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  • 1.
    Andersen, Hans Skifter
    et al.
    Aalborg Univ, Danish Bldg Res Inst, Birkerod, Denmark.
    Andersson, Roger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Wessel, Terje
    Univ Oslo, Inst Sociol & Geog, Oslo, Norway.
    Wilkama, Katja
    City Helsinki Urban Facts, Helsinki, Finland.
    The impact of housing policies and housing markets on ethnic spatial segregation: Comparing the capital cities of four Nordic welfare states2016In: International journal of housing policy, ISSN 1461-6718, E-ISSN 1473-3269, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 1-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines how ethnic segregation is connected to an ethnic division of the housing market and a spatial separation of different housing tenures in four Nordic cities. Explanations for the differences across the cities are found by comparing housing markets and housing policies. The housing markets are in all four cities ethnically segmented with high concentrations of immigrants in some forms of tenures (especially social/public housing) and low concentrations in others. We further discuss the reasons for the observed pattern. The paper shows that the spatial distribution of immigrants is strongly connected with the tenure composition of neighbourhoods. Ethnic divisions of housing tenures thus contributes to segregation, but the effect is much dependent on how tenures are distributed spatially. It is shown that ethnic segregation in three of the cities is connected to social housing, while cooperative housing is crucial in the fourth. It is also shown that a policy of neighbourhood tenure mix in one of the cities has resulted in a relatively low degree of segregation in spite of high concentrations of immigrants in social/public housing.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Roger
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Magnusson Turner, Lena
    Segregation, gentrification, and residualisation: from public housing to market driven housing allocation in inner city Stockholm2014In: International journal of housing policy, ISSN 1461-6718, E-ISSN 1473-3269, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 3-29Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Grundström, Karin
    et al.
    Malmö Univ, Dept Urban Studies, Malmö, Sweden.
    Molina, Irene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    From Folkhem to lifestyle housing in Sweden: Segregation and urban form, 1930s–2010s2016In: International journal of housing policy, ISSN 1461-6718, E-ISSN 1473-3269, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 316-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses the political and ideological transformations underlying the gradual privatisation and deregulation of the mid-twentieth-century Keynesian model of housing provision in Sweden. We identify a series of three political and ideological shifts in housing policy and urban form since the 1930s: regulating Folkhem housing, deregulating Folkhem housing, and back to business in housing. We argue that even though the Folkhem parole of ‘housing for all’ differs extensively from the current situation where the market is ‘housing the privileged’, segregation trends have, from the Folkhem to the post-welfare period, been shaped by both state interventions and market forces. Second, we argue that there is a continuing trend through which newly constructed housing has metamorphosed from a basic human right for the working class into an expression of individual distinction and ‘style’ for the upper middle and middle classes. While privileged classes, more than ever before in modern Swedish housing history, have the possibility to choose new forms of housing, the most impoverished groups live in residual and often stigmatised peripheral housing areas. One main conclusion is that recent forms of housing for privileged groups signal a cultural and ideological shift towards new, more elitist conceptions of housing and privilege.

  • 4.
    Lux, Martin
    et al.
    Institute of Sociology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic.
    Kährik, Anneli
    University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Sunega, Peter
    Institute of Sociology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic.
    Housing restitution and privatization: Both catalysts and obstacles to the formation of private rental housing in the Czech Republic and Estonia2012In: International journal of housing policy, ISSN 1461-6718, E-ISSN 1473-3269, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 137-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The return of property expropriated during the communist period to previous owners or to their descendants (property restitution) led to the quick emergence of a private rental sector in those post-communist countries that applied a physical form of property restitution soon after 1990. The Czech Republic and Estonia are examples of such countries. Within just a few years, as a result of property restitution, a private rental sector grew out of almost non-existence to become a significant part of the countries’ total housing stock. However, the character of this sector remained different from the private rental sector found in countries with advanced economies – especially owing to specific rent regulation, tenant protection and, albeit indirectly, public housing privatisation. This article analyses and compares the genesis of private rental tenure in the Czech Republic and Estonia. Its main goal is to demonstrate how state regulations and interventions have influenced tenure choice, the formation of social norms, and thus the permanent perception of private renting. In both transition countries private renting gradually acquired the character of a transitional and residual form of housing. State interventions early on in the transition were probably the most significant factors behind the fact that private renting did not establish itself as a real tenure alternative to owner-occupied housing.

  • 5.
    Molina, Irene
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Centre for Multidisciplinary Studies on Racism.
    Czischke, Darinka
    Delft Univ Technol, Fac Architecture & Built Environm, Delft, Netherlands.
    Rolnik, Raquel
    Univ Sao Paulo, Fac Architecture & Urbanism, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Housing policy issues in contemporary South America: an introduction2019In: International journal of housing policy, ISSN 1461-6718, E-ISSN 1473-3269, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 277-287Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the introduction to this special issue on Latin American housing policies, we address the common elements evident in this collection of papers with the aim of enabling a better knowledge exchange between the 'global North' and the 'global South' on potentially common issues. These include the changing relationship between state and capital, with special emphasis on the new role adopted by the State as a facilitator for financial private capital in an increasingly privatised housing sector; the need to address precarious housing conditions among vast sectors of the population, including international migrants; and the various innovative roles played by civil society in housing provision. Notwithstanding these similarities between world regions, our editorial introduction highlights a number of particularities in housing research in the Latin American region, underscoring the need to reflect critically on the applicability of concepts and models created in different geographical contexts with different historical, social and political realities. Within this editorial, we also introduce the main themes discussed in the specific articles and attempt to place them within the more general scope of earlier research on housing policies in the region. We conclude by acknowledging that a solution to long lasting housing inequality in Latin America remains an unfulfilled promise.

  • 6.
    Molina Vega, Irene
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Grundström, Karin
    From Folkhem to Life-style Housing in Sweden: Segregation and Urban Form, 1930’s – 2010’s2016In: International journal of housing policy, ISSN 1461-6718, E-ISSN 1473-3269, Vol. 16, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses the political and ideological transformations underlying the gradual privatisation and deregulation of the mid-twentieth-century Keynesian model of housing provision in Sweden. We identify a series of three political and ideological shifts in housing policy and urban form since the 1930s: regulating Folkhem housing, deregulating Folkhem housing, and back to business in housing. We argue that even though the Folkhem parole of ‘housing for all’ differs extensively from the current situation where the market is ‘housing the privileged’, segregation trends have, from the Folkhem to the postwelfare period, been shaped by both state interventions and market forces. Second, we argue that there is a continuing trend through which newly constructed housing has metamorphosed from a basic human right for the working class into an expression of individual distinction and ‘style’ for the upper middle and middle classes. While privileged classes, more than ever before in modern Swedish housing history, have the possibility to choose new forms of housing, the most impoverished groups live in residual and often stigmatised peripheral housing areas. One main conclusion is that recent forms of housing for privileged groups signal a cultural and ideological shift towards new, more elitist conceptions of housing and privilege.

  • 7.
    Sørvoll, Jardar
    et al.
    Norwegian Social Research (NOVA), Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences (HiOA), Oslo, Norway.
    Bengtsson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research. Malmö University, Department of Urban Studies, Malmö, Sweden.
    The Pyrrhic victory of civil society housing?: Co-operative housing in Sweden and Norway2018In: International journal of housing policy, ISSN 1461-6718, E-ISSN 1473-3269, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 124-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Co-operative housing in Sweden and Norway are true success stories of civil society housing in terms of market shares. This stands in stark contrast to some other European countries, where attempts to promote co-operative housing have consistently met with difficulties, both politically and in the market. The paper explores the history of co-operative housing in Sweden and Norway since 1945 through the lens of path dependence. Notably, co-operative housing changed gradually in both countries between the 1950s and the 1990s, when co-operative companies went from being civil society organisations espousing the ideals of self-help, democracy, non-profit and solidarity, towards becoming more market oriented and profit seeking. We argue that two drivers, ‘the logic of conflicting member interests’ and ‘the logic of competition and growth’, contributed decisively to this development. These drivers may also be good candidates for general mechanisms of civil society housing based partly on collective or individual ownership – if they are not kept at bay. In our view, there seems to be some trade-off between the pursuit of civil society objectives and market success. This should serve as a marker for advocates of civil society housing.

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