM). This pseudopeptide exerted full agonistic activity in an AT2 receptor induced neurite outgrowth assay but displayed no agonistic effect in an AT1 receptor functional assay. Molecular modeling, using the program DISCOtech, showed that the high-affinity ligands could interact similarly with the AT2 receptor as other ligands with high affinity for this receptor. A tentative agonist model is proposed for AT2 receptor activation by angiotensin II analogues. We conclude that the 1,3,5-trisubstituted benzene rings can be conveniently prepared and are suitable as γ-turn mimics.

  • 43. Giordanetto, Fabrizio
    et al.
    Kihlberg, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Organic Chemistry.
    Macrocyclic drugs and clinical candidates: what can medicinal chemists learn from their properties?2014In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 57, no 2, p. 278-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Macrocycles are ideal in efforts to tackle "difficult" targets, but our understanding of what makes them cell permeable and orally bioavailable is limited. Analysis of approximately 100 macrocyclic drugs and clinical candidates revealed that macrocycles are predominantly used for infectious disease and in oncology and that most belong to the macrolide or cyclic peptide class. A significant number (N = 34) of these macrocycles are administered orally, revealing that oral bioavailability can be obtained at molecular weights up to and above 1 kDa and polar surface areas ranging toward 250 Å(2). Moreover, insight from a group of "de novo designed" oral macrocycles in clinical studies and understanding of how cyclosporin A and model cyclic hexapeptides cross cell membranes may unlock wider opportunities in drug discovery. However, the number of oral macrocycles is still low and it remains to be seen if they are outliers or if macrocycles will open up novel oral druggable space.

  • 44.
    Gising, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Belfrage, Anna Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Alogheli, Hiba
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Ehrenberg, Angelica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC.
    Åkerblom, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Svensson, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Artursson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Anders, Karlén
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Danielsson, U. Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC.
    Larhed, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Sandström, Anja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Achiral Pyrazinone-Based Inhibitors of the Hepatitis C Virus NS3 Protease and Drug-Resistant Variants with Elongated Substituents Directed Toward the S2 Pocket2014In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 57, no 5, p. 1790-1801Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Herein we describe the design, synthesis, inhibitory potency, and pharmacokinetic properties of a novel class of achiral peptidomimetic HCV NS3 protease inhibitors. The compounds are based on a dipeptidomimetic pyrazinone glycine P3P2 building block in combination with an aromatic acyl sulfonamide in the P1P1′ position. Structure–activity relationship data and molecular modeling support occupancy of the S2 pocket from elongated R6 substituents on the 2(1H)-pyrazinone core and several inhibitors with improved inhibitory potency down to Ki = 0.11 μM were identified. A major goal with the design was to produce inhibitors structurally dissimilar to the di- and tripeptide-based HCV protease inhibitors in advanced stages of development for which cross-resistance might be an issue. Therefore, the retained and improved inhibitory potency against the drug-resistant variants A156T, D168V, and R155K further strengthen the potential of this class of inhibitors. A number of the inhibitors were tested in in vitro preclinical profiling assays to evaluate their apparent pharmacokinetic properties. The various R6 substituents were found to have a major influence on solubility, metabolic stability, and cell permeability.

  • 45.
    Gising, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Nilsson, Mikael T
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Odell, Luke R
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Yahiaoui, Samir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Lindh, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Iyer, Harini
    AstraZeneca India.
    Sinha, Achyut M
    AstraZeneca India.
    Srinivasa, Bachally R
    AstraZeneca India.
    Larhed, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Mowbray, Sherry L
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structure and Molecular Biology.
    Karlén, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Trisubstituted Imidazoles as Mycobacterium tuberculosis Glutamine Synthetase Inhibitors2012In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 55, no 6, p. 2894-2898Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine synthetase (MtGS) is a promising target for antituberculosis drug discovery. In a recent high-throughput screening study we identified several classes of MtGS inhibitors targeting the ATP-binding site. We now explore one of these classes, the 2-tert-butyl-4,5-diarylimidazoles, and present the design, synthesis, and X-ray crystallographic studies leading to the identification of MtGS inhibitors with submicromolar IC(50) values and promising antituberculosis MIC values.

  • 46.
    Good, James A. D.
    et al.
    Umea Univ, Dept Chem, S-90187 Umea, Sweden.;Umea Univ, Umea Ctr Microbial Res, S-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Silver, Jim
    Umea Univ, Umea Ctr Microbial Res, S-90187 Umea, Sweden.;Umea Univ, Dept Mol Biol, S-90187 Umea, Sweden.;Umea Univ, Lab Mol Infect Med Sweden MIMS, S-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Nunez-Otero, Carlos
    Umea Univ, Dept Clin Microbiol, S-90185 Umea, Sweden..
    Bahnan, Wael
    Umea Univ, Umea Ctr Microbial Res, S-90187 Umea, Sweden.;Umea Univ, Dept Mol Biol, S-90187 Umea, Sweden.;Umea Univ, Lab Mol Infect Med Sweden MIMS, S-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Krishnan, K. Syam
    Umea Univ, Dept Chem, S-90187 Umea, Sweden.;Umea Univ, Umea Ctr Microbial Res, S-90187 Umea, Sweden.;Mannam Mem NSS Coll, Dept Chem, Kollam 691571, Kerala, India..
    Salin, Olli
    Umea Univ, Umea Ctr Microbial Res, S-90187 Umea, Sweden.;Umea Univ, Lab Mol Infect Med Sweden MIMS, S-90187 Umea, Sweden.;Umea Univ, Dept Clin Microbiol, S-90185 Umea, Sweden..
    Engström, Patrik
    Umea Univ, Umea Ctr Microbial Res, S-90187 Umea, Sweden.;Umea Univ, Dept Mol Biol, S-90187 Umea, Sweden.;Umea Univ, Lab Mol Infect Med Sweden MIMS, S-90187 Umea, Sweden.;Univ Calif Berkeley, Dept Mol & Cell Biol, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Svensson, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Artursson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Gylfe, Asa
    Umea Univ, Umea Ctr Microbial Res, S-90187 Umea, Sweden.;Umea Univ, Lab Mol Infect Med Sweden MIMS, S-90187 Umea, Sweden.;Umea Univ, Dept Clin Microbiol, S-90185 Umea, Sweden..
    Bergstrom, Sven
    Umea Univ, Umea Ctr Microbial Res, S-90187 Umea, Sweden.;Umea Univ, Dept Mol Biol, S-90187 Umea, Sweden.;Umea Univ, Lab Mol Infect Med Sweden MIMS, S-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Almqvist, Fredrik
    Umea Univ, Dept Chem, S-90187 Umea, Sweden.;Umea Univ, Umea Ctr Microbial Res, S-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Thiazolino 2-Pyridone Amide Inhibitors of Chlamydia trachomatis Infectivity2016In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 59, no 5, p. 2094-2108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The bacterial pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis is a global health burden currently treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics which disrupt commensal bacteria. We recently identified a compound through phenotypic screening that blocked infectivity of this intracellular pathogen without host cell toxicity (compound 1, KSK 120). Herein, we present the optimization of 1 to a class of thiazolino 2-pyridone amides that are highly efficacious (EC50 <= 100 nM) in attenuating infectivity across multiple serovars of C. trachomatis without host cell toxicity. The lead compound 21a exhibits reduced lipophilicity versus 1 and did not affect the growth or viability of representative commensal flora at 50 mu M. In microscopy studies, a highly active fluorescent analogue 37 localized inside the parasitiphorous inclusion, indicative of a specific targeting of bacterial components. In summary, we present a class of small molecules to enable the development of specific treatments for C. trachomatis.

  • 47.
    Graffner-Nordberg, Malin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Fyfe, M
    Brattsand, R
    Mellgard, B
    Hallberg, A
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Design and synthesis of dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors encompassing a bridging ester group. Evaluation in a mouse colitis model2003In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 46, no 16, p. 3455-3462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease characterized by inflammation of both the small and large intestines. Methotrexate (MTX), a classical dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) inhibitor, has been used as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of patients with Crohn's disease in recent years. We sought to develop antifolates similar in structure to MTX that would be effective in reducing inflammation in a mouse disease model of colitis. Four classical DHFR inhibitors encompassing ester bridges in the central parts of the molecules were synthesized. These antifolates were efficient inhibitors of the DHFR enzyme derived from rat. They were also tested in vitro for their ability to inhibit induced proliferation of lymphocytes from mouse spleen. Inhibition of cell proliferation was achieved only in the micromolar range, whereas MTX was effective at low nanomolar concentrations. One of the DHFR inhibitors (1), with an IC50 value for rlDHFR approximately 8 times higher than that of methotrexate, was selected for in vivo experiments in an experimental colitis model in mice. This compound demonstrated a clear antiinflammatory effect after topical administration, comparable to the effect achieved with the glucocorticoid budesonide. Three parameters were evaluated in this model: myeloperoxidase activity, colon weight, and inflammation scoring. A favorable in vivo effect of compound 1 (15 mg/(kg(.)day)) was observed in all three inflammatory parameters. However, the results cannot be explained fully by DHFR inhibition or by inhibition of lymphocyte cell proliferation, suggesting that other yet unidentified mechanisms enable reduction of inflammation in the colitis model. The mechanism of action of methotrexate analogues encompassing a bridging ester group is not well understood in vivo but seems to lend itself well to further development of similar compounds.

  • 48.
    Graffner-Nordberg, Malin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Marelius, J
    Ohlsson, S
    Persson, A
    Swedberg, G
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Andersson, P
    Andersson, SE
    Aqvist, J
    Hallberg, A
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Computational predictions of binding affinities to dihydrofolatereductase: synthesis and biological evaluation of methotrexate analogues2000In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 43, no 21, p. 3852-3861Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relative binding affinities to human dihydrofolate reductase of four new potential antifolates, containing ester linkages between the two aromatic systems, were estimated by free energy perturbation simulations. The ester analogue, predicted to exhibit the highest binding affinity to human dihydrofolate reductase, and a reference ester (more structurally related to methotrexate) were synthesized. As deduced from the measured IC50 values, the calculated ranking of the ligands was correct although a greater difference in affinity was indicated by the experimental measurements. Among the new antifolates the most potent inhibitor exhibited a similar pharmacokinetic profile to methotrexate but lacked activity in a complex antiarthritic model in rat in vivo.

  • 49.
    Graffner-Nordberg, Malin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structural Molecular Biology.
    Åqvist, J
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structural Molecular Biology.
    Queener, SF
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structural Molecular Biology.
    Hallberg, A
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structural Molecular Biology.
    Kolmodin, M
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structural Molecular Biology.
    Ohlsson, S
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structural Molecular Biology.
    Andersson, P
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structural Molecular Biology.
    Design, Synthesis, Computational Prediction and Biological Evaluation of Ester Soft Drugs as Inhibitors of Dihydrofolate Reductase from Pneumocystis Carinii2001In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 44, no 15, p. 2391-2402Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A series of lipophilic soft drugs structurally related to the nonclassical dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) inhibitors trimetrexate and piritrexim have been designed, synthesized, and evaluated in DHFR assays, with special emphasis on the inhibition of P. carinii DHFR. The best inhibitors, encompassing an ester bond in the bridge connecting the two aromatic systems, were approximately 10 times less potent than trimetrexate and piritrexim. The metabolites were designed to be poor inhibitors. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations of three ligands in complex with DHFR from Pneumocystis carinii and from the human enzyme were conducted in order to better understand the factors determining the selectivity. A correct ranking of the relative inhibition of DHFR was achieved utilizing the linear interaction energy method. The soft drugs are intended for local administration. One representative ester was selected for a pharmacokinetic study in rats where it was found to undergo fast metabolic degradation to the predicted inactive metabolites.

  • 50. Hill, Timothy A
    et al.
    Gordon, Christopher P
    McGeachie, Andrew B
    Venn-Brown, Barbara
    Odell, Luke R
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Chau, Ngoc
    Quan, Annie
    Mariana, Anna
    Sakoff, Jennette A
    Chircop, Megan
    Robinson, Phillip J
    McCluskey, Adam
    Inhibition of dynamin mediated endocytosis by the dynoles: synthesis and functional activity of a family of indoles2009In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 52, no 12, p. 3762-3773Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Screening identified two bisindolylmaleimides as 100 microM inhibitors of the GTPase activity of dynamin I. Focused library approaches allowed development of indole-based dynamin inhibitors called dynoles. 100-Fold in vitro enhancement of potency was noted with the best inhibitor, 2-cyano-3-(1-(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl)-1H-indol-3-yl)-N-octylacrylamide (dynole 34-2), a 1.3 +/- 0.3 microM dynamin I inhibitor. Dynole 34-2 potently inhibited receptor mediated endocytosis (RME) internalization of Texas red-transferrin. The rank order of potency for a variety of dynole analogues on RME in U2OS cells matched their rank order for dynamin inhibition, suggesting that the mechanism of inhibition is via dynamin. Dynoles are the most active dynamin I inhibitors reported for in vitro or RME evaluations. Dynole 34-2 is 15-fold more active than dynasore against dynamin I and 6-fold more active against dynamin mediated RME (IC(50) approximately 15 microM; RME IC(50) approximately 80 microM). The dynoles represent a new series of tools to better probe endocytosis and dynamin-mediated trafficking events in a variety of cells.

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