uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Eiffener, Elodie
    et al.
    Department of Health Promotion, NUTRIM School of Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism, Maastricht University Medical Center+, Maastricht, the Netherlands.
    Eli, Karin
    Unit for Biocultural Variation and Obesity, Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK ; Division of Health Sciences, Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK.
    Ek, Anna
    Unit of Pediatrics, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandvik, Pernilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Somaraki, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Kremers, Stef
    Department of Health Promotion, NUTRIM School of Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism, Maastricht University Medical Center+, Maastricht, the Netherlands.
    Sleddens, Ester
    Department of Health Promotion, NUTRIM School of Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism, Maastricht University Medical Center+, Maastricht, the Netherlands.
    Nowicka, Paulina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics. Unit of Pediatrics, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The influence of preschoolers' emotional and behavioural problems on obesity treatment outcomes: Secondary findings from a randomized controlled trial2019In: Pediatric Obesity, ISSN 2047-6302, E-ISSN 2047-6310, p. 1-12, article id e12556Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Few studies have explored the influence of preschoolers' behavioural problems on obesity treatment.

    Objectives: To assess emotional and behavioural problems before and after an obesity intervention and examine relationships between changes in child behaviour and changes in weight status.

    Method: The study included 77 children (4‐6 years old, 53% girls, mean body mass index [BMI] z‐score of 3.0 [SD 0.6]) who participated in the More and Less Study, a randomized controlled trial. Families were randomized to a parenting program or to standard treatment. The children's heights and weights (BMI z‐score, primary outcome) were measured at baseline and 12 months post baseline. Parents rated their children's behaviours (secondary outcome) on the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) for ages 1.5 to 5 years, a questionnaire that measures psychosocial health and functioning, encompassing emotional and behavioural problems. Changes in child behaviour during treatment were examined through paired samples t tests; the influence of child behaviour on treatment effects was examined through linear regressions.

    Results: Child emotional and behavioural problems significantly improved after obesity treatment. Lower scores were found for Emotional Reactivity, Sleep Problems, Affective Problems, Aggressive Behaviour, Externalizing Behaviours, Oppositional Defiant Problems, and Total Problems. Child behaviour significantly affected obesity treatment results: Attention Problems and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) at baseline contributed to increasing BMI z‐scores, whereas Oppositional Defiant Problems, Externalizing Behaviours, and a higher number of behavioural problems predicted decreasing BMI z‐scores.

    Conclusions: Child behaviours at baseline influenced treatment results. Child emotional and behavioural problems improved post treatment. The results suggest that obesity treatment may help in reducing emotional distress among preschoolers.

  • 2.
    Johnsson, Inger W
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Haglund, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    A high birth weight is associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes and obesity2015In: Pediatric Obesity, ISSN 2047-6302, E-ISSN 2047-6310, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 77-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The association between low birth weight and adult disease is well known. Less is known on long-term effects of high birth weight.

    OBJECTIVE: This study aims to investigate whether a high birth weight increases risk for adult metabolic disease.

    METHODS: Swedish term single births, 1973-1982 (n = 759 999), were studied to age 27.5-37.5 years using Swedish national registers. Hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated in relation to birth weight for type 2 diabetes, obesity, hypertension and dyslipidaemia.

    RESULTS: Men with birth weights between 2 and 3 standard deviation score (SDS) had a 1.9-fold increased risk (HR 1.91, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.25-2.90) of type 2 diabetes, whereas those with birth weights above 3 SDS had a 5.4-fold increased risk (HR 5.44, 95% CI 2.70-10.96) compared to men with birth weights between -2 and 2 SDS. The corresponding HRs for women were 0.60 (95% CI 0.40-0.91) and 1.71 (95% CI 0.85-3.43) for birth weights 2-3 SDS and >3 SDS, respectively. Men with birth weights between 2 and 3 SDS had a 1.5-fold increased risk (HR 1.47, 95% CI 1.22-1.77) of obesity. The corresponding risk for women was 1.3-fold increased (HR 1.32, 95% CI 1.19-1.46). For men and women with birth weights above 3 SDS, the risks of adult obesity were higher, HR 2.46 (95% CI 1.63-3.71) and HR 1.85 (95% CI 1.44-2.37), respectively.

    CONCLUSIONS: A high birth weight, particularly very high, increases the risk of type 2 diabetes in male young adults. The risk of obesity increases with increasing birth weight in both genders.

  • 3. Lindberg, Louise
    et al.
    Ek, Anna
    Nyman, Jonna
    Marcus, Claude
    Ulijaszek, Stanley
    Nowicka, Paulina
    Low grandparental social support combined with low parental socioeconomic status is closely associated with obesity in preschool-aged children: a pilot study2015In: Pediatric Obesity, ISSN 2047-6302, E-ISSN 2047-6310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While the influence of parental socioeconomic status (SES) on children’s weight status is well known, the impact of other family-related aspects such as parental and grandparental social support is less understood. This study investigates the importance of parents’ SES and social support (functional and structural) for weight status in a clinical sample of preschoolers 4–6 years old with obesity (n = 39, 56% girls; 73% of parents were overweight/obese, 50% were of non-Swedish origin). Linear regression analyses, simple and multiple, were performed on SES and social support with child BMI SDS (body mass index standard deviation score) as the dependent variable. The results show that parents’ income and low emotional support from paternal grandparents were significantly associated with more severe obesity. The association between parental income and the child’s BMI SDS was stronger among parents who had low emotional support from their own parents. In conclusion, grandparental social support may be protective against childhood obesity.

  • 4.
    Lundgren, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Morgården, E.
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Is obesity a risk factor for impaired cognition in young adults with low birth weight?2014In: Pediatric Obesity, ISSN 2047-6302, E-ISSN 2047-6310, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 319-326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT: Obesity is associated with metabolic disease and impaired cognitive function in adults. Low birth weight is known to be associated with adult metabolic disease and low intellectual performance.

    WHAT THIS STUDY ADDS: Adolescent overweight and obesity are associated with increased risk of low intellectual performance. Overweight/obese adolescents, born with a low weight, have a further increased risk of low intellectual performance. A high birth weight increases the risk of adolescent obesity. Overweight/obese adolescents, born with a high weight, do not have a further increased risk of low intellectual performance.

    BACKGROUND: Overweight and obesity are risk factors for cardiovascular disease. There is also an association between body mass index (BMI) and cognitive ability. Since low birth weight is associated with adult metabolic disease, particularly in obese subjects, the question emerges whether obesity has an additional negative effect on cognitive function in subjects with low birth weight.

    OBJECTIVES: The aim was to analyse whether overweight or obesity influence intellectual performance in young adults with particular focus on those with a low birth weight.

    METHODS: Data were collected from the Swedish Medical Birth Register on 620 834 males born between 1973 and 1988 and matched to results on intellectual performance and BMI at conscription.

    RESULTS: The risk for low intellectual performance was higher for those with high BMI compared to those with normal. The highest risk was found among subjects with low birth weight and overweight or obesity in young adulthood (odds ratios, 1.98 [1.73-2.22] and 2.59 [2.00-3.34], respectively). However, subjects with further high birth weight and a high BMI at conscription had no further increased risk.

    CONCLUSIONS: Overweight and obesity are associated with an increased risk of subnormal intellectual performance in young adult males. Subjects with low birth weight and adolescent overweight/obesity are at particular risk of subnormal performance. A high birth weight increases the risk for obesity, but a high adult BMI does not further increase the risk for subnormal performance.

  • 5.
    Lundström, Elin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Ljungberg, Joy
    Andersson, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Manell, Hannes
    Strand, Robin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Forslund, Anders
    Bergsten, Peter
    Weghuber, Daniel
    Mörwald, Katharina
    Zsoldos, Fanni
    Widhalm, Kurt
    Meissnitzer, Matthias
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Kullberg, Joel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Brown adipose tissue estimated with the magnetic resonance imaging fat fraction is associated with glucose metabolism in adolescents2019In: Pediatric Obesity, ISSN 2047-6302, E-ISSN 2047-6310, Vol. 14, no 9, article id e12531Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Shackleton, N.
    et al.
    Univ Auckland, Better Start Natl Sci Challenge, Auckland, New Zealand;Univ Auckland, Ctr Methods & Policy Applicat Social Sci, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Milne, B. J.
    Univ Auckland, Better Start Natl Sci Challenge, Auckland, New Zealand;Univ Auckland, Ctr Methods & Policy Applicat Social Sci, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Audas, R.
    Univ Auckland, Better Start Natl Sci Challenge, Auckland, New Zealand;Univ Otago, Dunedin Sch Med, Dunedin, New Zealand.
    Derraik, Jose G. B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. Univ Auckland, Better Start Natl Sci Challenge, Auckland, New Zealand;Univ Auckland, Liggins Inst, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Zhu, T.
    Univ Auckland, Better Start Natl Sci Challenge, Auckland, New Zealand;Univ Auckland, Ctr Methods & Policy Applicat Social Sci, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Taylor, R. W.
    Univ Auckland, Better Start Natl Sci Challenge, Auckland, New Zealand;Univ Otago, Dunedin Sch Med, Dunedin, New Zealand.
    Morton, S. M. B.
    Univ Auckland, Better Start Natl Sci Challenge, Auckland, New Zealand;Univ Auckland, Ctr Longitudinal Res He Ara Ki Mua, Auckland, New Zealand;Univ Auckland, Sch Populat Hlth, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Glover, M.
    Univ Auckland, Better Start Natl Sci Challenge, Auckland, New Zealand;Massey Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Coll Hlth, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Cutfield, W. S.
    Univ Auckland, Better Start Natl Sci Challenge, Auckland, New Zealand;Univ Auckland, Liggins Inst, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Taylor, B.
    Univ Auckland, Better Start Natl Sci Challenge, Auckland, New Zealand;Univ Otago, Dunedin Sch Med, Dunedin, New Zealand.
    Improving rates of overweight, obesity and extreme obesity in New Zealand 4-year-old children in 2010-20162018In: Pediatric Obesity, ISSN 2047-6302, E-ISSN 2047-6310, Vol. 13, no 12, p. 766-777Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Prevalence of childhood obesity is high in developed countries, and there is a growing concern regarding increasing socio-economic disparities. Objectives To assess trends in the prevalence of overweight, obesity and extreme obesity among New Zealand 4-year olds, and whether these differ by socio-economic and ethnic groupings. Methods A national screening programme, the B4 School Check, collected height and weight data for 75-92% of New Zealand 4-year-old children (n = 317 298) between July 2010 and June 2016. Children at, or above, the 85th, 95th and 99.7th percentile for age and sex adjusted body mass index (according to World Health Organization standards) were classified as overweight, obese and extremely obese, respectively. Prevalence rates across 6 years (2010/11 to 2015/16) were examined by sex, across quintiles of socio-economic deprivation, and by ethnicity. Results The prevalence of overweight, obesity and extreme obesity decreased by 2.2 [95% CI, 1.8-2.5], 2.0 [1.8-2.2] and 0.6 [0.4-0.6] percentage points, respectively, between 2010/2011 and 2015/2016. The downward trends in overweight, obesity and extreme obesity in the population persisted after adjustment for sex, ethnicity, deprivation and urban/rural residence. Downward trends were also observed across sex, ethnicity and deprivation groups. Conclusions The prevalence of obesity appears to be declining in 4-year-old children in New Zealand across all socio-economic and ethnic groups.

  • 7.
    Taylor, J H
    et al.
    Yale Child Study Ctr, 230 South Frontage Rd, New Haven, CT 06519 USA.; Yale Dept Psychiat, New Haven, CT USA.
    Xu, Y
    Yale Sch Publ Hlth, New Haven, CT USA.
    Li, F
    Yale Sch Publ Hlth, New Haven, CT USA.
    Shaw, M
    Yale Pediat Endocrinol, New Haven, CT USA.
    Dziura, J
    Yale Sch Publ Hlth, New Haven, CT USA.
    Caprio, S
    Yale Pediat Endocrinol, New Haven, CT USA.
    Tamborlane, W V
    Yale Pediat Endocrinol, New Haven, CT USA.
    Nowicka, Paulina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics. Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, Div Pediat, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Savoye, M
    Yale Pediat Endocrinol, New Haven, CT USA.
    Psychosocial predictors and moderators of weight management programme outcomes in ethnically diverse obese youth2017In: Pediatric Obesity, ISSN 2047-6302, E-ISSN 2047-6310, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 453-461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: An important area of research in childhood obesity is the identification of factors that predict or moderate the responses to obesity intervention programmes, yet few studies have examined the impact of self-esteem and family functioning on obesity treatment outcomes.

    OBJECTIVES: We sought to determine whether baseline self-esteem and family functioning predicted or moderated childhood obesity intervention outcomes at 6 months.

    METHODS: From 2009 to 2011, seventy-five 10-16 year old, racially/ethnically diverse obese youths with abnormal glucose tolerance were randomized to 6 months of an intensive family-based obesity lifestyle intervention (Bright Bodies) or routine outpatient Clinic Care. We examined youth self-concept, parent-rated family functioning and 6-month outcomes (youths' glucose tolerance, weight, body mass index and percent fat). We set the significance threshold as P ≤ 0.05 for moderator and predictor analyzes.

    RESULTS: Having poor family functioning and self-concept scores indicating high anxiety and low self-esteem at baseline predicted poor 6-month outcomes overall (Bright Bodies and Clinic Care groups combined). Additionally, baseline self-esteem and family functioning moderated treatment effects such that Bright Bodies outperformed Clinic Care in youths with low self-esteem and poorly functioning families, whereas youths with high self-esteem and high-functioning families did similarly well with either intervention.

    DISCUSSION: Our findings suggest intensive family-based lifestyle programmes are particularly beneficial for youth with low self-esteem and poorly functioning families.

  • 8.
    Ulijaszek, S J
    et al.
    Univ Oxford, Sch Anthropol, Oxford, England.
    Pentecost, M
    Univ Oxford, Sch Anthropol, Oxford, England.
    Marcus, C
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Karpe, F
    Univ Oxford, Oxford Ctr Diabet Endocrinol & Metab, Oxford, England.
    Frühbeck, G
    Clin Univ Navarra, CIBEROBN, IdiSNA, Dept Endocrinol & Nutr, Pamplona, Spain.
    Nowicka, Paulina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics. Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Inequality and childhood overweight and obesity: a commentary2017In: Pediatric Obesity, ISSN 2047-6302, E-ISSN 2047-6310, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 195-202Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Statements on childhood overweight and obesity (COO) have focused on different avenues for prevention and treatment, critical stages of the life cycle, including pregnancy and lactation, individual, family, school and community-based interventions, multidisciplinary family programmes and multicomponent interventions. This commentary is concerned with the less-addressed relationship between COO and inequality. It describes current global patterns of inequality and COO and the ways in which those inequalities are linked to COO at micro-level, meso-level and macro-level. It then describes current programmatic approaches for COO inequality, preventive and medical, and considers important pitfalls in the framing of the problem of COO and inequality. It ends with describing how childhood and adolescent overweight and obesity prevention and treatment programmes might be formulated within broader socio-political frameworks to influence outcomes.

  • 9.
    Wijnhoven, T M A
    et al.
    Noncommunicable Diseases and Health Promotion, World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe, Copenhagen Ø, Denmark.
    van Raaij, J M A
    Centre for Nutrition and Health, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, the Netherlands; Division of Human Nutrition, Wageningen University, Wageningen, the Netherlands.
    Spinelli, A
    National Centre for Epidemiology, Surveillance and Health Promotion, National Institute of Health, Rome, Italy.
    Rito, A I
    Food and Nutrition Department, National Institute of Health Dr. Ricardo Jorge IP, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Hovengen, R
    Department of Health Statistics, National Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
    Kunesova, M
    Obesity Unit, Institute of Endocrinology, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Starc, G
    Faculty of Sport, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Rutter, H
    National Obesity Observatory, Oxford, UK.
    Sjöberg, A
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Public Health Epidemiology Unit, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Petrauskiene, A
    Academy of Medicine, Faculty of Public Health, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    O'Dwyer, U
    Department of Health and Children, Dublin, Ireland.
    Petrova, S
    Department of Food and Nutrition, National Centre of Public Health and Analysis, Sofia, Bulgaria.
    Farrugia Sant'angelo, V
    Primary Health Care Department, Floriana, Malta.
    Wauters, M
    Flemish Agency for Care and Health, Flemish Ministry of Welfare, Public Health and Family, Brussels, Belgium.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Örebro universitet, Restaurang- och hotellhögskolan.
    Rubana, I-M
    Public Health Agency, Riga, Latvia.
    Breda, J
    Noncommunicable Diseases and Health Promotion, World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe, Copenhagen Ø, Denmark.
    WHO European Childhood Obesity Surveillance Initiative 2008: weight, height and body mass index in 6-9-year-old children2013In: Pediatric Obesity, ISSN 2047-6302, E-ISSN 2047-6310, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 79-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    UNLABELLED: What is already known about this subject Overweight and obesity prevalence estimates among children based on International Obesity Task Force definitions are substantially lower than estimates based on World Health Organization definitions. Presence of a north-south gradient with the highest level of overweight found in southern European countries. Intercountry comparisons of overweight and obesity in primary-school children in Europe based on measured data lack a similar data collection protocol. What this study adds Unique dataset on overweight and obesity based on measured weights and heights in 6-9-year-old children from 12 European countries using a harmonized surveillance methodology. Because of the use of a consistent data collection protocol, it is possible to perform valid multiple comparisons between countries. It demonstrates wide variations in overweight and obesity prevalence estimates among primary-school children between European countries and regions.

    BACKGROUND: Nutritional surveillance in school-age children, using measured weight and height, is not common in the European Region of the World Health Organization (WHO). The WHO Regional Office for Europe has therefore initiated the WHO European Childhood Obesity Surveillance Initiative.

    OBJECTIVE: To present the anthropometric results of data collected in 2007/2008 and to investigate whether there exist differences across countries and between the sexes.

    METHODS: Weight and height were measured in 6-9-year-old children in 12 countries. Prevalence of overweight, obesity, stunting, thinness and underweight as well as mean Z-scores of anthropometric indices of height, weight and body mass index were calculated.

    RESULTS: A total of 168 832 children were included in the analyses and a school participation rate of more than 95% was obtained in 8 out of 12 countries. Stunting, underweight and thinness were rarely prevalent. However, 19.3-49.0% of boys and 18.4-42.5% of girls were overweight (including obesity and based on the 2007 WHO growth reference).The prevalence of obesity ranged from 6.0 to 26.6% among boys and from 4.6 to 17.3% among girls. Multi-country comparisons suggest the presence of a north-south gradient with the highest level of overweight found in southern European countries.

    CONCLUSIONS: Overweight among 6-9-year-old children is a serious public health concern and its variation across the European Region highly depends on the country. Comparable monitoring of child growth is possible across Europe and should be emphasized in national policies and implemented as part of action plans.

1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf