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  • 1.
    Cauchard, Laure
    et al.
    Univ Montreal, Dept Sci Biol, Montreal, PQ, Canada.
    Angers, Bernard
    Univ Montreal, Dept Sci Biol, Montreal, PQ, Canada.
    Boogert, Neeltje J.
    Univ Exeter, Ctr Ecol & Conservat, Penryn, England.
    Lenarth, Melissa
    Univ Lausanne, Dept Ecol & Evolut, Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Bize, Pierre
    Univ Lausanne, Dept Ecol & Evolut, Lausanne, Switzerland;Univ Aberdeen, Inst Biol & Environm Sci, Aberdeen, Scotland.
    Doligez, Blandine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology. Univ Lyon 1, Dept Biometry & Evolutionary Biol, CNRS, Villeurbanne, France.
    An Experimental Test of a Causal Link between Problem-Solving Performance and Reproductive Success in Wild Great Tits2017In: Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2296-701X, Vol. 5, article id 107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies have uncovered relationships between measures of various cognitive performances and proxies of fitness such as reproductive success in non-human animals. However, to better understand the evolution of cognition in the wild, we still have to determine the causality of these relationships and the underlying mechanisms. The cognitive ability of an individual may directly influence its ability to raise many and/or high quality young through for example its provisioning ability. Conversely, large and/or high quality broods may lead to high parental motivation to solve problems related to their care. To answer this question, we manipulated reproductive success through brood size and measured subsequent problem-solving performance in wild great tit parents. Our results show that brood size manipulation did not affect the probability to solve the task. Moreover, solver pairs fledged more young than non-solver pairs independently of brood size treatment in one of the two experimental years and they showed higher nestling provisioning rate in both years. Overall, it shows that problem-solving performance was not driven by motivation and suggest that problem-solvers may achieve higher fledging success through higher provisioning rates. Our study constitutes a first key step toward a mechanistic understanding of the consequences of innovation ability for individual fitness in the wild.

  • 2.
    Janssen, Ralf
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Schönauer, Anna
    Weber, Melanie
    Turetzek, Natascha
    Hogvall, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Goss, Georgina E.
    Patel, Neel H.
    McGregor, Alistair P.
    Hilbrant, Maarten
    The evolution and expression of panarthropod frizzled genes2015In: Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2296-701X, Vol. 3, article id 96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wnt signaling regulates many important processes during metazoan development. It has been shown that Wnt ligands represent an ancient diverse family of proteins that likely function in complex signaling landscapes to induce target cells and tissues via receptors including those of the Frizzled family. The four subfamilies of Fz receptors also evolved early in metazoan evolution. To compare with other metazoans and arthropods such as insects, we explored the repertoire of fz genes in three panarthropod species: Parasteatoda tepidariorum, Glomeris marginata and Euperipatoides kanangensis, representing the Chelicerata, Myriapoda and Onychophora respectively. We found that these three diverse panarthropods each have four fz genes with representatives of all four metazoan fz subfamilies found in Glomeris and Euperipatoides while Parasteatoda does not have a fz3 gene but has two fz4 paralogues. Furthermore we characterized the expression patterns of all fz genes in Parasteatoda, Glomeris and Euperipatoides and found both conserved and divergent expression of these genes among these animals and in comparison to insects. Our study provides new insights into the evolution and developmental functions of fz receptors and Wnt signaling more generally.

  • 3.
    Kleinteich, Julia
    et al.
    Univ Tubingen, Ctr Appl Geosci, Tubingen, Germany.
    Hildebrand, Falk
    European Mol Biol Lab, Struct & Computat Biol, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Bahram, Mohammad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology. Univ Tartu, Inst Ecol & Earth Sci, Dept Bot, Tartu, Estonia.
    Voigt, Anita Y.
    European Mol Biol Lab, Struct & Computat Biol, Heidelberg, Germany;Jackson Lab Genom Med, Farmington, CT USA.
    Wood, Susanna A.
    Cawthron Inst, Coastal & Freshwater, Nelson, New Zealand;Univ Waikato, Environm Res Inst, Hamilton, New Zealand.
    Jungblut, Anne D.
    London Nat Hist Museum, London, England.
    Kupper, Frithjof C.
    Scottish Assoc Marine Sci, Oban, Argyll, Scotland;Univ Aberdeen, Oceanlab, Aberdeen, Scotland.
    Quesada, Antonio
    Autonomous Univ Madrid, Dept Biol, Madrid, Spain.
    Camacho, Antonio
    Univ Valencia, Cavanilles Inst Biodivers & Evolutionary Biol, Valencia, Spain.
    Pearce, David A.
    Univ Northumbria Newcastle, Fac Hlth & Life Sci, Dept Appl Sci, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England;British Antarct Survey, Cambridge, England.
    Convey, Peter
    British Antarct Survey, Cambridge, England.
    Vincent, Warwick F.
    Univ Laval, Dept Biol, Quebec City, PQ, Canada;Univ Laval, Ctr Northern Studies, Quebec City, PQ, Canada.
    Zarfl, Christiane
    Univ Tubingen, Ctr Appl Geosci, Tubingen, Germany.
    Bork, Peer
    European Mol Biol Lab, Struct & Computat Biol, Heidelberg, Germany;Max Delbruck Ctr Mol Med, Berlin, Germany;Univ Wurzburg, Dept Bioinformat, Wurzburg, Germany.
    Dietrich, Daniel R.
    Univ Konstanz, Human & Environm Toxicol, Constance, Germany.
    Pole-to-Pole Connections: Similarities between Arctic and Antarctic Microbiomes and Their Vulnerability to Environmental Change2017In: Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2296-701X, Vol. 5, article id 137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The global biogeography of microorganisms remains poorly resolved, which limits the current understanding of microbial resilience toward environmental changes. Using high-throughput 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing, we characterized the microbial diversity of terrestrial and lacustrine biofilms from the Arctic, Antarctic and temperate regions. Our analyses suggest that bacterial community compositions at the poles are more similar to each other than they are to geographically closer temperate habitats, with 32% of all operational taxonomic units (OTUs) co-occurring in both polar regions. While specific microbial taxa were confined to distinct regions, representing potentially endemic populations, the percentage of cosmopolitan taxa was higher in Arctic (43%) than in Antarctic samples (36%). The overlap in polar microbial OTUs may be explained by natural or anthropogenically-mediated dispersal in combination with environmental filtering. Current and future changing environmental conditions may enhance microbial invasion, establishment of cosmopolitan genotypes and loss of endemic taxa.

  • 4. Mantzouki, Evanthia
    et al.
    Beklioǧlu, Meryem
    Brookes, Justin D.
    de Senerpont Domis, Lisette Nicole
    Dugan, Hilary A.
    Doubek, Jonathan P.
    Grossart, Hans-Peter
    Nejstgaard, Jens C.
    Pollard, Amina I.
    Ptacnik, Robert
    Rose, Kevin C.
    Sadro, Steven
    Seelen, Laura
    Skaff, Nicholas K.
    Teubner, Katrin
    Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Ibelings, Bastiaan W.
    Snapshot Surveys for Lake Monitoring, More Than a Shot in the Dark2018In: Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2296-701X, Vol. 6, article id 201Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Morinay, Jennifer
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology. Univ Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Univ Lyon, Lab Biometrie & Biol Evolut, CNRS,UMR 5558, Villeurbanne, France.
    Forsman, Jukka Tapio
    Univ Oulu, Dept Ecol & Genet, Oulu, Finland.
    Kivelä, Sami M.
    Univ Oulu, Dept Ecol & Genet, Oulu, Finland; Univ Tartu, Inst Ecol & Earth Sci, Dept Zool, Tartu, Estonia.
    Gustafsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Doligez, Blandine
    Univ Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Univ Lyon, Lab Biometrie & Biol Evolut, CNRS,UMR 5558, Villeurbanne, France.
    Heterospecific nest site copying behavior in a wild bird: assessing the influence of genetics and past experience on a joint breeding phenotype2018In: Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2296-701X, Vol. 5, no 167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Breeding site selection is often a joint decision of pair members in species with biparental care and the experience of both pair members may influence the use of information for site selection. Nevertheless, quantitative genetics of joint information use for site selection remains unexplored so far. We used an experimental approach to quantify the relative importance of genetics (heritability) and past experience (age, familiarity with the environment, previous breeding success, previous information use) in heterospecific social information use for nest site selection in wild collared flycatchers (Ficedula albicollis). Flycatchers collect social information from resident tits for nest site selection. We created an apparent preference of tits for a novel nest site feature and recorded choices of flycatchers (copying or rejecting the tit preference). Copying behavior was stronger for naive individuals but also differed between years, which could be explained by contrasting seasonality in the demonstrator species. Past experience as reflected by age affected subsequent use of social information: pairs with a yearling male were more likely to copy the heterospecific preference than pairs with older immigrant males. There was no general pattern in successive individual choices over the years. Accordingly, individual repeatability in copying tit preference was very low. At the pair level, we estimated sex-specific direct and indirect genetic effects on the joint nest site decision and found no sex-specific heritability and no cross-sex genetic correlation. Our results confirm the importance of past experience for social information use and suggest that social information use is highly plastic and most likely not genetically inherited in collared flycatchers. Whether individuals use social information should be related to environmentally-induced changes in the quality of information and thus be context-dependent. Selection may therefore act on the ability to optimally use social information in varying environments and on the processes underlying such adjustment, such as learning, rather than the use of information itself.

  • 6.
    Parducci, Laura
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Alsos, Inger Greve
    Univ Tromso, Arctic Univ Norway, Tromso Museum, Tromso, Norway.
    Unneberg, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular Evolution. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pedersen, Mikkel W.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Zool, Cambridge, England.
    Han, Lu
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics. Jilin Univ, Ancient DNA Lab, Coll Life Sci, Changchun, Jilin, Peoples R China.
    Lammers, Youri
    Univ Tromso, Arctic Univ Norway, Tromso Museum, Tromso, Norway.
    Salonen, J. Sakari
    Univ Helsinki, Dept Geosci & Geog, Helsinki, Finland.
    Valiranta, Minna M.
    Univ Helsinki, Ecosyst & Environm Res Programme, ECRU, Helsinki, Finland.
    Slotte, Tanja
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Ecol Environm & Plant Sci, Stockholm, Sweden;Sci Life Lab, Solna, Sweden.
    Wohlfarth, Barbara
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Geol Sci, Stockholm, Sweden;Stockholm Univ, Bolin Ctr Climate Res, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Shotgun Environmental DNA, Pollen, and Macrofossil Analysis of Lateglacial Lake Sediments From Southern Sweden2019In: Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2296-701X, Vol. 7, article id 189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The lake sediments of Hasseldala Port in south-east Sweden provide an archive of local and regional environmental conditions similar to 14.5-9.5 ka BP (thousand years before present) and allow testing DNA sequencing techniques to reconstruct past vegetation changes. We combined shotgun sequencing with plant micro- and macrofossil analyses to investigate sediments dating to the Allerod (14.1-12.7 ka BP), Younger Dryas (12.7-11.7 ka BP), and Preboreal (<11.7 ka BP). Number of reads and taxa were not associated with sample age or organic content. This suggests that, beyond the initial rapid degradation, DNA is still present. The proportion of recovered plant DNA was low, but allowed identifying an important number of plant taxa, thus adding valid information on the composition of the local vegetation. Importantly, DNA provides a stronger signal of plant community changes than plant micro- and plant macrofossil analyses alone, since a larger number of new taxa were recorded in Younger Dryas samples. A comparison between the three proxies highlights differences and similarities and supports earlier findings that plants growing close to or within a lake are recorded by DNA. Plant macrofossil remains moreover show that tree birch was present close to the ancient lake since the Allerod; together with the DNA results, this indicates that boreal to subarctic climatic conditions also prevailed during the cold Younger Dryas interval. Increasing DNA reference libraries and enrichment strategies prior to sequencing are necessary to improve the potential and accuracy of plant identification using the shotgun metagenomic approach.

1 - 6 of 6
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