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  • 1.
    Balgård, Matts
    et al.
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Medicat & Patient Safety, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Srndic, Samra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Wahlander, R.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Medicines reconciliation and drug adherence in a population of acute psychiatric patients at a Swedish teaching hospital2016In: International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy, ISSN 2210-7703, E-ISSN 2210-7711, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 486-486Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Cam, Henrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Kempen, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Intervention fidelity within a randomised controlled trial on comprehensive medication reviews in hospitalised patients2018In: International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy, ISSN 2210-7703, E-ISSN 2210-7711, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 251-251Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Frisk, Pia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Bergman, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Kalvemark-Sporrong, Sofia
    Exploring community pharmacists' experiences of surveying patients for drug utilization research purposes2015In: International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy, ISSN 2210-7703, E-ISSN 2210-7711, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 522-528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Patient self-reported data are important in drug utilization research, but often logistically difficult to collect. During 2006-2012, 72 Swedish community pharmacies regularly collected such data through structured survey interviews at the pharmacy counter, performed by the dispensing pharmacists. This study is part of a validation of that data acquisition method. Objectives (1) To explore the experiences of the pharmacists involved, (2) to explore a random or systematic exclusion of eligible patients by the pharmacists, and (3) to find areas of improvement to the applied method of surveying. Setting 72 Swedish community pharmacies, distributed all over the country. Method (a) A questionnaire was distributed to approximately 400 dispensing pharmacists at the pharmacies conducting the patient surveys; (b) semi-structured telephone interviews conducted with 19 pharmacists at 12 of the pharmacies. Main outcome measure Proportions of pharmacists reporting positive and negative experiences of structured survey interviews, the nature of their experiences, proportion of pharmacists reporting to avoid survey interviews and reasons for doing so, and suggested areas of improvement. Results A total of 126 pharmacists (32 %) completed the questionnaire. A majority (82 %) reported positive experiences of interviewing. In addition to the data generated as the primary goal of surveying, secondary benefits such as an improved patient-pharmacist dialogue and an increased detection and resolution of drug related problems were reported. However, a majority (63 %) of the pharmacists also reported negative experiences related to a perceived lack of time to fulfil one's professional obligations. Almost half of the pharmacists (44 %) in the survey admitted that they occasionally avoided interviewing eligible patients, due to the immediate increase in work load. The limited availability of staff resources was the most apparent area of improvement. Conclusion Under certain conditions, community pharmacies are feasible as a setting for conducting patient surveys in drug utilization research, and dispensing pharmacists suitable for conducting them. When regular dispensing staff perform the survey interviews as a part of the drug dispensing process, additional resources to manage the immediate increase in work load have to be considered. Otherwise, data quality may be compromised.

  • 4.
    Gillespie, Ulrika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Mörlin, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Hammarlund-Udenaes, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Hedström, Mariann
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Perceived value of ward-based pharmacists from the perspective of physicians and nurses2012In: International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy, ISSN 2210-7703, E-ISSN 2210-7711, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 127-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Clinical pharmacy in a hospital setting is relatively new in Sweden. Its recent introduction at the University Hospital in Uppsala has provided an opportunity for evaluation by other relevant professionals of the integration of clinical pharmacists into the health-care team.

    Objectives

    The objectives of this descriptive study were to evaluate the perceived value of wardbased clinical pharmacists from the perspective of hospital based physicians and nurses and to identify potential advantages and disadvantages related to the new inter professional collaboration. Another objective was to evaluate the experiences of general practitioners on receiving medication reports from wardbased clinical pharmacists.

    Setting

    Two acute internal medicine wards at the University Hospital in Uppsala, where a previously reported randomized controlled trial investigating the effects of ward based clinical pharmacists on re-visits to hospital was undertaken.

    Methods

    Data were collected by questionnaires containing closed- and openended questions. The questionnaires were distributed during the nine-month study period of the randomized controlled trial by an independent researcher to 29 hospital-based physicians and 44 nurses on the study wards and to 21 general practitioners who had received two or more medication reports. Answers were analysed descriptively for the closedended questions and by content analysis for the open-ended questions.

    Main outcome measure

    The main outcome measure was the physicians’ and nurses’ level of satisfaction with the new collaboration with clinical pharmacists, from a hospital and primary care perspective.

    Results

    Seventy-six percent of the hospital-based physicians and 81% of the nurses completed the questionnaire. Ninety-five percent of the physicians and 93% of the nurses were very satisfied with the collaboration. Out of the 17 general practitioners (81%) that completed the questionnaire 71% wanted to continue to receive medication reports in a similar way in the future. Increased patient safety and improvements in patients’ drug therapy were the main advantages stated by all three groups of respondents. Eighteen percent of the hospital-based physicians and 21% of the nurses thought that the collaboration had been time-consuming to certain or to a high extent.

    Conclusions

    The majority of the respondents, both GPs and hospital based physicians and nurses, were satisfied with the new collaboration with the ward based pharmacists and perceived that the quality of the patients’ drug therapy and drug-related patient safety had increased.

  • 5.
    Kempen, Thomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Hedström, Mariann
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Olsson, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Johansson, Amanda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Ottosson, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Al-Sammak, Yousif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Gillespie, Ulrika
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, Dept Hosp Pharm, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Assessment tool for hospital admissions related to medications: development and validation in older patients2019In: International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy, ISSN 2210-7703, E-ISSN 2210-7711, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 198-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Medication-related hospital admissions (MRAs) are frequently used to measure outcomes in studies involving medication reviews. The process of identifying MRAs is subjective and time-consuming, and practical, validated alternatives are required.

    Objective: The aim of this study was to develop and validate a practical tool to identify MRAs. Setting Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden.

    Method: We reviewed existing literature on methods to identify MRAs. The tool AT-HARM10 was developed using an iterative process including content validity and feasibility testing. The tool's inter-rater reliability (IRR) and criterion-related validity (CRV) were assessed: four pairs of either final-year undergraduate or postgraduate pharmacy students applied the tool to one of two batches of 50 older patients' hospital admissions. Assessment of the same 100 admissions by two experienced clinicians acted as gold standard.

    Main outcome: measure Cohen's and Fleiss' kappa for IRR, and sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value for CRV. Results AT-HARM10 consists of ten closed questions to distinguish between admissions that are unlikely to be and those that are possibly medication-related. The IRR was moderate to substantial (Cohen's kappa values were 0.45-0.75 and Fleiss' kappa values were 0.46 and 0.58). The sensitivity and specificity values were 70/86% and 74/70%, positive and negative predictive values were 73/74% and 71/83% respectively. Both AT-HARM10 and the gold standard identified approximately 50% of the admissions as MRAs.

    Conclusion: AT-HARM10 has been developed as a practical tool to identify MRAs and the tool is valid for use in older patients by final-year undergraduate and postgraduate pharmacy students.

  • 6.
    Kempen, Thomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Kälvemark, A.
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gillespie, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Stewart, D.
    Robert Gordon Univ, Sch Pharm & Life Sci, Aberdeen, Scotland.
    Comprehensive medication reviews in Swedish hospitals: what does the patient have to say?2019In: International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy, ISSN 2210-7703, E-ISSN 2210-7711, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 346-346Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7. Kempen, Thomas
    et al.
    van de Steeg-van Gompel, Caroline H P A
    Hoogland, Petra
    Liu, Yuqian
    Bouvy, Marcel L
    Large scale implementation of clinical medication reviews in Dutch community pharmacies: drug-related problems and interventions2014In: International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy, ISSN 2210-7703, E-ISSN 2210-7711, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 630-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Research on the benefits of clinical medication reviews (CMRs) performed by pharmacists has been conducted mostly in controlled settings and has been widely published. Less is known of the effects after large scale implementation in community pharmacies. An online CMR tool enabled the systematic registration of drug-related problems (DRPs) and implemented interventions derived from CMRs in daily practice.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the effects of CMRs on pharmacy practice after large-scale implementation in the Netherlands.

    SETTING: 268 community pharmacies. Pharmacists were trained on CMRs with a patient centred approach.

    METHOD: Retrospective analyses of DRPs, pharmacists' proposals and implemented interventions recorded between January 1st and September 1st 2012.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Frequencies of DRPs, intervention proposals, implemented interventions, and drugs involved.

    RESULTS: 4,579 CMRs were analysed. On average 2.9 (SD 2.1) DRPs per review were identified. 4,123 (31 %) of the DRPs led to medication changes. Stopping a drug (16 %) was more frequent than starting a drug (8.1 %). Drugs related to cardiovascular risk management, diabetes and osteoporosis were most frequently involved.

    CONCLUSION: This study is the largest analysis of pharmacists-initiated CMRs in the Netherlands to date. The findings demonstrate the potential to reduce medication-related errors through pharmacist involvements in complex pharmacotherapy and the positive impact on the quality of drug therapy through making necessary medication changes. The data also support the need for large-scale implementation of pharmacists-initiated CMRs in the presence of proper training programmes.

  • 8.
    Wisell, Kristin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Sporrong, Sofia Kälvemark
    Univ Copenhagen, Dept Pharm, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Winblad Spångberg, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research.
    The innovation that never came true: stakeholders views of the perceived effects of the reregulation of the Swedish pharmacies2015In: International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy, ISSN 2210-7703, E-ISSN 2210-7711, Vol. 37, p. 15-15Article in journal (Other academic)
1 - 8 of 8
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  • apa
  • ieee
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  • de-DE
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  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
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  • text
  • asciidoc
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